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Sample records for accelerates particles perpendicular

  1. The acceleration of electrons at perpendicular shocks and its implication for solar energetic particle events

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2012-11-20

    We present a study of the acceleration of electrons at a perpendicular shock that propagates through a turbulent magnetic field. The energization process of electrons is investigated by utilizing a combination of hybrid (kinetic ions and fluid electron) simulations and test-particle electron simulations. In this method, the motions of the test-particle electrons are numerically integrated in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields generated by two-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect electrons in a number of ways and lead to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons mainly follow along magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons to interact with the shock front and get accelerated multiple times. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. The acceleration efficiency is critically dependent on the turbulence amplitude and coherence length. We also discuss the implication of this study for solar energetic particles (SEPs) by comparing the acceleration of electrons with that of protons. Their correlation indicates that perpendicular shocks play an important role in SEP events.

  2. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT NEAR-PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS: THE ROLE OF FIELD-LINE TOPOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Kota, Jozsef

    2010-11-01

    Particle acceleration at two-dimensional (2D) shocks can significantly differ from our expectations based on one-dimensional shocks. We discuss several features of 2D shocks. First, we present a simple example of diffusive acceleration to demonstrate that (1) 'hot spots' and cold regions can be expected along the shock face, as the field-line configuration changes along the shock face, (2) the flux of accelerated particles (even the average flux) can be expected to increase beyond the shock, and (3) 2D structures may lead to a softening of the spectrum. We also address quasi-perpendicular shocks and discuss what happens when a field line is hit by a curved shock or is detaching from a shock. This mechanism is of interest on both large and small scales. We consider pure field-aligned transport and address both the diffusive (large scale) and scatter-free (small scale) cases, looking from the perspective of one field line. We find that quasi-trapping of particles in front of the shock can lead to rapid and effective acceleration via multiple mirroring on the ever faster moving shock. This mechanism may be of importance at various astrophysical, heliospheric, and coronal mass ejection driven shocks.

  3. Perpendicular ion acceleration in whistler turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Nariyuki, Y.

    2014-04-15

    Whistler turbulence is an important contributor to solar wind turbulence dissipation. This turbulence contains obliquely propagating whistler waves at electron scales, and these waves have electrostatic components perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. In this paper, a full kinetic, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that whistler turbulence can accelerate ions in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. When the ions pass through wave-particle resonances region in the phase space during their cyclotron motion, the ions are effectively accelerated in the perpendicular direction. The simulation results suggest that whistler turbulence contributes to the perpendicular heating of ions observed in the solar wind.

  4. Nonrelativistic Perpendicular Shocks Modeling Young Supernova Remnants: Nonstationary Dynamics and Particle Acceleration at Forward and Reverse Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Volkmar; Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Rafighi, Iman; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    For parameters that are applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants, we present results of two-dimensional, three-vector (2D3V) particle-in-cell simulations of a non-relativistic plasma shock with a large-scale perpendicular magnetic field inclined at a 45^\\circ angle to the simulation plane to approximate three-dimensional (3D) physics. We developed an improved clean setup that uses the collision of two plasma slabs with different densities and velocities, leading to the development of two distinctive shocks and a contact discontinuity. The shock formation is mediated by Weibel-type filamentation instabilities that generate magnetic turbulence. Cyclic reformation is observed in both shocks with similar period, for which we note global variations due to shock rippling and local variations arising from turbulent current filaments. The shock rippling occurs on spatial and temporal scales produced by the gyro-motions of shock-reflected ions. The drift motion of electrons and ions is not a gradient drift, but is commensurate with {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}} drift. We observe a stable supra-thermal tail in the ion spectra, but no electron acceleration because the amplitude of the Buneman modes in the shock foot is insufficient for trapping relativistic electrons. We see no evidence of turbulent reconnection. A comparison with other two-dimensional (2D) simulation results suggests that the plasma beta and the ion-to-electron mass ratio are not decisive for efficient electron acceleration, but the pre-acceleration efficacy might be reduced with respect to the 2D results once 3D effects are fully accounted for. Other microphysical factors may also play a part in limiting the amplitude of the Buneman waves or preventing the return of electrons to the foot region.

  5. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF PARTICLE ENERGIZATION VIA SHOCK DRIFT ACCELERATION FROM LOW MACH NUMBER QUASI-PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Ren Chuang; Workman, Jared C.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2013-03-10

    Low Mach number, high beta fast mode shocks can occur in the magnetic reconnection outflows of solar flares. These shocks, which occur above flare loop tops, may provide the electron energization responsible for some of the observed hard X-rays and contemporaneous radio emission. Here we present new two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of low Mach number/high beta quasi-perpendicular shocks. The simulations show that electrons above a certain energy threshold experience shock-drift-acceleration. The transition energy between the thermal and non-thermal spectrum and the spectral index from the simulations are consistent with some of the X-ray spectra from RHESSI in the energy regime of E {approx}< 40 {approx} 100 keV. Plasma instabilities associated with the shock structure such as the modified-two-stream and the electron whistler instabilities are identified using numerical solutions of the kinetic dispersion relations. We also show that the results from PIC simulations with reduced ion/electron mass ratio can be scaled to those with the realistic mass ratio.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. Ion pre-acceleration in fully self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of supercritical perpendicular reforming shocks in multiple ion species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekaa, V. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2014-08-10

    Supernova remnant and heliopause termination shock plasmas may contain significant populations of minority heavy ions, with relative number densities n{sub α}/n{sub i} up to 50%. Preliminary kinetic simulations of collisionless shocks in these environments showed that the reformation cycle and acceleration mechanisms at quasi-perpendicular shocks can depend on the value of n{sub α}/n{sub i} . Shock reformation unfolds on ion spatio-temporal scales, requiring fully kinetic simulations of particle dynamics, together with the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. This paper presents the first set of particle-in-cell simulations for two ion species, protons (n{sub p} ) and α-particles (n{sub α}), with differing mass and charge-to-mass ratios, that spans the entire range of n{sub α}/n{sub i} from 0% to 100%. The interplay between the differing gyro length scales and timescales of the ion species is crucial to the time-evolving phenomenology of the shocks, the downstream turbulence, and the particle acceleration at different n{sub α}/n{sub i} . We show how the overall energization changes with n{sub α}/n{sub i} , and relate this to the processes individual ions undergo in the shock region and in the downstream turbulence, and to the power spectra of magnetic field fluctuations. The crossover between shocks dominated by the respective ion species happens when n{sub α}/n{sub i} = 25%, and minority ion energization is strongest in this regime. Energization of the majority ion species scales with injection energy. The power spectrum of the downstream turbulence includes peaks at sequential ion cyclotron harmonics, suggestive of ion ring-beam collective instability.

  8. Cosmic ray acceleration at perpendicular shocks in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Danos, Rebecca J.; Shalchi, Andreas; Safi-Harb, Samar; Edmon, Paul; Mendygral, Peter

    2014-09-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles up to high energies through the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Except for direct plasma simulations, all modeling efforts must rely on a given form of the diffusion coefficient, a key parameter that embodies the interactions of energetic charged particles with magnetic turbulence. The so-called Bohm limit is commonly employed. In this paper, we revisit the question of acceleration at perpendicular shocks, by employing a realistic model of perpendicular diffusion. Our coefficient reduces to a power law in momentum for low momenta (of index α), but becomes independent of the particle momentum at high momenta (reaching a constant value κ{sub ∞} above some characteristic momentum p {sub c}). We first provide simple analytical expressions of the maximum momentum that can be reached at a given time with this coefficient. Then we perform time-dependent numerical simulations to investigate the shape of the particle distribution that can be obtained when the particle pressure back-reacts on the flow. We observe that for a given index α and injection level, the shock modifications are similar for different possible values of p {sub c}, whereas the particle spectra differ markedly. Of particular interest, low values of p {sub c} tend to remove the concavity once thought to be typical of non-linear DSA, and result in steep spectra, as required by recent high-energy observations of Galactic SNRs.

  9. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  10. Fast acceleration of ions at quasi-perpendicular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Balogh, A. ); Erdos, G. )

    1991-09-01

    Acceleration of low-energy protons by quasi-perpendicular shocks is investigated. The pitch angle distribution of ions in the energy range 35 keV to 1 MeV has been determined across the interplanetary shock that passed through the ISEE 3 spacecraft on November 30, 1979. Upstream of the shock a bidirectional angular distribution was observed. It is suggested that multiple crossings of the field line with the surface of the shock, forming a magnetic bottle, may account for such an unusual angular distribution. The shock event was modeled by integrating particle trajectories numerically. Qualitative agreement between observations and simulations supports the idea of magnetic bottle field line formation. A detailed numerical study of particle acceleration has shown that in the bottle topology the particle flux is enhanced close to the shock front, contrary to the original scatter-free model, i.e., assuming homogeneous magnetic fields on both sides of the shock. It is suggested that multiple crossings of the field line with the shock may explain shock spike events.

  11. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Electron acceleration by parallel and perpendicular electric fields during magnetic reconnection without guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, N.; Chen, L.-J.; Germaschewski, K.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    Electron acceleration due to the electric field parallel to the background magnetic field during magnetic reconnection with no guide field is investigated by theory and two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations and compared with acceleration due to the electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The magnitude of the parallel electric potential shows dependence on the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency as (ωpe/Ωe)-2 and on the background plasma density as nb-1/2. In the Earth's magnetotail, the parameter ωpe/Ωe˜9 and the background (lobe) density can be of the order of 0.01 cm-3, and it is expected that the parallel electric potential is not large enough to accelerate electrons up to 100 keV. Therefore, we must consider the effect of the perpendicular electric field to account for electron energization in excess of 100 keV in the Earth's magnetotail. Trajectories for high-energy electrons are traced in a simulation to demonstrate that acceleration due to the perpendicular electric field in the diffusion region is the dominant acceleration mechanism, rather than acceleration due to the parallel electric fields in the exhaust regions. For energetic electrons accelerated near the X line due to the perpendicular electric field, pitch angle scattering converts the perpendicular momentum to the parallel momentum. On the other hand, for passing electrons that are mainly accelerated by the parallel electric field, pitch angle scattering converting the parallel momentum to the perpendicular momentum occurs. In this way, particle acceleration and pitch angle scattering will generate heated electrons in the exhaust regions.

  13. Accelerated ions from pulsed-power-driven fast plasma flow in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezaki, Taichi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2016-06-01

    To understand the interaction between fast plasma flow and perpendicular magnetic field, we have investigated the behavior of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by a laboratory-scale experiment using a pulsed-power discharge. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a tapered cone plasma focus device is about 30 km/s, and the magnetic Reynolds number is estimated to be 8.8. After flow through the perpendicular magnetic field, the accelerated ions are measured by an ion collector. To clarify the behavior of the accelerated ions and the electromagnetic fields, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell method have been carried out. The results show that the behavior of the accelerated ions corresponds qualitatively to the experimental results. Faster ions in the plasma flow are accelerated by the induced electromagnetic fields modulated with the plasma flow.

  14. Electron acceleration at nearly perpendicular collisionless shocks. 3: Downstream distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft observations at the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks have established that the largest fluxes of accelerated suprathermal electrons occur in so-called shock spike events immediately downstream of the shock ramp. Previous theoretical efforts have mainly focused on explaining upstream energetic electron beams. Here we investigate the general motion and acceleration of energetic electrons in a curved, nearly perpendicular shock by numerically integrating the orbits of solar wind halo electrons in shock fields generated by a hybrid simulation (core electron fluid and kinetic ions). Close to the angle Theta(sub Bn) = 90 degs between the upstream magnetic field and shock normal, the calculations result in a (perpendicular) temperature increase proportional to the magnetic field ratio and give the highest phase space densities in the overshoot. For a steep distribution, the temperature change can correspond to an enhancement of the distribution by several orders of magnitude. These results are in agreement with predictions from adiabatic mapping. With smaller angles Theta(sub Bn), the overshoot and downstream densities fall off quickly, because the adiabatic energy gain is less and fewer electrons transmit. The shock curvature also leads to an accumulation of electrons close to 90 degs. Without pitch angle scattering, energization is only significant within a few (approximately 5 to 10 degs) degrees of the point of tangency. However, shock spike events appear to be observed more easily and farther away from 90 degs. Given that over a region of several degrees around 90 degs the theory gives enhancements of up to approximately 4 orders of magnitude, such electrons could in principle account for the typically observed enhancements of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, if they were distributed over Theta(sub Bn). To test the idea that scattering could efficiently redistribute the energetic electrons, we have conducted test particle simulations in which

  15. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  16. HIGH PERPENDICULAR CHARGED PARTICLES AZIMUTHAL CORRELATION IN PHENIX.

    SciTech Connect

    RAK,J. FOR THE PHENIX COLLABORATION

    2002-01-13

    A two-particle azimuthal correlation analysis of the PHENIX data taken at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV/c is discussed. A comparison of the magnitude of v{sub 2}(p{perpendicular}) extracted from the correlation analysis with those obtained from a reaction plane analysis by the STAR collaboration, indicate surprisingly small non-flow contributions. A similar comparison obtained from the CERES experiment at {radical}s{sub NN} = 17 GeV/c shows stronger non-flow contributions for a similar p{perpendicular}-range which can be attributed to the presence of mini-jets. It is argued that for the p{perpendicular}-range below 2-3 GeV/c the RHIC results may be indicative of a novel particle production mechanism related to low-x gluon saturation.

  17. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.; Hussein, M. E-mail: m_hussein@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-10

    A model for noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence was recently proposed. This model was already used to study the random walk of magnetic field lines. In the current article we use the same model to investigate the diffusion of energetic particles across the mean magnetic field. To compute the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, two analytical theories are used, namely, the Non-Linear Guiding Center theory and the Unified Non-Linear Transport (UNLT) theory. It is shown that the two theories provide different results for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. We also perform test-particle simulations for the aforementioned turbulence model. We show that only the UNLT theory describes perpendicular transport accurately, confirming that this is a powerful tool in diffusion theory.

  18. Electron Acceleration and Structure in the Quasi-perpendicular Collisionless Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, D.

    2005-08-01

    Electron acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shocks is a key problem in collisionless shock physics, in the context of the Earth's bow shock and other astrophysical situations. Fast Fermi acceleration, or reflection by adiabatic mirroring is a robust mechanism, but predicts that the highest energies are produced over a very small shock angle range, close to perpendicular where the reflected flux is decreasingly small. Pitch angle scattering has been shown to be effective in broadening the parameter range where this process is important. Using 2D hybrid simulations and electron test particle simulations, we show that ripples and oscillations of the shock surface are efficient scatters of suprathermal electrons. The results indicate that power law energy distributions can be obtained for both upstream and downstream energetic electrons, over a reasonably wide range of shock angles.

  19. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  20. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  1. Injection to Rapid Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Perpendicular Shocks in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v sh ≈ 1333 km s‑1 and f i ˜ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ˜ 100 v sh ˜ 0.3 c within ˜100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 1015.5 eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  2. Injection to Rapid Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Perpendicular Shocks in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v sh ≈ 1333 km s‑1 and f i ∼ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ∼ 100 v sh ∼ 0.3 c within ∼100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 1015.5 eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  3. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper, we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev and Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester and Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin and Istomin. In the current article, we focus on the Rechester and Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  5. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  6. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  7. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  8. Relativistic Shocks: Particle Acceleration and Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, L.; Keshet, U.; Lemoine, M.

    2015-10-01

    We review the physics of relativistic shocks, which are often invoked as the sources of non-thermal particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, and as possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. We focus on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation, and describe the recent progress in the field driven by theory advances and by the rapid development of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In weakly magnetized or quasi parallel-shocks (i.e. where the magnetic field is nearly aligned with the flow), particle acceleration is efficient. The accelerated particles stream ahead of the shock, where they generate strong magnetic waves which in turn scatter the particles back and forth across the shock, mediating their acceleration. In contrast, in strongly magnetized quasi-perpendicular shocks, the efficiencies of both particle acceleration and magnetic field generation are suppressed. Particle acceleration, when efficient, modifies the turbulence around the shock on a long time scale, and the accelerated particles have a characteristic energy spectral index of s_{γ}˜eq2.2 in the ultra-relativistic limit. We discuss how this novel understanding of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic shocks can be applied to high-energy astrophysical phenomena, with an emphasis on PWNe and GRB afterglows.

  9. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  10. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  11. Low-energy ion acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shocks: Transverse diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of ion injection and acceleration at quasi perpendicular shocks has been the subject of some debate over the past two decades. It is widely known that these shocks efficiently accelerate particles that are well in the high-energy tail of the distribution. However, the issue of injection, or the acceleration of low-energy ions, has yet to reach a consensus. The fundamental issue is whether there is enough diffusion normal to the magnetic field for the particles to remain near the shock. Since transverse diffusion is a physical process that is not well understood in space plasmas, this is an important, and difficult issue to address. In this report, we will investigate the ion injection problem by performing test particle orbit integrations using synthesized turbulent fields. These fields are fully three-dimensional so that transverse diffusion is possible (cross-field diffusion is not possible in geometries where the electromagnetic fields are less than three dimensional). The synthesized fields are produced by superimposing a three-dimensional wave field on a background field. For completeness, we will compare the results from this model with the more well-established theories, such as the diffusive approximation and scatter-free shock drift acceleration. We will also compare these results with other numerical simulation techniques such as the well known hybrid simulation, and other test-particle calculations in which the shock fields are specified to have less than three dimensions. We will also discuss some recent relevant observations and how these compare with our results.

  12. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  13. Observation of particle acceleration in laboratory magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Nogami, T.; Sato, N.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Mushiake, T.

    2015-11-15

    The self-organization of magnetospheric plasma is brought about by inward diffusion of magnetized particles. Not only creating a density gradient toward the center of a dipole magnetic field, the inward diffusion also accelerates particles and provides a planetary radiation belt with high energy particles. Here, we report the first experimental observation of a “laboratory radiation belt” created in the ring trap 1 device. By spectroscopic measurement, we found an appreciable anisotropy in the ion temperature, proving the betatron acceleration mechanism which heats particles in the perpendicular direction with respect to the magnetic field when particles move inward. The energy balance model, including the heating mechanism, explains the observed ion temperature profile.

  14. Acceleration in Perpendicular Relativistic Shocks for Plasmas Consisting of Leptons and Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem, A.; Fiúza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the acceleration of light particles in perpendicular shocks for plasmas consisting of a mixture of leptonic and hadronic particles. Starting from the full set of conservation equations for the mixed plasma constituents, we generalize the magnetohydrodynamical jump conditions for a multi-component plasma, including information about the specific adiabatic constants for the different species. The impact of deviations from the standard model of an ideal gas is compared in theory and particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the standard MHD model is a good approximation. The simulations of shocks in electron-positron-ion plasmas are for the first time multi-dimensional, transverse effects are small in this configuration, and one-dimensional (1D) simulations are a good representation if the initial magnetization is chosen high. 1D runs with a mass ratio of 1836 are performed, which identify the Larmor frequency ω ci as the dominant frequency that determines the shock physics in mixed component plasmas. The maximum energy in the non-thermal tail of the particle spectra evolves in time according to a power law vpropt α with α in the range 1/3 < α < 1, depending on the initial parameters. A connection is made with transport theoretical models by Drury and Gargaté & Spitkovsky, which predict an acceleration time vpropγ and the theory for small wavelength scattering by Kirk & Reville, which predicts a behavior rather as vpropγ2. Furthermore, we compare different magnetic field orientations with B 0 inside and out of the plane, observing qualitatively different particle spectra than in pure electron-ion shocks.

  15. ACCELERATION IN PERPENDICULAR RELATIVISTIC SHOCKS FOR PLASMAS CONSISTING OF LEPTONS AND HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2012-08-10

    We investigate the acceleration of light particles in perpendicular shocks for plasmas consisting of a mixture of leptonic and hadronic particles. Starting from the full set of conservation equations for the mixed plasma constituents, we generalize the magnetohydrodynamical jump conditions for a multi-component plasma, including information about the specific adiabatic constants for the different species. The impact of deviations from the standard model of an ideal gas is compared in theory and particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the standard MHD model is a good approximation. The simulations of shocks in electron-positron-ion plasmas are for the first time multi-dimensional, transverse effects are small in this configuration, and one-dimensional (1D) simulations are a good representation if the initial magnetization is chosen high. 1D runs with a mass ratio of 1836 are performed, which identify the Larmor frequency {omega}{sub ci} as the dominant frequency that determines the shock physics in mixed component plasmas. The maximum energy in the non-thermal tail of the particle spectra evolves in time according to a power law {proportional_to}t{sup {alpha}} with {alpha} in the range 1/3 < {alpha} < 1, depending on the initial parameters. A connection is made with transport theoretical models by Drury and Gargate and Spitkovsky, which predict an acceleration time {proportional_to}{gamma} and the theory for small wavelength scattering by Kirk and Reville, which predicts a behavior rather as {proportional_to}{gamma}{sup 2}. Furthermore, we compare different magnetic field orientations with B{sub 0} inside and out of the plane, observing qualitatively different particle spectra than in pure electron-ion shocks.

  16. Reversible electron heating vs. wave-particle interactions in quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, P.; Mangeney, A.; Scudder, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The energy necessary to explain the electron heating in quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks can be derived either from the electron acceleration in the d.c. cross shock electric potential, or by the interactions between the electrons and the waves existing in the shock. A Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to study the electron distribution function evolution through the shock structure, with and without particle diffusion on waves. This simulation has allowed us to clarify the relative importance of the two possible energy sources; in particular it has been shown that the electron parallel temperature is determined by the d.c. electromagnetic field and not by any wave-particle-induced heating. Wave particle interactions are effective in smoothing out the large gradients in phase space produced by the 'reversible' motion of the electrons, thus producing a 'cooling' of the electrons.

  17. Direct Particle Acceleration in Astroplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, M.

    2002-10-01

    The high energy particle acceleration mechanisms are discussed by focusing on the direct acceleration in the astrophysical context. We specifically argue that the relativistic magnetic reconnection and the shock surfing/surfatron processes can efficiently accelerate charged particles to a relativistic energy, and that those mechanisms may produce a non-thermal, power-law energy spectrum. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  18. Kinetic structures of quasi-perpendicular shocks in global particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ivy Bo Markidis, Stefano; Laure, Erwin; Johlander, Andreas; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Henri, Pierre; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-09-15

    We carried out global Particle-in-Cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a magnetosphere to study the kinetic collisionless physics in super-critical quasi-perpendicular shocks. After an initial simulation transient, a collisionless bow shock forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind and a planet magnetic dipole. The shock ramp has a thickness of approximately one ion skin depth and is followed by a trailing wave train in the shock downstream. At the downstream edge of the bow shock, whistler waves propagate along the magnetic field lines and the presence of electron cyclotron waves has been identified. A small part of the solar wind ion population is specularly reflected by the shock while a larger part is deflected and heated by the shock. Solar wind ions and electrons are heated in the perpendicular directions. Ions are accelerated in the perpendicular direction in the trailing wave train region. This work is an initial effort to study the electron and ion kinetic effects developed near the bow shock in a realistic magnetic field configuration.

  19. PREFERENTIAL ACCELERATION AND PERPENDICULAR HEATING OF MINOR IONS IN A COLLISIONLESS CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2009-05-01

    We incorporate the cyclotron-resonant Fermi heating mechanism of Isenberg and Vasquez into an inhomogeneous, collisionless coronal hole model to investigate this kinetic process in the presence of the other known forces on the coronal hole minor ions. The model includes the effects of gravity, charge-separation electric field, and mirroring in the decreasing magnetic field of a super-radially expanding flux tube. The Fermi process, due to the existence of multiple cyclotron resonances for minor ions, acts preferentially since it is not available to thermal protons in the low-beta coronal hole. The minor ions are treated as test particles, and we consider the specific case of O{sup 5+}, which is the principal minor ion observed by the UVCS/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory instrument. We estimate an upper limit to the nonlinearly generated resonant wave power by extrapolating from the observed low-frequency fluctuations, and find that only a small fraction of this power is required to provide the observed minor ion energization. The perpendicular heating provided by this Fermi mechanism accelerates the entire minor ion distribution to high speed with respect to the bulk protons, consistent with the differentially streaming minor ion core distributions which are a distinctive property of the in situ fast solar wind. We conclude that this cyclotron-resonant Fermi process is easily capable of providing the observed preferential acceleration and heating of minor ions in the fast solar wind.

  20. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  1. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  2. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  3. Efficient particle acceleration in shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, A. F.

    1984-10-01

    A self-consistent non-linear theory of acceleration of particles by shock waves is developed, using an extension of the two-fluid hydrodynamical model by Drury and Völk. The transport of the accelerated particles is governed by a diffusion coefficient which is initially assumed to be independent of particle momentum, to obtain exact solutions for the spectrum. It is found that steady-state shock structures with high acceleration efficiency are only possible for shocks with Mach numbers less than about 12. A more realistic diffusion coefficient is then considered, and this maximum Mach number is reduced to about 6. The efficiency of the acceleration process determines the relative importance of the non-relativistic and relativistic particles in the distribution of accelerated particles, and this determines the effective specific heat ratio.

  4. Laboratory Reconnection Experiments - heating and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yasushi

    Recent laboratory merging/ reconnection experiments have solved a number of key physics of magnetic reconnection: 1) reconnection heating/ acceleration, 2) fast reconnection mechanisms, 3) plasmoid reconnection, 4) non-steady reconnection and 5) non-thermal particle acceleration using new kinetic interpretations. Especially, significant ion temperatures 1.2keV were documented in the world-largest tokamak merging experiment: MAST after detailed 2D elucidation of ion and electron heating characteristics in TS-3 and 4 merging experiments. The measured 2D contours of ion and electron temperatures in TS-3, 4 and MAST reveal ion heating in the downstream by reconnection outflow and electron heating around the X-point by ohmic heating of current sheet. Their detailed heating mechanisms were further investigated by comparing those results with particle simulations developed by NIFS. The ion acceleration mechanism is mostly parallel acceleration by reconnection electric field and partly perpendicular acceleration by electrostatic potential. The fast shock and ion viscosity are the major dumping (heating) mechanisms for the accelerated ions. We successfully applied the reconnection heating - typically 10-50MW to the high-beta spherical tokamak formation and heating. This paper will review major progresses in those international and interdisciplinary merging tokamak experiments.

  5. Wave and particle evolution downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Omidi, N.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Distributions of ions heated in quasi-perpendicular bow shocks have large perpendicular temperature anisotropies that provide free energy for the growth of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) and mirror waves. These modes are often obsreved in the Earth's magnetosheath. Using two-dimensional hybrid simulations, we show that these waves are produced near the shock front and convected downstream rather than being produced locally downstream. The wave activity reduces the proton anisotropy to magnetosheath levels within a few tens of gyroradii of the shock but takes significantly longer to reduce the anisotropy of He(++) ions. The waves are primarily driven by proton anisotropy and the dynamics of the helium ions is controlled by the proton waves. Downstream of high Mach number shocks, mirror waves compete effectively with AIC waves. Downstream of low Mach number shocks, AIC waves dominate.

  6. Re-assessing how much parallel and perpendicular electric fields accelerate electrons during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, Naoki; Chen, Li-Jen; Germaschewski, Kai; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    By means of 2-D PIC simulations applicable to reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail, we show that the parallel electric field accelerates electrons only up to 40 keV, and further acceleration above that energy in fact comes from the perpendicular electric field, which can explain observations of energetic electrons with energies greater than 100 keV. We show that the parallel potential, which is the integral of the parallel electric field along the field line, is proportional to (ωpe /Ωe) - 2, and also to (nb /n0) - 1 / 2, where ωpe /Ωe is the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency, and nb /n0 is the ratio of the lobe density to the density of the current sheet. Applying the parameters in the Earth's magnetotail to the above relations, we demonstrate that the parallel potential is not more than 40 keV. In addition to pitch angle scattering from the parallel to the perpendicular velocity for electron beams along magnetic field, which was suggested in previous studies, energetic electrons accelerated by the perpendicular electric field experience pitch angle scattering from the perpendicular to the parallel velocity, which can isotropize plasma in the exhaust.

  7. International Aspects of Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The development of particle accelerators -- an activity that started about 1930 and is still on-going -- is very much an international activity. There have been international contributions to this development all along the way. The result is remarkably effective accelerators, for many different activities, spread throughout the world. Because many don't appreciate this story and, furthermore, that it is very much worthy of explicit recognition, this session and this talk have been organized. In the talk, a survey will be made of the start of accelerators: electrostatic machines, cyclotrons, betatrons, linacs, synchrotrons, and colliders. Then a brief survey will be given of the more important contributions to particle accelerators. For each of these concepts we shall discuss the physics behind the concept, the origin of the concept, and the places where development and implementation took place. Some of the various applications of accelerators will then be presented. Finally we shall show, in broad terms, the present distribution of particle accelerators.

  8. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  9. Particle accelerator development: Selected examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    2016-03-01

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  10. Particle Accelerator Development: Selected Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  11. Particle acceleration in dipolarization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Nakamura, R.; Zaharia, S.

    2013-05-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of a recent MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection, flow bursts and dipolarization, we investigate the acceleration of test particles (protons and electrons) to suprathermal energies, confirming and extending earlier results on acceleration mechanisms and sources. (Part of the new results have been reviewed recently in Birn et al., Space Science Reviews, 167, doi:10.1007/ s11214-012-9874-4.) The test particle simulations reproduce major features of energetic particle events (injections) associated with substorms or other dipolarization events, particularly a rapid rise of energetic particle fluxes over limited ranges of energy. The major acceleration mechanisms for electrons are betatron acceleration and Fermi acceleration in the collapsing magnetic field. Ions, although non-adiabatic, undergo similar acceleration. Two major entry mechanisms into the acceleration site are identified: cross-tail drift from the inner tail plasma sheet and reconnection entry from field lines extending to the more distant plasma sheet. The former dominates early in an event and at higher energies (hundreds of keV) while the latter constitutes the main source later and at lower energies (tens of keV). Despite the fact that the injection front moves earthward in the tail, the peak of energetic particle fluxes moves to higher latitude when mapped from the near-Earth boundary to Earth in a static magnetic field model.

  12. Particles under radiation thrust in Schwarzschild space-time from a flux perpendicular to the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, D.; Geralico, A.; Jantzen, R. T.; Semerák, O.

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the picture of a thin accretion disc around a black hole, radiating mainly in the direction perpendicular to its plane, we study the motion of test particles interacting with a test geodesic radiation flux originating in the equatorial plane of a Schwarzschild space-time and propagating initially in the perpendicular direction. We assume that the interaction with the test particles is modelled by an effective term corresponding to the Thomson-type interaction which governs the Poynting-Robertson effect. After approximating the individual photon trajectories adequately, we solve the continuity equation approximately in order to find a consistent flux density with a certain plausible prescribed equatorial profile. The combined effects of gravity and radiation are illustrated in several typical figures which confirm that the particles are generically strongly influenced by the flux. In particular, they are both collimated and accelerated in the direction perpendicular to the disc, but this acceleration is not enough to explain highly relativistic outflows emanating from some black hole-disc sources. The model can however be improved in a number of ways before posing further questions which are summarized in concluding remarks.

  13. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  14. Positrons from accelerated particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    Positron production from the decay of radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear interactions of accelerated particles is treated in detail. Laboratory data as well as theoretical considerations are used to construct energy-dependent cross sections for the production of a large number of radioactive positron emitters resulting from proton and alpha-particle interactions with ambient cosmic matter. Using these cross sections, positron production rates are calculated for a variety of energetic particle spectra, assuming solar abundances for both the energetic particles and the ambient medium. These results can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which emit annihilation radiation. In particular, the results have been applied to solar flares, where the observed 0.511 MeV line is shown to be due to positrons resulting from accelerated particle reactions.

  15. Non-Axisymmetric Perpendicular Diffusion of Charged Particles and their Transport Across Tangential Magnetic Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R. D.; le Roux, J. A.; Engelbrecht, N. E.; Ruffolo, D.; Dunzlaff, P.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the transport of charged particles across magnetic discontinuities, focusing specifically on stream interfaces associated with co-rotating interaction regions in the solar wind. We argue that the magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the magnetic discontinuity, and usually also perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, are strongly damped in the vicinity of such a magnetic structure, leading to anisotropic perpendicular diffusion. Assuming that perpendicular diffusion arises from drifts in a turbulent magnetic field, we adopt a simplified approach to derive the relevant perpendicular diffusion coefficient. This approach, which we believe gives the correct principal dependences as expected from more elaborate calculations, allows us to investigate transport in different turbulent geometries, such as longitudinal compressional turbulence that may be present near the heliopause. Although highly dependent on the (possibly anisotropic) perpendicular length scales and turbulence levels, we generally find perpendicular diffusion to be strongly damped at magnetic discontinuities, which may in turn provide an explanation for the large particle gradients associated with these structures.

  16. THE EFFECT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE ON THE ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS BY PERPENDICULAR COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2010-05-20

    We study the physics of electron acceleration at collisionless shocks that move through a plasma containing large-scale magnetic fluctuations. We numerically integrate the trajectories of a large number of electrons, which are treated as test particles moving in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields determined from two-dimensional hybrid simulations (kinetic ions and fluid electron). The large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect the electrons in a number of ways and lead to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons mainly follow along magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons to cross the shock front several times, leading to efficient acceleration. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. The current study is also helpful in understanding the injection problem for electron acceleration by collisionless shocks. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of energetic electrons is similar to in situ observations. The process may be important to our understanding of energetic electrons in planetary bow shocks and interplanetary shocks, and explaining herringbone structures seen in some type II solar radio bursts.

  17. The Effect of Large-scale Magnetic Turbulence on the Acceleration of Electrons by Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2010-05-01

    We study the physics of electron acceleration at collisionless shocks that move through a plasma containing large-scale magnetic fluctuations. We numerically integrate the trajectories of a large number of electrons, which are treated as test particles moving in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields determined from two-dimensional hybrid simulations (kinetic ions and fluid electron). The large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect the electrons in a number of ways and lead to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons mainly follow along magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons to cross the shock front several times, leading to efficient acceleration. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. The current study is also helpful in understanding the injection problem for electron acceleration by collisionless shocks. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of energetic electrons is similar to in situ observations. The process may be important to our understanding of energetic electrons in planetary bow shocks and interplanetary shocks, and explaining herringbone structures seen in some type II solar radio bursts.

  18. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization from low Mach number quasi-perpendicular shocks in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric; Park, Jaehong; Ren, Chuang; Workman, Jared

    2012-10-01

    Low Mach/high beta fast mode shocks can occur in the magnetic reconnection outflows of solar flares. These shocks, which occur above flare loop tops, may provide electron energization responsible for some of the hard X-rays detected by YOHKO and the RHESSE, and radio emission. There has been a dearth of work on understanding the microphysics of these low Mach number shocks. We present new 2D particle-in-cell simulations of low Mach/high beta shocks for the general quasi-perpendicular geometry of field and shock normal to compare with the results for the purely perpendicular case considered in Park et. al. (2012)[Phys.Plasmas 19,062904]. Our aim is to study shock structure and particle acceleration. We find that the modified-two-stream instability sustains the shock and accounts for the entropy creation downstream. We observe the electron Whistler instability in the transition region due to the temperature anisotropy. To have enough simulation electrons above the threshold energy for shock-drift-acceleration (SDA), we inject a two-temperature Maxwellian distribution represented by two separate species, which is approximated to a kappa distribution with κ=10. From particle tracking and the particle energy distribution, we find copious high-energy electrons experiencing SDA.

  20. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  1. Accelerators for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanz, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    History has shown that energetic particles can be useful for medical applications. From the time, in 1895 when Roentgen discovered X-rays, and in 1913 when Coolidge developed the vacuum X-ray tube, energetic particles have been an important tool for medicine. Development of the appropriate tool for effective and safe radiotherapy requires an in-depth understanding of the application and constraints. Various solutions are possible and choices must be analyzed on the basis of the suitability for meeting the requirements. Some of the requirements of charged particle therapy are summarized and various accelerator options are described and discussed.

  2. Magnetic switching time of a Stoner-Wohlfarth particle in a perpendicular bias field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dong

    This thesis studies magnetic switching of a Stoner-Wholfarth particle. The particle is characterized by a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, and the magnetic field driving the switching is applied along the anisotropy axis. In addition, a constant small bias field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis. The dynamics of the magnetic moment are studied numerically by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. Numeric results obtained without any approximations are then compared to the analytic theory of switching time in a perpendicular bias field. A good correspondence between the approximate analytic and exact numeric values of the switching time is observed in a wide parameter region.

  3. Particle acceleration by the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R. P.

    2008-08-25

    Observations of hard X-ray/{gamma}-ray continuum and {gamma}-ray line emission show that electrons are accelerated to >{approx}100 s of MeV and ions up to GeV energies, respectively, in large solar flares. The flare-accelerated electrons above {approx}20 keV and ions above a few MeV often contain >{approx}10-50% or more of the total energy released, indicating that the particle acceleration is intimately related to the energy release mechanism. RHESSI observations show strong evidence that both the ion and electron acceleration are associated with the process of magnetic reconnection. Direct in situ observations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) near 1 AU indicate that shock waves driven by fast (>{approx}1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) accelerate ions and electrons to similarly high energies, at altitudes of {approx}2-40 solar radii. Both CMEs and large flares involve the transient release of up to {approx}10{sup 32}-10{sup 33} ergs. Frequent acceleration of electrons to {approx}10 keV is observed in smaller flares and even in microflares. Radio type III bursts indicate that electron acceleration can occur high in the corona, often without flare signatures at lower altitude. At 1 AU, hundreds of small impulsive SEP events are detected per year near solar maximum. These are dominated by <{approx}1 to {approx}100 keV electrons and often accompanied by tens of keV to MeV/nuc ions, strongly enriched in 3He and heavies. Here I review the recent RHESSI and related in situ observations as they bear on the fundamental acceleration processes that are occurring.

  4. Naked singularities as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by naked singularities to arbitrarily high center of mass energies. Recently it has been suggested that black holes could be used as particle accelerators to probe the Planck scale physics. We show that the naked singularities serve the same purpose and probably would do better than their black hole counterparts. We focus on the scenario of a self-similar gravitational collapse starting from a regular initial data, leading to the formation of a globally naked singularity. It is seen that when particles moving along timelike geodesics interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center of mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to Planck scale physics.

  5. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  6. Energetic particle transport and acceleration within the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    The propagation through space of energetic particles accelerated at the Sun and in the inner heliosphere is governed by the characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field. At large scales, the average Parker spiral configuration, on which transient magnetic structures may be superimposed, dominates the transport, while at smaller scales turbulence scatters the particles and produces field line meandering. This talk will review the classical 1D approach to interplanetary transport, mainly applied to Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), as well as alternative models which allow for effects such as scattering perpendicular to the average magnetic field and field line meandering. The recently emphasized role of drifts in the propagation of SEPs will be discussed. The presentation will also review processes by which particle acceleration takes place within the interplanetary medium and the overall way in which acceleration and transport shape in-situ observations of energetic particles.

  7. Semiclassical geons at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2014-02-01

    We point out that in certain four-dimensional extensions of general relativity constructed within the Palatini formalism stable self-gravitating objects with a discrete mass and charge spectrum may exist. The incorporation of nonlinearities in the electromagnetic field may effectively reduce their mass spectrum by many orders of magnitude. As a consequence, these objects could be within (or near) the reach of current particle accelerators. We provide an exactly solvable model to support this idea.

  8. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  9. Design of ferrite-tuned accelerator cavities using perpendicular-biased high-Q ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, K.

    1984-11-01

    Microwave ferrites with dc bias fields perpendicular to the rf fields exhibit magnetic and dielectric quality factors 1 order of magnitude above that of ferrites used in ferrite-tuned synchrotron accelerating cavities built in the past. For the LAMPF II project, these ferrites appear to allow the design of synchrotron cavities with high gap voltages and high efficiency. A simple coaxial quarter-wave-resonator geometry, first considered only as a model for preliminary studies, turned out to be a good basis for the solution of most technical problems such as generation of the bias field, cooling of the ferrites, and installation of a generous high-voltage gap design. Two quarter-wave resonators combined to form one accelerating unit of about 2.5-m length and 0.6-m diameter should be capable of delivering 120 kV of accelerating voltage in the tuning range 50-60 MHz, up to 200 kV in the range 59-60 MHz. The main advantage of the given resonator design is its full rotational symmetry, which allows calculation and optimization of all electrical properties with maximum reliability.

  10. Electron acceleration at nearly perpendicular collisionless shocks. I - One-dimensional simulations without electron scale fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Burgess, D.; Wu, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Under certain conditions electrons can be reflected and effectively energized at quasi-perpendicular shocks. This process is most prominent close to the point where the upstream magnetic field is tangent to the curved shock. A theoretical explanation of the underlying physical mechanism has been proposed which assumes conservation of magnetic moment and a static, simplified shock profile are performed. Test particle calculations of the electron reflection process in order to examine the results of the theoretical analysis without imposing these restrictive conditions. A one-dimensional hybrid simulation code generates the characteristic field variations across the shock. Special emphasis is placed on the spatial and temporal length scales involved in the mirroring process. The simulation results agree generally well with the predictions from adiabatic theory. The effects of the cross-shock potential and unsteadiness are quantified, and the influence of field fluctuations on the reflection process is discussed.

  11. Particle acceleration at shocks in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard

    This dissertation describes a study of particle acceleration at shocks via the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Results for particle acceleration at both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks are presented to address the question of whether there are sufficient particles in the solar wind thermal core, modeled as either a Maxwellian or kappa- distribution, to account for the observed accelerated spectrum. Results of accelerating the theoretical upstream distribution are compared to energetic observations at 1 AU. It is shown that the particle distribution in the solar wind thermal core is sufficient to explain the accelerated particle spectrum downstream of the shock, although the shape of the downstream distribution in some cases does not follow completely the theory of diffusive shock acceleration, indicating possible additional processes at work in the shock for these cases. Results show good to excellent agreement between the theoretical and observed spectral index for one third to one half of both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks studied herein. Coronal mass ejections occurring during periods of high solar activity surrounding solar maximum can produce shocks in excess of 3-8 shocks per day. During solar minimum, diffusive shock acceleration at shocks can generally be understood on the basis of single independent shocks and no other shock necessarily influences the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this sense, diffusive shock acceleration during solar minimum may be regarded as Markovian. By contrast, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at periods of high solar activity (e.g. solar maximum) see frequent, closely spaced shocks that include the effects of particle acceleration at preceding and following shocks. Therefore, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at solar maximum cannot be modeled on the basis of diffusive shock acceleration as a single, independent shock and the process is essentially non-Markovian. A

  12. Anisotropic particles align perpendicular to the flow direction in narrow microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Trebbin, Martin; Steinhauser, Dagmar; Perlich, Jan; Buffet, Adeline; Roth, Stephan V.; Zimmermann, Walter; Thiele, Julian; Förster, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The flow orientation of anisotropic particles through narrow channels is of importance in many fields, ranging from the spinning and molding of fibers to the flow of cells and proteins through thin capillaries. It is commonly assumed that anisotropic particles align parallel to the flow direction. When flowing through narrowed channel sections, one expects the increased flow rate to improve the parallel alignment. Here, we show by microfocus synchrotron X-ray scattering and polarized optical microscopy that anisotropic colloidal particles align perpendicular to the flow direction after passing a narrow channel section. We find this to be a general behavior of anisotropic colloids, which is also observed for disk-like particles. This perpendicular particle alignment is stable, extending downstream throughout the remaining part of the channel. We show by microparticle image velocimetry that the particle reorientation in the expansion zone after a narrow channel section occurs in a region with considerable extensional flow. This extensional flow is promoted by shear thinning, a typical property of complex fluids. Our discovery has important consequences when considering the flow orientation of polymers, micelles, fibers, proteins, or cells through narrow channels, pipes, or capillary sections. An immediate consequence for the production of fibers is the necessity for realignment by extension in the flow direction. For fibrous proteins, reorientation and stable plug flow are likely mechanisms for protein coagulation. PMID:23569240

  13. AN EFFECT OF PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION ON THE ANISOTROPY OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES FROM UNCONNECTED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; He, H.-Q.; Zhang, M. E-mail: hqhe@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2011-09-01

    Recently, Tan and coworkers studied the 2001 September 24 solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed by the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU and found that there is a counter-streaming particle beam with a deep depression of flux at 90{sup 0} pitch angle during the beginning of the event. They suggested that it is a result of a reflecting boundary at some distance outside of 1 AU. While this scenario could be true under some specific configuration of an interplanetary magnetic field, in this paper we offer another possible explanation. We simulated the SEP event by solving the five-dimensional focused transport equation numerically for 40 keV electrons with perpendicular diffusion. We find that a counter-streaming particle beam with deep depression at 90{sup 0} pitch angle can form on Parker magnetic field lines that do not directly connect to the main particle source on the Sun in the beginning of an SEP event. It can happen when a significant number of observed particles come from adjacent field lines through parallel transport to large radial distance first, hopping across field lines through perpendicular diffusion, and then getting scattered back to 1 AU, where they combine with the particles directly coming from the Sun to form a counter-streaming beam.

  14. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  15. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  16. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles: Numerical test of the theorem on reduced dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental statement in diffusion theory is provided by the so-called theorem on reduced dimensionality. The latter theorem is saying that if the dimensionality of the turbulence is reduced, charged particles are tied to a single magnetic field line. If there is pitch-angle scattering and therewith parallel diffusion, this usually means that perpendicular transport is subdiffusive. Subdiffusive transport was found in numerous simulations for slab turbulence. However, it was unclear whether the theorem is valid for other models with reduced dimensionality such as the two-dimensional model. In the current paper, we simultaneously trace magnetic field lines and energetic particles and we compute the distance between the particle and the initial field line. We confirm the aforementioned theorem for slab turbulence but we cannot confirm it for two-dimensional turbulence. We also show that particles are not tied to field lines for two-component turbulence.

  17. Modeling Particle Acceleration and Transport at CIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Mason, G. M.; Chen, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    CIRs are a major site for particle acceleration during solar minimum. Earlier Ulysses observations have found that particles can be accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shocks that often form at a few AUs. The accelerated particles then propagate back to the Earth along Parker's field line. Theoretical calculations predicted a modulation of the spectrum at low energies, qualitatively agreed with obsevations at 1 AU. However, this picture was recently challenged by STEREO observations, where local accelerations near 1 AU were inferred in many events. In this work, we perform a detailed numerical calculation to study particle acceleration and transport in one CIR event which was observed by both ACE and STEREO spacecraft. We obtain particle currents at different heliocentric distances and different longitudes, as well as particle anisotropy. These values are compared with observations and the implication on the acceleration site and the interplanetary turbulence spectrum is discussed.

  18. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  19. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  20. Relativistic particle acceleration in plerions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, Jonathan; Tavani, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent research on the structure and particle acceleration properties of relativistic shock waves in which the magnetic field is transverse to the flow direction in the upstream medium, and whose composition is either pure electrons and positrons or primarily electrons and positrons with an admixture of heavy ions. Particle-in-cell simulation techniques as well as analytic theory have been used to show that such shocks in pure pair plasmas are fully thermalized -- the downstream particle spectra are relativistic Maxwellians at the temperature expected from the jump conditions. On the other hand, shocks containing heavy ions which are a minority constituent by number but which carry most of the energy density in the upstream medium do put approximately 20% of the flow energy into a nonthermal population of pairs downstream, whose distribution in energy space is N(E) varies as E(exp -2), where N(E)dE is the number of particles with energy between E and E+dE. The mechanism of thermalization and particle acceleration is found to be synchrotron maser activity in the shock front, stimulated by the quasi-coherent gyration of the whole particle population as the plasma flowing into the shock reflects from the magnetic field in the shock front. The synchrotron maser modes radiated by the heavy ions are absorbed by the pairs at their (relativistic) cyclotron frequencies, allowing the maximum energy achievable by the pairs to be gamma(sub +/-)m(sub +/-)c squared = m(sub i)c squared gamma(sub 1)/Z(sub i), where gamma(sub 1) is the Lorentz factor of the upstream flow and Z(sub i) is the atomic number of the ions. The shock's spatial structure is shown to contain a series of 'overshoots' in the magnetic field, regions where the gyrating heavy ions compress the magnetic field to levels in excess of the eventual downstream value. This shock model is applied to an interpretation of the structure of the inner regions of the Crab Nebula, in particular to the 'wisps

  1. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  2. The Effect of Large Scale Magnetic Turbulence on the Acceleration of Electrons by Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, F.; Giacalone, J.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate electron acceleration at collisionless shocks propagating into an upstream plasma containing large-scale magnetic fluctuations in the direction normal to the mean field. We treat electrons as test particles, and integrate their trajectories numerically, in a time dependent electromagnetic field which is determined from a two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electron) simulation. We find the large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect the electrons in a number of ways leading to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons move freely along the magnetic field lines, the large scale field line meandering allows the fast-moving electrons to cross the shock front multiple times, leading to efficient acceleration. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring electrons back and forth between them. The downstream spectrum is broadened, with a power-law like tail at high energies up to 200-300 times of the original energy. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of energetic electrons appears to be similar to in-situ observations (e.g. Bale 1999; Simnett 2005). The study may be important in understanding observations of energetic electrons in planetary bow shocks and interplanetary shocks, and explaining herringbone structures in type II solar radio bursts.

  3. Ion acceleration in quasi-perpendicular PIC simulations of a reforming heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2003-12-01

    Recent Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have revealed time-dependent shock solutions for parameters relevant to astrophysical and heliospheric shocks [1,2,3]. These solutions are characterised by a shock which cyclically reforms on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends not only upon the correct treatment of the electrons, but also on the plasma parameters, the upstream β in particular. In the case of the heliospheric termination shock these parameters are not well determined, however, some estimates suggest that the termination shock may be in a parameter regime such that it is time-dependent. It has been pointed out [3] that this will switch off some acceleration mechanisms, for example shock surfing, which has been proposed previously for time-stationary shock solutions. The introduction of time-dependent electromagnetic fields intrinsic to the shock does however introduce the possibility of new mechanisms for the acceleration of protons. Here we present for the first time one such process as revealed by high phase space resolution 1.5D PIC simulations in which all vector quantities are three dimensional, the solution then varying with the spatial coordinate and time. We find that a subset of the protons that reflect off the reforming shock front are accelerated by subsequent interaction with the shock to form a suprathermal population which then propagates into the downstream region with energies of order six times the upstream inflow energy. These may provide an injection population for further acceleration to cosmic ray energies. [1] Shimada, N., and M. Hoshino, Astrophys. J, 543, L67, 2000. [2] Schmitz, H., S.C. Chapman and R.O. Dendy, Astrophys. J, 570, 637, 2002 [3] Scholer, M., I. Shinohara and S. Matsukiyo, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 1014, 2003

  4. Space charge compensation in laser particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    1999-07-01

    Laser particle acceleration (LPA) involves the acceleration of particle beams by electromagnetic waves with relatively short wavelength compared with conventional radio-frequency systems. These short length scales raise the question whether space charge effects may be a limiting factor in LPA performance. This is analyzed in two parts of an accelerator system, the acceleration sections and the drift region of the prebuncher. In the prebuncher, space charge can actually be converted to an advantage for minimizing the energy spread. In the accelerator sections, the laser fields can compensate for space charge forces, but the compensation becomes weaker for high beam energy.

  5. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  6. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  7. The Maximum Energy of Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Arons, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock that propagates with relativistic velocities into the magnetized interstellar medium. By means of multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the acceleration performance of weakly magnetized relativistic shocks, in the magnetization range 0 <~ σ <~ 10-1. The pre-shock magnetic field is orthogonal to the flow, as generically expected for relativistic shocks. We find that relativistic perpendicular shocks propagating in electron-positron plasmas are efficient particle accelerators if the magnetization is σ <~ 10-3. For electron-ion plasmas, the transition to efficient acceleration occurs for σ <~ 3 × 10-5. Here, the acceleration process proceeds similarly for the two species, since the electrons enter the shock nearly in equipartition with the ions, as a result of strong pre-heating in the self-generated upstream turbulence. In both electron-positron and electron-ion shocks, we find that the maximum energy of the accelerated particles scales in time as ɛmaxvpropt 1/2. This scaling is shallower than the so-called (and commonly assumed) Bohm limit ɛmaxvpropt, and it naturally results from the small-scale nature of the Weibel turbulence generated in the shock layer. In magnetized plasmas, the energy of the accelerated particles increases until it reaches a saturation value ɛsat/γ0 mic 2 ~ σ-1/4, where γ0 mic 2 is the mean energy per particle in the upstream bulk flow. Further energization is prevented by the fact that the self-generated turbulence is confined within a finite region of thickness vpropσ-1/2 around the shock. Our results can provide physically grounded inputs for models of non-thermal emission from a variety of astrophysical sources, with particular relevance to GRB afterglows.

  8. Particle Acceleration in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, J.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important driver of energetic particles in phenomena such as magnetospheric storms and solar flares. Using kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we show that the stochastic magnetic field structure which develops during 3D reconnection plays a vital role in particle acceleration and transport. In a 2D system, electrons are trapped in magnetic islands which limits their energy gain. In a 3D system, however, the stochastic magnetic field enables the energetic electrons to access volume-filling acceleration regions and therefore gain energy much more efficiently than in the 2D system. We also examine the relative roles of two important acceleration drivers: parallel electric fields and a Fermi mechanism associated with reflection of charged particles from contracting field lines. We find that parallel electric fields are most important for accelerating low energy particles, whereas Fermi reflection dominates energetic particle production. We also find that proton energization is reduced in the 3D system.

  9. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  10. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Zank, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  11. Particle acceleration processes in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.

    A review is presented of some theoretical ideas on particle acceleration associated with solar flares. Various acceleration mechanisms are discussed, including forms of stochastic acceleration, shock drift acceleration, resonant acceleration, diffusive acceleration at shock fronts, acceleration during magnetic reconnection, and acceleration by parallel electric fields in double layers or electrostatic shocks. Particular attention is given to first phase acceleration of electrons in solar flares, which is usually attributed to bulk energization of electrons. It is proposed that the dissipation cannot be due to classical resistivity and entails anomalous resistivity or hyperresistivity, such as in multiple double layers. A model is developed for bulk energization due to the continual formation and decay of weak double layers.

  12. Perpendicular Diffusion in the Transport of Solar Energetic Particles from Unconnected Sources: The Counter-streaming Particle Beams Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.-Q.

    2015-12-01

    In some solar energetic particle (SEP) events, a counter-streaming particle beam with a deep depression of flux at ∼ 90^\\circ pitch angle during the beginning phase is observed. Two different interpretations exist within the community to explain this interesting phenomenon. One explanation invokes the hypothesis of an outer reflecting boundary or a magnetic mirror beyond the observer. The other one considers the effect of perpendicular diffusion on the transport process of SEPs in interplanetary space. In this work, we revisit the problem of counter-streaming particle beams observed in SEP events and discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the formation of this phenomenon. We clarify some results in previous works.

  13. Magnetic ramp scale at supercritical perpendicular collisionless shocks: Full particle electromagnetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Huang, Can; Yang, Huigen; Hu, Hongqiao; Han, Desheng; Liu, Ying

    2013-09-15

    Supercritical perpendicular collisionless shocks are known to exhibit foot, ramp, and overshoot structures. The shock ramp structure is in a smaller scale in contrast to other microstructures (foot and overshoot) within the shock front. One-dimensional full particle simulations of strictly perpendicular shocks over wide ranges of ion beta β{sub i}, Alfvén Mach number M{sub A}, and ion-to-electron mass ratio m{sub i}/m{sub e} are presented to investigate the impact of plasma parameters on the shock ramp scale. Main results are (1) the ramp scale can be as small as several electron inertial length. (2) The simulations suggest that in a regime below the critical ion beta value, the shock front undergoes a periodic self-reformation and the shock ramp scale is time-varying. At higher ion beta values, the shock front self-reformation is smeared. At still higher ion beta value, the motion of reflected ions is quite diffuse so that they can lead to a quasi-steady shock ramp. Throughout the above three conditions, the shock ramp thickness increases with β{sub i}. (3) The increase (decrease) in Mach number and the decrease (increase) in the beta value have almost equivalent impact on the state (i.e., stationary or nonstationary) of the shock ramp. Both of front and ramp thicknesses are increased with M{sub A}.

  14. Reformation at a low-Mach-number perpendicular shock: Two-dimensional full particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, T.; Kidani, Y.; Matsukiyo, S.; Yamazaki, R.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale two-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulations are carried out for studying periodic self-reformation of supercritical perpendicular shocks. It is confirmed that the shock reformation becomes absent with specific parameters. When electromagnetic whistler mode waves are strongly excited by the modified two-stream instability, both incoming and reflected ions are strongly scattered and the shock reformation becomes absent. On the other hand, when electrostatic waves are weakly excited or there is no microinstabilities, reflected ions show a coherent behavior and the shock reformation is persistent. In this case, however, the reformation period is modified essentially due to the shock-front ripples. The present simulation result suggests that the persistence and absence of the shock reformation are controlled by the cross-scale coupling between electron-scale microinstabilities and ion-scale shock-front ripples.

  15. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  16. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  17. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The SEPAC instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam-particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  18. Pickup Ion Acceleration at Low-{beta}{sub p} Perpendicular Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, A.S.; Zank, G.P.; Lipatov, A.S.

    1999-05-01

    Multiscale hybrid kinetic simulations of low-{beta}{sub p} supercritical shocks demonstrate that pickup ions may be strongly accelerated by shock surfing, also known as multiply reflected ion acceleration. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation of stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole is presented. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the problem of ion and electron energization in solar flares, and is capable of accounting for a wide range of both neutral and charged particle emissions. It is also a component in diffusive shock acceleration, since pitch-angle scattering (which is necessary for multiple shock crossings) is accompanied by diffusion in momentum space, which in turn yields a net systematic energy gain; however, stochastic energization will dominate the first-order shock process only in certain parameter regimes. Although stochastic acceleration has been applied to particle energization in the lobes of radio galaxies, its application to the central regions of AGNs (active galactic nuclei) has only recently been considered, but not in detail. We proposed to systematically investigate the plasma processes responsible for stochastic particle acceleration in black hole magnetospheres along with the energy-loss processes which impede particle energization. To this end, we calculated acceleration rates and escape time scales for protons and electrons resonating with Alfven waves, and for electrons resonating with whistlers. We also considered the "hot" topic of gamma-ray line emission from the Orion complex. We proposed that the observed gamma-ray lines are produced by energetic ions that are stochastically accelerated by cascading Alfven waves in the accretion plasma near a black hole. Related research papers that were published in journals are listed.

  20. Particle acceleration by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given of the analysis of new observations of energetic particles and energetic secondary emissions obtained over the solar maxium (approx. 1980) by the Solar Maximum mission, Hinotori, the international Sun-Earth Explorer, Helios, Explorer satellites, and Voyager spacecraft. Solar energetic particle events observed in space, He(3)- rich events, solar gamma rays and neutrons, and solar neutrinos are discussed.

  1. Effect of the Acceleration Energy of Hydrogen Ion Irradiation on Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in CoOx/Pd Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Chul; Kim, Sanghoon; Han, Jungjin; Hong, Jongill; Kang, Shinill

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic stripes were achieved from hydrogen-ion-irradiated areas separated by the nonirradiated areas masked by UV-imprinted polymeric patterns. A perpendicular magnetic anistropy with a squareness of 0.96 and a coercivity of 2 kOe in (CoOx/Pd)10 multilayer films was induced via deoxidization, which heavily depended on the acceleration energy of hydrogen ion irradiation in the range of 400 eV. These phenomena were demonstrated via deoxidization of cobalt oxide to pure cobalt as observed by X-ray diffraction, accompanying the formation of a CoPd(111) phase indicating perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the preferential removal or reduction of oxygen atoms in multilayer films.

  2. Geometric integration for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, Étienne

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a very personal view of the field of geometric integration in accelerator physics—a field where often work of the highest quality is buried in lost technical notes or even not published; one has only to think of Simon van der Meer Nobel prize work on stochastic cooling—unpublished in any refereed journal. So I reconstructed the relevant history of geometrical integration in accelerator physics as much as I could by talking to collaborators and using my own understanding of the field. The reader should not be too surprised if this account is somewhere between history, science and perhaps even fiction.

  3. Laser ion sources for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, T. R.

    1996-05-01

    There is an interest in accelerating atomic nuclei to produce particle beams for medical therapy, atomic and nuclear physics, inertial confinement fusion and particle physics. Laser Ion Sources, in which ions are extracted from plasma created when a high power density laser beam pulse strikes a solid surface in a vacuum, are not in common use. However, some new developments in which heavy ions have been accelerated show that such sources have the potential to provide the beams required for high-energy accelerator systems.

  4. Lasers and new methods of particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    There has been a great progress in development of high power laser technology. Harnessing their potential for particle accelerators is a challenge and of great interest for development of future high energy colliders. The author discusses some of the advances and new methods of acceleration including plasma-based accelerators. The exponential increase in sophistication and power of all aspects of accelerator development and operation that has been demonstrated has been remarkable. This success has been driven by the inherent interest to gain new and deeper understanding of the universe around us. With the limitations of the conventional technology it may not be possible to meet the requirements of the future accelerators with demands for higher and higher energies and luminosities. It is believed that using the existing technology one can build a linear collider with about 1 TeV center of mass energy. However, it would be very difficult (or impossible) to build linear colliders with energies much above one or two TeV without a new method of acceleration. Laser driven high gradient accelerators are becoming more realistic and is expected to provide an alternative, (more compact, and more economical), to conventional accelerators in the future. The author discusses some of the new methods of particle acceleration, including laser and particle beam driven plasma based accelerators, near and far field accelerators. He also discusses the enhanced IFEL (Inverse Free Electron Laser) and NAIBEA (Nonlinear Amplification of Inverse-Beamstrahlung Electron Acceleration) schemes, laser driven photo-injector and the high energy physics requirements.

  5. A theoretical perspective on particle acceleration by interplanetary shocks and the Solar Energetic Particle problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the physics of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events is of importance to the general question of particle energization throughout the cosmos as well as playing a role in the technologically critical impact of space weather on society. The largest, and often most damaging, events are the so-called gradual SEP events, generally associated with shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We review the current state of knowledge about particle acceleration at evolving interplanetary shocks with application to SEP events that occur in the inner heliosphere. Starting with a brief outline of recent theoretical progress in the field, we focus on current observational evidence that challenges conventional models of SEP events, including complex particle energy spectra, the blurring of the distinction between gradual and impulsive events, and the difference inherent in particle acceleration at quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks. We also review the important problem of the seed particle population and its injection into particle acceleration at a shock. We begin by discussing the properties and characteristics of non-relativistic interplanetary shocks, from their formation close to the Sun to subsequent evolution through the inner heliosphere. The association of gradual SEP events with shocks is discussed. Several approaches to the energization of particles have been proposed, including shock drift acceleration, diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), acceleration by large-scale compression regions, acceleration by random velocity fluctuations (sometimes known as the "pump mechanism"), and others. We review these various mechanisms briefly and focus on the DSA mechanism. Much of our emphasis will be on our current understanding of the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients for energetic particles and models of plasma turbulence in the vicinity of the shock. Because of its importance both to the DSA mechanism itself and to the particle

  6. Acceleration of ions and electrons to near-cosmic ray energies in a perpendicular shock: The January 6, 1978 event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sarris, E. T.

    1985-01-01

    Acceleration of energetic ions to approx 200 MeV and electrons to approx 2 MeV were detected by the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument on Voyager 2 in association with a quasiperpendicular shock of theta sub Bn - 87.5 deg at 1.9 AU. The measurments, obtained at a time resolution of approx. 1.2 sec, reveal structure of the energetic particle intensity enhancements down to a scale of the order of the particle gyroradius, and suggest that acceleration takes place within a gyrodiameter of the shock. The observations are consistent with the prediction of the shock drift acceleration (SDA) mechanism. The absence of any fluctuations in the magnetic field during the shock passage suggest that turbulence is not essential to the shock acceleration process in the interplanetary medium.

  7. Scalar fields and particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon discovered in 2009 by Bañados, Silk and West where particle collisions can achieve arbitrary high center-of-mass (c.m.) energies close to the event horizon of an extreme Kerr black hole, has generated a lot of interest. Although rotation seemed to be an essential requirement, it was later shown that arbitrary high energies can also be achieved for collisions between radially moving particles near the horizon of the electrically charged extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Recently Patil and Joshi claimed that instead of spinning up the black hole one can also crank up the c.m. energy of particle collisions by "charging up" a static black hole with a massless scalar field. In this regard they showed that infinite energies can be attained in the vicinity of the naked singularity of the Janis-Newman-Wincour (JNW) spacetime, which contains a massless scalar field that also becomes infinite at the position of the curvature singularity. In this study we show that Patil and Joshi's claim does not apply for other static black hole systems endowed with a massless scalar field. In particular we consider the well-known Bekenstein black hole and the recently discovered Martínez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole, and show that the expression of the c.m. energy for particle collisions near the event horizons of these black holes is no different than the corresponding case with vanishing scalar field represented by the Schwarzschild solution. Moreover by studying the motion of scalar test charges that interact with the background scalar field in these black hole spacetimes we show that the resulting c.m. energies are even smaller than in the case of free particles. This shows that the infinite energies obtained by Patil and Joshi may not be due to the fact that the black hole contains a massless scalar field, but may be instead related to the geometry of the naked singularity in the JNW spacetime. An analogous case of infinite c.m. energy in the vicinity of a naked

  8. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  9. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  10. Solar Particle Acceleration Radiation and Kinetics (SPARK). A mission to understand the nature of particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Sarah A.; Williams, David R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kontar, Eduard P.; Smith, David M.; Lagg, Andreas; Krucker, Sam; Hurford, Gordon J.; Vilmer, Nicole; MacKinnon, Alexander L.; Zharkova, Valentina V.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, Iain G.; Browning, Philippa K.; Innes, Davina E.; Trottet, Gerard; Foullon, Clare; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Green, Lucie M.; Lamoureux, Herve; Forsyth, Colin; Walton, David M.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Gandorfer, Achim; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin; Limousin, Olivier; Verwichte, Erwin; Dalla, Silvia; Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henri; Neukirch, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Energetic particles are critical components of plasma populations found throughout the universe. In many cases particles are accelerated to relativistic energies and represent a substantial fraction of the total energy of the system, thus requiring extremely efficient acceleration processes. The production of accelerated particles also appears coupled to magnetic field evolution in astrophysical plasmas through the turbulent magnetic fields produced by diffusive shock acceleration. Particle acceleration is thus a key component in helping to understand the origin and evolution of magnetic structures in, e.g. galaxies. The proximity of the Sun and the range of high-resolution diagnostics available within the solar atmosphere offers unique opportunities to study the processes involved in particle acceleration through the use of a combination of remote sensing observations of the radiative signatures of accelerated particles, and of their plasma and magnetic environment. The SPARK concept targets the broad range of energy, spatial and temporal scales over which particle acceleration occurs in the solar atmosphere, in order to determine how and where energetic particles are accelerated. SPARK combines highly complementary imaging and spectroscopic observations of radiation from energetic electrons, protons and ions set in their plasma and magnetic context. The payload comprises focusing-optics X-ray imaging covering the range from 1 to 60 keV; indirect HXR imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 200 keV, γ-ray spectroscopic imaging with high-resolution LaBr3 scintillators, and photometry and source localisation at far-infrared wavelengths. The plasma environment of the regions of acceleration and interaction will be probed using soft X-ray imaging of the corona and vector magnetography of the photosphere and chromosphere. SPARK is designed for solar research. However, in addition it will be able to provide exciting new insights into the origin of particle acceleration in

  11. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  12. Non-accelerator particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Kenneth W.; Delayen, Jean R.

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium.

  14. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  15. Compressional acceleration of energetic particles during an enhancement of magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Qin, G.; Zhu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    When a gas is compressed, its temperature increases and particles in the gas are accelerated. Particle acceleration at collision shock waves acts on the same mechanism although the compression at the shock is very abrupt and particles need to depend on spatial diffusion to achieve energies more than 4 times their original energy. This is a first-order particle acceleration process and it is much more effective than the second-order energy diffusion in many space plasma environments. Based on the adiabatic theory of particle motion and the frozen-in-law of space plasma, we can write the rate of particle energy increase and particle pitch-angle change in terms of the divergence of plasma flow. It shows that particles are accelerated whenever the plasma with its embedded magnetic fields is compressed. If compression is in direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, particle pitch-angle gets larger and the particle distribution becomes more pancake-like. Inside the magnetosphere, a shock is unlikely, but plasma compression can still occur. This perhaps is driving particle acceleration during magnetic storm periods, but it should also occur during quiet times at lower rate. Using a model map of magnetospheric convection pattern, we found that the compression of magnetospheric plasma can play important roles in particle acceleration and trapping. It is a large-scale phenomenon. The strongest compressional acceleration occurs ~6-12 Re on the night-side plasma sheet. It has a correlation with the speed of external solar wind that drives the magnetospheric convection and the location of plasmapause that indicates the level of magnetospheric convection. In this paper, we are going to show how particle acceleration initiates and how the particle flux increases propagate through the magnetosphere during an enhancement of magnetospheric convection of magnetic storm. We will also discuss to role of particle diffusion in the acceleration process.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the

  17. Particle acceleration in solar flares - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1992-01-01

    Contrary to our historical understanding, the energetic particles in most major solar proton events do not come from the flare itself. The particle abundances, ionization states, time evolution, and longitude distributions all indicate that the particles are accelerated from the ambient plasma by a shock wave driven by a coronal mass ejection in these events. In contrast, the particles that do come from impulsive solar flares are unique in character. These particles are electron rich, have He-3/He-4 enhancements of up to 10,000, and enhancements in heavy elements such as Fe/C by factors of 10. The high ionization state of Fe, +20 indicates that the material has been heated to temperatures of about 2 x 10 exp 7 K. It is generally believed that preferential heating by selective absorption of plasma waves is combined with stochastic acceleration in these events. Recent studies of the broad gamma-ray lines emitted by energetic particles within the flare loops indicate that they are also Fe-rich, He-3 rich and proton-poor like the particles seen at 1 AU. In large impulsive events, particles from the impulsive phase may be reaccelerated by a coronal blast-wave shock.

  18. Origin and acceleration of suprathermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir I.; Dayeh, Maher A.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2016-03-01

    Observations over the last decade have shown that suprathermal ions with energies above that of the core or bulk solar wind protons (i.e., ~1-2 keV/nucleon) are an important constituent of the overall seed population that is accelerated in solar and interplanetary events. Despite the recent recognition of their importance, the origin of these populations and the method of their acceleration remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that these particles exist in the so-called tail regions of the corresponding solar wind distributions where high temporal and sensitivity measurements are sparse. Moreover, observations comprising long-term averages (between hours to more than a day) show conflicting results. For instance, below ~40 keV/nucleon the ion differential intensities in the solar wind frame appear to exhibit a near-constant power-law spectral slope of ~1.5, perhaps indicating a universal acceleration mechanism. In contrast, at energies greater than ~40 keV/nucleon, the ion composition changes with solar activity, and the energy spectra are significantly steeper, perhaps indicating that the suprathermal pool of material also comprises lower-energy particle populations accelerated in corotating interaction regions, interplanetary shocks, and solar energetic particle events. This paper discusses key observations of suprathermal ions and electrons in terms of state-of-the-art theories and models that have been put forward to account for their origin and acceleration.

  19. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  20. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Sessler

    2008-04-04

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  1. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Sessler

    2013-06-11

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  2. EIDOSCOPE: particle acceleration at plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaivads, A.; Andersson, G.; Bale, S. D.; Cully, C. M.; De Keyser, J.; Fujimoto, M.; Grahn, S.; Haaland, S.; Ji, H.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lazarian, A.; Lavraud, B.; Mann, I. R.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Narita, Y.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schwartz, S. J.; Shinohara, I.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the mission concept of how ESA can make a major contribution to the Japanese Canadian multi-spacecraft mission SCOPE by adding one cost-effective spacecraft EIDO (Electron and Ion Dynamics Observatory), which has a comprehensive and optimized plasma payload to address the physics of particle acceleration. The combined mission EIDOSCOPE will distinguish amongst and quantify the governing processes of particle acceleration at several important plasma boundaries and their associated boundary layers: collisionless shocks, plasma jet fronts, thin current sheets and turbulent boundary layers. Particle acceleration and associated cross-scale coupling is one of the key outstanding topics to be addressed in the Plasma Universe. The very important science questions that only the combined EIDOSCOPE mission will be able to tackle are: 1) Quantitatively, what are the processes and efficiencies with which both electrons and ions are selectively injected and subsequently accelerated by collisionless shocks? 2) How does small-scale electron and ion acceleration at jet fronts due to kinetic processes couple simultaneously to large scale acceleration due to fluid (MHD) mechanisms? 3) How does multi-scale coupling govern acceleration mechanisms at electron, ion and fluid scales in thin current sheets? 4) How do particle acceleration processes inside turbulent boundary layers depend on turbulence properties at ion/electron scales? EIDO particle instruments are capable of resolving full 3D particle distribution functions in both thermal and suprathermal regimes and at high enough temporal resolution to resolve the relevant scales even in very dynamic plasma processes. The EIDO spin axis is designed to be sun-pointing, allowing EIDO to carry out the most sensitive electric field measurements ever accomplished in the outer magnetosphere. Combined with a nearby SCOPE Far Daughter satellite, EIDO will form a second pair (in addition to SCOPE Mother-Near Daughter) of closely

  3. Perpendicular diffusion on the anisotropy of energetic particles and its challenging implications for several classical paradigms of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongqing

    2016-07-01

    In some solar energetic particle (SEP) events, a counter-streaming particle beam with a deep flux depression near 90 degrees pitch angle during the onset phase is observed. Two different interpretations exist in the community to explain this interesting phenomenon. One explanation invokes the hypothesis of an outer reflecting boundary or a magnetic mirror beyond the observer. The other one considers the effect of the perpendicular diffusion on the transport process of SEPs in the interplanetary space. In this talk, we revisit the problem of the counter-streaming particle beams observed in SEP events and discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the formation of this phenomenon. Furthermore, we discuss the challenging implications of perpendicular diffusion for rethinking and redefining several classical physical paradigms and concepts of the inner heliosphere.

  4. Directions of Improvement in the Theory of Perpendicular Diffusion of Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D. J.; Pianpanit, T.; Chuychai, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Qin, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the study of energetic particle transport through magnetic turbulence, the nonlinear guiding center (NLGC) theory has provided new insight and improved modeling of the asymptotic perpendicular diffusion coefficient κ ⊥. Here we explore the key assumptions of NLGC theory, and examine three directions for improvement, while retaining the format of a simple analytic theory that can readily be evaluated: 1) For a two-component 2D+slab model of turbulence, our simulation results support the Shalchi slab hypothesis that the slab contribution is subdiffusive, and when considering only the 2D contribution we obtain an improved description of the diffusion coefficient κ ⊥. 2) We replace the assumption of diffusive decorrelation with random ballistic decorrelation (RBD), which yields an explicit formula for κ ⊥. We note that scattering processes can cause a reversal of the guiding center motion along the field line, i.e., "backtracking," leading to partial cancellation of contributions to κ ⊥, especially for low-wavenumber components of the magnetic turbulence. We therefore include a heuristic backtracking correction (BC) that can be used in combination with RBD. 3) Based on careful consideration of various assumptions, the unknown prefactor a2 can be replaced by known factors. We also provide a simple approximation formula for the case of weak pitch-angle scattering. In comparison with computer simulation results for various cases, the modified theories provide an improved match with direct simulation results for κ ⊥ and its parameter dependence. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund, the Development and Promotion of Science and Technology Talents Project of the Royal Thai Government, Thailand's Commission on Higher Education (MRG 5286239), the U.S. NSF (AGS-1063439 and SHINE AGS-1156094), NASA (Heliophysics Theory NNX11AJ4G), and the Solar Probe Plus/ISIS project.

  5. Kinetic Simulations of SNR Shocks- Prospects for Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Sandra

    2006-02-01

    Recent kinetic simulations of supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shocksyield time varying shock solutions that cyclically reform on thespatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution isstationary or reforming depends upon the plasma parameters which, for SNRshocks are ill defined but believed to be within thetime-dependent regime. We will first review the structure and evolution ofthe time dependentsolutions, and the acceleration processes of the ions and electrons inthese time dependent fields, for a proton-electron plasma. We will thenpresent recent results for a three component plasma: backgroundprotons; electrons; and a second heavier ion population. These accelerationmechanisms may generate a suprathermalïnjection$quot; population - a seed population for subsequentacceleration at the shock, which can in turn generate particles at cosmicray energies.

  6. Double layers acting as particles accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Lozneanu, E.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that self-consistent stable and unstable double layers generated in plasma after a self-organisation process are able to accelerate charged particles. The implication of cosmic double layers (Dls) in the acceleration of electrical charged particles long been advocated by Alfven and his Stockholm school is today disputed by argument that static electric fields associated with Dls are conservative and consequently the line integral of the electric field outside the DL balances the line integral inside it. Related with this dispute we will evidence some, so far not considered, facts which are in our opinion arguments that aurora Dls are able to energize particles. For justifying this assertion we start from recent experimental results concerning the phenomenology of self-consistent Dls whose generation involve beside ionisations the neutrals excitations which are at tile origin of the light phenomena as those observed in auroras.

  7. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  8. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  9. Computation applied to particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Yan, Y.T. )

    1991-07-01

    The rapid growth in the power of large-scale computers has had a revolutionary effect on the study of charged-particle accelerators that is similar to the impact of smaller computers on everyday life. Before an accelerator is built, it is now the absolute rule to simulate every component and subsystem by computer to establish modes of operation and tolerances. We will bypass the important and fruitful areas of control and operation and consider only application to design and diagnostic interpretation. Applications of computers can be divided into separate categories including: component design, system design, stability studies, cost optimization, and operating condition simulation. For the purposes of this report, we will choose a few examples taken from the above categories to illustrate the methods and we will discuss the significance of the work to the project, and also briefly discuss the accelerator project itself. The examples that will be discussed are: (1) the tracking analysis done for the main ring of the Superconducting Supercollider, which contributed to the analysis which ultimately resulted in changing the dipole coil diameter to 5 cm from the earlier design for a 4-cm coil-diameter dipole magnet; (2) the design of accelerator structures for electron-positron linear colliders and circular colliding beam systems (B-factories); (3) simulation of the wake fields from multibunch electron beams for linear colliders; and (4) particle-in-cell simulation of space-charge dominated beams for an experimental liner induction accelerator for Heavy Ion Fusion. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  11. Energetic particle acceleration in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2012-05-01

    There has been a remarkable discovery in the heliosphere. Ions accelerated in disparate plasma conditions - the quiet solar wind, disturbed conditions downstream from shocks, and throughout the heliosheath - all have the same spectrum, a power law with spectral index of -5 when expressed as a distribution function. An acceleration mechanism has been developed that can account for these observations, a pump mechanism, in which particles are pumped out of a core distribution through a series of compressions and expansions. The derivation of the governing equation of the pump mechanism and some important subtleties in the derivation are discussed.

  12. Self-force on an accelerated particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Thomas M.; Friedman, John L.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the singular field of an accelerated point particle (scalar charge, electric charge or small gravitating mass) moving on an accelerated (nongeodesic) trajectory in a generic background spacetime. Using a mode-sum regularization scheme, we obtain explicit expressions for the self-force regularization parameters. We use a Lorentz gauge for the electromangetic and gravitational cases. This work extends the work of Barack and Ori [1] who demonstrated that the regularization parameters for a point particle in geodesic motion in a Schwarzschild spacetime can be described solely by the leading and subleading terms in the mode-sum (commonly known as the A and B terms) and that all terms of higher order in ℓ vanish upon summation (later they showed the same behavior for geodesic motion in Kerr [2], [3]). We demonstrate that these properties are universal to point particles moving through any smooth spacetime along arbitrary (accelerated) trajectories. Our renormalization scheme is based on, but not identical to, the Quinn-Wald axioms. As we develop our approach, we review and extend work showing that that different definitions of the singular field used in the literature are equivalent to our approach. Because our approach does not assume geodesic motion of the perturbing particle, we are able use our mode-sum formalism to explicitly recover a well-known result: The self-force on static scalar charges near a Schwarzschild black hole vanishes.

  13. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    1985-05-01

    In the 1970's major advances in the understanding of auroral processes were brought about by observations of plasmas and electric fields within the regions of space responsible for auroral particle acceleration. The major contribution of these observations was the verification of the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large regions of altitude (1000 to 20000 kilometers). These electric fields constitute potential drops of several kilovolts, accelerating magnetospheric electrons downward to form the aurora and ionospheric ions upward, where they contribute significantly to the magnetospheric hot ion population. Perpendicular spatial scales of about 100 kilometers are most common, although finer scales have been observed embedded, and individual small amplitude double layers occur on much smaller parallel spatial scales. More recently, the same data sets have revealed the existance of about 100 V electric potential drops directed downward in return current regions. Downward electric fields are in a direction to accelerate electrons out of the ionsphere and tend to retard the propagation of ions upward. An association between upflowing electron beams and transversely heated ions at low altitude has been noted, and a casual relationship between downward electric fields and ion conics is suggested.

  14. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  15. Perpendicular diffusion of a dilute beam of charged dust particles in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2014-06-15

    The diffusion of projectiles drifting through a target of strongly coupled dusty plasma is investigated in a simulation. A projectile's drift is driven by a constant force F. We characterize the random walk of the projectiles in the direction perpendicular to their drift. The perpendicular diffusion coefficient D{sub p⊥} is obtained from the simulation data. The force dependence of D{sub p⊥} is found to be a power law in a high force regime, but a constant at low forces. A mean kinetic energy W{sub p} for perpendicular motion is also obtained. The diffusion coefficient is found to increase with W{sub p} with a linear trend at higher energies, but an exponential trend at lower energies.

  16. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-15

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. D 82, 104049 (2010).] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  17. Preferential perpendicular acceleration of heavy ionospheric ions by interactions with electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1983-05-01

    Observations in recent years indicate the presence of energetic ions of ionospheric origin in various parts of the magnetosphere. These energetic ions have been found at all latitudes. Observations from the S3-3 satellite have made a great contribution toward an understanding of the energization of ionospheric ions. One of the most interesting observations is related to the finding that ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves are highly correlated and that they show an abrupt increase in their occurrence rate at an altitude of about 5000 km. A statistical survey of upward flowing ion (UFI) events occurring between 6000 and 8000 km has shown that the average energy of O(+) has a strong correlation with that of the H(+) ions. The present investigation has the objective to examine critically the energetics of UFI events in view of the theory of the interaction of a single coherent EHC wave with O(+), He(+), and H(+) ions. It is found that preferential acceleration of heavy ions occurs when such ions interact with an EHC wave.

  18. SUPPRESSION OF REFLECTED ELECTRONS BY KINETIC ALFVEN TURBULENCE IN A QUASI-PERPENDICULAR SHOCK: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Umeda, T.

    2011-07-20

    Shock drift acceleration is one of the important mechanisms for electron acceleration associated with magnetic mirror reflection along the magnetic field in a quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock. We study the influence of a rippled shock surface in the in-plane magnetic field on the magnetic mirror reflection of electrons. Simulation results show that the number of reflected electrons reduces after generation of the rippled shock surface. Electric and magnetic wavenumber spectra of the generated fluctuations in the shock transition region indicate the existence of kinetic Alfven turbulence. The kinetic Alfven turbulence decreases the electron pitch angle by parallel scattering, which reduces the magnetic mirror force acting on the electrons. These results suggest that the shock-generated kinetic Alfven turbulence suppresses the magnetic mirror reflection of electrons during the shock drift acceleration.

  19. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  20. Interdisciplinary glossary — particle accelerators and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, V. V.; Dyubkov, V. S.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    A general concept of a new interdisciplinary glossary, which includes particle accelerator terminology used in medicine, as well as relevant medical concepts, is presented. Its structure and usage rules are described. An example, illustrating the quickly searching technique of relevant information in this Glossary, is considered. A website address, where one can get an access to the Glossary, is specified. Glossary can be refined and supplemented.

  1. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  2. Particle energization during solar maximum: Diffusive shock acceleration at multiple shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Neergaard Parker, L.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-08-01

    We present a model for the acceleration of particles at multiple shocks using an approach related to box models. A distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles out of the box by either the method used in Melrose and Pope and Pope and Melrose or by the approach introduced in Zank et al. where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E{sub max}) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks. We provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS CONTAINING LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC-FIELD VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J. E-mail: jokipii@lpl.arizona.ed

    2010-12-10

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field have been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar planar-shock results can be significantly altered as a consequence of large-scale, meandering magnetic lines of force. Because the perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub perpendicular} is generally much smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub ||}, the energetic charged particles are trapped and preferentially accelerated along the shock front in the regions where the connection points of magnetic field lines intersecting the shock surface converge, and thus create the 'hot spots' of the accelerated particles. For the regions where the connection points separate from each other, the acceleration to high energies will be suppressed. Further, the particles diffuse away from the 'hot spot' regions and modify the spectra of downstream particle distribution. These features are qualitatively similar to the recent Voyager observations in the Heliosheath. These results are potentially important for particle acceleration at shocks propagating in turbulent magnetized plasmas as well as those which contain large-scale nonplanar structures. Examples include anomalous cosmic rays accelerated by the solar wind termination shock, energetic particles observed in propagating heliospheric shocks, galactic cosmic rays accelerated by supernova blast waves, etc.

  4. Channeled particle acceleration by plasma waves in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Noble, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal is presented. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible. Particle dechanneling due to electron multiple scattering can be eliminated with a sufficiently high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed.

  5. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  6. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  7. Particle acceleration magnetic field generation, and emission in Relativistic pair jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) are responsible for particle acceleration in relativistic pair jets. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic pair jet propagating through a pair plasma. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Simulation results show that this instability generates and amplifies highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter' I radiation from deflected electrons can have different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. The growth rate of the Weibel instability and the resulting particle acceleration depend on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and on the initial particle distribution function. In this presentation we explore some of the dependencies of the Weibel instability and resulting particle acceleration on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and the particle distribution function.

  8. Particle acceleration by combined diffusive shock acceleration and downstream multiple magnetic island acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    As a consequence of the evolutionary conditions [28; 29], shock waves can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence. Simulations [32-34] and observations [30; 31] support the idea that downstream magnetic islands (also called plasmoids or flux ropes) result from the interaction of shocks with upstream turbulence. Zank et al. [18] speculated that a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream reconnection-related effects associated with the dynamical evolution of a “sea of magnetic islands” would result in the energization of charged particles. Here, we utilize the transport theory [18; 19] for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets to investigate a combined DSA and downstream multiple magnetic island charged particle acceleration mechanism. We consider separately the effects of the anti-reconnection electric field that is a consequence of magnetic island merging [17], and magnetic island contraction [14]. For the merging plasmoid reconnection- induced electric field only, we find i) that the particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory, and ii) that the solution is constant downstream of the shock. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, we find that i) the accelerated particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory; ii) for a given energy, the particle intensity peaks downstream of the shock, and the peak location occurs further downstream of the shock with increasing particle energy, and iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x, c/c0)/f(0, c/c0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA theory, but increases with increasing particle energy. These predictions can be tested against observations of electrons and ions accelerated at interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric

  9. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  10. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  11. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  12. Particle acceleration during substorm growth and onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    ISEE-1 observations of ion and electron energization made at 11 RE during a substorm event on April 2, 1978 are presented. An analysis of the dominant cross-tail current systems in this event (Mitchell et al., 1990) has made it possible to uniquely associate particle energization processes with the development and/or disruption of the cross-tail currents. It is found that significant ion acceleration occurs as the ions participate in serpentine cross-tail motion (Speiser, 1965), establishing the dominant plasma sheet current system just prior to onset. As this current disrupts, the magnetic field configuration dipolarizes and further ion energization and the bulk of the electron energization occurs. During dipolarization energization is due primarily to the inductive electric field, including betatron and Fermi acceleration processes.

  13. On the Parallel and Perpendicular Propagating Motions Visible inPolar Plumes: An Incubator For (Fast) Solar Wind Acceleration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; McIntosh, Scott W.; De Moortel, Ineke; Wang, Yuming

    2015-06-01

    We combine observations of the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to study the characteristic properties of (propagating) Alfvénic motions and quasi-periodic intensity disturbances in polar plumes. This unique combination of instruments highlights the physical richness of the processes taking place at the base of the (fast) solar wind. The (parallel) intensity perturbations with intensity enhancements around 1% have an apparent speed of 120 km s-1 (in both the 171 and 193 Å passbands) and a periodicity of 15 minutes, while the (perpendicular) Alfvénic wave motions have a velocity amplitude of 0.5 km s-1, a phase speed of 830 km s-1, and a shorter period of 5 minutes on the same structures. These observations illustrate a scenario where the excited Alfvénic motions are propagating along an inhomogeneously loaded magnetic field structure such that the combination could be a potential progenitor of the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence required to accelerate the fast solar wind.

  14. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  16. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  17. Low-energy particle acceleration and compression at the termination shock and in the heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Le Roux, J. A.; Decker, R. B.

    2008-08-25

    We discuss some theoretical aspects of pickup ion acceleration at the solar wind termination shock and beyond in the heliosheath. Our model of anisotropic transport permits a wide range of acceleration mechanisms, including (a) adiabatic compression by the shock of PUI suprathermal tails, (b) standard diffusive acceleration at the shock, (c) mirroring by the magnetic field kink at a quasi-perpendicular shock, and (d) momentum diffusion in the solar wind and the heliosheath. It is shown that momentum diffusion in the heliosheath is an efficient particle accelerator at low energies. We also investigate the processing of a pre-accelerated pickup ion spectra by the termination shock and analyze the long-term averaged anisotropies of the combined distributions near a shock whose obliquity varies with time.

  18. Particle Acceleration and Radiation associated with Magnetic Field Generation from Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  19. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific emphasis of this contract has been on the physics of beam ionosphere interactions, in particular, what are the plasma wave levels stimulated by the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) electron beam as it is ejected from the Electron Beam Accelerator (EBA) and passes into and through the ionosphere. There were two different phenomena expected. The first was generation of plasma waves by the interaction of the DC component of the beam with the plasma of the ionosphere, by wave particle interactions. The second was the generation of waves at the pulsing frequency of the beam (AC component). This is referred to as using the beam as a virtual antenna, because the beam of electrons is a coherent electrical current confined to move along the earth's magnetic field. As in a physical antenna, a conductor at a radio or TV station, the beam virtual antenna radiates electromagnetic waves at the frequency of the current variations. These two phenomena were investigated during the period of this contract.

  20. GPU accelerated particle visualization with Splotch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivi, M.; Gheller, C.; Dykes, T.; Krokos, M.; Dolag, K.

    2014-07-01

    Splotch is a rendering algorithm for exploration and visual discovery in particle-based datasets coming from astronomical observations or numerical simulations. The strengths of the approach are production of high quality imagery and support for very large-scale datasets through an effective mix of the OpenMP and MPI parallel programming paradigms. This article reports our experiences in re-designing Splotch for exploiting emerging HPC architectures nowadays increasingly populated with GPUs. A performance model is introduced to guide our re-factoring of Splotch. A number of parallelization issues are discussed, in particular relating to race conditions and workload balancing, towards achieving optimal performances. Our implementation was accomplished by using the CUDA programming paradigm. Our strategy is founded on novel schemes achieving optimized data organization and classification of particles. We deploy a reference cosmological simulation to present performance results on acceleration gains and scalability. We finally outline our vision for future work developments including possibilities for further optimizations and exploitation of hybrid systems and emerging accelerators.

  1. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  2. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  3. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  4. PIC simulations of reforming perpendicular shocks- implications for ion acceleration at SNRs and the heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2004-12-01

    Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have revealed time-dependent shock solutions for parameters relevant to astrophysical and heliospheric shocks [e.g. 1,2,3]. These solutions are characterised by a shock which cyclically reforms on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends not only upon the model adopted for electron dynamics, but also on the plasma parameters, notably the upstream beta. For the heliospheric termination shock, these parameters are not well determined: some estimates suggest that the termination shock may be in a parameter regime such that it is time-dependent. It has been pointed out [3] that this may terminate some acceleration processes, for example shock surfing, which have been proposed for time-stationary shock solutions. The introduction of time-dependent electromagnetic fields intrinsic to the shock does however introduce the possibility of new mechanisms for the acceleration of protons. We will discuss the prospects for local ion acceleration at reforming quasiperpendicular shocks, in the presence of pickup ions as seen in selfconsistent PIC simulations with parameters relevant to both SNRs and the heliospheric termination shock. [1] Shimada, N., and M. Hoshino, Astrophys. J, 543, L67, 2000. [2] Schmitz, H., S.C. Chapman and R.O. Dendy, Astrophys. J, 570, 637, 2002 [3] Scholer, M., I. Shinohara and S. Matsukiyo, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 1014, 2003

  5. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.; Holzer, T. E. (Editor); Mihalas, D. (Editor); Sturrock, P. A. (Editor); Ulrich, R. K. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theories of particle acceleration in solar flares are reviewed. The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are gamma rays, X-rays and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere and energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The implication of these observations are discussed. Stochastic and shock acceleration as well as acceleration in direct electric fields are considered. Interplanetary particle propagation is discussed and an overview of the highlights of both current and promising future research is presented.

  6. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Ushirokawa, A.; Kudo, I.; Ejiri, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Plans for SEPAC, an instrument array to be used on Spacelab 1 to study vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interaction in space, beam-atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and the electromagnetic-field configuration of the magnetosphere, are presented. The hardware, consisting of electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma arcjet, neutral-gas plume generator, power supply, diagnostic package (photometer, plasma probes, particle analyzers, and plasma-wave package), TV monitor, and control and data-management unit, is described. The individual SEPAC experiments, the typical operational sequence, and the general outline of the SEPAC follow-on mission are discussed. Some of the experiments are to be joint ventures with AEPI (INS 003) and will be monitored by low-light-level TV.

  7. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant is for the analysis of FUSE observations of particle acceleration in supernova remnant SN1006 shock waves. We have performed quick look analysis of the data, but because the source is faint and because the O VI emission lines on SN1006 are extremely broad, extreme care is needed for background subtraction and profile fitting. Moreover, the bulk of the analysis in will consist of model calculations. The Ly beta and O VI lines are clearly detected at the position in the NW filament of SN1006, but not in the NE position where non-thermal X-rays are strong. The lack of O VI emission in the NE places an upper limit on the pre-shock density there.

  8. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  9. Perpendicular diffusion of a dilute beam of charged particles in the PK-4 dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2015-09-01

    We study the random walk of a dilute beam of projectile dust particles that drift through a target dusty plasma. This random walk is a diffusion that occurs mainly due to Coulomb collisions with target particles that have a different size. In the direction parallel to the drift, projectiles exhibit mobility-limited motion with a constant average velocity. We use a 3D molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the dust particle motion to determine the diffusion and mobility coefficients for the dilute beam. The dust particles are assumed to interact with a shielded Coulomb repulsion. They also experience gas drag. The beam particles are driven by a prescribed net force that is not applied to the target particles; in the experiments this net force is due to an imbalance of the electric and ion drag forces. This simulation is motivated by microgravity experiments, with the expectation that the scattering of projectiles studied here will be observed in upcoming PK-4 experiments on the International Space Station. Supported by NASA and DOE.

  10. Optical Phase Locking of Modelocked Lasers for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Sinha, S.; Wisdom, J.; Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    Particle accelerators require precise phase control of the electric field through the entire accelerator structure. Thus a future laser driven particle accelerator will require optical synchronism between the high-peak power laser sources that power the accelerator. The precise laser architecture for a laser driven particle accelerator is not determined yet, however it is clear that the ability to phase-lock independent modelocked oscillators will be of crucial importance. We report the present status on our work to demonstrate long term phaselocking between two modelocked lasers to within one degree of optical phase and describe the optical synchronization techniques that we employ.

  11. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  12. Particle acceleration and wave emissions associated with the formation of auroral cavities and enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Pritchett, P. L.; Persoon, A. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.; Collin, H. L.; Slavin, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A unified model is presented which interrelates the various processes involved in auroral particle acceleration and the associated wave emissions, and it is shown how energy is coupled from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere. The phenomena in the magnetotail which can provide the source of free energy for the perpendicular electrostatic shocks are identified along with the associated potential structures in the nightside auroral region. The characteristics of the particle acceleration produced by the shock are described, including efficiency and energy transport between magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas, the properties of the particle distributions throughout the shock region and return current regions, and the associated wave emissions. The source of free energy for the generation of ion conics is identified, as are the signatures for the formation of plasma cavities and/or enhancements.

  13. NONRELATIVISTIC COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN WEAKLY MAGNETIZED ELECTRON-ION PLASMAS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION OF PERPENDICULAR SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-09-20

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is performed to investigate weakly magnetized perpendicular shocks with a magnetization parameter of {sigma} = 6 x 10{sup -5}, which is equivalent to a high Alfven Mach number M{sub A} of {approx}130. It is shown that current filaments form in the foot region of the shock due to the ion-beam-Weibel instability (or the ion filamentation instability) and that they generate a strong magnetic field there. In the downstream region, these current filaments also generate a tangled magnetic field that is typically 15 times stronger than the upstream magnetic field. The thermal energies of electrons and ions in the downstream region are not in equipartition and their temperature ratio is T{sub e}/T{sub i} {approx} 0.3-0.4. Efficient electron acceleration was not observed in our simulation, although a fraction of the ions are accelerated slightly on reflection at the shock. The simulation results agree very well with the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. It is also shown that electrons and ions are heated in the foot region by the Buneman instability (for electrons) and the ion-acoustic instability (for both electrons and ions). However, the growth rate of the Buneman instability is significantly reduced due to the relatively high temperature of the reflected ions. For the same reason, ion-ion streaming instability does not grow in the foot region.

  14. Plasma cell adaptation to enhance particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ragheb, M. S.

    2008-06-15

    A plasma study is performed in order to construct a cell for plasma acceleration purpose. As well, a multicell design is introduced for the injection of beam driver application. The suggested idea is experimentally demonstrated for two plasma cell configuration. The preformed plasma is obtained by a symmetrically driven capacitive audio frequency discharge. It is featured by its moderate pressure of 0.1-0.2 Torr, low consumption power of 130 W maximum, low discharge voltage and frequency up to 950 V and 20 kHz, respectively, and high plasma density from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The electron temperature obtained by Langmuir double probe varies from 1 up to 16 eV. It is observed that the increases of the discharge voltage and frequency enlarge the plasma parameters to their maximum values. The plasma cell filled with different gases demonstrates that the Ar and He gases manifest the highest ionization efficiency exceeding 100% at 950 V and 20 kHz. The formed plasma is cold; its density is uniform and stable along the positive column for long competitive lifetime. Showing that it follows the conditions to enhance particle acceleration and in conjunction with its periphery devices form a plasma cell that could be extended to serve this purpose. Demonstrating that an injected electron beam into the extended preformed plasma could follow, to long distance, a continuous trajectory of uniform density. Such plasma generated by H{sub 2} or Ar gases is suggested to be used, respectively, for low-density or higher density beam driver.

  15. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  16. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  17. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  18. Multiwavelength studies of Galactic TeV particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-07-01

    Our Milky Way galaxy is host to a variety of astrophysical objects capable of accelerating particles to TeV energies, including supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. I will review recent multiwavelength results on Galactic TeV sources and discuss the implications for particle acceleration and diffusion in these systems.

  19. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  20. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  1. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the most pertinent data on solar energetic particles is presented, and the implications of the data are discussed, taking into account radio emissions, hard X-rays, gamma rays, energy spectra and electron-proton correlations, chemical compositions, and isotopic and ionic compositions. The mechanisms of solar flare particle acceleration are considered along with solar flare particle spectra in interplanetary space. Attention is given to stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, acceleration in direct electric fields, the mean free paths of solar electrons and protons in interplanetary space, and an illustration of the probable effect of adiabatic deceleration on the spectra of solar flare ions at the time of maximum.

  2. Inertial-particle accelerations in turbulence: a Lagrangian closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajedi, S.; Gustavsson, K.; Mehlig, B.; Biferale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of particle accelerations in turbulence is intermittent, with non-Gaussian tails that are quite different for light and heavy particles. In this article we analyse a closure scheme for the acceleration fluctuations of light and heavy inertial particles in turbulence, formulated in terms of Lagrangian correlation functions of fluid tracers. We compute the variance and the flatness of inertial particle accelerations and we discuss their dependency on the Stokes number. The closure incorporates effects induced by the Lagrangian correlations along the trajectories of fluid tracers, and its predictions agree well with results of direct numerical simulations of inertial particles in turbulence, provided that the effects induced by the inertial preferential sampling of heavy/light particles outside/inside vortices are negligible. In particular, the scheme predicts the correct functional behaviour of the acceleration variance, as a function of Stokes, as well as the presence of a minimum/maximum for the flatness of the acceleration of heavy/light particles, in good qualitative agreement with numerical data. We also show that the closure works well when applied to the Lagrangian evolution of particles using a stochastic surrogate for the underlying Eulerian velocity field. Our results support the conclusion that there exist important contributions to the statistics of the acceleration of inertial particles independent of the preferential sampling. For heavy particles we observe deviations between the predictions of the closure scheme and direct numerical simulations, at Stokes numbers of order unity. For light particles the deviation occurs for larger Stokes numbers.

  3. Production and Applications of Neutrons Using Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, David L.

    2012-06-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and interactions with matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed for them. Today, these systems are in use in such diverse applications as mineral assaying, oil well logging, radiography, and explosive detection to name a few. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the industrial fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends.

  4. PARTICLE ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN A COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-08-20

    Particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk was investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We discuss the important role that magnetic reconnection plays not only on the saturation of MRI but also on the relativistic particle generation. The plasma pressure anisotropy of p > p{sub ||} induced by the action of MRI dynamo leads to rapid growth in magnetic reconnection, resulting in the fast generation of nonthermal particles with a hard power-law spectrum. This efficient particle acceleration mechanism involved in a collisionless accretion disk may be a possible model to explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  5. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  6. Earth's Most Powerful Natural Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Thunderstorms launch antimatter, gamma rays, and highly energetic electrons and neutrons to the edge of space. This witches' brew of radiation is generated at the edge of the stratopause, by the strong electric fields associated with lightning discharges. In less than a quarter millisecond, an explosive feedback process takes an initial seed population of electrons, perhaps produced by cosmic rays from dying stars, and amplifies them a billion billion-fold in the rarefied air over high altitude thunderheads. The electrons generate gamma radiation as they travel through the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, momentarily brighter and of harder spectrum than cosmic gamma ray bursts. These electrons ultimately are absorbed by the atmosphere, but the gamma rays continue on, into the upper reaches of the atmosphere, where they in turn generate a new population of electrons, positrons, and energetic neutrons. These secondary electrons and positrons move along the magnetic field, and can reach near-earth space, streaming through the inner radiation belts, and possibly contributing to the trapped populations there. First postulated by Wilson in 1925, and serendipitously discovered by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in 1994 [Fishman et al.], these events, known as "Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes" (TGFs), represent the most intense episodes of particle acceleration on or near the Earth, resulting in electrons with energies up to 100 MeV. Recent observations by the RHESSI [Smith et al., 2004], Fermi [Briggs et al., 2010], and AGILE [Tavani et al., 2011] satellites, and theoretical and computational modeling, have suggested that the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism [Gurevich, 1992], and important modifications, such as the relativistic feedback discharge (RFD) model [Dwyer 2012] can best explain the observations at present. In these models, strong thunderstorm electric fields drive seed electrons, generated from cosmic ray interactions, into a runaway

  7. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  8. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Pair Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating into an ambient plasma. We find that the growth times depend on the Lorenz factors of jets. The jets with larger Lorenz factors grow slower. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The small scale magnetic field structure generated by the Weibel instability is appropriate to the generation of "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons (positrons) as opposed to synchrotron radiation. The jitter radiation resulting from small scale magnetic field structures may be important for understanding the complex time structure and spectral evolution observed in gamma-ray bursts or other astrophysical sources containing relativistic jets and relativistic collisionless shocks.

  9. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Pair Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created by relativistic pair jets are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. The growth rates of the Weibel instability depends on the distribution of pair jets. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  10. Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission in relativistic pair jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Mizuno, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Recent simulations show that the Weibel instability created by relativistic pair jets is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. The growth rates of the Weibel instability depends on the distribution of pair jets. The Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. This instability is also responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  11. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  12. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented. PMID:21908658

  13. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  14. Oblique Propagation, Wave-Particle Interaction and Particle Distribution Functions in the Quasi-Perpendicular Bow Shock.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmane, A.; Hamza, A. M.; Meziane, K.

    2007-12-01

    Recent results from the Cluster mission have stimulated theoretical investigations and simulations to explain ion distribution functions observed in the quasi-perp bow shock. [Meziane et al., 2001] High-time resolution observations have revealed distributions of gyrating ions that are gyrophase-bunched. When not produced at the shock, such distributions are believed to be resulting from interactions between field-aligned beams and low frequency beam-driven waves (ω <Ømega) [Hamza et al., 2005] The Conventional models used to account for such distributions assume that the waves are purely transverse, and that they propagate parallel to the ambient magnetic field. However observations indicate that these waves are propagating obliquely (θ ≤ 30 ° ) with respect to the ambient magnetic field [Meziane et al., 2001]. A theoretical investigation of the non-relativistic wave-particle interaction in a background magnetic field with the electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely has been addressed previously, resulting in a dynamical system describing the wave interaction with a single ion in the absence of dissipation mechanisms. [Hamza et al., 2005] This dynamical system can be numerically integrated to construct the ion distribution functions by seeding the particles with different initial conditions. We compute the particle orbits and simulate the time evolution of the distribution functions based on Liouville's theorem of phase space density conservation. This exercise can then provide insights on the particle dynamics away from the shock. Meziane, K., C. Mazelle, R.P. Lin, D. LeQueau, D.E. Larson, G.K. Parks, R.P. Lepping (2001), Three dimensional observations of gyrating ions distributions far upstream from the Earth's bow shock and their association with low-frequency waves, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 5731 Hamza, A. M., K. Meziane, and C. Mazelle (2006), Oblique propagation and nonlinear wave particle processes, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A04104

  15. Particle Acceleration at Low Coronal Compression Regions and Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Lee, M. A.; Gorby, M.; Lugaz, N.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M.; Török, T.; Downs, C.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.; Mikić, Z.; Riley, P.; Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Kozarev, K.

    2015-09-01

    We present a study on particle acceleration in the low corona associated with the expansion and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Because CME expansion regions low in the corona are effective accelerators over a finite spatial region, we show that there is a rigidity regime where particles effectively diffuse away and escape from the acceleration sites using analytic solutions to the Parker transport equation. This leads to the formation of broken power-law distributions. Based on our analytic solutions, we find a natural ordering of the break energy and second power-law slope (above the break energy) as a function of the scattering characteristics. These relations provide testable predictions for the particle acceleration from low in the corona. Our initial analysis of solar energetic particle observations suggests a range of shock compression ratios and rigidity dependencies that give rise to the solar energetic particle (SEP) events studied. The wide range of characteristics inferred suggests competing mechanisms at work in SEP acceleration. Thus, CME expansion and acceleration in the low corona may naturally give rise to rapid particle acceleration and broken power-law distributions in large SEP events.

  16. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  17. Simulation of particle acceleration in the PLASMONX project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Carlo

    2010-02-01

    In this paper I will present some numerical studies and parameter scans performed with the electromagnetic, rela-tivistic, fully-self consistent particle-in-cell (PIC) code ALaDyn (Acceleration by LAser and DYNamics of charged particles), concerning electron acceleration via plasma waves in the framework of the INFN-PLASMONX (PLASma acceleration and MONochromatic X-ray production) project. In particular I will focus on the modelling of the SITE (Self Injection Test Experiment) which will be a relevant part of the commissioning of the FLAME laser. Some issues related to the quality of the accelerated bunch will be discussed.

  18. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  19. Acceleration of solid particles by gaseous detonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilenko, T.P.; Grigoriev, V.V.; Zhdan, S.A.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Boiko, V.M.; Papyrin, A.N.

    1986-11-01

    This investigation is concerned with a theoretical and experimental study of acceleration dynamics of spherically inert solid particles (100 ..mu..m nominal diameter) in flows of gaseous detonation products. The experiments were conducted in a detonation channel 1.5 m long with a 20 x 20 mm/sup 2/ cross section and one open end. Particle motion was observed with the method of multiexposure photographic recording and a laser stroboscopic light source. The character of velocity variation of individual particles inside and outside of the channel was investigated for different initial positions of particles. Under certain conditions the accelerated particles are destroyed. A mathematical model based on two-phase multivelocity continuum mechanics has been formulated to describe the detonation wave propagation, outflow of detonation products from the channel, and interaction between particles and a nonstationary flow of detonation products. The model includes chemical equilibrium of detonation products, particle acceleration, heat exchange between phases and channel walls, particle melting, and fragmentation of droplets if the Weber number exceeds some critical value. Particle destruction has been correlated with the initial position, diameter, and physical properties of particles. Comparison of computer and experimental results shows that the model satisfactorily describes acceleration, heating, and fragmentation of particles.

  20. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  1. Suppression of Fermi acceleration in composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Kellen Manoela; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2016-09-01

    We study the motion of a composite particle in a one-dimensional billiard with a moving wall. The particle is modeled by two point masses coupled by a harmonic spring. We show that the energy gained by the composite particle is greatly reduced with respect to a single point particle. We show that the amount of energy transferred to the system at each collision with the walls is independent of the spring constant. However, the presence of the spring is responsible for the energy suppression because it diminishes the number of collisions by storing part of the system's energy and reducing the velocity of the particle's center of mass.

  2. Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Subramanian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Trans-relativistic particle acceleration due to Fermi interactions between charged particles and MHD waves helps to power the observed high-energy emission in AGN transients and solar flares. The trans-relativistic acceleration process is challenging to treat analytically due to the complicated momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient. For this reason, most existing analytical treatments of particle acceleration assume that the injected seed particles are already relativistic, and therefore they are not suited to study trans-relativistic acceleration. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem describing the acceleration of seed particles due to hard-sphere collisions with MHD waves. The new results include the exact solution for the steady-state Green's function resulting from the continual injection of monoenergetic seed particles with an arbitrary energy. We also introduce an approximate treatment of the trans-relativistic acceleration process based on a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The main advantage of the hybrid approximation is that it allows the extension of the physical model to include (i) the effects of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses and (ii) time dependence. The new analytical results can be used to model the trans-relativistic acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed. We highlight (i) relativistic ion acceleration in black hole accretion coronae, and (ii) the production of gyrosynchrotron microwave emission due to relativistic electron

  3. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  4. On particle acceleration in astrophysical relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic jets, e.g., in active galactic nuclei, are believed to be accelerators of high-energy cosmic rays. This is a lore but no justification of it exists. We investigate this problem from the first principles and present arguments that ``no-jets'' are better accelerators than the jets themselves. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Superluminal Strong Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  6. DRIFT-KINETIC MODELING OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND TRANSPORT IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, T.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Based on the drift-kinetic theory, we develop a model for particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. The model describes the evolution of the particle distribution function by means of a numerical simulation of the drift-kinetic Vlasov equation, which allows us to directly compare simulation results with observations within an actual parameter range of the solar corona. Using this model, we investigate the time evolution of the electron distribution in a flaring region. The simulation identifies two dominant mechanisms of electron acceleration. One is the betatron acceleration at the top of closed loops, which enhances the electron velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field line. The other is the inertia drift acceleration in open magnetic field lines, which produces antisunward electrons. The resulting velocity space distribution significantly deviates from an isotropic distribution. The former acceleration can be a generation mechanism of electrons that radiate loop-top nonthermal emissions, and the latter of escaping electrons from the Sun that should be observed by in situ measurements in interplanetary space and resulting radio bursts through plasma instabilities.

  7. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    SciTech Connect

    Farhoosh, H.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1980-08-15

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  8. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhoosh, Hamid; Zimmerman, Robert L.

    1980-08-01

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  9. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Sessler, Andy

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  10. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  11. Particle Acceleration in Slower SNR Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John

    Models predict that the acceleration efficiency of shock waves drops off as an SNR shock slows down, though this is partly offset by the increasing area of the shock front. Middle-aged SNRs emit pion-decay gamma rays, but it is not yet clear when during the SNR evolution the enegetic protons were produced. We examine observations of the Cygnus Loop to obtain some estimates of the cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in the 400 km/s shock of this older supernova remnant.

  12. Particle Acceleration and Associated Emission from Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Five talks consist of a research program consisting of numerical simulations and theoretical development designed to provide an understanding of the emission from accelerated particles in relativistic shocks. The goal of this lecture is to discuss the particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and radiation along with the microphysics of the shock process in a self-consistent manner. The discussion involves the collisionless shocks that produce emission from gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows, and producing emission from supernova remnants and AGN relativistic jets. Recent particle-in-cell simulation studies have shown that the Weibel (mixed mode two-stream filamentation) instability is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic collisionless shocks. 3-D RPIC code parallelized with MPI has been used to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields. In this lecture we will present brief tutorials of RPIC simulations and RMHD simulations, a brief summary of recent RPIC simulations, mechanisms of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks, and calculation of synchrotron radiation by tracing particles. We will discuss on emission from the collisionless shocks, which will be calculated during the simulation by tracing particle acceleration self-consistently in the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated in the shocks. In particular, we will discuss the differences between standard synchrotron radiation and the jitter radiation that arises in turbulent magnetic fields.

  13. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  14. A DIRECT APPROACH FOR DETERMINING THE PERPENDICULAR MEAN FREE PATH OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT AND SPATIALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.-Q.; Wan, W. E-mail: wanw@mail.iggcas.ac.cn

    2012-12-15

    A direct approach for explicitly determining the perpendicular mean free path of solar energetic particles (SEPs) influenced by parallel diffusion and composite dynamical turbulence in a spatially varying magnetic field is presented. As theoretical applications of the direct approach, we investigate the inherent relations between the perpendicular mean free path and various parameters concerning physical properties of SEPs as well as those of interplanetary conditions such as the solar wind and the turbulent magnetic field. Comparisons of the perpendicular mean free paths with and without adiabatic focusing are also presented. The direct method shows encouraging agreement with spacecraft observations, suggesting it is a reliable and useful tool for use in theoretical investigations and space weather forecasting.

  15. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  16. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Hesse, M.; Schindler, K.

    1997-08-01

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  17. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities. PMID:17668952

  18. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  19. Double layer -- a particle accelerator in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong

    2015-07-16

    Slides present the material under the following topics: Introduction (What is a double layer (DL)? Why is it important? Key unsolved problems); Theory -- time-independent solutions of 1D Vlasov--Poisson system; Particle-in-cell simulations (Current-driven DLs); and Electron acceleration by DL (Betatron acceleration). Key problems include the generation mechanism, stability, and electron acceleration. In summary, recent observations by Van Allen Probes show large number of DLs in the outer radiation belt, associated with enhanced flux of relativistic electrons. Simulations show that ion acoustic double layers can be generated by field-aligned currents. Thermal electrons can gain energy via betatron acceleration in a dipole magnetic field.

  20. Solid-particle jet formation under shock-wave acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2013-12-01

    When solid particles are impulsively dispersed by a shock wave, they develop a spatial distribution which takes the form of particle jets whose selection mechanism is still unidentified. The aim of the present experimental work is to study particle dispersal with fingering effects in an original quasi-two-dimensional experiment facility in order to accurately extract information. Shock and blast waves are generated in the carrier gas at the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell and impulsively accelerated. With the present experimental setup, the particle jet formation is clearly observed. From fast flow visualizations, we notice, in all instances, that the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. This point has not been observed in three-dimensional experiments. We highlight that the number of jets is unsteady and decreases with time. For a fixed configuration, considering the very early times following the initial acceleration, the jet size selection is independent of the particle diameter. Moreover, the influence of the initial overpressure and the material density on the particle jet formation have been studied. It is shown that the wave number of particle jets increases with the overpressure and with the decrease of the material density. The normalized number of jets as a function of the initial ring acceleration shows a power law valid for all studied configurations involving various initial pressure ratios, particle sizes, and particle materials. PMID:24483561

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  3. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  4. Prospects for Fermi Particle Acceleration at Coronal Magnetic Reconnection Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Laming, J. M.; Lukin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of first order Fermi acceleration of particles interacting with the converging magnetized flows at a reconnection site was introduced recently in an attempt to predict the energy distribution of particles resulting from violent reconnection in galactic microquasars. More careful consideration of this mechanism showed that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within a reconnection region, similar to that in the formulation for diffusive shock acceleration. In the solar context, reconnection regions producing strong compression could be the source of suprathermal "seed particles". A hard spectrum of such suprathermal particles is believed to be necessary to initiate the particle acceleration process at low Mach number coronal mass ejection shocks close to the Sun where the gradual solar energetic particle events originate. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites in the solar corona. This work presents a set of 2D two-temperature resistive MHD simulations of the dynamics of several magnetic configurations within a range of lower corona plasma parameters. Energy transport processes in the MHD model include anisotropic thermal conduction for electrons and ions and radiative cooling. Magnetic configurations considered are a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, a flux rope sitting above an arcade of magnetic loops, and two merging flux ropes. We demonstrate that only for some magnetic topologies, corresponding in particular to 3D magnetic nulls, the compression ratio, sufficient for first order Fermi acceleration in the reconnection region, can be achieved. These represent the potential sites in the solar corona where a hard seed particle energetic spectrum could be produced.

  5. Particle Acceleration at the Sun and in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic particles are accelerated in rich profusion at sites throughout the heliosphere. They come from solar flares in the low corona, from shock waves driven outward by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), from planetary magnetospheres and bow shocks. They come from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) produced by high-speed streams in the solar wind, and from the heliospheric termination shock at the outer edge of the heliospheric cavity. We sample all these populations near Earth, but can distinguish them readily by their element and isotope abundances, ionization states, energy spectra, angular distributions and time behavior. Remote spacecraft have probed the spatial distributions of the particles and examined new sources in situ. Most acceleration sources can be "seen" only by direct observation of the particles; few photons are produced at these sites. Wave-particle interactions are an essential feature in acceleration sources and, for shock acceleration, new evidence of energetic-proton-generated waves has come from abundance variations and from local cross-field scattering. Element abundances often tell us the physics the source plasma itself, prior to acceleration. By comparing different populations, we learn more about the sources, and about the physics of acceleration and transport, than we can possibly learn from one source alone.

  6. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  7. Localized Ionospheric Particle Acceleration and Wave Acceleration of Auroral Ions: Amicist Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Kristina A.

    1999-01-01

    Research supported by this grant covered two main topics: auroral ion acceleration from ELF-band wave activity, and from VLF-spikelet (lower hybrid solitary structure) wave activity. Recent auroral sounding rocket data illustrate the relative significance of various mechanisms for initiating auroral ion outflow. Two nightside mechanisms are shown in detail. The first mechanism is ion acceleration within lower hybrid solitary wave events. The new data from this two payload mission show clearly that: (1) these individual events are spatially localized to scales approximately 100 m wide perpendicular to B, in agreement with previous investigations of these structures, and (2) that the probability of occurrence of the events is greatest at times of maximum VLF wave intensity. The second mechanism is ion acceleration by broadband, low frequency electrostatic waves, observed in a 30 km wide region at the poleward edge of the arc. The ion fluxes from the two mechanisms are compared and it is shown that while lower hybrid solitary structures do indeed accelerate ions in regions of intense VLF waves, the outflow from the electrostatic ion wave acceleration region is dominant for the aurora investigated by this sounding rocket, AMICIST. The fluxes are shown to be consistent with DE-1 and Freja outflow measurements, indicating that the AMICIST observations show the low altitude, microphysical signatures of nightside auroral outflow. In this paper, we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations, we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse ion acceleration (TAI) in LHSS. The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90 degrees pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a

  8. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  9. Particle acceleration and reconnection in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2016-03-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized quasi-2D small-scale magnetic island reconnection processes. An advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution describes particle transport and energization in a region of interacting magnetic islands [1; 2]. The dominant charged particle energization processes are 1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging, and 2) magnetic island contraction. The acceleration of charged particles in a "sea of magnetic islands" in a super-Alfvénic flow, and the energization of particles by combined diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic island reconnection processes are discussed.

  10. Schwarzschild black hole as particle accelerator of spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that in the Schwarzschild background there exists a direct counterpart of the Bañados-Silk-West effect for spinning particles. This means that if two particles collide near the black-hole horizon, their energy in the centre-of-mass frame can grow unbounded. In doing so, the crucial role is played by the so-called near-critical trajectories when the particle parameters are almost fine-tuned. A direct scenario of the collision under discussion is possible with restriction on the energy-to-mass ratio E/m<\\frac{1}{2\\sqrt{3}} only. However, if one takes into account multiple scattering, this becomes possible for E≥ m as well.

  11. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  12. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  13. First-Order Particle Acceleration in Magnetically-driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  14. Data handling facility for the Sandia Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W. B.; Neau, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an on-line data handling facility for Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-I, and the upgrade prototype machine Supermite. These accelerators are used for research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) using particle beams. The main objectives in designing the data acquisition system were: (1) process both experiment and machine performance diagnostic signals, (2) record high signal-to-noise ratio, wideband waveforms in a severe EMP environment, (3) support multiple users recording and analyzing data simultaneously, and (4) provide fast turnaround for experimental results. Commercially available equipment is used wherever possible. However, several special purpose devices were developed. This data handling facility is a significant upgrade of an existing system that supports other Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators.

  15. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  16. Energetic particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions: Ulysses results

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.I.; Marsden, R.G.; Sanderson, T.R.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-07-01

    We present here statistical properties of energetic ions (tilde 1 MeV) accelerated by corotating interaction regions observed at the Ulysses spacecraft. We have correlated the tilde 1 MeV proton intensity measured near the trailing edges of the interaction regions with their compression ratio. We interpret our results in terms of the plasma conditions experienced at Ulysses and identify a likely source of the low energy seed particles accelerated at the interaction regions.

  17. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  18. Charged dilation black holes as particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-03-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the center-of-mass (CM) frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole (BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the CM energy (Ecm) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the Ecm at the horizon with the ISCO (Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes Ecm|r+ >Ecm|rmb >Ecm|rISCO i.e. Ecm|r+=M :Ecm | rmb =(3 +√{ 5 }/2) M :Ecm| rISCO = 4 M = ∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 4 M :Ecm| rISCO = 6 M =√{ 5 } :√{ 2 } :√{ 13 }/3 . Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 2 M :Ecm| rISCO = 2 M = ∞ : ∞ : ∞ .

  19. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe by particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ibotombi N.; Devi, Bembem Y.

    2016-04-01

    A spatially flat FRW Universe in the context of particle creation has been discussed by assuming a variable deceleration parameter which is a function of scale factor. A dust model in which creation of particles giving a negative creation pressure has been studied. Treating the Universe as an open adiabatic system, it is supposed that matter creation takes place out of gravitational energy. In this model, the Universe shows an accelerating phase of its expansion. Total number of particles increases while number of particle density decreases. Some physical implications of this model are investigated.

  20. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  1. Anomalous/Fractional Diffusion in Particle Acceleration Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    This talk is aimed at reviewing a certain number of theoretical aspects concerning the relation between stochastic acceleration and anomalous/fractional transport of particles. As a matter of fact, anomalous velocity-space diffusion is required within any stochastic acceleration scenario to explain the formation of the ubiquitous power-law tail of non-thermal particles, as observed e.g. in the accelerated distribution of electrons during solar flares. I will establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving turbulence in magnetized plasmas. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the spatial transport (possibly fractional) of charged particles in the acceleration region. I will also discuss recent attempts to obtain spatially non-local and fractional diffusion equations directly from first principles, starting either from the Fokker-Planck equation in the large mean free-path regime or the Boltzmann equation involving velocity-space relaxation toward the kappa distribution instead of the standard Maxwellian distribution.

  2. Particle bursts from thunderclouds: Natural particle accelerators above our heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Hovhannisyan, Armen

    2011-03-15

    Strong electrical fields inside thunderclouds give rise to fluxes of high-energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. Gamma rays and electrons are currently detected by the facilities of low orbiting satellites and by networks of surface particle detectors. During intensive particle fluxes, coinciding with thunderstorms, series of particle bursts were detected by the particle detectors of Aragats Space Environmental Center at an altitude of 3250 m. We classify the thunderstorm ground enhancements in 2 categories, one lasting microseconds, and the other lasting tens of minutes. Both types of events can occur at the same time, coinciding with a large negative electric field between the cloud and the ground and negative intracloud lightning. Statistical analysis of the short thunderstorm ground enhancement bursts sample suggests the duration is less than 50 {mu}s and spatial extension is larger than 1000 m{sup 2}. We discuss the origin of thunderstorm ground enhancements and its connection to the terrestrial gamma flashes detected by orbiting gamma-ray observatories.

  3. Applications of laser-accelerated particle beams for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Fourkal, E.; Li, J. S.; Veltchev, I.; Luo, W.; Fan, J. J.; Lin, T.; Tafo, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beams are more advantageous than high-energy photons and electrons for radiation therapy because of their finite penetrating range and the Bragg peak near the end of their range, which have been utilized to achieve better dose conformity to the treatment target allowing for dose escalation and/or hypofractionation to increase local tumor control, reduce normal tissue complications and/or treatment time/cost. Proton therapy employing conventional particle acceleration techniques is expensive because of the large accelerators and treatment gantries that require excessive space and shielding. Compact proton acceleration systems are being sought to improve the cost-effectiveness for proton therapy. This paper reviews the physics principles of laser-proton acceleration and the development of prototype laserproton therapy systems as a solution for widespread applications of advanced proton therapy. The system design, the major components and the special delivery techniques for energy and intensity modulation are discussed in detail for laser-accelerated proton therapy.

  4. Particle accelerators unravel Art and Archaeology issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Many analytical techniques are applied to get a better insight on art works and archaeological artefacts and to contribute to their conservation and restoration. Because of the precious and sometimes unique character of these items, non-destructive and non-sampling techniques are preferred. From this standpoint, the analysis with ion beams produced by accelerators (IBA), featuring good analytical performance and non-destructiveness, constitutes one of the best choices. Ion beams analysis techniques (IBA) introduced in 1957 have been constantly adapted to address art and archaeology questions; today the performances obtained directly on the object placed in the atmosphere rival with those achieved in vacuum. Since 20 years, AGLAE, the IBA facility of the Centre for Research and Restoration of the Museums of France located in the Louvre museum has contributed to this progress. The cornerstone of this development is a versatile external nuclear microprobe implementing PIXE, PIGE, RBS, NRA and ERDA methods for rapid expertises of art works and more extensive research works in art history, archaeology and conservation science. After an introduction of the physical principles of IBA, a virtual tour of this unique facility will be provided. The benefit of its use will be illustrated through two case studies, the first one dealing with the determination by PIXE of the provenance of painted works of the Spanish master Murillo and the second one with the authentication study using NRA of a mysterious archaeological rock crystal skull.

  5. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2).

  6. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jets propagating into an unmagnetized plasmas. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and acceleration. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants

  7. Harmonic Ratcheting for Ferrite Tuned RF Acceleration of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Brennan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    One of the most persistent difficulties in the design of RF cavities for acceleration of charged particles is the rapid and efficient acceleration of particles over a large range of frequencies. From medical synchrotrons to accelerator driven systems, there is a strong need for fast acceleration of protons and light ions over hundreds of MeV. Conventionally, this is a costly undertaking, requiring specially designed ferrite loaded cavities to be tuned over a large range of frequencies. Ferromagnetic materials allow for the precise adjustment of cavity resonant frequency, but rapid changes in the frequency as well as operation outside material specific frequency ranges result in significant Q-loss to the cavity. This leads to a considerable increase in power required and is thus undesirable for regular operation. We introduce an acceleration scheme known as harmonic ratcheting which can be used to reduce the cavity frequency range needed for accelerating an ion beam in a synchrotron. In particular, this scheme addresses the need for high rep. rate machines for applications such as radiation therapy in which low beam intensity is needed. We demonstrate with simulations the type of ramps achievable using this technique and consider its advantages over h=1 acceleration schemes.

  8. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  9. Kinematically Accelerated Repulsions Due to Relative Motion between Mass Particles in an Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2016-03-01

    An accelerated expansion of the universe, due only to relative particle motion, is described here in the form of a particular model that illustrates its physical cause. A simplified three particle universe is considered here by defining coordinate positions for effective mass-points because their size is extremely small compared to the distances between them. The three particles initially form a static isosceles triangular configuration. The third particle at the triangle's apex could only then determine its position relative to the triangle by measuring the apex angle subtended by the base particles. If the two base particles then exert for an instant a force between only themselves, they will move away from each other while the third particle could physically maintain its position relative to the universe only by referring to these other two existing particles. It would then be required that the apex particle would accelerate outwards and away from the base particles in order to regain the smaller size of the original apex angle and subsequently generate a Hubble expansion for the particles.

  10. SHOCK ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES IN THE NONSTATIONARY EVOLUTION OF COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2011-10-20

    One-dimensional hybrid simulations are used to investigate the particle energization process during the nonstationary evolution of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the heliosphere. The simulation model, where fast and slow solar wind streams interact with each other, allows the formation of a pair (forward/reverse) of shocks at the CIR boundaries and the stream interface interior, which prevents the interchange of both streams. While both shocks are quasi-perpendicular and are not capable of accelerating thermal particles (hundreds of eV) up to a suprathermal energy (tens to hundreds of keV) in the early phase of their development, the reverse shock in the fast wind experiences a transition to a quasi-parallel regime in the later phase. The quasi-parallel reverse shock can efficiently accelerate particles to the suprathermal range. The different timescale of the adiabatic expansion between the fast and slow wind leads to a transition of the shock geometry that can take place more easily in the reverse shock than in the forward shock, where the magnetic field in the fast wind remains more radial to the propagation direction than in the slow wind. The difference in the acceleration efficiency between these shocks follows a well-known observed asymmetry in the profile of the energetic particle fluxes, where the larger intensity increases more in the reverse shock than in the forward shock. The present results suggest that the solar wind thermal plasma, as well as interstellar pickup ions, can contribute to the composition of energetic particles associated with the CIRs.

  11. Radiation from accelerated particles in relativistic jets with shocks and shear-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Phil; Dutan, Ioana; Niemiec, Jacek; Medvedev, Mikhail; Meli, Athina; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nordlund, Aake; Trier Frederiksen, Jacob; Sol, Helene; Zhang, Bing; Pohl, Martin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    We investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electron’s transverse deflection and acceleration. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KKHI) is also responsible to create strong DC and AC magnetic fields. The velocity shears in core-sheath jets create strong magnetic field perpendicular to the jet. We examine how the Lorentz factors of jets affect the growth rates of KKHI. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in these turbulent magnetic fields in the shocks. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, its temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We will investigate synthetic spectra from accelerated electrons in strong magnetic fields generated by KKHI. The calculated properties of the emerging radiation provide our understanding of the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  12. Particle acceleration in helical magnetic fields in the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa; Bareford, Michael; Pinto, Rui; Kontar, Eduard; Bian, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Twisted magnetic fields should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. Emerging twisted ropes as well as complex photospheric motions provide continuous influx of the magnetic helicity. Twisted coronal fields, in turn, contain excess magnetic energy, which can be released, causing solar flares and other explosive phenomena. It has been shown recently, that reconnection in helical magnetic structures results in particle acceleration distributed within large volume, including the lower corona and chromosphere. Hence, the magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration scenario involving magnetic helicity can be a viable alternative to the standard flare model, where particles are accelerated in a small volume located in the upper corona. We discuss our recent results on the energy release and particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in twisted coronal loops. Evolution of various helical structures is described in terms of resistive MHD, including heat conduction and radiation. We consider the effects of field topology and photospheric motions on the energy accumulation and release. In particular, we focus on scenarios with continuous helicity injection, leading to recurrent explosive events. Using the obtained MHD models, ion and electron acceleration is investigated, taking into account Coulomb collisions. We derive time-dependent energy spectra and spatial distribution for these species, and calculate resulting non-thermal radiation intensities. Based on the developed numerical models, we investigate observational implications of particle acceleration in helical magnetic structures. Thus, we compare temporal variations of thermal and non-thermal emission in different configurations. Furthermore, we consider spatial distributions of the thermal EUV and X-ray emission and non-thermal X-ray emission and compare them with observational data.

  13. 50 years of research on particle acceleration in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    In 1965, and through the late 1960s, the heliosphere was considered to be a passive place, an impediment to the information on the galaxy contained in galactic cosmic ray observations, and on the Sun, from solar energetic particles. All this changed in the early 1970s with the discovery of the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), and the subsequent acceptance that the ACRs are ionized interstellar neutral gas that is accelerated in the heliosphere by four orders of magnitude in energy. In the mid-1970s, Pioneer 10 & 11 observations provided direct evidence of acceleration. In 1977-78, diffusive shock acceleration was introduced, and subsequently developed in detail, providing compelling explanations for, e.g., the observed acceleration in co-rotating interaction regions, and a likely explanation for the acceleration of ACRs at the termination shock of the solar wind. In 2004 and 2008, the Voyagers crossed the termination shock, did not observe the acceleration of the ACRs, but did observe that low- energy particles, up to a few MeV/nucleon, had identical spectra downstream from the termination shock, a distribution function that is a power law in particle speed with a spectral index of -5. When Voyager 1 reached ∼120 AU, where the high-energy ACRs are at peak intensity, the ACR spectrum is also a -5 spectrum. Moreover, observations of suprathermal tails in the solar wind in the inner solar system have a -5 spectrum, often peaking downstream, but not at shocks. These observations led to the development of a new acceleration mechanism, the pump acceleration mechanism of Fisk & Gloeckler, which can account for all the observed -5 spectra.

  14. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE data have been reduced, and a paper on the results is in progress. The main results have been presented in a poster at the January 2004 AAS meeting and an ApJ paper in press. The primary result is that the widths of the 0 VI lines in the NW filament are a bit less than the width expected if the oxygen kinetic temperature is 16 times the proton temperature (mass proportional heating). This is at variance with measurements of shocks in the heliosphere, where preferential heating of oxygen and other heavy species is observed. The paper discusses the theoretical implications for collisionless shock wave physics. A secondary result is that no O VI emission was observed from the NE filament. While the very different particle distribution in that region can partially account for the weakness of the O VI lines, the simplest interpretation is that the pre-shock density in the NE is less than 0.22 times the density in the NW.

  15. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  16. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. Our initial results of a jet-ambient interaction with anti-parallelmagnetic fields show pile-up of magnetic fields at the colliding shock, which may lead to reconnection and associated particle acceleration. We will investigate the radiation in a transient stage as a possible generation mechanism of precursors of prompt emission. In our simulations we calculate the radiation from electrons in the shock region. The detailed properties of this radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic and Ultra-Relativistic Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic and ultra-relativistic shock waves. High upstream flow gamma factors are used, Γ=(1-uup2/c2)-0.5, which are relevant to models of ultra-relativistic particle shock acceleration in the central engines and relativistic jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) fireballs. Numerical investigations are carried out on acceleration properties in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic flow regime (Γ ˜ 10-1000) concerning angular distributions, acceleration time scales, particle energy gain versus number of crossings and spectral shapes. We perform calculations for both parallel and oblique sub-luminal and super-luminal shocks. For parallel and oblique sub-luminal shocks, the spectra depend on whether or not the scattering is represented by pitch angle diffusion or by large angle scattering. The large angle case exhibits a distinctive structure in the basic power-law spectrum not nearly so obvious for small angle scattering. However, both cases yield a significant 'speed-up' of acceleration rate when compared with the conventional, non-relativistic expression, tacc=[c/(uup-udown)] (λup/uup+λdown/udown). An energization by a factor Γ2 for the first crossing cycle and a large energy gains for subsequent crossings as well as the high 'speed-up' factors found, are important in supporting past works, especially the models developed by Vietri and Waxman on ultra-high energy cosmic ray, neutrino and gamma-ray production in GRB. For oblique super-luminal shocks, we calculate the energy gain and spectral shape for a number of different inclinations. For this case the acceleration of particles is 'pictured' by a shock drift mechanism. We use high gamma flows with Lorentz factors in the range 10-40 which are relevant to ultra-relativistic shocks in AGN accretion disks and jets. In all investigations we closely follow the particle's trajectory along the magnetic field

  18. Nondestructive diagnostics of charged particle beams in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logachev, P. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Starostenko, A. A.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Andrianov, A. V.; Maltseva, Yu. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Emanov, F. A.

    2016-03-01

    The basic techniques for nondestructive diagnostics and detection of losses of charged particle beams used in accelerator engineering are reviewed. The data provided may help choose the systems for diagnostics and detection of losses of beams and give a qualitative picture of the operation principles of such devices. Quantitative characteristics that define the limits of applicability of each diagnostic technique are outlined.

  19. Investigations of turbulent motions and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Fludra, A.; Lemen, J. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Sylwester, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations of X-raya spectra of solar flares show that intense random (turbulent) motions are present in hot flare plasma. Here it is argued that the turbulent motions are of great importance for flare development. They can efficiently enhance flare energy release and accelerate particles to high energies.

  20. Where are CIR-associated suprathermal particles accelerated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Malandraki, Olga E.; Li, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are believed to be the main source of suprathermal particles at the Earth's orbit in absence of flares and CMEs. The dominant paradigm says that in this particular case, particles are accelerated rather far from the Earth, at 2-3 AU, where reverse shocks are formed. According to this scenario, the particles should propagate back to the Earth's orbit, which demands specific time-intensity profiles of observed particle fluxes. We discuss here unusual cases, when it is hardly possible to explain observations trough such an approach, and suggest an alternative hypothesis on local particle acceleration determined by (a) plasma confinement, (b) the presence of small-scale magnetic islands, (c) the occurrence of the heliospheric current sheet of smaller-scale current sheets in the solar wind, preceding the CIR approach. The theoretical basis for this is given in (Zank et al., ApJ, 2014) and applications of the idea to the HCS case are discussed in (Khabarova et al. ApJ, submitted). Khabarova O., Zank G.P., Li G., le Roux J.A., Webb G.M., Dosch A., and Malandraki O.E., Small-scale magnetic islands in the solar wind and their role in particle acceleration. Part 1: Dynamics of magnetic islands near the heliospheric current sheet. Submitted to ApJ, 2014 Zank G.P., le Roux J.A., Webb G.M., Dosch A., and O. Khabarova. Particle acceleration via reconnection processes in the supersonic solar wind. The Astrophysical Journal, 797, 1, 28 (18pp), 2014

  1. Analytic Method to Estimate Particle Acceleration in Flux Ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. (2006) proposed a kinetic mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by reconnection. In this model, particles that gyrate around magnetic field lines transit from island to island, increasing their energy by Fermi acceleration in those islands that are contracting. Based on these ideas, we present an analytic model to estimate the energy gain of particles orbiting around field lines inside a flux rope (2.5D magnetic island). We calculate the change in the velocity of the particles as the flux rope evolves in time. The method assumes a simple profile for the magnetic field of the evolving island; it can be applied to any case where flux ropes are formed. In our case, the flux-rope evolution is obtained from our recent high-resolution, compressible 2.5D MHD simulations of breakout eruptive flares. The simulations allow us to resolve in detail the generation and evolution of large-scale flux ropes as a result of sporadic and patchy reconnection in the flare current sheet. Our results show that the initial energy of particles can be increased by 2-5 times in a typical contracting island, before the island reconnects with the underlying arcade. Therefore, particles need to transit only from 3-7 islands to increase their energies by two orders of magnitude. These macroscopic regions, filled with a large number of particles, may explain the large observed rates of energetic electron production in flares. We conclude that this mechanism is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in flares, but further research is needed to extend our results to 3D flare conditions.

  2. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Many spectacular and violent phenomena in the high-energy universe exhibit nonthermal radiation spectra, from which we infer power-law energy distributions of the radiating particles. Relativistic magnetic reconnection, recognized as a leading mechanism of nonthermal particle acceleration, can efficiently transfer magnetic energy to energetic particles. We present a comprehensive particle-in-cell study of particle acceleration in 2D relativistic reconnection in both electron-ion and pair plasmas without guide field. We map out the power-law index α and the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum as functions of three key parameters: the system size (and initial layer length) L, the ambient plasma magnetization σ, and the ion/electron mass ratio (from 1 to 1836). We identify the transition between small- and large-system regimes: for small L, the system size affects the slope and extent of the high-energy spectrum, while for large enough L, α and the cutoff energy are independent of L. We compare high energy particle spectra and radiative (synchrotron and inverse Compton) signatures of the electrons, for pair and electron-ion reconnection. The latter cases maintain highly relativistic electrons, but include a range of different magnetizations yielding sub- to highly-relativistic ions. Finally, we show how nonthermal acceleration and radiative signatures alter when the radiation back-reaction becomes important. These results have important implications for assessing the promise and the limitations of relativistic reconnection as an astrophysically-important particle acceleration mechanism. This work is funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  3. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes as Powerful Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tavani, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Morelli, E.; Rossi, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.

    2011-01-07

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and {gamma} rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of mega volts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere.

  4. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes as powerful particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Marisaldi, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Pittori, C; Palma, F; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Pucella, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D

    2011-01-01

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and γ rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of megavolts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere. PMID:21231775

  5. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel, and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find small differences in the results for no ambient and modest ambient magnetic fields. New simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Furthermore, the nonlinear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, and electric and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper at a comparable simulation time. This comes from the fact that both electrons and positrons contribute to generation of the Weibel instability. In addition, we have performed simulations with different electron skin depths. We find that growth times scale inversely with the plasma frequency, and the sizes of structures created by tine Weibel instability scale proportionally to the electron skin depth. This is the expected result and indicates that the simulations have sufficient grid resolution. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron and positron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s (positron s) transverse deflection behind the jet head. This

  6. Spacetime Noncommutative Effect on Black Hole as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun; Liu, Changqing; Quo, Qian

    2013-03-01

    We study the spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators and, find that the particles falling from infinity with zero velocity cannot collide with unbound energy, either near the horizon or on the prograde ISCO when the noncommutative Kerr black hole is exactly extremal. Our results also show that the bigger of the spinning black hole's mass is the higher of center of mass energy that the particles obtain. For small and medium noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole, the collision energy depends on the black hole's mass.

  7. Particle acceleration by turbulent magnetohydro-dynamic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Test particles in a two dimensional, turbulent MHD simulation are found to undergo significant acceleration. The magnetic field configuration is a periodic sheet pinch which undergoes reconnection. The test particles are trapped in the reconnection region for times of order an Alfven transit time in the large electric fields that characterize the turbulent reconnection process at the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number used in the simulation. The maximum speed attained by these particles is consistent with an analytic estimate which depends on the reconnection electric field, the Alfven speed, and the ratio of Larmor period to the Alfven transit time.

  8. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  9. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  10. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  11. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-10

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  12. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  13. Designing of electrode for high energy charged particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Basanta Kumar; Shyam, A.

    2010-02-01

    Vacuum insulation plays an important role in charged particle acceleration. We are making one compact size neutron generator in our lab. For this purpose the deuterium ions are formed in a penning ion source and extracted along the axis of the electrode arrangement. For neutron generation from D-T reaction, the deuterium ions are to be accelerated up to ~ 100KeV to the tritium target. After extraction of the ions from the ion source, the ions pass through the acceleration electrode. For high acceleration voltage, selecting the shape of the electrode is important. The plane geometry leads to high electric field at the edge whereas a curved geometry reduces this effect. The study of the physical processes at the electrode surface due to ion interaction is crucial. In this presentation, we will present the designing of the electrode for our purpose and discuss the issues related to the physical process at the surface of the electrode

  14. Accurate and efficient spin integration for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Dan T.; Meiser, Dominic; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; Barber, Desmond P.

    2015-02-01

    Accurate spin tracking is a valuable tool for understanding spin dynamics in particle accelerators and can help improve the performance of an accelerator. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of the integrators in the spin tracking code gpuSpinTrack. We have implemented orbital integrators based on drift-kick, bend-kick, and matrix-kick splits. On top of the orbital integrators, we have implemented various integrators for the spin motion. These integrators use quaternions and Romberg quadratures to accelerate both the computation and the convergence of spin rotations. We evaluate their performance and accuracy in quantitative detail for individual elements as well as for the entire RHIC lattice. We exploit the inherently data-parallel nature of spin tracking to accelerate our algorithms on graphics processing units.

  15. Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC): Description of instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Baker, B. B.; Burch, J. L.; Gibson, W. C.; Black, R. K.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Bounds, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    SEPAC (Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators) flew on Spacelab 1 (SL 1) in November and December 1983. SEPAC is a joint U.S.-Japan investigation of the interaction of electron, plasma, and neutral beams with the ionosphere, atmosphere and magnetosphere. It is scheduled to fly again on Atlas 1 in August 1990. On SL 1, SEPAC used an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, and neutral gas source as active elements and an array of diagnostics to investigate the interactions. For Atlas 1, the plasma accelerator will be replaced by a plasma contactor and charge collection devices to improve vehicle charging meutralization. This paper describes the SEPAC instrumentation in detail for the SL 1 and Atlas 1 flights and includes a bibliography of SEPAC papers.

  16. Extreme particle acceleration in the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Bulgarelli, A; Piano, G; Sabatini, S; Striani, E; Evangelista, Y; Trois, A; Pooley, G; Trushkin, S; Nizhelskij, N A; McCollough, M; Koljonen, K I I; Pucella, G; Giuliani, A; Chen, A W; Costa, E; Vittorini, V; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mattaini, E; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mauri, A; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Santolamazza, P; Antonelli, A; Salotti, L

    2009-12-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galaxies can accelerate particles to relativistic energies, producing jets with associated gamma-ray emission. Galactic 'microquasars', which are binary systems consisting of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole accreting gas from a companion star, also produce relativistic jets, generally together with radio flares. Apart from an isolated event detected in Cygnus X-1, there has hitherto been no systematic evidence for the acceleration of particles to gigaelectronvolt or higher energies in a microquasar, with the consequence that we are as yet unsure about the mechanism of jet energization. Here we report four gamma-ray flares with energies above 100 MeV from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (an exceptional X-ray binary that sporadically produces radio jets). There is a clear pattern of temporal correlations between the gamma-ray flares and transitional spectral states of the radio-frequency and X-ray emission. Particle acceleration occurred a few days before radio-jet ejections for two of the four flares, meaning that the process of jet formation implies the production of very energetic particles. In Cygnus X-3, particle energies during the flares can be thousands of times higher than during quiescent states. PMID:19935645

  17. Acceleration PDFs of particles in rotating turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clercx, Herman; Perlekar, Prasad; Lavezzo, Valentina; Toschi, Federico

    2012-11-01

    Particle dispersion in buoyancy-driven rotating turbulent flows has direct relevance for many industrial and environmental applications. We have used a Lattice Boltzmann Method coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking algorithm to investigate the behaviour of passive and inertial particles released in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection. The flow domain is horizontally periodic and vertically confined. Both the gravity and the rotation vector are oriented in the vertical direction. Here we present the results of the acceleration PDFs of particles in both non-rotating and strongly rotating RB convection. It is found that the bulk acceleration PDF in non-rotating RB turbulence is like in homogeneous isotropic turbulence whereas rotation introduces anisotropy similar to acceleration PDFs obtained from experiments in (isothermal) forced rotating turbulence. These results and those obtained for inertial particles will be discussed. PP and VL were financially supported by the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of NWO. This work was sponsored by NWO-NCF (SH-176).

  18. Accelerators for charged particle therapy: PAMELA and related issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease that will affect one in three people at some point in their life; radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cancer treatment, and contributes about 40% to the successful treatment of cancer. Charged Particle Therapy uses protons and other light ions to deliver the lethal dose to the tumor while being relatively sparing of healthy tissue and, because of the finite range of the particles, is able to avoid giving any dose to vital organs. While there are adequate technologies currently available to deliver the required energies and fluxes, the two main technologies (cyclotrons and synchrotrons) have limitations. PAMELA (the Particle Accelerator for MEdicaLApplications) uses the newly-developed non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerator concepts to deliver therapeutically relevant beams. The status of the development of the PAMELA conceptual design is discussed.

  19. Strongly Accelerated Margination of Active Particles in Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic nanoparticles and other stiff objects injected into a blood vessel filled with red blood cells are known to marginate toward the vessel walls. By means of hydrodynamic lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we show that active particles can strongly accelerate their margination by moving against the flow direction: particles located initially in the channel center migrate much faster to their final position near the wall than in the nonactive case. We explain our findings by an enhanced rate of collisions between the stiff particles and the deformable red blood cells. Our results imply that a significantly faster margination can be achieved either technically by the application of an external magnetic field (if the particles are magnetic) or biologically by self-propulsion (if the particles are, e.g., swimming bacteria). PMID:26789773

  20. New modes of particle acceleration, techniques & sources symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    A Symposium on {open_quotes}New Modes of Particle Acceleration Technique and Sources{close_quotes} was held August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was the first of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor the National Science Foundation, as part of our {open_quotes}New Ideas for Particle Accelerators{close_quotes} program. The symposia was organized and chaired by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of ITP/Brookhaven National Laboratory. This Symposium provided a perspective on the future direction of the Advanced Accelerator Research. The experimental study of elementary particles has become concentrated at a few large laboratories throughout the world because of the size and cost of the accelerator facilities needed for this work. For example, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, currently under construction, is 27 km in circumference and is being financed by the European membership of CERN plus contributions from non-member nations. An evolutionary approach to construction of ever higher energy colliders will only continue this trend towards high cost and large size.

  1. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Toma, Kenji; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation and without back reaction to the field. Our results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energy through interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: the diffusion coefficient in the direction of the unperturbed flow is about 20 times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration works efficiently for energetic particles. We also cautiously note that in the shearing box approximation, particles that cross the simulation box many times along the radial direction undergo unphysical runaway acceleration by the Lorentz transformation, which needs to be taken into account with special care.

  2. Resonance, particle dynamics, and particle transmission in the micro-accelerator platform

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, J.; Hazra, K. S.; Liu, G.; Sozer, E. B.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R. B.

    2012-12-21

    We describe particle dynamics in the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), a slab-symmetric dielectric laser accelerator (DLA), and model the expected performance of recently fabricated MAP structures. The quality of the structure resonances has been characterized optically, and results are compared with simulation. 3D trajectory analysis is used to model acceleration in those same structures 'as built.' Results are applied to ongoing beam transmission and acceleration tests at NLCTA/E-163, in which transmission of 60 MeV injected electrons through the beam channel of the MAP was clearly observed, despite the overfilling of the structure by the beam.

  3. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  4. Support Vector Machine Based on Adaptive Acceleration Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  5. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  6. Catalogue of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Becker, M.; Raucq, F.

    2013-10-01

    Massive systems made of two or more stars are known to be the site for interesting physical processes - including at least in some cases - particle acceleration. Over the past decade, this topic motivated a particular effort to unveil the properties of these systems and characterize the circumstances responsible for the acceleration of particles and the potential role of pre-supernova massive stars in the production of high energy particles in our Galaxy. Although previous studies on this topic were mostly devoted to processes in general, or to a few individual objects in particular, a unified target-oriented census of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries (hereafter PACWBs) does not exist yet. This paper aims at making a general and unified census of these systems, emphasizing their main properties. A general discussion includes energetic considerations along with wind properties in relation with non-thermal emission processes that are likely at work in colliding-wind binaries. Finally, some guidelines for future observational and theoretical studies are drawn.

  7. Support vector machine based on adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  8. On the compressibility effect in test particle acceleration by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C. A.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of compressibility in a charged particle energization by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fields is studied in the context of test particle simulations. This problem is relevant to the solar wind and the solar corona due to the compressible nature of the flow in those astrophysical scenarios. We consider turbulent electromagnetic fields obtained from direct numerical simulations of the MHD equations with a strong background magnetic field. In order to explore the flow compressibility effect over the particle dynamics, we performed different numerical experiments: an incompressible case and two weak compressible cases with Mach number M = 0.1 and M = 0.25. We analyze the behavior of protons and electrons in those turbulent fields, which are well known to form aligned current sheets in the direction of the guide magnetic field. What we call protons and electrons are test particles with scales comparable to (for protons) and much smaller than (for electrons) the dissipative scale of MHD turbulence, maintaining the correct mass ratio m e / m i . For these test particles, we show that compressibility enhances the efficiency of proton acceleration, and that the energization is caused by perpendicular electric fields generated between currents sheets. On the other hand, electrons remain magnetized and display an almost adiabatic motion, with no effect of compressibility observed. Another set of numerical experiments takes into account two fluid modifications, namely, electric field due to Hall effect and electron pressure gradient. We show that the electron pressure has an important contribution to electron acceleration allowing highly parallel energization. In contrast, no significant effect of these additional terms is observed for the protons.

  9. Perpendicular Transport in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampa, F.; Kallenrode, M.-B.

    2009-04-01

    In previous studies, transport of solar energetic particles in the inner heliosphere has been regarded as one dimensional along the archimedian field spiral; any perpendicular transport is neglected. We have extended Ruffolo's equation of focused transport for solar energetic particles to accommodate perpendicular transport in the plane of ecliptic. Numerically, this additional term is solved with the implicit and stable Laasonen scheme. For typical ratios κ⊥/κ∥ between 0.02 and 0.1 at 1 AU as suggested in non linear guiding center theory and a scaling of κ⊥ with r2 as suggested from the random walk of field lines we find that (a) azimuthal spread over some ten degrees occurs within a few hours, (b) the variation of maximum intensities with longitude is comparable to the ones inferred from multi-spacecraft observations, and (c) on a given field line intensity- and anisotropy-time profiles are modified such that fits with the 2D transport model give different combinations of injection profiles and mean free paths. Implications for the interpretation of intensity and anisotropy time profiles observed in interplanetary space and consequences for our understanding of particle propagation and acceleration in space will be discussed. We will also address the question whether and how the modeling of flux dropouts and propagation channels is possible in the presence of perpendicular diffusion as the ultimate leveler.

  10. String black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-07-01

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision is independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ( r ISCO ) or at the photon orbit ( r ph ) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ( r mb ) i.e. at r≡ r ISCO = r ph = r mb =2 M could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned space-time, which is quite different from the Schwarzschild and the Reissner-Nordstrøm space-time. For non-extremal GMGHS space-time the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ( ϕ 0).

  11. Time-dependent diffusive acceleration of test particles at shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.

    1991-07-01

    A theoretical description is developed for the acceleration of test particles at a steady plane nonrelativistic shock. The mean and the variance of the acceleration-time distribution are expressed analytically for the condition under which the diffusion coefficient is arbitrarily dependent on position and momentum. The formula for an acceleration rate with arbitrary spatial variation in the diffusion coefficient developed by Drury (1987) is supplemented by a general theory of time dependence. An approximation scheme is developed by means of the analysis which permits the description of the spectral cutoff resulting from the finite shock age. The formulas developed in the analysis are also of interest for analyzing the observations of heliospheric shocks made from spacecraft.

  12. The use of particle acceleration machines in radiotherapy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, C.; Pelliccioni, M.

    1982-10-01

    The effects of the dosage and the oxygen enhancement ratio when using particle accelerators in radiotherapy are discussed. The advantages derived from the Bragg peak effect and pion mass to energy conversion are commented on. Machines to produce electrons, X rays, protons, neutrons, heavy ions and negative pions are described. The good results observed in the case of negative pions can be attributed either to the favorable dose distribution or to the specific biological properties of the particles produced in the process of pion capture. The cost factors of the generating machines are also discussed.

  13. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than ‑ 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  14. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  15. Single particles accelerate final stages of capillary break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Anke; Fiscina, Jorge Eduardo; Wagner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite-time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well-known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. This accelerated regime is characterized by an asymmetric shape of the filament with an enhanced curvature that depends on the size and the spatial distribution of the particles within the capillary thread.

  16. Particle acceleration via reconnection processes in the supersonic solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-10

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index α = –(3 + M{sub A} )/2, where M{sub A} is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index –3(1 + τ {sub c}/(8τ{sub diff})), where τ {sub c}/τ{sub diff} is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio τ{sub diff}/τ {sub c}. Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c {sup –5} (c particle

  17. Kerr black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy.

    PubMed

    Bañados, Máximo; Silk, Joseph; West, Stephen M

    2009-09-11

    We show that intermediate mass black holes conjectured to be the early precursors of supermassive black holes and surrounded by relic cold dark matter density spikes can act as particle accelerators with collisions, in principle, at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies in the case of Kerr black holes. While the ejecta from such interactions will be highly redshifted, we may anticipate the possibility of a unique probe of Planck-scale physics. PMID:19792361

  18. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-11-16

    Project Title: Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications PI: Michael R. Brown, Swarthmore College The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas.

  20. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Zhang, B.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We are currently investigating the specific case of a jet colliding with an anti-parallel magnetized ambient medium. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  1. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  2. Future large scale accelerator projects for particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of a new particle, the properties of which are compatible with the expected Brout-Englert-Higgs scalar field in the Standard Model (SM), is the starting point of an intense program for studying its couplings. With this particle, all the components of the SM have now been unraveled. Yet, the existence of dark matter, baryon asymmetry of the Universe and neutrino mass call for new physics at an energy scale, which is not determined so far. Therefore, new large scale accelerators are needed to investigate these mysteries through ultra-high precision measurements and/or the exploration of higher energy frontiers. In the following, we discuss the various accelerator projects aimed at the achievement of the above objectives. The physics reach of these facilities will be briefly described as well as their main technical features and related challenges, highlighting the importance of accelerator R&D not only for the benefit of particle physics but also for other fields of research, and more generally for the society.

  3. Particle acceleration on a chip: A laser-driven micro-accelerator for research and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.

    2013-03-01

    Particle accelerators are conventionally built from radio-frequency metal cavities, but this technology limits the maximum energy available and prevents miniaturization. In the past decade, laser-powered acceleration has been intensively studied as an alternative technology promising much higher accelerating fields in a smaller footprint and taking advantage of recent advances in photonics. Among the more promising approaches are those based on dielectric field-shaping structures. These ``dielectric laser accelerators'' (DLAs) scale with the laser wavelength employed and can be many orders of magnitude smaller than conventional accelerators; DLAs may enable the production of high-intensity, ultra-short relativistic electron bunches in a chip-scale device. When combined with a high- Z target or an optical-period undulator, these systems could produce high-brilliance x-rays from a breadbox-sized device having multiple applications in imaging, medicine, and homeland security. In our research program we have developed one such DLA, the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP). We describe the fundamental physics, our fabrication and testing program, and experimental results to date, along with future prospects for MAP-based light-sources and some remaining challenges. Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and National Nuclear Security Administration.

  4. Particle acceleration and plasma energization in substorms: MHD and test particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2015-07-16

    The author organizes his slide presentation under the following topics: background, MHD simulation, orbit integration, typical orbits, spatial and temporal features, acceleration mechanisms, source locations, and source energies. Field-­aligned energetic particle fluxes are shown for 45-keV electrons and 80-keV protons. It is concluded that the onset from local thin current sheet is electron tearing. Acceleration is mainly from field collapse, governed by Ey = -vxXBz: importance of localization; betatron acceleration (similar if nonadiabatic); 1st order Fermi, type B (or A; current sheet acceleration). There are two source regions (of comparable importance in magnetotail): - flanks, inner tail - drift entry - early, higher energy - outer plasma sheet - reconnection entry - later, lower energy. Both thermal and suprathermal sources are important, with limited energy range for acceleration

  5. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Ponderomotive Particle Acceleration in a Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, E.A.; McKinstrie, C.J.

    2003-06-17

    (B204)In previous publications the ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by an idealized (one-dimensional) circularly polarized laser pulse in a plasma was studied analytically. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GeV/m were predicted. To verify the predictions of the theoretical model, a two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell code was developed. Simulations of the interaction of a preaccelerated electron bunch with a realistic (two-dimensional)laser pulse in a plasma are presented and analyzed. The simulation results validate the theoretical model and show that significant ponderomotive acceleration is possible.

  6. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  7. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  8. A study of the effect of in-line and perpendicular magnetic fields on beam characteristics of electron guns in medical linear accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Dragoş E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for real-time guidance during radiotherapy is an active area of research and development. One aspect of the problem is the influence of the MRI scanner, modeled here as an external magnetic field, on the medical linear accelerator (linac) components. The present work characterizes the behavior of two medical linac electron guns with external magnetic fields for in-line and perpendicular orientations of the linac with respect to the MRI scanner. Methods: Two electron guns, Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, are considered as representative models for this study. Emphasis was placed on the in-line design approach in which case the MRI scanner and the linac axes of symmetry coincide and assumes no magnetic shielding of the linac. For the in-line case, the magnetic field from a 0.5 T open MRI (GE Signa SP) magnet with a 60 cm gap between its poles was computed and used in full three dimensional (3D) space charge simulations, whereas for the perpendicular case the magnetic field was constant. Results: For the in-line configuration, it is shown that the electron beam is not deflected from the axis of symmetry of the gun and the primary beam current does not vanish even at very high values of the magnetic field, e.g., 0.16 T. As the field strength increases, the primary beam current has an initial plateau of constant value after which its value decreases to a minimum corresponding to a field strength of approximately 0.06 T. After the minimum is reached, the current starts to increase slowly. For the case when the beam current computation is performed at the beam waist position the initial plateau ends at 0.016 T for Litton L-2087 and at 0.012 T for Varian VTC6364. The minimum value of the primary beam current is 27.5% of the initial value for Litton L-2087 and 22.9% of the initial value for Varian VTC6364. The minimum current is reached at 0.06 and 0.062 T for Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, respectively. At 0.16 T the

  9. A study of the effect of in-line and perpendicular magnetic fields on beam characteristics of electron guns in medical linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Dragos E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for real-time guidance during radiotherapy is an active area of research and development. One aspect of the problem is the influence of the MRI scanner, modeled here as an external magnetic field, on the medical linear accelerator (linac) components. The present work characterizes the behavior of two medical linac electron guns with external magnetic fields for in-line and perpendicular orientations of the linac with respect to the MRI scanner. Methods: Two electron guns, Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, are considered as representative models for this study. Emphasis was placed on the in-line design approach in which case the MRI scanner and the linac axes of symmetry coincide and assumes no magnetic shielding of the linac. For the in-line case, the magnetic field from a 0.5 T open MRI (GE Signa SP) magnet with a 60 cm gap between its poles was computed and used in full three dimensional (3D) space charge simulations, whereas for the perpendicular case the magnetic field was constant. Results: For the in-line configuration, it is shown that the electron beam is not deflected from the axis of symmetry of the gun and the primary beam current does not vanish even at very high values of the magnetic field, e.g., 0.16 T. As the field strength increases, the primary beam current has an initial plateau of constant value after which its value decreases to a minimum corresponding to a field strength of approximately 0.06 T. After the minimum is reached, the current starts to increase slowly. For the case when the beam current computation is performed at the beam waist position the initial plateau ends at 0.016 T for Litton L-2087 and at 0.012 T for Varian VTC6364. The minimum value of the primary beam current is 27.5% of the initial value for Litton L-2087 and 22.9% of the initial value for Varian VTC6364. The minimum current is reached at 0.06 and 0.062 T for Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, respectively. At 0.16 T the

  10. Particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in SNR shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, M.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the diffusive acceleration mechanism in SNR shocks in terms of its potential to accelerate CRs to 10^18 eV, as observations imply. One possibility, currently discussed in the literature, is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles in excess of the background field. We analyze some problems of this scenario and suggest a different mechanism, which is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves. The essential idea is an A->A+S decay instability process, where one of the interacting scatterers (i.e. the sound, or S-waves) are driven by the Drury instability process. This rapidly generates longer wavelength Alfven waves, which in turn resonate with high energy CRs thus binding them to the shock and enabling their further acceleration.

  11. Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC'07)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2007-08-01

    The twenty-second Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC'07, took place at the Albuquerque Convention Centre in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico, from Monday to Friday, 2007 June 25 to 29. It was attended by over 1350 delegates from 25 different countries (63% North America, 24% Europe, 11% Asia and 2% Other), and was held under the auspices of the two professional societies that oversee and make holding this series of conferences possible, the Division of Physics of Beams within APS, and the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society within IEEE. As host of the conference, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is especially thanked for their many contributions and assistance both prior to and during the conference. The Convention Center was an ideal location for information sharing and discussions between the interdisciplinary aspects of the accelerator community, as well as for related meetings and ad-hoc 'rump' sessions.

  12. The Particle Accelerator Simulation Code PyORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2015-01-01

    The particle accelerator simulation code PyORBIT is presented. The structure, implementation, history, parallel and simulation capabilities, and future development of the code are discussed. The PyORBIT code is a new implementation and extension of algorithms of the original ORBIT code that was developed for the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PyORBIT code has a two level structure. The upper level uses the Python programming language to control the flow of intensive calculations performed by the lower level code implemented in the C++ language. The parallel capabilities are based on MPI communications. The PyORBIT is an open source code accessible to the public through the Google Open Source Projects Hosting service.

  13. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL PARTICLES UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Zhang, M. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2013-02-10

    The acceleration of suprathermal charged particles in the heliosphere under pressure balance conditions including for the first time the radial spatial particle diffusion and convection in the solar wind is investigated. The physical conditions are derived for which the stationary phase space distribution of suprathermal particles approaches the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5}, which is often seen in spacecraft observations. For separable source distributions in momentum and position we analytically solve the stationary particle transport equation for a radially constant solar wind speed V {sub 0} and a momentum-independent radial spatial diffusion coefficient. The resulting stationary solution at any position within the finite heliosphere is the superposition of an infinite sum of power laws in momentum below and above the (assumed mono-momentum) injection momentum p{sub I} . The smallest spatial eigenvalue determines the flattest power law, to which the full stationary solution approaches at large and small enough momenta. Only for the case of a reflecting inner and a free-escape outer spatial boundary, does one small eigenvalue exist, yielding the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5} at sufficiently large momentum values. The other three spatial boundary conditions imply steeper momentum spectra. Momentum spectra and radial profiles of suprathermal particles are calculated by adopting a uniform outer ring spatial source distribution.

  14. Particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptitsyna, K.; Neronov, A.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We consider particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in magnetospheres of black holes powered by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism and embedded in the radiatively-inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) environment. In this situation, the gap height is limited by the onset of gamma-gamma pair production on the infrared photons originating in the RIAF. Methods: We numerically calculated the acceleration and propagation of charged particles by taking the detailed structure of the electric and magnetic fields in the gap and in the entire black hole magnetosphere into account, as well as the radiative energy losses and interactions of γ-rays produced by the propagated charged particles with the background radiation field of the RIAF. Results: We show that the presence of the vacuum gap has clear observational signatures. The spectra of emission from gaps embedded in a relatively high-luminosity RIAF are dominated by the inverse Compton emission with a sharp, super-exponential cut-off in the very-high-energy gamma-ray band. The cut-off energy is determined by the properties of the RIAF and is largely independent of the structure of magnetosphere and geometry of the gap. The spectra of the gap residing in low-luminosity RIAFs are dominated by synchrotron or curvature emission with the spectra extending into 1-100 GeV energy range. We also consider the effect of possible acceleration of protons in the gap and find that proton energies could reach the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) range only in extremely low-luminosity RIAFs.

  15. New modes of particle accelerations techniques and sources. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on New Modes of Particle Accelerations - Techniques and Sources, August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  16. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    Observations of plasmas and electric field activity within regions of auroral particle acceleration have verified the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large altitude regions. Evidence is presented which indicates that small-ampliatude double layers along the auroral magnetic field lines may provide a mechanism for the maintenance of auroral ion potential. Evidence is also presented of downward-directed parallel electric fields along the magnetic field lines in the return current region. It is suggested that the downward electric fields may have significant effects on ion trajectories, and further theoretical investigation of the effects of downward parallel electric fields on ion conic formation is recommended.

  17. Accelerated heavy particles and the lens. 1. Cataracogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, G.R.; Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Zaider, M.; Rossi, H.H.

    1984-04-01

    The effect of varying doses of accelerated (570 MeV/amu) argon ions on the rat lens is described with detailed observations on the sequence of development of the cataracts, the time-dose relationship, and the analysis of their cataractogenic potential. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy particles for cataract production, compared to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (X-rays), has been established. These data indicate that, as with neutrons, the RBE increases with decreasing dose and that at a dose of 0.05 Gy an RBE of about 40 was observed.

  18. Black holes are neither particle accelerators nor dark matter probes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that maximally spinning black holes can serve as particle accelerators, reaching arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. Despite several objections regarding the practical achievability of such high energies, and demonstrations past and present that such large energies could never reach a distant observer, interest in this problem has remained substantial. We show that, unfortunately, a maximally spinning black hole can never serve as a probe of high energy collisions, even in principle and despite the correctness of the original diverging energy calculation. Black holes can indeed facilitate dark matter annihilation, but the most energetic photons can carry little more than the rest energy of the dark matter particles to a distant observer, and those photons are actually generated relatively far from the black hole where relativistic effects are negligible. Therefore, any strong gravitational potential could probe dark matter equally well, and an appeal to black holes for facilitating such collisions is unnecessary. PMID:23383773

  19. Next-to-modified leading logarithmic approximation corrections to single inclusive k{sub perpendicular} distributions and two-particle correlations in a jet

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Ramos, Redamy; Arleo, Francois; Machet, Bruno

    2008-07-01

    The hadronic k{sub perpendicular}-spectrum inside a high-energy jet is determined including corrections of relative magnitude O({radical}({alpha}{sub s})) with respect to the Modified Leading Logarithmic Approximation (MLLA) in the limiting spectrum approximation (assuming an infrared cutoff Q{sub 0}={lambda}{sub QCD}) and beyond (Q{sub 0}{ne}{lambda}{sub QCD}). The results in the limiting spectrum approximation are found to be, after normalization, in impressive agreement with preliminary measurements by the CDF Collaboration, unlike what occurs at MLLA, pointing out small overall nonperturbative contributions. Within the same framework, 2-particle correlations inside a jet are also predicted at next-to-MLLA and compared to previous MLLA calculations.

  20. Field-aligned Transport and Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Sokolov, I.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) phenomena represent one of the major components of space weather. Often, but not exclusively associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), they pose a significant scientific as well as practical interest. As these particles originate at such explosive events, they have energies up to several GeV. SEP may cause disruptions in operations of space instruments and spacecrafts and are dangerous to astronauts. For this reason, studies of SEP events and predictions of their impact are of great importance. The motion and acceleration of SEP, though kinetic in nature, is governed by Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and its disturbances. Therefore, a consistent and accurate simulation and predictive tool must include a realistic MHD model of IMF. At the same time, transport of SEP is essentially one-dimensional as at high energies particles are tied to magnetic field lines. This allows building a model that can effectively map active regions on the solar surface onto various regions of the Solar System thus predicting the affected regions of the at any distance from the Sun. We present the first attempt to construct a model that employs coupling of MHD and kinetic models. The former describes the evolution of IMF disturbed by CME, while the latter simulates particles moving along the field lines extracted from MHD model. The first results are provided.

  1. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shock Accelerated Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, G. C.; Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Desai, M. I.; Hu, Q.; Kasper, J.

    2006-01-01

    We use simultaneous measurements from the Wind and ACE spacecraft to determine the spatial properties of both interplanetary (IP) shocks and the shock-associated energetic particle events. We combine plasma, magnetic field and energetic particle data from ACE and Wind for 124 energetic storm particle (ESP) events from 1998 to 2003 and examine the spatial and temporal variations of these events in the Earth's vicinity. We find that even though the two spacecraft were occasionally separated by more than 400 RE, the plasma, field, and energetic particle time-intensity profiles during the events were very similar. In addition, we find that the ion composition and energy spectra in individual IP shock events are identical at the two spacecraft locations. We also use the fitted shock velocity along the normal from ACE and estimate the shock transit time to Wind location. In general, there is poor agreement between the estimated transit time and the actual measured transit time. Hence, our assumptions that a) the IP shock at 1 AU propagates radially, and/or b) the IP shock is spherically symmetric at 1 AU are not valid. In this paper, we will also study, for the first time, the anisotropy measurements of low-energy IP shock-associated ions at both ACE and Wind. We will then compare these new anisotropy analyses with locally measured shock parameters and identify possible signatures of different shock acceleration processes as predicted by the first-order Fermi and shock-drift models.

  2. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  3. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  4. Requirements for Simulating Space Radiation With Particle Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M-H Y.

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary space radiation consists of fully ionized nuclei of atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in the materials of spacecraft and planetary surface enclosures is a major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. Accurate risk prediction depends on a knowledge of basic radiobiological mechanisms and how they are modified in the living tissues of a whole organism. To a large extent, this knowledge is not currently available. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate the components of space radiation. Different particles, in different energy regions, are required to study different biological effects, including beams of argon and iron nuclei in the energy range 600 to several thousand MeV/nucleon and carbon beams in the energy range of approximately 100 MeV/nucleon to approximately 1000 MeV/nucleon. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjunction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required. International cooperation in the use of these facilities is essential to the development of a safe international space program.

  5. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E.

    2014-05-15

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection are studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The plasma is in the two-fluid regime, where the motion of the ions is decoupled from that of the electrons within the ion diffusion region. The reconnection process studied here is quasi-symmetric since plasma parameters such as the magnitude of the reconnecting magnetic field, the plasma density, and temperature are compatible on each side of the current sheet. Our experimental data show that the in-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential that produces the in-plane electric field is established by electrons that are accelerated near the electron diffusion region. The in-plane profile of this electrostatic potential shows a “well” structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet. This well becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. Since the in-plane electric field is 3–4 times larger than the out-of-plane reconnection electric field, it is the primary source of energy for the unmagnetized ions. With regard to ion acceleration, the Hall electric field causes ions near separatrices to be ballistically accelerated toward the outflow direction. Ion heating occurs as the accelerated ions travel into the high pressure downstream region. This downstream ion heating cannot be explained by classical, unmagnetized transport theory; instead, we conclude that ions are heated by re-magnetization of ions in the reconnection exhaust and collisions. Two-dimensional (2-D) simulations with the global geometry similar to MRX demonstrate downstream ion thermalization by the above mechanisms. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the

  6. Comparative Theoretical Analysis Between Parallel and Perpendicular Geomotries for 2D Particle Patterning in Photovoltaic Ferroelectric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, C.; Ramiro, J. B.; Alcázar, A.; Méndez, A.; Muñoz-Martínez, J. F.; Carrascosa, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the dielectrophoretic potential created by the evanescent electric field acting on a particle near a photovoltaic crystalsurface depending on the crystal cut. This electric field is obtained from the steady state solution of the Kukhtarev equations for thephotovoltaic effect, where the diffusion term has been disregarded. First, the space charge field generated by a small, square, light spotwhere d << l (being d a side of the square and l the crystal thickness) is studied. The surface charge density generated in both geometriesis calculated and compared as their relation determines the different properties of the dielectrophoretic potential for both cuts. The shapeof the dielectrophoretic potential is obtained and compared for several distances to the sample. Afterwards other light patterns are studiedby the superposition of square spots, and the resulting trapping profiles are analysed. Finally the surface charge densities and trappingprofiles for different d/l relations are studied.

  7. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of particle acceleration by circularly polarised inertial Alfven waves in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2012-08-15

    The process of particle acceleration by left-hand, circularly polarised inertial Alfven waves (IAW) in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma is studied using 3D particle-in-cell simulation. A cylindrical tube with, transverse to the background magnetic field, inhomogeneity scale of the order of ion inertial length is considered on which IAWs with frequency 0.3{omega}{sub ci} are launched that are allowed to develop three wavelength. As a result time-varying parallel electric fields are generated in the density gradient regions which accelerate electrons in the parallel to magnetic field direction. Driven perpendicular electric field of IAWs also heats ions in the transverse direction. Such numerical setup is relevant for solar flaring loops and earth auroral zone. This first, 3D, fully kinetic simulation demonstrates electron acceleration efficiency in the density inhomogeneity regions, along the magnetic field, of the order of 45% and ion heating, in the transverse to the magnetic field direction, of 75%. The latter is a factor of two times higher than the previous 2.5D analogous study and is in accordance with solar flare particle acceleration observations. We find that the generated parallel electric field is localised in the density inhomogeneity region and rotates in the same direction and with the same angular frequency as the initially launched IAW. Our numerical simulations seem also to suggest that the 'knee' often found in the solar flare electron spectra can alternatively be interpreted as the Landau damping (Cerenkov resonance effect) of IAWs due to the wave-particle interactions.

  8. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  9. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling Between 3D Magnetohydrodynamic and Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Lee, M. A.; Booth, A. C.; Spence, H.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Kozarev, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between 3D energetic particle models (e.g., the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Model, EPREM) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs, e.g., the PSI MAS model) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions in front of fast CMEs for particle acceleration from remarkably low in the corona (3-6 solar radii). Typically particle acceleration becomes rapid beyond 3Rs and often in regions where compression regions have not yet formed active shocks. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. Simulations show rapid particle acceleration in the range of 3-8 Rs over a broad longitudinal region (80°) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression and the subsequent expansion of these fields. These results have important implications for multi-instrument observations that will allow Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter to test the developing paradigm of SEP acceleration and transport from coronal compressions. We present here recent coupled simulations for SEP acceleration and transport, including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles. The broadness of the longitudinal profile from such events may be a key observational test of compression acceleration in the low corona.

  10. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E. Wes

    2013-07-05

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  11. Feature-based analysis of plasma-based particle acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam, and to investigate transverse particle loss. PMID:24356363

  12. Estimation of direct laser acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. L.; Lemos, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-03-01

    Many current laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments are carried out in a regime where the laser pulse length is on the order of or longer than the wake wavelength and where ionization injection is employed to inject electrons into the wake. In these experiments, the electrons can gain a significant amount of energy from the direct laser acceleration (DLA) mechanism as well as the usual LWFA mechanism. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are frequently used to discern the relative contribution of these two mechanisms. However, if the longitudinal resolution used in the PIC simulations is inadequate, it can produce numerical heating that can overestimate the transverse motion, which is important in determining the energy gain due to DLA. We have therefore carried out a systematic study of this LWFA regime by varying the longitudinal resolution of PIC simulations and then examining the energy gain characteristics of both the highest-energy electrons and the bulk electrons. By calculating the contribution of DLA to the final energies of the electrons produced from the LWFA, we find that even at the highest longitudinal resolutions, DLA contributes a significant portion of the energy gained by the highest-energy electrons and also contributes to accelerating the bulk of the charge in the electron beam produced by the LWFA.

  13. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  14. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-07-06

    We have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles and derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. Lastly, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.

  15. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Mendez, C. Delgado; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; Muñoz, A. González; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Rügamer, S.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Zanin, R.; Kadler, M.; Schulz, R.; Ros, E.; Bach, U.; Krauß, F.; Wilms, J.

    2014-11-01

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes, revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet.

  16. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Brau, James E [University of Oregon

    2014-06-25

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  17. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-07-06

    Here, we have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We also introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles andmore » derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. Finally, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.« less

  18. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2010-11-23

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  19. Symplectic maps and chromatic optics in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-07-06

    Here, we have applied the nonlinear map method to comprehensively characterize the chromatic optics in particle accelerators. Our approach is built on the foundation of symplectic transfer maps of magnetic elements. The chromatic lattice parameters can be transported from one element to another by the maps. We also introduce a Jacobian operator that provides an intrinsic linkage between the maps and the matrix with parameter dependence. The link allows us to directly apply the formulation of the linear optics to compute the chromatic lattice parameters. As an illustration, we analyze an alternating-gradient cell with nonlinear sextupoles, octupoles, and decapoles and derive analytically their settings for the local chromatic compensation. Finally, the cell becomes nearly perfect up to the third-order of the momentum deviation.

  20. Relativistically strong CO{sub 2} laser driver for plasma-channeled particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Long-wavelength, short-duration laser pulses are desirable for plasma wakefield particle acceleration and plasma waveguiding. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser is under development to test laser-driven electron acceleration schemes.

  1. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  2. Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particle by CME induced shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Dryer, Murray; Wu, Shitsan; Tylka, Allan J.

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may play a major role on the Space Weather forecast since it only takes about 8 minutes (for an representative ion accelerated to 0.5c at a shock's COBPoint at roughly 0.5 AU) to propagate from the Sun to the Earth. COBPoint means Connection of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with Observer Point. It is well known that SEPs can be generated by interplanetary (IP) shocks which are driven by the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using both a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation and ACE's EPAM data analysis, "how SEPs are being accelerated by IP shocks?" will be presented. Three SEP events occurred during Halloween 2003 epoch will be presented in this study. We assume that the flares occur close enough to the the ecliptic plane to justify the use of the 1.5D approximation and, thus, the IMF connection from the shocks' COBPoint to ACE. We also assume, as a further "first-look" approximation, that the COBPoint is always on the Sun-Earth line. The correlation coefficient for "IP shock Mach number" vs. "SEPs enhancement" will be calculated to interpret "how SEPs are generated by IP shocks?" thus supporting the empirical and existing discussion concerning the need for a high shock compression ratio.

  3. Wave-particle interaction and peculiarities of propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Tsap, Yu. T.

    2006-08-01

    Consequences of wave-particle interaction in the propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares are considered. i. Strong diffusion energetic particles on small-scale waves (Trakhtengerts 1984) gives time delays of gamma ray line emission vs hard X-ray emission when electron and protons are accelerated simultaneously. ii. Anomalous propagation of relativistic electrons along the flare loop with velocity of 30 times less compared with light velocity (Yokoyama et al 2002) is explained in terms of the collective effects of interaction of electrons with plasma turbulence. A cloud of high-energetic electrons responsible for microwave emission generates whistler waves and a turbulent "wall" in the loop is formed. The electrons undergo strong resonant scattering and the emission front propagates with the wave phase velocity, which is much lower than particle velocity. iii. Absence of linear polarization (≤ 0.07%) in Hα emission of some flares (Bianda et al 2005) is interpreted in terms of pitch-angle scattering of proton beams on small-scale Alfven waves. References Bianda M., Benz F.O., Stenflo J.O. et al 2005, A&A, 434, 1183 Trakhtengerts V.Yu. 1984, Relaxation of Plasma with Anisotropic Velocity Distribution, in A.A.Galeev and R.N.Sudan (eds.) Basic Plasma Physics II, North-Holland Physics Publishing Yokoyama T., Nakajima H., Shibasaki K, et al. 2002, ApJ, 576, L87

  4. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  5. Particle Acceleration At Small-Scale Flux Ropes In The Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, G.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux roped. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands". We describe briefly some observations, selected simulations, and then introduce a transport approach for describing particle acceleration at small-scale flux ropes. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations.

  6. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids. PMID:20192410

  7. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    2010-02-15

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  8. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  9. Dynamics and microinstabilities at perpendicular collisionless shock: A comparison of large-scale two-dimensional full particle simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki Kidani, Yoshitaka; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-02-15

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (M{sub A} ∼ 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. The result suggests that these waves play a role in the modification of the dynamics of collisionless shocks through the interaction with shock front ripples.

  10. Injection of κ-like suprathermal particles into diffusive shock acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyesung; Petrosian, Vahé; Ryu, Dongsu; Jones, T. W. E-mail: vahe@stanford.edu E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu

    2014-06-20

    We consider a phenomenological model for the thermal leakage injection in the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process, in which suprathermal protons and electrons near the shock transition zone are assumed to have the so-called κ-distributions produced by interactions of background thermal particles with pre-existing and/or self-excited plasma/MHD waves or turbulence. The κ-distribution has a power-law tail, instead of an exponential cutoff, well above the thermal peak momentum. So there are a larger number of potential seed particles with momentum, above that required for participation in the DSA process. As a result, the injection fraction for the κ-distribution depends on the shock Mach number much less severely compared to that for the Maxwellian distribution. Thus, the existence of κ-like suprathermal tails at shocks would ease the problem of extremely low injection fractions, especially for electrons and especially at weak shocks such as those found in the intracluster medium. We suggest that the injection fraction for protons ranges 10{sup –4}-10{sup –3} for a κ-distribution with 10 ≲ κ {sub p} ≲ 30 at quasi-parallel shocks, while the injection fraction for electrons becomes 10{sup –6}-10{sup –5} for a κ-distribution with κ {sub e} ≲ 2 at quasi-perpendicular shocks. For such κ values the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) electrons to protons naturally becomes K {sub e/p} ∼ 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}, which is required to explain the observed ratio for Galactic CRs.

  11. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures for particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The production of neutrons, 4 to 7 MeW nuclear gamma rays, positrons and pions resulting from the interaction of flare accelerated particles with the solar atmosphere was calculated. For the energy spectra of these particles the Bessel function predicted by stochastic acceleration and power laws which could result from acceleration at large-scale planar shocks was used, with the thick-target model. It is assumed that in the interaction region the accelerated particles are isotropic. The neutron-to-2.223 MeV photon conversion factors for various flare locations on the Sun are derived by averaging conversion factors over these spectra. Comparing calculations with data confirms that for most gamma-ray flares the bulk of the accelerated particles remain trapped at the Sun and that these particles have spectra similar to the spectra of flare particles observed in interplanetary space.

  12. Accelerations in water waves by extended particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, A.; Sveen, J. K.; Grue, J.; Richon, J.-B.; Gray, C.

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measures instantaneous velocity across an extended area of flow by recording the motion of tracers suspended in and moving with the fluid. This principle is extended to the measurement of higher moments of the velocity field (acceleration) by recording the velocity field at two separate time instants using two cameras, viewing the same region of flow. Planar illumination of large areas within a hydrodynamic flow is achieved using a scanned argon ion laser beam and individual velocity measurements are made by cross-correlating image pairs acquired with a cooled, frame-straddling camera. A high-speed acousto-optic modulator is used to shut off the CW laser after two scans of the flow have been captured by the first camera. The modulator switches the beam back on for the second velocity measurement after a programmed delay. Synchronization of the cameras and beam modulator with the scanning beam system is achieved with a purpose-built multi-channel synchronizer device and operated from an integrated modular tree-based acquisition and processing software system. The extended PIV system is employed to measure the velocities and accelerations in periodic waves in a precise laboratory wave tank. A complementary theoretical description of Stokes waves provides a comparison with the measurements. The theoretical model is very precise, with an error term being less than 0.5% relative to the primary wave for the conditions of the experiments. The purpose is to test the measurement system and to judge the accuracy of the wave experiments under realistic and controllable conditions in the laboratory. Good agreement between the experiments and theory is found. The relative accuracy of the present experiments and measurements may be quantified in terms of the standard deviation due to an ensemble of measurements. In the best case, we find a relative standard deviation of 0.6% for the velocity measurements and 2% for the accelerations. It is

  13. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Dynamics of electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    The Lorentz-Dirac-equation with Landau approximation has been solved numerically for electrons in the electromagnetic field of a magnetic dipole rotating with the angular velocity omega perpendicular to its magnetic moment mu. Results are discussed with respect to electron orbits and energy development.

  14. Experimental and numerical studies on plasma behavior flowing across perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezaki, T.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    To understand particle acceleration mechanisms in a collisionless shock, we have investigated the behaviors of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by experimental and numerical simulations in a laboratory scale experiment. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a taper-cone-shaped plasma focus device has varied by the gradient of the perpendicular magnetic field. The plasma flow has accelerated by applying the magnetic field with the negative gradient. To clarify the behavior of the plasma flow in the perpendicular magnetic field, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) method have been carried out. These results indicate that the magnetic field gradient affects the plasma flow velocity.

  15. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  16. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  17. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, C.E. Reece, R.A. Rimmer,L. Lin, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  18. Associations of Accelerating CMEs with Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S.; Sheeley, N.; Reames, D.

    2001-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The times of significant E > 10 MeV SEP events observed with the Goddard Space Flight Center EPACT detector on the Wind spacecraft have been compared with CME observations from the Lasco coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft. As earlier studies have shown, a correlation exists between peak SEP intensities and the measured speeds of associated CMEs. Of the CMEs associated with SEP events in the period 1996 to 2000, we find 9 CMEs for which the height-time plots of the leading edges show accelerations of at least 13 m/s/s. The heights at which those CMEs attained speeds of 600 km/s ranged from 7 to 20 Ro. The peak 20 MeV intensities of the 9 SEP events are relatively low compared with all gradual SEP events of the same period. We compare the energy spectra and solar event associations of these 9 SEP events with those of the SEP events associated with CMEs of uniform speeds.

  19. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  20. Variation in Angular Velocity and Angular Acceleration of a Particle in Rectilinear Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the angular velocity ([image omitted]) and angular acceleration ([image omitted]) associated with a particle in rectilinear motion with constant acceleration. The discussion was motivated by an observation that students and even teachers have difficulty in ascribing rotational motion concepts to a particle when the trajectory is a…

  1. Hawking radiation of scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, Usman A.; Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K. E-mail: mudassar051@yahoo.com

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation of uncharged and charged scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes is studied. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of these particles from the rotation and acceleration horizons of these black holes. Using this method we recover the correct Hawking temperature as well.

  2. DC-like Phase Space Manipulation and Particle Acceleration Using Chirped AC Fields

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2009-06-17

    Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A DC electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. We investigate the effect on a Hamiltonian distribution of an accelerating potential waveform, which could, for example, represent the average ponderomotive effect of two counterpropagating electromagnetic waves. In particular, we examine the apparent DC-like time-asymptotic response of the distribution in regimes where the potential structure is accelerated adiabatically. A highly resonant population within the distribution is always present, and we characterize its nonadiabatic response during wave-particle resonance using an integral method in the noninertial reference frame moving with the wave. Finally, we show that in the limit of infinitely slow acceleration of the wave, these highly resonant particles disappear and the response

  3. Design of a plasma discharge circuit for particle wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G. P.; Ghigo, A.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Mostacci, A.; Mezi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Serio, M.

    2014-03-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV m-1), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimetres. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators; radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in the accelerating field (10-100 MV m-1) requiring therefore kilometric distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. Combining high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB [1,2]. In particular, here we focus on the ionization process; we show a simplified model to study the evolution of plasma induced by discharge, very useful to design the discharge circuit able to fully ionize the gas and bring the plasma at the needed temperature and density.

  4. Particle Acceleration by Multiple Shock Waves: A model for Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, A.

    We study the acceleration, the transport and radiation of energetic particles (electrons and ions) inside an active region. The acceleration of particles is due to the presence of an ensemble of oblique shock waves inside an evolving active region and is based on the shock drift mechanism. The high-energy particles are transported inside a chaotic magnetic field and are subject to Coulomb collisions and radiation. We calculate the energy distribution of the particles, their acceleration time and their maximum energy as a function to the number of shock waves present. Preliminary results on the the duffusive nature of the process are presented. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  5. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Proton orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    Proton orbits are calculated in the electromagnetic vacuum field of a magnetic point dipole rotating with its angular velocity omega perpendicular to its dipole moment mu by numerical integration of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. Trajectories are shown and discussed for various initial conditions. A critical surface is shown separating initial positions of protons which finally hit the pulsar in the polar region from those which finally recede to infinity.

  6. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  7. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  8. Acceleration of energetic particles. [in collisionless shock waves in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Acceleration of some particles from the background plasma to highly superthermal energies is a common feature of collisionless shocks in interplanetary space. The complete in situ measurements of bulk flows, thermal plasma, electromagnetic waves and energetic particles available for interplanetary shocks both suggest and test the models of shock acceleration in the solar system and the rest of the universe. This tutorial will review the present state of shock acceleration theory. Scatter-free acceleration by grad B drift in the plasma electric field E = -V x B/c, and diffusive acceleration resulting from scattering by Alfven waves in the plasma on both sides of the shock are discussed. The diffusive theory in simple steady state gives power-law spectra, but also shows the effects of time-dependent shocks and injection rates, escape and other losses, the self-consistent Alfven wave spectra, and plasma flow fields affected by diffusive energetic particle acceleration.

  9. Modeling Focused Acceleration of Cosmic-Ray Particles by Stochastic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, C. K.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Craig, I. J. D.

    2012-10-01

    Schlickeiser & Shalchi suggested that a first-order Fermi mechanism of focused particle acceleration could be important in several astrophysical applications. In order to investigate focused acceleration, we express the Fokker-Planck equation as an equivalent system of stochastic differential equations. We simplify the system for a set of physically motivated parameters, extend the analytical theory, and determine the evolving particle distribution numerically. While our numerical results agree with the focused acceleration rate of Schlickeiser & Shalchi for a weakly anisotropic particle distribution, we establish significant limitations of the analytical approach. Momentum diffusion is found to be more significant than focused acceleration at early times. Most critically, the particle distribution rapidly becomes anisotropic, leading to a much slower momentum gain rate. We discuss the consequences of our results for the role of focused acceleration in astrophysics.

  10. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  11. A new type of accelerator for charged particle cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2013-04-01

    Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators (ns-FFAGs) show great potential for the acceleration of protons and light ions for the treatment of certain cancers. They have unique features as they combine techniques from the existing types of accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons, and hence look to have advantages over both for this application. However, these unique features meant that it was necessary to build one of these accelerators to show that it works and to undertake a detailed conceptual design of a medical machine. Both of these have now been done. This paper will describe the concepts of this type of accelerator, show results from the proof-of-principle machine (EMMA) and described the medical machine (PAMELA).

  12. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  13. Future Prospects of Accelerator Science for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2012-06-15

    Future advances in understanding fundamental questions of nature require revolutionary developments in accelerator science to allow several orders of magnitude enhancements in terms of energy, intensity, faster timing, and higher resolution. The challenges of the 21st century (energy, power, environment, resources, cost, and space) also play a significant role in the development of accelerator tools. In this overview article, we consider several recent developments and ideas that may become steps in addressing the challenges and which may find their way into designs of accelerator tools of the future.

  14. The status and evolution of plasma Wakefield particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2006-03-15

    The status and evolution of the electron beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme is described. In particular, the effects of the radial electric field of the wake on the drive beam such as multiple envelope oscillations, hosing instability and emission of betatron radiation are described. Using ultra-short electron bunches, high-density plasmas can be produced by field ionization by the electric field of the bunch itself. Wakes excited in such plasmas have accelerated electrons in the back of the drive beam to greater that 4 G eV in just 10 cm in experiments carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre. PMID:16483949

  15. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vesztergombi, G.

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  16. Particle Acceleration At Shock Waves and Downstream Small-Scale Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, Gary; Hunana, Peter; Mostafavi, Parisa; le Roux, Jakobus; Webb, Gary; Khabarova, Olga; Li, Gang; Cummungs, Alan; Stone, Edward; Decker, Robert

    2016-04-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux ropes. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands" by developing a transport formalism. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. Shock waves generate naturally vortical turbulence and particle acceleration at shocks is likely therefore to be a combination of classical diffusive shock acceleration and acceleration by downstream magnetic islands or flux ropes. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations made at the heliospheric termination shock.

  17. Particle acceleration and turbulence in cosmic Ray shocks: possible pathways beyond the Bohm limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.

    2007-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration is discussed in terms of its potential to accelerate cosmic rays (CR) to 1018 eV (beyond the ``knee,'' as observations suggest) and in terms of the related observational signatures (spectral features). One idea to reach this energy is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles much in excess of the background field. We identify difficulties with this scenario and suggest two separate mechanisms that can work in concert with one another leading to a significant acceleration enhancement. The first mechanism is based on a nonlinear modification of the flow ahead of the shock supported by particles already accelerated to some specific (knee) momentum. The particles gain energy by bouncing off converging magnetic irregularities frozen into the flow in the shock precursor and not so much by re-crossing the shock itself. The acceleration rate is determined by the gradient of the flow velocity and turns out to be formally independent of the particle mean free path. The velocity gradient is set by the knee-particles. The acceleration rate of particles above the knee does not decrease with energy, unlike in the linear acceleration regime. The knee (spectrum steepening) forms because particles above it are effectively confined to the shock only if they are within limited domains in the momentum space, while other particles fall into ``loss-islands'', similar to the ``loss-cone'' of magnetic traps. This also maintains the steep velocity gradient and high acceleration rate. The second mechanism is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves.

  18. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  19. CO{sub 2} laser technology for advanced particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-06-01

    Short-pulse, high-power CO{sub 2} lasers open new prospects for development of ultra-high gradient laser-driven electron accelerators. The advantages of {lambda}=10 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser radiation over the more widely exploited solid state lasers with {lambda}{approximately}1 {mu}m are based on a {lambda}{sup 2}-proportional ponderomotive potential, {lambda}-proportional phase slippage, and {lambda}-proportional scaling of the laser accelerator structures. We show how a picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser that is under construction at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility may benefit the ATF`s experimental program of testing far-field, near-field, and plasma accelerator schemes.

  20. A critical shock mach number for particle acceleration in the absence of pre-existing cosmic rays: M=√5

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2014-01-10

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M>√5. The reason is that for M≤√5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain. This lower limit applies to situations without significant magnetic field pressure. In case that the magnetic field pressure dominates the pressure in the unshocked medium, i.e., for low plasma beta, the resistivity of the magnetic field makes it even more difficult to fulfill the energetic requirements for the formation of shock with an accelerated particle precursor and associated compression of the upstream plasma. We illustrate the effects of magnetic fields for the extreme situation of a purely perpendicular magnetic field configuration with plasma beta β = 0, which gives a minimum Mach number of M = 5/2. The situation becomes more complex, if we incorporate the effects of pre-existing cosmic rays, indicating that the additional degree of freedom allows for less strict Mach number limits on acceleration. We discuss the implications of this result for low Mach number shock acceleration as found in solar system shocks, and shocks in clusters of galaxies.

  1. Particle acceleration and non-thermal emission in Pulsar Wind Nebulae from relativistic MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2015-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae are among the most powerful particle accelerators in the Galaxy with acceleration efficiencies that reach up to 30% and maximum particle energies in the PeV range. In recent years relativistic axisymmetric MHD models have proven to be excellent tools for describing the physics of such objects, and particularly successful at explaining their high energy morphology, down to very fine details. Nevertheless, some important aspects of the physics of PWNe are still obscure: the mechanism(s) responsible for the acceleration of particles of all energies is (are) still unclear, and the origin of the lowest energy (radio emitting) particles is most mysterious. The correct interpretation of the origin of radio emitting particles is of fundamental importance, as this holds information about the amount of pair production in the pulsar magnetosphere, and hence on the role of pulsars as antimatter factories. On the other hand, the long lifetimes of these particles against synchrotron losses, allows them to travel far from their injection location, making their acceleration site difficult to constrain. As far as the highest energy (X and gamma-ray emitting) particles are concerned, their acceleration is commonly believed to occur at the pulsar wind termination shock. But since the upstream flow is thought to have non-uniform properties along the shock surface, important constraints on the acceleration mechanism(s) could come from exact knowledge of the location and flow properties where particles are being accelerated. We investigate in detail both topics by means of 2D numerical MHD simulations. Different assumptions on the origin of radio particles and more generally on the injection sites of all particles are considered, and the corresponding emission properties are computed. We discuss the physical constraints that can be inferred from comparison of the synthetic emission properties against multiwavelength observations of the PWN class prototype, the Crab

  2. Effects of Turbulent Magnetic Fields on the Transport and Acceleration of Energetic Charged Particles: Numerical Simulations with Application to Heliospheric Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan

    2012-11-01

    (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) to investigate the acceleration of low-energy particles (often termed as "injection problem") at parallel shocks. We find that the accelerated particles always gain the first amount of energy by reflection and acceleration at the shock layer. The protons can move off their original field lines in the 3-D electric and magnetic fields. The results are consistent with the acceleration mechanism found in previous 1-D and 2-D simulations. In the second part of Chapter 3, we use a stochastic integration method to study diffusive shock acceleration in the existence of large-scale magnetic variations. We show that the 1-D steady state solution of diffusive shock acceleration can be significantly modified in this situation. The results suggest that the observations of anomalous cosmic rays by Voyager spacecraft can be explained by a 2-D shock that includes the large-scale magnetic field variations. In Chapter 4 we study electron acceleration at a shock passing into a turbulent magnetic field by using a combination of hybrid simulations and test-particle electron simulations. We find that the acceleration of electrons is greatly enhanced by including the effect of large-scale magnetic turbulence. Since the electrons mainly follow along the magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons interacting with the shock front multiple times. Ripples in the shock front occurring at various scales also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. We discuss the application of this process in interplanetary shocks and flare termination shocks. We also discuss the implication of this study to solar energetic particles (SEPs) by comparing the acceleration of electrons with that of protons. The intensity correlation of electrons and ions in SEP events indicates that perpendicular or quasi-perpendicular

  3. Kinetic studies of wave-particle interactions in cosmic-ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Stroman, Thomas; Bret, Antoine; Roeken, Christian

    Shock acceleration relies on the presence of magnetic-field fluctuations that can scatter rela-tivistic charged particles in both the upstream and downstream regions of the shock. We report on kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of the non-linear evolution of magnetic turbulence that arises upstream of the shock as well as at the shock itself. We will in particular address the relation between modes seen in the simulations and waves expected on the grounds of a linear instability analysis, the efficiency of small-scale turbulence in scattering relativistic particles, and the influence of accelerated particles on the formation of the shock itself.

  4. Non-linear interactions of plasma waves in the context of solar particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration in plasmas by means of MHD turbulence in-volves a wide range of alternatives according to, the specific wave mode, the frequency regime of the turbulence, the kind of particles to be accelerated, the assumed plasma model and so on. At present most of the alternatives have been studied with relatively deepness, though some features are not yet com-pletely understood. One of them is the delimitation of the real importance of non-lineal effects of turbulence waves in the process of particle acceleration. In this work we analyse such effects taking into account the temporal evolution of the turbulence. For illustration we exemplify our analysis with the fast MHD mode. Our results show that in some specific stages of the turbulence evolu-tion, non-linear interactions have important effects in the process of particle acceleration.

  5. Stochastic Acceleration of Dust Particles in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Marmolino, C.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-10-15

    Stochastic heating of dust particles resulting from dust charge fluctuations is considered in the conditions of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) in tokamak plasmas. It is shown that kinetic energies corresponding to velocities of {approx_equal}Km/s can be reached in times of order {approx_equal}1 ms by micron-size dust particles interacting with a background of stochastically heated nano-size dust particles.

  6. On the Distribution of Particle Acceleration Sites in Plasmoid-dominated Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Cerutti, Benoît; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  7. Particle Acceleration at Filamentary Structures Downstream of Collisionless Shocks in the Heliosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shocks are an important feature in astrophysical, heliospheric and magnetospheric settings. At these structures plasma is heated, the properties of flows are changed, and particles are accelerated to high energies. Particles are accelerated throughout the heliosphere. There are no times or conditions where suprathermal ions forming tails are not present on the solar wind ion distribution, and given the low speeds of these particles they must be accelerated locally in the heliosphere. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) accelerate particles up to 10s of MeV/nucleon. The termination shock of the solar and the heliosheath produce energetic particles including the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), with energies in excess of 100 MeV. In the last few years' very interesting observations at low energies showing power laws that cannot be explained with commonly accepted acceleration mechanisms and thus increased the need for alternative acceleration processes. Fully consistent kinetic particle simulations such as hybrid simulations appear to be a powerful tool to investigated ion acceleration. Nowadays these simulations can be performed in 3D and relative large simulation domains covering up to hundreds of ion inertial length in size and thus representing the MHD scale. These 3D hybrid simulations show filamentary magnetic and density structures, which could be interpreted as small-scale flux ropes. The growth of these small-scale structures is also associated with ion acceleration. In this talk we will discuss properties of these filamentary structures, their spatial and temporal evolution and the particle dynamics during the acceleration process. The results of this study may be of particular importance for future high resolution magnetospheric and heliospheric mission such as THOR.

  8. APT related papers presented at the 1997 particle accelerator conference, Vancouver, May 12--16, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium is essential for the US nuclear weapons to function, but because it is radioactive with a half-life of 12.3 years, the supply must be periodically replenished. Presently, only reactor or accelerator systems can be used to produce tritium. This report is a compilation of 31 papers given at the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference which dealt with the accelerator production of tritium. The papers are grouped into two categories, invited and contributed.

  9. The acceleration of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium by transit-time damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Transit time damping is examined as a possible means for accelerating low energy particles in co-rotating streams and interstellar ions. Data show that: the protons in co-rotating streams may be accelerated by transient-time damping the small-scale variations in the field magnitude that are observed at a low level in the inner solar system. The interstellar ions may be accelerated by transit time damping large-scale field variations in the outer solar system.

  10. Particle acceleration in cosmic sites. Astrophysics issues in our understanding of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R. L.

    2009-11-01

    Particles are accelerated in cosmic sites probably under conditions very different from those at terrestrial particle accelerator laboratories. Nevertheless, specific experiments which explore plasma conditions and stimulate particle acceleration carry significant potential to illuminate some aspects of the cosmic particle acceleration process. Here we summarize our understanding of cosmic particle acceleration, as derived from observations of the properties of cosmic ray particles, and through astronomical signatures caused by these near their sources or throughout their journey in interstellar space. We discuss the candidate-source object variety, and what has been learned about their particle-acceleration characteristics. We conclude identifying open issues as they are discussed among astrophysicists. - The cosmic ray differential intensity spectrum across energies from 1010 eV to 1021 eV reveals a rather smooth power-law spectrum. Two kinks occur at the “knee” (≃1015 eV) and at the “ankle” (≃ 3×1018 eV). It is unclear if these kinks are related to boundaries between different dominating sources, or rather related to characteristics of cosmic-ray propagation. Currently we believe that galactic sources dominate up to 1017 eV or even above, and the extragalactic origin of cosmic rays at highest energies merges rather smoothly with galactic contributions throughout the 1015-1018 eV range. Pulsars and supernova remnants are among the prime candidates for galactic cosmic-ray production, while nuclei of active galaxies are considered best candidates to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays of extragalactic origin. The acceleration processes are probably related to shocks formed when matter is ejected into surrounding space from energetic sources such as supernova explosions or matter accreting onto black holes. Details of shock acceleration are complex, as relativistic particles modify the structure of the shock, and simple approximations or perturbation

  11. Dust particle injector for hypervelocity accelerators provides high charge-to-mass ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, O. E.

    1966-01-01

    Injector imparts a high charge-to-mass ratio to microparticles and injects them into an electrostatic accelerator so that the particles are accelerated to meteoric speeds. It employs relatively large masses in the anode and cathode structures with a relatively wide separation, thus permitting a large increase in the allowable injection voltages.

  12. Suppression of an unwanted flow of charged particles in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu.; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the construction of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation several changes were made. This allowed us to suppress the unwanted flow of charged particles in the accelerator, to improve its high-voltage stability, and to increase the proton beam current from 1.6 mA to 5 mA.

  13. Light-triggered chemical amplification to accelerate degradation and release from polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Jason; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Lux, Jacques; Grossman, Madeleine; He, Sha; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-12-11

    We describe a means of chemical amplification to accelerate triggered degradation of a polymer and particles composed thereof. We designed a light-degradable copolymer containing carboxylic acids masked by photolabile groups and ketals. Photolysis allows the unmasked acidic groups in the polymer backbone to accelerate ketal hydrolysis even at neutral pH. PMID:26445896

  14. Single crystal niobium tubes for particle colliders accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James E

    2013-02-28

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred °C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 °C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 °C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was

  15. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, protons, antiprotons, electrons, and positrons currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameter necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) the ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z less than or = 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator.

  16. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  17. Kerr black holes as accelerators of spinning test particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minyong; Gao, Sijie

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that ultraenergetic collisions can occur near the horizon of an extremal Kerr black hole. Previous studies mainly focused on geodesic motions of particles. In this paper, we consider spinning test particles whose orbits are nongeodesic. By employing the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equation, we find the critical angular momentum satisfies J =2 E for extremal Kerr black holes. Although the conserved angular momentum J and energy E have been redefined in the presence of spin, the critical condition remains the same form. If a particle with this angular momentum collides with another particle arbitrarily close to the horizon of the black hole, the center-of-mass energy can be arbitrarily high. We also prove that arbitrarily high energies cannot be obtained for spinning particles near the horizons of nonextremal Kerr black holes.

  18. The laser driven particle accelerator project: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L. Smith, T.I.; Siemann, R.H. Huang, Y.C.

    1999-07-01

    A proof of principle experiment for laser driven electron acceleration from crossed laser beams in a dielectric loaded vacuum is being carried out at Stanford University. We seek to measure a maximum energy gain of about 250 keV for a 30{endash}35 MeV electron beam in one accelerator cell. We use laser pulses of a few picoseconds of duration from a regenerative Ti:sapphire laser amplifier at a wavelength of 800 nm in a laser-electron interaction distance of {approximately}1 mm. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  20. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  1. (Laser Particle Accelerator Program: Annual report, 1990--1991)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the basic ICA experiment, the gas cell design; the radial polarization converter system; the psec carbon dioxide laser system; the model predictions for ATF ICA experiment; the analysis of near-resonance ICA; and the laser acceleration in a vacuum. (LSP)

  2. DIFFUSIVE PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SHOCKED, VISCOUS ACCRETION DISKS: GREEN'S FUNCTION ENERGY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Peter A.; Das, Santabrata; Le, Truong E-mail: sbdas@iitg.ernet.in

    2011-12-10

    The acceleration of relativistic particles in a viscous accretion disk containing a standing shock is investigated as a possible explanation for the energetic outflows observed around radio-loud black holes. The energy/space distribution of the accelerated particles is computed by solving a transport equation that includes the effects of first-order Fermi acceleration, bulk advection, spatial diffusion, and particle escape. The velocity profile of the accreting gas is described using a model for shocked viscous disks recently developed by the authors, and the corresponding Green's function distribution for the accelerated particles in the disk and the outflow is obtained using a classical method based on eigenfunction analysis. The accretion-driven, diffusive shock acceleration scenario explored here is conceptually similar to the standard model for the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova-driven shocks. However, in the disk application, the distribution of the accelerated particles is much harder than would be expected for a plane-parallel shock with the same compression ratio. Hence the disk environment plays a key role in enhancing the efficiency of the shock acceleration process. The presence of the shock helps to stabilize the disk by reducing the Bernoulli parameter, while channeling the excess binding energy into the escaping relativistic particles. In applications to M87 and Sgr A*, we find that the kinetic power in the jet is {approx}0.01 M-dot c{sup 2}, and the outflowing relativistic particles have a mean energy {approx}300 times larger than that of the thermal gas in the disk at the shock radius. Our results suggest that a standing shock may be an essential ingredient in accretion onto underfed black holes, helping to resolve the long-standing problem of the stability of advection-dominated accretion disks.

  3. Particle acceleration through multiple conversions from a charged into a neutral state and back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, E. V.; Aharonian, F. A.; Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.

    2003-08-01

    We propose a new means for a quick and efficient acceleration of protons and/or electrons in relativistic bulk flows. The maximum attainable particle energies are limited either by radiative losses or by the condition of confinement in the magnetic field. The new mechanism takes advantage of a conversion of particles from the charged state (protons, electrons or positrons) into a neutral state (neutrons or photons) and back. In most cases, the conversion is photon induced and requires the presence of intense radiation fields, but under special circumstances the converter acceleration mechanism may operate via other charge-changing reactions, for example, inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions. As in the traditional, “stochastic” (or diffusive) acceleration models, the acceleration cycle in the proposed scenario consists of the escape of particles from the relativistic flow followed by their return back after deflection from the ambient magnetic field. The difference is that the charge-changing reactions, which occur during the cycle, allow accelerated particles to increase their energies in each cycle by a factor much larger than 2 and usually roughly equal to the bulk Lorentz factor squared. The emerging spectra of accelerated particles can be very hard and their maximum energy in some cases is larger than in the standard mechanism. This significantly reduces the required energy budget of the sources of the highest-energy particles observed in cosmic rays. The proposed acceleration mechanism has a distinctive feature—it unavoidably creates neutral beams, consisting of photons, neutrinos, or neutrons, whose beam pattern may be much broader than the inverse Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. Also, the new mechanism may serve as an efficient means of transferring the energy of bulk motion to gamma radiation and, if the accelerated particles are nucleons, inevitably produces high-energy neutrinos at a relative efficiency approaching ≳50%.

  4. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  5. Test-particle acceleration in a hierarchical three-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Dalena, S.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.; Greco, A.

    2014-03-10

    The acceleration of charged particles is relevant to the solar corona over a broad range of scales and energies. High-energy particles are usually detected in concomitance with large energy release events like solar eruptions and flares. Nevertheless, acceleration can occur at smaller scales, characterized by dynamical activity near current sheets. To gain insight into the complex scenario of coronal charged particle acceleration, we investigate the properties of acceleration with a test-particle approach using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. These are obtained from direct solutions of the reduced MHD equations, well suited for a plasma embedded in a strong axial magnetic field, relevant to the inner heliosphere. A multi-box, multiscale technique is used to solve the equations of motion for protons. This method allows us to resolve an extended range of scales present in the system, namely, from the ion inertial scale of the order of a meter up to macroscopic scales of the order of 10 km (1/100th of the outer scale of the system). This new technique is useful to identify the mechanisms that, acting at different scales, are responsible for acceleration to high energies of a small fraction of the particles in the coronal plasma. We report results that describe acceleration at different stages over a broad range of time, length, and energy scales.

  6. Particle acceleration in the dynamic magnetotail: Orbits in self-consistent three-dimensional MHD fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The acceleration of protons in a dynamically evolving magnetotail is investigated by tracing particles in the fields obtained from a three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. The MHD simulation, representing plasmoid formation and ejection through a near-Earth reconnection process, leads to cross-tail electric fields of up to approximately 4 mV/m with integrated voltages across the tail of up to approximately 200 kV. Energization of particles takes place over a wide range along the tail, due to the large spatial extent of the increased electric field together with the finite cross-tail extent of the electric field region. Such accelerated particles appear earthward of the neutral line over a significant portion of the closed field line region inside of the separatrix, not just in the vicinity of the separatrix. Two different acceleration processes are identified: a 'quasi-potential' acceleration, due to particle motion in the direction of the cross-tail electric field, and a 'quasi-betatron' effect, which consists of multiple energy gains from repeated crossings of the acceleration region, mostly on Speiser-type orbits, in the spatially varying induced electric field. The major source region for accelerated particles in the hundreds of keV range is the central plasma sheet at the dawn flank outside the reconnection site. Since this source plasma is already hot and dense, its moderate energization by a factor of approximately 2 may be sufficient to explain the observed increases in the energetic particle fluxes. Particles from the tail are the source of beams at the plasma sheet/lobe boundary. The temporal increase in the energetic particle fluxes, estimated from the increase in energy gain, occurs on a fast timescale of a few minutes, coincident with a strong increase in B(sub z), despite the fact that the inner boundary ('injection boundary') of the distribution of energized particles is fairly smooth.

  7. Consequences of wave-particle interactions on chaotic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, David; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1991-01-01

    The recent model of Ashour-Abdalla et al. (1991) has proposed that the earth's plasma sheet can be formed by chaotic acceleration in a magnetotail-like field configuration. The ion velocity distributions created by chaotic acceleration have unstable features and represent robust free energy sources for kinetic plasma waves that can modify the original distributions. In the plasma sheet boundary layer, field-aligned ion beamlets are formed which drive a host of instabilities creating a broadbanded noise spectrum and cause thermal spreading of the beamlets. In addition, there is strong heating of any cold background plasma that may be present. In the central plasma sheet, ion antiloss cone distributions are created which are unstable to very low frequency waves that saturate by filling the antiloss cone.

  8. The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechow, D. R.; Norris, B.; Amundson, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Tech-X Corp; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    Synergia2 is a beam dynamics modeling and simulation application for high-energy accelerators such as the Tevatron at Fermilab and the International Linear Collider, which is now under planning and development. Synergia2 is a hybrid, multilanguage software package comprised of two separate accelerator physics packages (Synergia and MaryLie/Impact) and one high-performance computer science package (PETSc). We describe our approach to producing a set of beam dynamics-specific software components based on the Common Component Architecture specification. Among other topics, we describe particular experiences with the following tasks: using Python steering to guide the creation of interfaces and to prototype components; working with legacy Fortran codes; and an example component-based, beam dynamics simulation.

  9. High average power lasers for future particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Crane, John K.; Messerly, Michael J.; Prantil, Matthew A.; Pax, Paul H.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Allen, Graham S.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Phan, Henry H.; Heebner, John E.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Hartouni, Edward P.; Siders, Craig W.; Spinka, Thomas M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Haefner, Leon C.; Albert, Felicie; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Bonanno, Regina E.

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are of increasing interest to the accelerator community and include applications as diverse as stripping electrons from hydrogen atoms, sources for Compton scattering, efficient high repetition rate lasers for dielectric laser acceleration, peta-watt peak power lasers for laser wake field and high energy, short pulse lasers for proton and ion beam therapy. The laser requirements for these applications are briefly surveyed. State of the art of laser technologies with the potential to eventually meet those requirements are reviewed. These technologies include diode pumped solid state lasers (including cryogenic), fiber lasers, OPCPA based lasers and Ti:Sapphire lasers. Strengths and weakness of the various technologies are discussed along with the most important issues to address to get from the current state of the art to the performance needed for the accelerator applications. Efficiency issues are considered in detail as in most cases the system efficiency is a valuable indicator of the actual ability of a given technology to deliver the application requirements.

  10. Modeling Extreme Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration with Self-Consistent Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, A. D.; le Roux, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with coronal mass ejection driven shocks have detected particle energies up to a few GeV at 1 AU within the first ~10 minutes to 1 hour of shock acceleration. Whether or not acceleration by a single shock is sufficient in these events or if some combination of multiple shocks or solar flares is required is currently not well understood. Furthermore, the observed onset times of the extreme SEP events place the shock in the corona when the particles escape upstream. We have updated our focused transport theory model that has successfully been applied to the termination shock and traveling interplanetary shocks in the past to investigate extreme SEP acceleration in the solar corona. This model solves the time-dependent Focused Transport Equation including particle preheating due to the cross shock electric field and the divergence, adiabatic compression, and acceleration of the solar wind flow. Diffusive shock acceleration of SEPs is included via the first-order Fermi mechanism for parallel shocks. To investigate the effects of the solar corona on the acceleration of SEPs, we have included an empirical model for the plasma number density, temperature, and velocity. The shock acceleration process becomes highly time-dependent due to the rapid variation of these coronal properties with heliocentric distance. Additionally, particle interaction with MHD wave turbulence is modeled in terms of gyroresonant interactions with parallel propagating Alfven waves. However, previous modeling efforts suggest that the background amplitude of the solar wind turbulence is not sufficient to accelerate SEPs to extreme energies over the short time scales observed. To account for this, we have included the transport and self-consistent amplification of MHD waves by the SEPs through wave-particle gyroresonance. We will present the results of this extended model for a single fast quasi-parallel CME driven shock in the

  11. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  12. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  13. COMBINED STEREO/RHESSI STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Krucker, S.; Vrsnak, B. E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.a E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2010-04-01

    Using the potential of two unprecedented missions, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we study three well-observed fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred close to the limb together with their associated high-energy flare emissions in terms of RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) spectra and flux evolution. From STEREO/EUVI and STEREO/COR1 data, the full CME kinematics of the impulsive acceleration phase up to {approx}4 R{sub sun} is measured with a high time cadence of <=2.5 minutes. For deriving CME velocity and acceleration, we apply and test a new algorithm based on regularization methods. The CME maximum acceleration is achieved at heights h <= 0.4 R{sub sun}, and the peak velocity at h <= 2.1 R{sub sun} (in one case, as small as 0.5 R{sub sun}). We find that the CME acceleration profile and the flare energy release as evidenced in the RHESSI HXR flux evolve in a synchronized manner. These results support the 'standard' flare/CME model which is characterized by a feedback relationship between the large-scale CME acceleration process and the energy release in the associated flare.

  14. A new magnetic pumping accelerator of charged particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, J.-L.

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes an acceleration mechanism to explain the observations of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. In the inner magnetosphere particles are convected towards and away from the Io plasma torus by the centrifugally driven interchange mode or by the longitudinal asymmetry of the magnetosphere and the Io plasma torus. They experience a varying (space-dependent in Jupiter's frame of reference) magnetic field and are subject to pitch-angle scattering by wave-particle interactions. Thus, an e-fold magnetic pumping acceleration is expected in the system. The calculations show that the accelerator can generate up to one MeV energy particles in about 10-15 times the characteristic convection time.

  15. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  16. Theoretical and Observational Analysis of Particle Acceleration Mechanisms at Astrophysical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, Edward Lawrence

    We analytically and numerically investigate the viability of Shock Surfing as a pre-injection mechanism for Diffusive Shock Acceleration, believed to be responsible for the production of Cosmic Rays. We demonstrate mathematically and from computer simulations that four critical conditions must be satisfied for Shock Surfing to function; the shock ramp must be narrow, the shock front must be smooth, the magnetic field angle must be very nearly perpendicular and, finally, these conditions must persist without interruption over substantial time periods and spatial scales. We quantify these necessary conditions, exhibit predictive functions for velocity maxima and accelerated ion fluxes based on observable shock parameters, and show unequivocally from current observational evidence that all of these necessary conditions are violated at shocks within the heliosphere, at the heliospheric Termination Shock, and also at Supernovae.

  17. Interactive visualization of particle beams for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Brett; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert

    2002-01-15

    We describe a hybrid data-representation and rendering technique for visualizing large-scale particle data generated from numerical modeling of beam dynamics. The basis of the technique is mixing volume rendering and point rendering according to particle density distribution, visibility, and the user's instruction. A hierarchical representation of the data is created on a parallel computer, allowing real-time partitioning into high-density areas for volume rendering, and low-density areas for point rendering. This allows the beam to be interactively visualized while preserving the fine structure usually visible only with slow point based rendering techniques.

  18. Particle Acceleration by Magnetic Reconnection in a Twisted Coronal Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa K.

    2011-03-01

    Photospheric motions may lead to twisted coronal magnetic fields which contain free energy that can be released by reconnection. Browning & Van der Linden suggested that such a relaxation event may be triggered by the onset of ideal kink instability. In the present work, we study the evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube with zero net axial current following Hood et al. Based on the obtained magnetic and electric fields, proton and electron trajectories are calculated using the test-particle approach. We discuss resulting particle distributions and possible observational implications, for example, for small solar flares.

  19. Particle acceleration and diffusion in fossil radio plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.

    The strong activity of radio galaxies should have led to a nearly ubiquitous presence of fossil radio plasma in the denser regions of the inter-galactic medium as clusters, groups and filaments of galaxies. This fossil radio plasma can contain large quantities of relativistic particles (electrons and possibly protons) by magnetic confinement. These particles might be released and/or re-energized under environmental influences as turbulence and shock waves. Possible connections of such processes to the formation of the observed sources of diffuse radio emission in clusters of galaxies (the cluster radio halos and the cluster radio relics) are discussed.

  20. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  1. Perpendicular magnetic recording: Playback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, Dmitri; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2005-04-01

    For the past several years, perpendicular magnetic recording has been under intense scrutiny as the primary alternative to magnetic data storage technologies in place today. Major system components, write heads and media in particular, have been the subject of extensive studies. Less attention, however, has been devoted to the playback processes in perpendicular recording systems. The playback heads used in technology demonstrations remain largely unchanged from their longitudinal recording counterparts. It is an open question whether the longitudinal playback-head design is optimal for perpendicular recording. For example, application of longitudinal playback heads in perpendicular recording leads to undesirable phenomena associated with modified playback response, increased flying height sensitivity, adjacent track interference, and calls for major modifications of the existing read channels. The subject of this work is a detailed discussion of the playback physics, in perpendicular recording systems; the focus being to establish the design guidelines for optimized perpendicular playback heads, which are equivalent or superior in their performance characteristics to conventional shielded readers used in longitudinal recording. Conformal mapping is applied to demonstrate the playback wave form equivalency between a shielded and dual-pole readers when applied in longitudinal and perpendicular recording, respectively. Utilizing extensive three-dimensional modeling and reciprocity principle to evaluate the performance of various playback-head configurations, it is demonstrated that differential reader configurations possess advantageous playback characteristics, such as higher playback amplitude, improved spatial resolution, and reduced dependence on flight-height variations as compared to conventional shielded readers. Modified design of differential readers with a single magnetoresistive sensor is proposed to overcome the manufacturability issues associated with a

  2. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  3. Identifying the Real Seed Population for Shock Accelerated Energetic Particles: Recent Observational Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; Desai, M. I.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle events, traveling interplanetary shocks, and corotating interaction regions are examples of shock acceleration of particles in the heliosphere. Although shock acceleration of particles has long been the subject of theoretical investigation, nevertheless key energetic particle properties such as intensity and spectral index are only roughly correlated with predictions of the theories. This may be due to limitations of the theories, but it may also be due to a lack of understanding of properties of the seed population. Recent measurements have shown that trace elements in the thermal plasma (e.g. singly ionized He, and 3He) often show dramatic enhancements in the energetic particle population. Although the observational picture is far from complete, it appears that the injection threshold in these events is about 1.5-2 times the solar wind speed. In this range, multiple particle sources are present, including solar wind suprathermals, pick up ions, and remnant material from prior shocks and impulsive events. Thus, the enhancements are not due to properties of the shock acceleration, but rather are primarily due to the properties of the seed population. This points to new opportunities for theoretical and experimental investigations to quantitatively model shock accelerated particle populations using realistic seed populations.

  4. ITEP subcritical neutron generator driven by charged particle accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedov, Oleg V.; Chuvilo, Ivan V.; Kulikov, Evgeny V.; Vasiliev, Valery V.; Igumnov, Mikhail M.; Kozodaev, Alexander M.; Volkov, Evgeny B.; Lopatkin, Alexander V.

    1995-09-15

    A research facility prototype including a combination of a linear accelerator, a neutron generating target, a subcritical multiplying system is discussed. Principles of the nuclear safety ensuring and means of its attainment for Subcritical Neutron Generator are considered. The scheme of the multiplying is shown. The assembly will be mounted in the body of the partly dismantled ITEP HWR. Requirements for subcritical assembly are worked out and their feasibility within the framework of the heavy-water blanket is shown. The facility's application as a full-scale model of more powerful installations of this kind and for fundamental experimental research has been investigated.

  5. The Role of Pressure Anisotropy on Particle Acceleration during Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffler, K. M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Knizhnik, K.

    2013-02-01

    Voyager spacecraft observations have revealed that contrary to expectations, the source of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) is not at the local termination shock. A possible mechanism of ACR acceleration is magnetic reconnection in the heliosheath. Using a particle-in-cell code, we investigate the effects of β on reconnection-driven particle acceleration by studying island growth in multiple interacting Harris current sheets. Many islands are generated, and particles are dominantly heated through Fermi reflection in contracting islands during island growth and merging. There is a striking difference between the heating of electrons versus the heating of ions. There is a strong dependence of β on electron heating, while the ion heating is insensitive to β. Anisotropies develop with T ∥ ≠ T for both electrons and ions. The electron anisotropies support the development of a Weibel instability that suppresses the Fermi acceleration of the electrons. Since the Weibel instability develops at a larger T ∥/T in lower β systems, electrons are able to accelerate more efficiently by the Fermi mechanism at low β. The variance in anisotropy implies less electron acceleration in higher β systems, and thus less heating. This study sheds light on particle acceleration mechanisms within the sectored magnetic field regions of the heliosheath and the dissipation of turbulence such as that produced by the magnetorotational instability in accreting systems.

  6. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  7. Particle acceleration by Majumdar-Papapetrou di-hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2014-10-01

    We explore the multi-black hole spacetimes from the perspective of the ultra-high energy particle collisions. Such a discussion is limited to the spacetimes containing a single black hole so far. We deal with the Majumdar-Papapetrou solution representing a system consisting of two identical black holes in the equilibrium. In order to identify the conditions suitable for the process of high energy collisions, we consider particles confined to move on the equatorial plane towards the axis of symmetry with the zero angular momentum. We consider collision between the particles moving in opposite directions at the location midway between the black holes on the axis. We show that the center of mass energy of collision between the particles increases with the decrease in the separation between the black holes and shows divergence in the limit where the separation goes to zero. We estimate the size of the region close to the central point on the equatorial plane where it would be possible to have high energy collisions and show that this region has a reasonably large spatial extent. We further explore the process of high energy collisions with the general geodesics with arbitrary angular momentum on the equatorial plane away from the central point. Although in this paper we deal with theMajumdar-Papapetrou spacetime which serves as a toy example representing multiple black holes, we speculate on the possibility that the ultra-high energy collisions would also occur in the more general setting like colliding black holes, when distance between the black holes is extremely small, which can in principle be verified in the numerical relativity simulations.

  8. GPU acceleration of particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John; Meiser, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become key components in many supercomputing systems, as they can provide more computations relative to their cost and power consumption than conventional processors. However, to take full advantage of this capability, they require a strict programming model which involves single-instruction multiple-data execution as well as significant constraints on memory accesses. To bring the full power of GPUs to bear on plasma physics problems, we must adapt the computational methods to this new programming model. We have developed a GPU implementation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, one of the mainstays of plasma physics simulation. This framework is highly general and enables advanced PIC features such as high order particles and absorbing boundary conditions. The main elements of the PIC loop, including field interpolation and particle deposition, are designed to optimize memory access. We describe the performance of these algorithms and discuss some of the methods used. Work supported by DARPA contract W31P4Q-15-C-0061 (SBIR).

  9. Particle acceleration studies with intense lasers and advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D.; McKenna, P.; Ridgers, C. P.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Wilson, L.; Green, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of lasers with matter is a subject which has progressed rapidly over the last two decades as higher intensity lasers are found to have possible applications in inertial fusion, laboratory astrophysics and ion acceleration for oncology or ultrafast proton probing. All of these applications require a good understanding of laser-electron coupling and fast electron transport in solid targets which has proven difficult to diagnose. Here we present data from an experiment carried out on the Astra Gemini laser system at STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where novel targets and diagnostics illuminate the complex processes at play. An outline of how x-ray free electron lasers may further expand our understanding of such processes will also be described.

  10. UV photoemission studies of metal photocathodes for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1988-09-01

    Photoemission from several metals was studied with 10 ps laser pulses at 266 nm. The yield was linear with energy and with area. Quantum efficiencies (/eta/) were determined (up to 10/sup /minus/3/ e/photons for samarium), and found to vary as (h..nu..-/phi/)/sup 2/. /eta/ also increased with the field. The field assisted efficiencies were calculated for some metals and confirmed by experiment for gold, up to surface fields of /approximately/3/times/10/sup 8/ V/m. High charge and current densities, close to 10/sup 5/ A/cm/sup 2/ from macroscopic areas, were measured or indicated. Results are then related to applications in accelerators. 18 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  12. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SHOCK-SHOCK INTERACTION: MODEL TO DATA COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, H.; Vainio, R.; Sandroos, A.

    2012-05-20

    Shock-shock interaction is a well-established particle acceleration mechanism in astrophysical and space plasmas, but difficult to study observationally. Recently, the interplanetary shock collision with the bow shock of the Earth on 1998 August 10 was identified as one of the rare events where detailed in situ observations of the different acceleration phases can be made. Due to the advantageous spacecraft and magnetic field configurations, in 2011, Hietala et al. were able to distinguish the seed population and its reacceleration at the bow shock, as well as the Fermi acceleration of particles trapped between the shocks. They also interpreted their results as being the first in situ evidence of the release of particles from the trap as the two shocks collided. In the present study we use a global 2.5D test-particle simulation to further study particle acceleration in this event. We concentrate on the last phases of the shock-shock interaction, when the shocks approach and pass through each other. The simulation results verify that the main features of the measurements can be explained by shock-shock interaction in this magnetic geometry, and are in agreement with the previous interpretation of particle release. Shock-shock collisions of this type occur commonly in many astrophysical locations such as stellar coronae, planetary and cometary bow shocks, and the distant heliosphere.

  13. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  14. Particle acceleration for delivery deoxyribonucleic acid vaccine into skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinglong, Yu; Xiwen, Zhang; Yuan, Wang; Junshi, Xie; Pengfei, Hao

    2001-08-01

    Skin represents an important immunogenic inductive site, 3%-4% epidermis cells are special antigen-presenting cells. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine can elicit vigorous immune responses in epidermis cells. The means of delivering DNA vaccine into epidermis cells becomes an important step in DNA vaccine applications. This article presents a new type of gene gun based on the principle of two-stage injector acceleration. DNA coated particles are attached on an screen-type carrier located at the negative pressure inlet, the particles will be sucked into the accelerating channel by negative pressure and be accelerated at a great speed. FLUENT, a computation fluid dynamic application software is used to simulate the flow condition of the injector. Distribution of Mach number, total pressure on exit cross section, and negative pressure on negative pressure inlet are analyzed, by which the process of acceleration of particles is determined. We also measured these parameters in this study. The data show that the particle velocity can be up to 500 m/s and the particles distribute evenly over a circle of Φ 20 mm. The numerical simulation results coincide with experimental data well. Therefore, the results of numerical simulation can be served as guidance for an optimal design of the gene gun and for practical operations. When gene coated particles are distributed evenly, they can penetrate into or even through epidermis cells where the gene can be expressed and subsequently elicits host immune responses. This device may be evaluated in human objects in future.

  15. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  16. Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during magnetorotational instability in a kinetic accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-13

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p(∥)>p(⊥) induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p(⊥)>p(∥) due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes. PMID:25723200

  17. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  18. Shock acceleration of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L.A.; Lee, M.A.

    1980-04-15

    A simple shock model for the acceleration of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the solar wind is presented. Particles are accelerated at the forward and reverse shocks which bound the CIR by being compressed between the shock fronts and magnetic irregularities upstream from the shocks, or by being compressed between upstream irregularities and those downstream from the shocks. Particles also suffer adiabatic deceleration in the expanding solar wind, an effect not included in previous shock models for acceleration in CIRs. The model is able to account for the observed exponential spectra at Earth, the observed behavior of the spectra with radial distance, the observed radial gradients in the intensity, and the observed differences in the intensity and spectra at the forward and reverse shocks.

  19. Particle acceleration and production of energetic photons in SN1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, Todor; Harding, Alice

    1987-01-01

    A pulsar wind model for the acceleration of particles in SN1987A is discussed. The expected photon flux is investigated in terms of the spectrum of parent protons and electrons, the nature of the region in which they propagate after acceleration, and the magnetic field and radiation environment which determines the subsequent fate of produced photons. The model is found to produce observable signals if the spin period of the pulsar is 10 ms or less.

  20. Baryon Loading Efficiency and Particle Acceleration Efficiency of Relativistic Jets: Cases for Low Luminosity BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic jets launched by supermassive black holes, so-called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are known as the most energetic particle accelerators in the universe. However, the baryon loading efficiency onto the jets from the accretion flows and their particle acceleration efficiencies have been veiled in mystery. With the latest data sets, we perform multi-wavelength spectral analysis of quiescent spectra of 13 TeV gamma-ray detected high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) following one-zone static synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. We determine the minimum, cooling break, and maximum electron Lorentz factors following the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. We find that HBLs have {P}B/{P}e∼ 6.3× {10}-3 and the radiative efficiency {ε }{{rad,jet}}∼ 6.7× {10}-4, where P B and P e is the Poynting and electron power, respectively. By assuming 10 leptons per one proton, the jet power relates to the black hole mass as {P}{{jet}}/{L}{{Edd}}∼ 0.18, where {P}{{jet}} and {L}{{Edd}} is the jet power and the Eddington luminosity, respectively. Under our model assumptions, we further find that HBLs have a jet production efficiency of {η }{{jet}}∼ 1.5 and a mass loading efficiency of {ξ }{{jet}}≳ 5× {10}-2. We also investigate the particle acceleration efficiency in the blazar zone by including the most recent Swift/BAT data. Our samples ubiquitously have particle acceleration efficiencies of {η }g∼ {10}4.5, which is inefficient to accelerate particles up to the ultra-high-energy-cosmic-ray (UHECR) regime. This implies that the UHECR acceleration sites should not be the blazar zones of quiescent low power AGN jets, if one assumes the one-zone SSC model based on the DSA theory.

  1. Baryon Loading Efficiency and Particle Acceleration Efficiency of Relativistic Jets: Cases for Low Luminosity BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic jets launched by supermassive black holes, so-called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are known as the most energetic particle accelerators in the universe. However, the baryon loading efficiency onto the jets from the accretion flows and their particle acceleration efficiencies have been veiled in mystery. With the latest data sets, we perform multi-wavelength spectral analysis of quiescent spectra of 13 TeV gamma-ray detected high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) following one-zone static synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. We determine the minimum, cooling break, and maximum electron Lorentz factors following the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. We find that HBLs have {P}B/{P}e˜ 6.3× {10}-3 and the radiative efficiency {ɛ }{{rad,jet}}˜ 6.7× {10}-4, where P B and P e is the Poynting and electron power, respectively. By assuming 10 leptons per one proton, the jet power relates to the black hole mass as {P}{{jet}}/{L}{{Edd}}˜ 0.18, where {P}{{jet}} and {L}{{Edd}} is the jet power and the Eddington luminosity, respectively. Under our model assumptions, we further find that HBLs have a jet production efficiency of {η }{{jet}}˜ 1.5 and a mass loading efficiency of {ξ }{{jet}}≳ 5× {10}-2. We also investigate the particle acceleration efficiency in the blazar zone by including the most recent Swift/BAT data. Our samples ubiquitously have particle acceleration efficiencies of {η }g˜ {10}4.5, which is inefficient to accelerate particles up to the ultra-high-energy-cosmic-ray (UHECR) regime. This implies that the UHECR acceleration sites should not be the blazar zones of quiescent low power AGN jets, if one assumes the one-zone SSC model based on the DSA theory.

  2. Interfacial dilatational deformation accelerates particle formation in monoclonal antibody solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gigi L; Pathak, Jai A; Kim, Dong Hyun; Carlson, Marcia; Riguero, Valeria; Kim, Yoen Joo; Buff, Jean S; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-04-14

    Protein molecules are amphiphilic moieties that spontaneously adsorb at the air/solution (A/S) interface to lower the surface energy. Previous studies have shown that hydrodynamic disruptions to these A/S interfaces can result in the formation of protein aggregates that are of concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Interfacial hydrodynamic stresses encountered by protein therapeutic solutions under typical manufacturing, filling, and shipping conditions will impact protein stability, prompting a need to characterize the contribution of basic fluid kinematics to monoclonal antibody (mAb) destabilization. We demonstrate that dilatational surface deformations are more important to antibody stability when compared to constant-area shear of the A/S interface. We have constructed a dilatational interfacial rheometer that utilizes simultaneous pressure and bubble shape measurements to study the mechanical stability of mAbs under interfacial aging. It has a distinct advantage over methods utilizing the Young-Laplace equation, which incorrectly describes viscoelastic interfaces. We provide visual evidence of particle ejection from dilatated A/S interfaces and spectroscopic data of ejected mAb particles. These rheological studies frame a molecular understanding of the protein-protein interactions at the complex-fluid interface. PMID:26891116

  3. A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Accelerated by Asynchronous Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    A parallel Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Particle swarm optimization is a fairly recent addition to the family of non-gradient based, probabilistic search algorithms that is based on a simplified social model and is closely tied to swarming theory. Although PSO algorithms present several attractive properties to the designer, they are plagued by high computational cost as measured by elapsed time. One approach to reduce the elapsed time is to make use of coarse-grained parallelization to evaluate the design points. Previous parallel PSO algorithms were mostly implemented in a synchronous manner, where all design points within a design iteration are evaluated before the next iteration is started. This approach leads to poor parallel speedup in cases where a heterogeneous parallel environment is used and/or where the analysis time depends on the design point being analyzed. This paper introduces an asynchronous parallel PSO algorithm that greatly improves the parallel e ciency. The asynchronous algorithm is benchmarked on a cluster assembled of Apple Macintosh G5 desktop computers, using the multi-disciplinary optimization of a typical transport aircraft wing as an example.

  4. The Study of Non-Linear Acceleration of Particles during Substorms Using Multi-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    2011-01-04

    To understand particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms we must consider the problem on multple scales ranging from the large scale changes in the entire magnetosphere to the microphysics of wave particle interactions. In this paper we present two examples that demonstrate the complexity of substorm particle acceleration and its multi-scale nature. The first substorm provided us with an excellent example of ion acceleration. On March 1, 2008 four THEMIS spacecraft were in a line extending from 8 R{sub E} to 23 R{sub E} in the magnetotail during a very large substorm during which ions were accelerated to >500 keV. We used a combination of a global magnetohydrodynamic and large scale kinetic simulations to model the ion acceleration and found that the ions gained energy by non-adiabatic trajectories across the substorm electric field in a narrow region extending across the magnetotail between x = -10 R{sub E} and x = -15 R{sub E}. In this strip called the 'wall region' the ions move rapidly in azimuth and gain 100s of keV. In the second example we studied the acceleration of electrons associated with a pair of dipolarization fronts during a substorm on February 15, 2008. During this substorm three THEMIS spacecraft were grouped in the near-Earth magnetotail (x {approx}-10 R{sub E}) and observed electron acceleration of >100 keV accompanied by intense plasma waves. We used the MHD simulations and analytic theory to show that adiabatic motion (betatron and Fermi acceleration) was insufficient to account for the electron acceleration and that kinetic processes associated with the plasma waves were important.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Parallel Trans-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and "smooth" the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ0 = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  6. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF NONLINEAR PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PARALLEL TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M. E-mail: ambykov@yahoo.com

    2013-10-10

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and 'smooth' the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ{sub 0} = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  7. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - I. Steady-state spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We study the acceleration, transport, and emission of particles in relativistic jets. Localized stochastic particle acceleration, spatial diffusion, and synchrotron as well as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission are considered in a leptonic model. To account for inhomogeneity, we use a 2D axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for both relativistic electrons and magnetic field. In this first phase of our work, we focus on steady-state spectra that develop from a time-dependent model. We demonstrate that small isolated acceleration region in a much larger emission volume are sufficient to accelerate particles to high energy. Diffusive escape from these small regions provides a natural explanation for the spectral form of the jet emission. The location of the acceleration regions within the jet is found to affect the cooling break of the spectrum in this diffusive model. Diffusion-caused energy-dependent inhomogeneity in the jets predicts that the SSC spectrum is harder than the synchrotron spectrum. There can also be a spectral hardening towards the high-energy section of the synchrotron spectrum, if particle escape is relatively slow. These two spectral hardening effects indicate that the jet inhomogeneity might be a natural explanation for the unexpected hard γ-ray spectra observed in some blazars.

  8. Particle trapping and beam transport issues in laser driven accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenael, Fubiani; Wim, Leemans; Eric, Esarey

    2000-10-01

    The LWFA and colliding pulses [1][2] sheme are capable of producing very compact electron bunches where the longitudinal size is much smaller than the transverse size. In this case, even if the electrons are relativistic, space charge force can affect the longitudinal and transverse bunch properties [3][4]. In the Self-modulated regime and the colliding pulse sheme, electrons are trapped from the background plasma and rapidly accelerated. We present theoretical studies of the generation and transport of electron bunches in LWFAs. The space charge effect induced in the bunch is modelled assuming the bunch is ellipsoid like. Beam transport in vacuum, comparison between gaussian and waterbag distribution, comparison between envelope model and PIC simulation will be discussed. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 [1]E.Esarey et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-24,252 (1996); W.P. Leemans et al, ibidem, 331. [2]D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E.Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C.B Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E59, 6037 (1999) [3]DESY M87-161 (1987); DESY M88-013 (1988) [4] R.W. Garnett and T.P Wangler, IEEE Part. Acce. Conf. (1991)

  9. Advances in understanding particle acceleration and loss from Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    The main science targets of the Cluster mission, originally proposed in 1982, were the bow shock, the cusp, the magnetopause and the plasmasheet. The inner magnetosphere was not a prime target and thanks to the low perigee, around 4 RE geocentric distance, that decreased down to a few 100s of kilometers altitude in 2011, this region could be studied for the first time with four spacecraft. We will present science highlights obtained both in the plasmasphere and in the radiation belts such as the localization of the source of non-thermal continuum radiation both through triangulation and through the tilt of one spacecraft, plasmasphere density structures, interplanetary shock electron acceleration in the inner magnetosphere, discovery of the plasmaspheric wind, interaction between the plasmasphere and the radiation belts, multi-point observations of equatorial noise as well as many multi-point observations of chorus emissions. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  10. Fastest Electropolishing Technique on Niobium for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, R.A. Rimmer, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Field emission on the inner surfaces of niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is still one of the major obstacles for reaching high accelerating gradients for SRF community. Our previous experimental results [1] seemed to imply that the threshold of field emission was related to the thickness of Nb surface oxide layers. In this contribution, a more detailed study on the influences of the surface oxide layers on the field emission on Nb surfaces will be reported. By anodization technique, the thickness of the surface pentoxide layer was artificially fabricated from 3nm up to 460nm. A home-made scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was employed to perform the scans on the surfaces. Emitters were characterized using a scanning electron microscope together with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer. The experimental results could be understood by a simple model calculation based on classic electromagnetic theory as shown in Ref.1. Possibly implications for Nb SRF cavity applications from this study will be discussed.

  11. Acceleration and transport processes - Verification and observations. [of particles in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The general problem of diffusive transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles is considered. The transport of solar-flare particles, solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays and shock acceleration processes on the solar wind are examined and observational tests are summarized. It is concluded that the basic diffusive transport equation is a useful approximation in situations like the solar wind, where turbulent scattering by magnetic irregularities is sufficient to maintain near isotropy. The application of this equation to the interstellar medium andd other, more distant astrophysical regimes is then discussed and implications for gamma-ray astrophysics are outlined. Finally the evidence for interstellar turbulence is reviewed and its consequences briefly discussed.

  12. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  13. Particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection in unstable twisted coronal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa; Vekstein, Grigory

    Photospheric motions may result in twisting of a coronal loop magnetic field. Such a field configuration contains free energy that may be released by reconnection with the magnetic field relaxing to the linear force-free configuration. Browning & Van der Linden (2003) suggested that such a relaxation event may be triggered by onset of ideal kink instability. In the present work we study the evolution of a twisted magnetic fluxtube with zero net ax-ial current following Browning et al. (2008). Further, proton and electron trajectories are investigated using the test-particle approach consistently with the time-dependent reconnec-tion model. We discuss temporal evolution of proton and electron energy spectra and possible observational implications.

  14. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  15. A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2013-07-10

    We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

  16. Extragalactic circuits, transmission lines, and CR particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Philipp P.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2015-08-01

    A non-negligible fraction of a Supermassive Black Hole's (SMBH) rest mass energy gets transported into extragalactic space by a remarkable process in jets which are incompletely understood. What are the physical processes which transport this energy? It is likely that the energy flows electromagnetically, rather than via a particle beam flux. The deduced electromagnetic fields may produce particles of energy as high as ˜ 1020 eV. The energetics of SMBH accretion disk models and the electromagnetic energy transfer imply that a SMBH should generate a 1018 - 1019 Ampères current close to the black hole and its accretion disk. We describe the so far best observation-based estimate of the magnitude of the current flow along the axis of the jet extending from the nucleus of the active galaxy in 3C303. The current is measured to be I ˜ 1018 Ampères at ˜ 40 kpc away from the AGN. This indicates that organised current flow remains intact over multi-kpc distances. The electric current I transports electromagnetic power into free space, P = I2Z, where Z ˜ 30 Ohms is related to the impedance of free space, and this points to the existence of cosmic electric circuit. The associated electric potential drop, V = IZ, is of the order of that required to generate Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). We also explore further implications, including disruption/deflection of the power flow and also why such measurements, exemplified by those on 3C303, are currently very difficult to make and to unambiguously interpret. This naturally leads to the topic of how such measurements can be extended and improved in the future. We describe the analogy of electromagnetically dominated jets with transmission lines. High powered jets in vacuo can be understood by approximate analogy with a waveguide. The importance of inductance, impedance, and other laboratory electrical concepts are discussed in this context.

  17. Comparison of test particle acceleration in torsional spine and fan reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseinpour, M. Mehdizade, M.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2014-10-15

    Magnetic reconnection is a common phenomenon taking place in astrophysical and space plasmas, especially in solar flares which are rich sources of highly energetic particles. Torsional spine and fan reconnections are important mechanisms proposed for steady-state three-dimensional null-point reconnection. By using the magnetic and electric fields for these regimes, we numerically investigate the features of test particle acceleration in both regimes with input parameters for the solar corona. By comparison, torsional spine reconnection is found to be more efficient than torsional fan reconnection in an acceleration of a proton to a high kinetic energy. A proton can gain as high as 100 MeV of relativistic kinetic energy within only a few milliseconds. Moreover, in torsional spine reconnection, an accelerated particle can escape either along the spine axis or on the fan plane depending on its injection position. However, in torsional fan reconnection, the particle is only allowed to accelerate along the spine axis. In addition, in both regimes, the particle's trajectory and final kinetic energy depend on the injection position but adopting either spatially uniform or non-uniform localized plasma resistivity does not much influence the features of trajectory.

  18. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II accelerator shots

    SciTech Connect

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes.

  19. Fossil AGN jets as ultrahigh-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Protheroe, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Remnants of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets and their surrounding cocoons leave colossal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fossil structures storing total energies ~1060 erg. The original AGN may be dead but the fossil will retain its stable configuration resembling the reversed-field pinch (RFP) encountered in laboratory MHD experiments. In an RFP the longitudinal magnetic field changes direction at a critical distance from the axis, leading to magnetic reconnection there, and to slow decay of the large-scale RFP field. We show that this field decay induces large-scale electric fields which can accelerate cosmic rays with an E-2 power law up to ultrahigh energies with a cut-off depending on the fossil parameters. The cut-off is expected to be rigidity dependent, implying the observed composition would change from light to heavy close to the cut-off if one or two nearby AGN fossils dominate. Given that several per cent of the Universe's volume may house such slowly decaying structures, these fossils may even re-energize ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from distant/old sources, offsetting the `GZK-losses' due to interactions with photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation and giving evidence of otherwise undetectable fossils. In this case the composition would remain light to the highest energies if distant sources or fossils dominated, but otherwise would be mixed. It is hoped the new generation of cosmic ray experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and ultrahigh-energy neutrino telescopes such as ANITA and lunar Cherenkov experiments will clarify this.

  20. Unsteady forces on a spherical particle accelerating or decelerating in an initially stagnant fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, Yashas Mudlapur Phaneesh

    Flows with particles play an important role in a number of engineering applications. These include trajectories of droplets in sprays in fuel-injected-reciprocating-piston and gas-turbine engines, erosion of materials due to particle impact on a surface, and deposition of materials on surfaces by impinging droplets or particles that could solidify or bond on impact. For these applications, it is important to understand the forces that act on the particles so that their trajectories could be predicted. Considerable work has been done on understanding the forces acting on spherical particles, where the Reynolds numbers (Rep) based on the particle diameter and the relative speed between the particle and the fluid is less than unity. When Rep is larger than unity and when the particle is accelerating or decelerating, the added-mass effect and the Basset forces are not well understood. In this study, time-accurate numerical simulations were performed to study laminar incompressible flow induced by a single non-rotating rigid spherical particle that is accelerated or decelerated at a constant rate in an initially stagnant fluid, where the unsteady flow about the spherical particle is resolved. The Rep studied range from 0.01 to 100, and the acceleration number (Ac), where A c is the square of the relative velocity between the particle and the fluid divided by the acceleration times the particle diameter studied was in the range 2.13x-7 < |Ac |< 21337. Results obtained show the added mass effect for Rep up to 100 has the same functional form as those based on potential theory where the Rep is infinite and creeping flow where Rep is less than unity. The Basset force, however, differs considerably from those under creeping flow conditions and depends on Rep and the acceleration number (Ac). A model was developed to provide the magnitude of the added-mass effect and the Basset force in the range of Rep and Ac studied. Results obtained also show the effect of unsteadiness to

  1. Open questions on particle acceleration in strongly magnetized plasmas and how to answer them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthomier, Matthieu; Fazakerley, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Particle acceleration mechanisms in solar system plasmas usually imply the conversion of electromagnetic energy into particle kinetic energy. These processes may take different forms depending on plasma magnetization but in most cases they involve multi-scale phenomena that cannot be described by ideal MHD. Little evidence has been gathered on how particle acceleration works in strongly magnetized plasmas. We will show how Earth's auroral regions provide the unique opportunity to address the open questions on particle acceleration in low beta plasmas. Single point observations in the auroral regions have suggested that acceleration by Alfvén waves would be responsible for filamentary acceleration along magnetic field lines. In the auroral regions, this mechanism would be associated with the generation of the sub-km scale auroral arcs. However single spacecraft measurements cannot evaluate the energy exchanged over a large volume of space between waves and particles. They cannot assess the efficiency of this mechanism, nor can they tell us where and when it is effective and how it relates to the evolving boundary conditions of the system. Numerical simulations alone cannot fully describe this multi-scale and non-local process in the inhomogeneous auroral plasma. Alternatively, it has been proposed from high-time resolution particle measurements in the auroral regions that localized parallel electric fields would explain the larger scale arcs that can be observed by onboard imagers. Single spacecraft measurements cannot follow the formation and evolution of these transient structures or the complex transport phenomena associated with the strong plasma turbulence that develop along magnetic field lines around these structures. Multi-point CLUSTER observations have shown how these potential acceleration structures were distributed in space and time. However we still miss the dynamic picture of how these structures are created on how they can be maintained in space and

  2. Particle acceleration in solar active regions being in the state of self-organized criticality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    We review the recent observational results on flare initiation and particle acceleration in solar active regions. Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons and protons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field’s strength and configuration with test particle simulations. We work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations, based on a self-organized criticality models (SOC). A relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle’s guiding center within these configurations. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission and compare our results with the current observations.

  3. Surfaces of infinite red-shift around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    SciTech Connect

    Farhoosh, H.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1980-04-15

    The structure of the surfaces of infinite red-shift that are formed about an accelerating Kerr-type particle is studied. It is shown that for nonzero acceleration and rotation there exist three relevant surfaces of infinite red-shift. One of these surfaces is analogous to the Schwarzschild surface and is mainly a consequence of the mass. The acceleration causes this surface to expand in the forward direction and contract in the backward direction. In addition, the rotation causes the Schwarzschild surface to contract both in the forward and backward directions. The second surface is mainly due to the acceleration and is called the Rindler surface. It has a shape similar to a parabola of revolution. As the acceleration increases, the Rindler surface moves inward, approaching the Schwarzschild surface. Rotation causes the Rindler surface to contract slightly in the equatorial plane. As the acceleration increases to a critical value the Rindler and the Schwarzschild surfaces coincide on the equatorial plane. As the acceleration is increased further, the points of coincidence spread towards the poles. The third surface is produced mainly by the rotation and is a shape similar to the interior Kerr surface. This surface is called the Kerr surface. By increasing the rotation this surface expands in the polar regions, approaching the Schwarzschild surface. Acceleration causes this surface to distort and become elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction.

  4. Test particle acceleration in a numerical MHD experiment of an anemone jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, K. J.; Galsgaard, K.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: To use a 3D numerical MHD experiment representing magnetic flux emerging into an open field region as a background field for tracing charged particles. The interaction between the two flux systems generates a localised current sheet where MHD reconnection takes place. We investigate how efficiently the reconnection region accelerates charged particles and what kind of energy distribution they acquire. Methods: The particle tracing is done numerically using the Guiding Center Approximation on individual data sets from the numerical MHD experiment. Results: We derive particle and implied photon distribution functions having power law forms, and look at the impact patterns of particles hitting the photosphere. We find that particles reach energies far in excess of those seen in observations of solar flares. However the structure of the impact region in the photosphere gives a good representation of the topological structure of the magnetic field. Three movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Killing horizons and dragging of the inertial frame about a uniformly accelerating particle

    SciTech Connect

    Farhoosh, H.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1980-01-15

    The structure of Killing horizons in the static vacuum C metric which represents the gravitational field of a uniformly accelerating Schwarzschild-type particle is studied. It is shown that for A/sup 2/m/sup 2/<1/27 there exist two physically meaningful horizons. One horizon is analogous to the Schwarzschild surface and the other is similar to a flat surface in Euclidean space traveling at the speed of light along the axis of symmetry. This second surface is called the Rindler surface because of its analogy with the Rindler surface in the limit that geometry becomes Euclidean. As the acceleration increases, the Schwarzschild surface distorts from its original spherical shape. Its shape becomes teardroplike with the pointed end oriented in the direction of the acceleration. In the forward direction the Schwarzschild surface moves outward from the origin as the acceleration continues to increase in accordance with the principle of equivalence. In the backward direction the surface shrinks from its original Schwarzschild surface as the acceleration increases for relatively small values of the acceleration. This is also expected from the principle of equivalence. As the acceleration reaches A=1/..sqrt..54m the Schwarzschild surface in the backward direction reaches a minimum distance from the origin at r=..sqrt..3m and as the acceleration further increases it reverses its direction of motion and grows outward until it reaches the original Schwarzschild surface at r=2m. This behavior is an apparent violation of the principle of equivalence. As the acceleration increases, the Rindler surface moves inward approaching the Schwarzschild surface, and finally when A=1/..sqrt..27m the two surfaces unite and produce a naked singularity. Radial geodesic and nongeodesic motions are also investigated. It is shown that for small accelerations the results are in agreement with the principle of equivalence and the effects of dragging of the inertial frame due to the rectilinear

  6. Observations of Particle Acceleration Associated with Small-Scale Magnetic Islands Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown both theoretically (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015) and observationally (Khabarova et al. 2015) that dynamical small-scale magnetic islands play a significant role in local particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind. We discuss here observational evidence for particle acceleration at shock waves that is enhanced by the recently proposed mechanism of particle energization by both island contraction and the reconnection electric field generated in merging or contracting magnetic islands downstream of the shocks (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015). Both observations and simulations suppose formation of magnetic islands in the turbulent wake of heliospheric or interplanetary shocks (ISs) (Turner et al. 2013; Karimabadi et al. 2014; Chasapis et al. 2015). A combination of the DSA mechanism with acceleration by magnetic island dynamics explain why the spectra of energetic particles that are supposed to be accelerated at heliospheric shocks are sometimes harder than predicted by DSA theory (Zank et al. 2015). Moreover, such an approach allows us to explain and describe other unusual behaviour of accelerated particles, such as when energetic particle flux intensity peaks are observed downstream of heliospheric shocks instead of peaking directly at the shock according to DSA theory. Zank et al. (2015) predicted the peak location to be behind the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) and showed that the distance from the shock to the peak depends on particle energy, which is in agreement with Voyager 2 observations. Similar particle behaviour is observed near strong ISs in the outer heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2. Observations show that heliospheric shocks are accompanied by current sheets, and that IS crossings always coincide with sharp changes in the IMF azimuthal angle and the IMF strength, which is typical for strong current sheets. The presence of current sheets in the vicinity of ISs acts to magnetically

  7. Inertial particle acceleration statistics in turbulence: Effects of filtering, biased sampling, and flow topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Juan P. L. C.; Collins, Lance R.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of "biased sampling," i.e., the clustering of inertial particles in regions of the flow with low vorticity, and "filtering," i.e., the tendency of inertial particles to attenuate the fluid velocity fluctuations, on the probability density function of inertial particle accelerations. In particular, we find that the concept of "biased filtering" introduced by Ayyalasomayajula et al. ["Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 20, 0945104 (2008), 10.1063/1.2976174], in which particles filter stronger acceleration events more than weaker ones, is relevant to the higher order moments of acceleration. Flow topology and its connection to acceleration is explored through invariants of the velocity-gradient, strain-rate, and rotation-rate tensors. A semi-quantitative analysis is performed where we assess the contribution of specific flow topologies to acceleration moments. Our findings show that the contributions of regions of high vorticity and low strain decrease significantly with Stokes number, a non-dimensional measure of particle inertia. The contribution from regions of low vorticity and high strain exhibits a peak at a Stokes number of approximately 0.2. Following the methodology of Ooi et al. ["A study of the evolution and characteristics of the invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor in isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 381, 141 (1999), 10.1017/S0022112098003681], we compute mean conditional trajectories in planes formed by pairs of tensor invariants in time. Among the interesting findings is the existence of a stable focus in the plane formed by the second invariants of the strain-rate and rotation-rate tensors. Contradicting the results of Ooi et al., we find a stable focus in the plane formed by the second and third invariants of the strain-rate tensor for fluid tracers. We confirm, at an even higher Reynolds number, the conjecture of Collins and Keswani ["Reynolds

  8. Particle Acceleration in a High Enthalpy Nozzle Flow with a Modified Detonation Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

    2014-04-01

    The quality of thermal sprayed coatings depends on many factors which have been investigated and are still in scientific focus. Mostly, the coating material is inserted into the spray device as solid powder. The particle condition during the spray process has a strong effect on coating quality. In some cases, higher particle impact energy leads to improved coating quality. Therefore, a computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension with a nozzle transforms the detonation gun process into an intermittent shock tunnel process in which the particles are accelerated in a high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation with nozzle in which the device generates very high particle velocities up to a frequency of 5 Hz. A variable particle injection system allows injection of the powder at any point along the nozzle axis to control particle temperature and velocity. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture is used in the experiments. Operation performance and nozzle outflow are characterized by time resolved pressure measurements. The particle conditions inside the nozzle and in the nozzle exit plane are calculated with a quasi-one-dimensional WENO-code of high order. For the experiments, particle velocity is obtained by particle image velocimetry, and particle concentration is qualitatively determined by a laser extinction method. The powders used are WC-Co(88/12), NiCr(80/20), Al2O3, and Cu. Different substrate/powder combinations for varying particle injection positions have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

  9. Particle injection and acceleration at earth's bow shock - Comparison of upstream and downstream events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Moebius, Eberhard; Paschmann, Goetz

    1990-01-01

    The injection and acceleration of thermal solar wind ions at the quasi-parallel earth's bow shock during radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions is investigated. Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module satellite observations of complete proton spectra, and of heavy ion spectra above 10 keV/Q, made on September 12, 1984 near the nose of the shock, are presented and compared to the predictions of a Monte Carlo shock simulation which includes diffusive shock acceleration. It is found that the spectral observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the simulation when it is assumed that all accelerated ions originate in the solar wind and are injected into the acceleration mechanism by thermal leakage from the downstream plasma. The efficiency, which is determined directly from the downstream observations, is high, with at least 15 percent of the solar wind energy flux going into accelerated particles. The comparisons allow constraints to be placed on the rigidity dependence of the scattering mean free path and suggest that the upstream solar wind must be slowed substantially by backstreaming accelerated ions prior to undergoing a sharp transition in the viscous subshock.

  10. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK WITH A STOCHASTIC SHOCK OBLIQUITY APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Aaron D.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2013-08-01

    Observations by the plasma and magnetic field instruments on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft suggest that the termination shock is weak with a compression ratio of {approx}2. However, this is contrary to the observations of accelerated particle spectra at the termination shock, where standard diffusive shock acceleration theory predicts a compression ratio closer to {approx}2.9. Using our focused transport model, we investigate pickup proton acceleration at a stationary spherical termination shock with a moderately strong compression ratio of 2.8 to include both the subshock and precursor. We show that for the particle energies observed by the Voyager 2 Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument, pickup protons will have effective length scales of diffusion that are larger than the combined subshock and precursor termination shock structure observed. As a result, the particles will experience a total effective termination shock compression ratio that is larger than values inferred by the plasma and magnetic field instruments for the subshock and similar to the value predicted by diffusive shock acceleration theory. Furthermore, using a stochastically varying magnetic field angle, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the multiple power-law structure observed for the LECP spectra downstream of the termination shock.

  12. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature driftmore » of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.« less

  13. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature drift of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.

  14. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Dynamics during Magnetic Reconnection in the Magnetically Dominated Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron-positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ \\equiv {B}2/(4π {n}e{m}e{c}2)\\gg 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature drift of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f\\propto {(γ -1)}-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This study suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.

  15. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE EXPANDING BLAST WAVE OF {eta} CARINA'S GREAT ERUPTION OF 1843

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, S.; Domainko, W.; Hinton, J. A. E-mail: wilfried.domainko@mpi-hd.mpg.d

    2010-08-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV {<=} E {<=} 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission in the direction of {eta} Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE, and Fermi satellites. So far this emission has been interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars. However, the existence of a very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 'Great Eruption' provides an alternative particle acceleration site in this system. Here, we explore an alternate scenario and find that inverse Compton emission from electrons accelerated in the blast wave can naturally explain both the flux and spectral shape of the measured hard X-ray and HE {gamma}-ray emission. This scenario is further supported by the lack of significant variability in the INTEGRAL and Fermi measured fluxes.

  16. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  17. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  18. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  19. Evaluation of parameters for particles acceleration by the zero-point field of quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.

    1985-01-01

    That particles may be accelerated by vacuum effects in quantum field theory has been repeatedly proposed in the last few years. A natural upshot of this is a mechanism for cosmic rays (CR) primaries acceleration. A mechanism for acceleration by the zero-point field (ZPE) when the ZPE is taken in a realistic sense (in opposition to a virtual field) was considered. Originally the idea was developed within a semiclassical context. The classical Einstein-Hopf model (EHM) was used to show that free isolated electromagnrtically interacting particles performed a random walk in phase space and more importantly in momentum space when submitted to the perennial action of the so called classical electromagnrtic ZPE.

  20. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  1. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas.more » At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.« less

  2. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy. PMID:12512712

  3. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  4. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  5. Energy-Dependent Ionization States of Shock-Accelerated Particles in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ng, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the range of possible energy dependence of the ionization states of ions that are shock-accelerated from the ambient plasma of the solar corona. If acceleration begins in a region of moderate density, sufficiently low in the corona, ions above about 0.1 MeV/amu approach an equilibrium charge state that depends primarily upon their speed and only weakly on the plasma temperature. We suggest that the large variations of the charge states with energy for ions such as Si and Fe observed in the 1997 November 6 event are consistent with stripping in moderately dense coronal. plasma during shock acceleration. In the large solar-particle events studied previously, acceleration occurs sufficiently high in the corona that even Fe ions up to 600 MeV/amu are not stripped of electrons.

  6. Developments in accelerators and instrumentation relevant to imaging with charged particles and positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    In past years particle accelerators have become increasingly important tools for the advancement of medical science. From the pace of advancing technology and current directions in medical research, it is clear that this relationship between accelerators and medicine will only grow stronger in future years. In view of this importance, this relationship is investigated in some detail, with an eye not so much towards the medical uses of the beams produced, but more towards the technology associated with these accelerators and the criteria which make for successful incorporation of these machines into the clinical environment. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the different kinds of accelerators found in medical use today are reviewed briefly discussing salient points of each.

  7. Diffusive Shock Acceleration Simulations: Comparison with Particle Methods and Bow Shock Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    1995-07-01

    Direct comparisons of diffusive particle acceleration numerical simulations have been made against Monte Carlo and hybrid plasma simulations by Ellison et al. (1993) and against observations at the Earth's bow shock presented by Ellison et al. (1990). Toward this end we have introduced a new numerical scheme for injection of cosmic-ray particles out of the thermal plasma, modeled by way of the diffusive scattering process itself; that is, the diffusion and acceleration across the shock front of particles out of the suprathermal tail of the Maxwellian distribution. Our simulations take two forms. First, we have solved numerically the timedependent diffusion-advection equation for the high-energy (cosmic-ray) protons in one-dimensional quasiparallel shocks. Dynamical feedback between the particles and thermal plasma is included. The proton fluxes on both sides of the shock derived from our method are consistent with those calculated by Ellison et al. (1993). A similar test has compared our methods to published measurements at the Earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was almost parallel to the solar wind velocity (Ellison et al. 1990). Again our results are in good agreement. Second, the same shock conditions have been simulated with the two-fluid version of diffusive shock acceleration theory by adopting injection rates and the closure parameters inferred from the diffusion-advection equation calculations. The acceleration efficiency and the shock structure calculated with the two-fluid method are in good agreement with those computed with the diffusion-advection method. Thus, we find that all of these computational methods (diffusion-advection, two-fluid, Monte Carlo, and hybrid) are in substantial agreement on the issues they can simultaneously address, so that the essential physics of diffusive particle acceleration is adequately contained within each. This is despite the fact that each makes what appear to be very different assumptions or

  8. Shock Acceleration and Transport of Solar Energetic Particles in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. K.; Ko, Y.; Tylka, A. J.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    In gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events, the phase-space density of suprathermal seed particles plays an important role in the bootstrap acceleration of SEPs at a coronal-mass-ejection driven shock in the corona. Higher seed proton density causes more rapid resonant amplification of ambient Alfvén waves and hence faster shock acceleration of SEPs. On the other hand, SEP-driven Alfvén wave growth is slowed by higher plasma density and by the thermal damping of left-hand polarized waves at frequencies exceeding a fraction of the proton cyclotron frequency. Damping also influences the background wave distribution. Coronal magnetic field strongly influences the wave-particle interaction since its magnitude scales the resonant wavenumber and its negative parallel gradient focuses the charged particles. The solar-wind velocity and Alfvén speed, relevant to the height of shock formation, are related to the plasma density and magnetic field. Consequently, the spatial dependences of all these environmental parameters influence the coupled evolution of SEP and Alfvén wave distributions. We will present results from our models of SEP acceleration and transport combining the effects of the above physical considerations. The model results will be compared to directly observed and inferred features of SEP events (e.g. streaming-limited intensity, maximum energy, height of first solar particle release) to address the roles and relative importance of the above physical factors.

  9. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  10. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common “bead-on-the-wire” approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their “falling” on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  11. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  12. Quantum radiation produced by a uniformly accelerating charged particle in thermal random motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshita, Naritaka; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Sen

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the properties of quantum radiation produced by a uniformly accelerating charged particle undergoing thermal random motion, which originates from the coupling to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Because the thermal random motion is regarded to result from the Unruh effect, the quantum radiation might give us hints of the Unruh effect. The energy flux of the quantum radiation is negative and smaller than that of Larmor radiation by one order in a /m , where a is the constant acceleration and m is the mass of the particle. Thus, the quantum radiation appears to be a suppression of the classical Larmor radiation. The quantum interference effect plays an important role in this unique signature. The results are consistent with the predictions of a model consisting of a particle coupled to a massless scalar field as well as those of the previous studies on the quantum effect on the Larmor radiation.

  13. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M; Vainchtein, D L

    2010-12-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. PMID:21198098

  14. Hybrid PIC Simulations of Particle Dynamics in Coaxial Plasma Jet Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten; Hughes, Thomas; Welch, Dale; Hakel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    We describe the results of 1D and 2D simulations of plasma jet accelerators using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code Lsp. Previous studies of 1D cartesian simulations have shown that ion particle dynamics at the plasma-vacuum interface depend critically on the local Hall parameter, which is strongly dependent on electron temperature. In a coaxial accelerator with finite transverse dimensions, large transverse ion motions, predicted at moderate Hall parameters in 1D, can lead to ion loss to the walls. The results of 2D r-z jet simulations are described and compared with the 1D cartesian results. The effects of particle loss and ablation at the wall are considered, as are electron heating mechanisms at the plasma-vacuum interface, including radiation losses. We will apply the results to the plasma jet experiments underway at HyperV Technologies Corp.

  15. CME-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event near solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the Heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare of the 26th of April 2008 offered an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favorable conditions, since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This allowed us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis combining radio observations (Nançay Radioheliograph and Decameter Array, Wind/WAVES spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light as well as in-situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3-D pressure front developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons that remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front generated ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, due to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the Heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The observations for this event

  16. Coronal mass ejection-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis P.

    2016-05-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare on 26 April 2008 provided an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favourable conditions since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This enabled us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified coronal mass ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis, which combines radio observations (Nançay Radio Heliograph and Nançay Decametre Array, Wind/Waves spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light, as well as in situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points, we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3D pressure front that was developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons, which remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, owing to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, which was traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The

  17. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  18. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  19. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  20. Magnetic-island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.