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Sample records for accelerates tumor progression

  1. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kveiborg, Marie; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Mercurio, Arthur M; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-11-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In this study, we found that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 seems to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we show that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma, ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and, only rarely, seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, on the basis of the fact that TGF-β1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-β1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12 synthesis, and growth of these cells in vivo induced more than 200-fold increase in ADAM12 expression. Our observation that ADAM12 expression is significantly higher in the terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) adjacent to human breast carcinoma compared with TDLUs found in normal breast tissue supports our hypothesis that tumor-associated stroma triggers ADAM12 expression.

  2. Neutrophils drive accelerated tumor progression in the collagen-dense mammary tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    García-Mendoza, María G; Inman, David R; Ponik, Suzanne M; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheerar, Dagna S; Van Doorn, Rachel R; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-05-11

    High mammographic density has been correlated with a 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer, and is associated with increased stromal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen I. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for high breast tissue density are not completely understood. We previously described accelerated tumor formation and metastases in a transgenic mouse model of collagen-dense mammary tumors (type I collagen-α1 (Col1α1)(tm1Jae) and mouse mammary tumor virus - polyoma virus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyVT)) compared to wild-type mice. Using ELISA cytokine arrays and multi-color flow cytometry analysis, we studied cytokine signals and the non-malignant, immune cells in the collagen-dense tumor microenvironment that may promote accelerated tumor progression and metastasis. Collagen-dense tumors did not show any alteration in immune cell populations at late stages. The cytokine signals in the mammary tumor microenvironment were clearly different between wild-type and collagen-dense tumors. Cytokines associated with neutrophil signaling, such as granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulated factor (GM-CSF), were increased in collagen-dense tumors. Depleting neutrophils with anti-Ly6G (1A8) significantly reduced the number of tumors, and blocked metastasis in over 80 % of mice with collagen-dense tumors, but did not impact tumor growth or metastasis in wild-type mice. Our study suggests that tumor progression in a collagen-dense microenvironment is mechanistically different, with pro-tumor neutrophils, compared to a non-dense microenvironment.

  3. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley XL; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S.; Carreras, Alba; Khlayfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Fragmented sleep (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that SF promotes tumor growth and progression through pro-inflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to SF one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis three weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that SF enhanced tumor size and weight compared to control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in SF tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in SF tumors where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule, compared to control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88−/− and TRIF−/− hosts, the more aggressive features produced by SF persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by SF were abolished completely in TLR4−/− mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:24448240

  4. Accelerated tumor progression in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Elena; Capece, Marina; Franceschini, Alessia; Falzoni, Simonetta; Giuliani, Anna L; Rotondo, Alessandra; Sarti, Alba C; Bonora, Massimo; Syberg, Susanne; Corigliano, Domenica; Pinton, Paolo; Jorgensen, Niklas R; Abelli, Luigi; Emionite, Laura; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito; Di Virgilio, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The ATP receptor P2X7 (P2X7R or P2RX7) has a key role in inflammation and immunity, but its possible roles in cancer are not firmly established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of host genetic deletion of P2X7R in the mouse on the growth of B16 melanoma or CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Tumor size and metastatic dissemination were assessed by in vivo calliper and luciferase luminescence emission measurements along with postmortem examination. In P2X7R-deficient mice, tumor growth and metastatic spreading were accelerated strongly, compared with wild-type (wt) mice. Intratumoral IL-1β and VEGF release were drastically reduced, and inflammatory cell infiltration was abrogated nearly completely. Similarly, tumor growth was also greatly accelerated in wt chimeric mice implanted with P2X7R-deficient bone marrow cells, defining hematopoietic cells as a sufficient site of P2X7R action. Finally, dendritic cells from P2X7R-deficient mice were unresponsive to stimulation with tumor cells, and chemotaxis of P2X7R-less cells was impaired. Overall, our results showed that host P2X7R expression was critical to support an antitumor immune response, and to restrict tumor growth and metastatic diffusion. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Inactivation of the Wwox gene accelerates forestomach tumor progression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Hagan, John P; Aqeilan, Haifa A; Pichiorri, Flavia; Fong, Louise Y Y; Croce, Carlo M

    2007-06-15

    The WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor spanning the second most common human fragile site, FRA16D. Targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice led to an increased incidence of spontaneous and ethyl nitrosourea-induced tumors. In humans, loss of heterozygosity and reduced or loss of WWOX expression has been reported in esophageal squamous cell cancers (SCC). In the present study, we examined whether inactivation of the Wwox gene might lead to enhanced esophageal/forestomach tumorigenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine. Wwox+/- and Wwox+/+ mice were treated with six intragastric doses of N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine and observed for 15 subsequent weeks. Ninety-six percent (25 of 26) of Wwox+/- mice versus 29% (10 of 34) of Wwox+/+ mice developed forestomach tumors (P = 1.3 x 10(-7)). The number of tumors per forestomach was significantly greater in Wwox+/- than in Wwox+/+ mice (3.2 +/- 0.34 versus 0.47 +/- 0.17; P < 0.0001). In addition, 27% of Wwox+/- mice had invasive SCC in the forestomach, as compared with 0% of wild-type controls (P = 0.002). Intriguingly, forestomachs from Wwox+/- mice displayed moderately strong Wwox protein staining in the near-normal epithelium, but weak and diffuse staining in SCC in the same tissue section, a result suggesting that Wwox was haploinsufficient for the initiation of tumor development. Our findings provide the first in vivo evidence of the tumor suppressor function of WWOX in forestomach/esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest that inactivation of one allele of WWOX accelerates the predisposition of normal cells to malignant transformation.

  6. Nonlinear ghost waves accelerate the progression of high-grade brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Rosa; Martínez-González, Alicia; Pérez-García, Víctor M.

    2016-10-01

    We study a reduced continuous model describing the evolution of high grade gliomas in response to hypoxic events through the interplay of different cellular phenotypes. We show that hypoxic events, even when sporadic and/or limited in space, may have a crucial role on the acceleration of high grade gliomas growth. Our modeling approach is based on two cellular phenotypes. One of them is more migratory and a second one is more proliferative. Transitions between both phenotypes are driven by the local oxygen values, assumed in this simple model to be uniform. Surprisingly, even very localized in time hypoxia events leading to transient migratory populations have the potential to accelerate the tumor's invasion speed up to speeds close to those of the migratory phenotype. The high invasion speed persists for times much longer than the lifetime of the hypoxic event. Moreover, the phenomenon is observed both when the migratory cells form a persistent wave of cells located on the invasion front and when they form a evanescent "ghost" wave disappearing after a short time by decay to the more proliferative phenotype. Our findings are obtained through numerical simulations of the model equations both in 1D and higher dimensional scenarios. We also provide a deeper mathematical analysis of some aspects of the problem such as the conditions for the existence of persistent waves of cells with a more migratory phenotype.

  7. Hepatitis B virus surface proteins accelerate cholestatic injury and tumor progression in Abcb4-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Churin, Yuri; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Köhler, Kernt; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Stinn, Anne; Tschuschner, Annette; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of cholestasis associated carcinogenesis could challenge the development of new personalized therapeutic approaches and thus improve prognosis. Simultaneous damage might aggravate hepatic injury, induce chronic liver disease and even promote carcinogenesis. We aimed to study the effect of Hepatitis B virus surface protein (HBsAg) on cholestatic liver disease and associated carcinogenesis in a mouse model combining both impairments. Hybrids of Abcb4−/− and HBsAg transgenic mice were bred on fibrosis susceptible background BALB/c. Liver injury, serum bile acid concentration, hepatic fibrosis, and carcinogenesis were enhanced by the combination of simultaneous damage in line with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), proto-oncogene c-Jun, and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Activation of Protein Kinase RNA-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2α) indicated unfolded protein response (UPR) in HBsAg-expressing mice and even in Abcb4−/− without HBsAg-expression. CONCLUSION: Cholestasis-induced STAT3- and JNK-pathways may predispose HBsAg-associated tumorigenesis. Since STAT3- and JNK-activation are well characterized critical regulators for tumor promotion, the potentiation of their activation in hybrids suggests an additive mechanism enhancing tumor incidence. PMID:28881751

  8. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  9. Increasing Dietary Selenium Elevates Reducing Capacity and ERK Activation Associated with Accelerated Progression of Select Mesothelioma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Aaron H.; Bertino, Pietro; Hoffmann, FuKun W.; Gaudino, Giovanni; Carbone, Michele; Hoffmann, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of the micronutrient selenium on malignant mesothelioma (MM) progression, we cultured four different MM cell lines in media containing increasing amounts of sodium selenite (30, 50, and 80 nmol/L). Increasing selenium levels increased density-dependent proliferation and mobility for CRH5 and EKKH5 but not AB12 and AK7. Comparing these cell lines revealed that extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation was sensitive to a selenium increase in CRH5 and EKKH5 but not AB12 and AK7 cells. Stable expression of a dominant-negative mutant ERK eliminated the effects of increasing selenium. Because ERK is redox sensitive, we compared the MM cell lines in terms of glutathione levels and the capacity to reduce exogenous hydrogen peroxide. Increasing selenium levels led to higher glutathione and reducing capacity in CRH5 and EKKH5 but not AB12 and AK7. The reducing agent N-acetylcysteine eliminated the effects of selenium on ERK activation, proliferation, and mobility. Mice fed diets containing increasing levels of selenium (0.08, 0.25, and 1.0 ppm) showed increased tumor progression for CRH5 but not AB12, MM cells, and in vivo N-acetylcysteine treatment eliminated these effects. These data suggest that the effects of dietary selenium on MM tumor progression depend on the arising cancer cells' redox metabolism, and the tumors able to convert increased selenium into a stronger reducing capacity actually benefit from increased selenium intake. PMID:24492200

  10. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  11. Tumor gangliosides accelerate murine tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihui; Wondimu, Assefa; Yan, Su; Bobb, Daniel; Ladisch, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Tumor cells shed gangliosides and populate their microenvironment with these biologically active membrane glycosphingolipids. In vitro, ganglioside enrichment amplifies receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and activation of vascular endothelial cells. However, a long-standing question is whether in the actual microenvironment of a neoplasm, in vivo, tumor cell ganglioside shedding stimulates angiogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that tumor gangliosides have a critical proangiogenic role in vivo using novel murine tumor cells, GM3synthase/GM2synthase double knockout (DKO) cells, genetically completely incapable of ganglioside synthesis and impaired in tumor growth versus wild-type (WT) ganglioside-rich cells. We studied angiogenesis during tumor formation by these ganglioside-depleted cells, quantifying vessel formation, angiogenic factor production/release, and consequences of reconstitution with purified WT gangliosides. DKO cells formed virtually avascular tumors, much smaller than ganglioside-rich WT tumors and displaying a striking paucity of blood vessels, despite levels of VEGF and other angiogenic factors that were similar to those of WT cells. Transient enrichment of the ganglioside milieu of the DKO cell inoculum by adding purified WT gangliosides partially restored angiogenesis and tumor growth. We conclude that tumor gangliosides trigger robust angiogenesis important for tumor growth. Our findings suggest strategies to eliminate their synthesis and shedding by tumor cells should be pursued.

  12. Tumor gangliosides accelerate murine tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihui; Wondimu, Assefa; Yan, Su; Bob, Daniel; Ladisch, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells shed gangliosides and populate their microenvironment with these biologically active membrane glycosphingolipids. In vitro, ganglioside enrichment amplifies receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and activation of vascular endothelial cells. However, a long-standing question is whether in the actual microenvironment of a neoplasm, in vivo, tumor cell ganglioside shedding stimulates angiogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that tumor gangliosides have a critical proangiogenic role in vivo using novel murine tumor cells (DKO) genetically completely incapable of ganglioside synthesis and impaired in tumor growth vs. wild-type (WT) ganglioside-rich cells. We studied angiogenesis during tumor formation by these ganglioside-depleted cells, quantifying vessel formation, angiogenic factor production/release, and consequences of reconstitution with purified WT gangliosides. DKO cells formed virtually avascular tumors, much smaller than ganglioside-rich WT tumors and displaying a striking paucity of blood vessels, despite levels of VEGF and other angiogenic factors that were similar to those of WT cells. Transient enrichment of the ganglioside milieu of the DKO cell inoculum by adding purified WT gangliosides partially restored angiogenesis and tumor growth. We conclude that tumor gangliosides trigger robust angiogenesis important for tumor growth. Our findings suggest strategies to eliminate their synthesis and shedding by tumor cells should be pursued. PMID:24165965

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells are an important source of MMP-2 in human pancreatic cancer and accelerate tumor progression in a murine xenograft model and CAM assay.

    PubMed

    Schneiderhan, Wilhelm; Diaz, Fredy; Fundel, Martin; Zhou, Shaoxia; Siech, Marco; Hasel, Cornelia; Möller, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Seufferlein, Thomas; Gress, Thomas; Adler, Guido; Bachem, Max G

    2007-02-01

    The effect of the characteristic desmoplastic reaction of pancreatic cancer on tumor progression is largely unknown. We investigated whether pancreatic stellate cells, which are responsible for the desmoplastic reaction, support tumor progression. Immunohistology revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is suggested to promote pancreatic cancer progression, is present in stellate cells adjacent to cancer cells. In vitro, stellate cells exhibited a much higher basal expression of MMP-2 compared with cancer cells. Panc1-, MiaPaCa2- and SW850-conditioned media stimulated MMP-2 release of stellate cells as detected by zymography. Cancer cells expressed and released basigin [BSG, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), CD147], a glycoprotein that is known to stimulate MMP-2 in mesenchymal cells, as detected by immunostaining, western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor cell-conditioned medium and BSG purified by affinity chromatography from supernatants of cancer cells, but not supernatants depleted from BSG, stimulated expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2 of stellate cells as demonstrated by western blot and zymography. Moreover, the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promoted the invasiveness of Panc-1 cells in the chorioallantoic membrane assay and increased the weight of tumors induced by all carcinoma cell lines in nude mice by 2.1-3.7-fold. Our findings support the assumption that the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promotes progression of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  15. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  16. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor micro-environment induces a form of “accelerated aging,” which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy (“self-eating”) in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy “fuel” and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a “mutagenic motor” and allows cancer cells to buffer—at a distance—exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of “accelerated host aging” in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively “cutting off the fuel supply” for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:21654190

  17. Laser-driven ion accelerators for tumor therapy revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, the authors of this report published a first paper on the technical challenges that laser accelerators need to overcome before they could be applied to tumor therapy. Among the major issues were the maximum energy of the accelerated ions and their intensity, control and reproducibility of the laser-pulse output, quality assurance and patient safety. These issues remain today. While theoretical progress has been made for designing transport systems, for tailoring the plumes of laser-generated protons, and for suitable dose delivery, today's best lasers are far from reaching performance levels, in both proton energy and intensity to seriously consider clinical ion beam therapy (IBT) application. This report details these points and substantiates that laser-based IBT is neither superior to IBT with conventional particle accelerators nor ready to replace it.

  18. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef A.; Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias; Nnetu, David K.; Pawlizak, Steve; Wetzel, Franziska; Zink, Mareike

    2011-03-01

    With an increasing knowledge in tumor biology an overwhelming complexity becomes obvious which roots in the diversity of tumors and their heterogeneous molecular composition. Nevertheless in all solid tumors malignant neoplasia, i.e. uncontrolled growth, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis, occurs. Physics sheds some new light on cancer by approaching this problem from a functional, materials perspective. Recent results indicate that all three pathomechanisms require changes in the active and passive cellular biomechanics. Malignant transformation causes cell softening for small deformations which correlates with an increased rate of proliferation and faster cell migration. The tumor cell's ability to strain harden permits tumor growth against a rigid tissue environment. A highly mechanosensitive, enhanced cell contractility is a prerequisite that tumor cells can cross its tumor boundaries and that this cells can migrate through the extracellular matrix. Insights into the biomechanical changes during tumor progression may lead to selective treatments by altering cell mechanics. Such drugs would not cure by killing cancer cells, but slow down tumor progression with only mild side effects and thus may be an option for older and frail patients.

  19. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present universities and national

  20. Alcohol Use Accelerates HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rafie, Carlin; Lai, Shenghan; Sales, Sabrina; Page, John Bryan; Campa, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The effects of alcohol abuse on HIV disease progression have not been definitively established. A prospective, 30-month, longitudinal study of 231 HIV+ adults included history of alcohol and illicit drug use, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), CD4+ cell count, and HIV viral load every 6 months. Frequent alcohol users (two or more drinks daily) were 2.91 times (95% CI: 1.23–6.85, p = 0.015) more likely to present a decline of CD4 to ≤200 cells/μl, independent of baseline CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load, antiretroviral use over time, time since HIV diagnosis, age, and gender. Frequent alcohol users who were not on ART also increased their risk for CD4 cell decline to ≤200 cells/mm3 (HR = 7.76: 95% CI: 1.2–49.2, p = 0.03). Combined frequent alcohol use with crack-cocaine showed a significant risk of CD4+ cell decline (HR = 3.57: 95% CI: 1.24–10.31, p = 0.018). Frequent alcohol intake was associated with higher viral load over time (β = 0.259, p = 0.038). This significance was maintained in those receiving ART (β = 0.384, p = 0.0457), but not in those without ART. Frequent alcohol intake and the combination of frequent alcohol and crack-cocaine accelerate HIV disease progression. The effect of alcohol on CD4+ cell decline appears to be independent of ART, through a direct action on CD4 cells, although alcohol and substance abuse may lead to unmeasured behaviors that promote HIV disease progression. The effect of alcohol abuse on viral load, however, appears to be through reduced adherence to ART. PMID:20455765

  1. Progress toward 10 tesla accelerator dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Gilbert, G.; Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.

    1983-08-01

    A 9.1 T central field has been achieved in a Nb-Ti dipole operating in pressurized helium II at 1.8 K. Three different Nb-Ti dipoles, without iron yokes, have achieved central fields of 8.0, 8.6, and 9.1 T - all short sample performance for the conductors at 1.8 K. In helium I, at 4.3 K, the maximum central fields are from 1.5 to 2.0 T lower. Ten-tesla magnets have been designed for both Nb-Ti operating at 1.8 K and Nb/sub 3/Sn operating at 4.2 K. They are based on a very small beam aperture, (40 to 45 mm), very high current density in the superconductors (over 1000 A/mm/sup 2/), and a very low ratio of stabilizing copper to superconductor (about 1). Both layer and block designs have been developed that utilize Rutherford Cable. Magnet cycling from 0 to 6 T has been carried out for field change rate up to 1 T/s; the cyclic heating at 1 T/s is 36 W per meter. At a more representative rate of 0.2 T/s the heating rate is only 2 W/m. Progress in the program to use Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi superconductor, in 10 T accelerator magnets is also discussed.

  2. Recent progress on FFAGS for rapid acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnstone; S. Koscielniak

    2002-12-10

    Muon acceleration is one of the more difficult stages to develop for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The large transverse and longitudinal admittances which must be designed into the system and the rapidity with which acceleration must take place because of muon decay preclude the use of conventional synchrotron design. The approach here employs fixed-field architectures for muon acceleration; specifically, a fixed-field alternating gradient or FFAG accelerator. This paper explores the FFAG option, in particular addressing an adjustment in the rf phase which, although characteristic of fixed-field machines, becomes problematic in the context of rapid acceleration.

  3. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  4. FERMILAB ACCELERATOR R&D PROGRAM TOWARDS INTENSITY FRONTIER ACCELERATORS : STATUS AND PROGRESS

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    The 2014 P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program at Fermilab. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near- term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss key elements of the accelerator physics and technology R&D program toward future multi-MW proton accelerators and present its status and progress. INTENSITY FRONTIER ACCELERATORS

  5. Microenvironmental regulation of tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Quail, DF; Joyce, JA

    2014-01-01

    Cancers develop in complex tissue environments, which they depend upon for sustained growth, invasion and metastasis. Unlike tumor cells, stromal cell types within the tumor microenvironment (TME) are genetically stable, and thus represent an attractive therapeutic target with reduced risk of resistance and tumor recurrence. However, specifically disrupting the pro-tumorigenic TME is a challenging undertaking, as the TME has diverse capacities to induce both beneficial and adverse consequences for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, many studies have shown that the microenvironment is capable of normalizing tumor cells, suggesting that reeducation of stromal cells, rather than targeted ablation per se, may be an effective strategy for treating cancer. Here, we will discuss the paradoxical roles of the TME during specific stages of cancer progression and metastasis, and recent therapeutic attempts to re-educate stromal cells within the TME to have anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:24202395

  6. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  7. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef A.

    2014-03-01

    Already the Roman Celsus recognized rigid tissue as characteristic for solid tumors. Conversely, changes towards a weaker cytoskeleton have been described as a feature of cancer cells since the early days of tumor biology. It remains unclear if a carcinoma's rigid signature stems from more inflexible cells or is caused by the stroma. Despite that the importance of cell biomechanics for tumor progression becomes more and more evident the chicken-and-egg problem to what extent cancer cells already change their mechanical properties within the solid tumor in order to transgress its boundary or mechanical changes are induced by the microenvironment when the cell has left the tumor has been discussed highly controversial. Comprehensive clinical biomechanical measurements only exist from tumor tissue without the possibility to identify individual cells or from individual cancer cells from pleural effusions. Since the biomechanical properties of cells in carcinomas remain unknown measurements on individual cells that directly stem out of primary tumor samples are required, which we have conducted. We found in cervix and mammary carcinomas a distinctive increase of softer cells as well as contractile cells. A soft and contractile cell is like a strong elastic rope. The cell can generate a strong tensile tension to pull its self along and is soft against compression to avoid jamming.

  8. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics in accelerator physics: radio frequency pulse compression and power transport; computational methods for the computer analysis of microwave components; persistent wakefields associated with waveguide damping of higher order modes; and photonic band gap cavities.

  9. Mitochondrial Redox Signaling and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell can reprogram their energy production by switching mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. However, mitochondria play multiple roles in cancer cells, including redox regulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptotic signaling. Moreover, these mitochondrial roles are integrated via multiple interconnected metabolic and redox sensitive pathways. Interestingly, mitochondrial redox proteins biphasically regulate tumor progression depending on cellular ROS levels. Low level of ROS functions as signaling messengers promoting cancer cell proliferation and cancer invasion. However, anti-cancer drug-initiated stress signaling could induce excessive ROS, which is detrimental to cancer cells. Mitochondrial redox proteins could scavenger basal ROS and function as “tumor suppressors” or prevent excessive ROS to act as “tumor promoter”. Paradoxically, excessive ROS often also induce DNA mutations and/or promotes tumor metastasis at various stages of cancer progression. Targeting redox-sensitive pathways and transcriptional factors in the appropriate context offers great promise for cancer prevention and therapy. However, the therapeutics should be cancer-type and stage-dependent. PMID:27023612

  10. Mitochondrial Redox Signaling and Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-03-25

    Cancer cell can reprogram their energy production by switching mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. However, mitochondria play multiple roles in cancer cells, including redox regulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptotic signaling. Moreover, these mitochondrial roles are integrated via multiple interconnected metabolic and redox sensitive pathways. Interestingly, mitochondrial redox proteins biphasically regulate tumor progression depending on cellular ROS levels. Low level of ROS functions as signaling messengers promoting cancer cell proliferation and cancer invasion. However, anti-cancer drug-initiated stress signaling could induce excessive ROS, which is detrimental to cancer cells. Mitochondrial redox proteins could scavenger basal ROS and function as "tumor suppressors" or prevent excessive ROS to act as "tumor promoter". Paradoxically, excessive ROS often also induce DNA mutations and/or promotes tumor metastasis at various stages of cancer progression. Targeting redox-sensitive pathways and transcriptional factors in the appropriate context offers great promise for cancer prevention and therapy. However, the therapeutics should be cancer-type and stage-dependent.

  11. Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Tumors with Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steven D.; Doty, James R.; Martin, David P.; Hancock, Steven L.; Adler, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, 79 patients with benign or malignant cavernous sinus tumors, have been treated at Stanford University with linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has been used as (1) a planned second-stage procedure for residual tumor following surgery, (2) primary treatment for patients whose medical conditions preclude surgery, (3) palliation of malignant lesions, and (4) definitive treatment for small, well-localized, poorly accessible tumors. Mean patient age was 52 years (range, 18 to 88); there were 28 males and 51 females. Sixty-one patients had benign tumors; 18 had malignant tumors. Mean tumor volume was 6.8 cm3 (range 0.5 to 22.5 cm3) covered with an average of 2.3 isocenter (range, 1 to 5). Radiation dose averaged 17.1 Gy. Mean follow-up was 46 months. Tumor control or shrinkage, or both, varied with pathology. Radiographic tumor improvement was most pronounced in malignant lesions, with greater than 85% showing reduction in tumor size; benign tumors (meningiomas and schwannomas) had a 63% control rate and 37% shrinkage rate, with none enlarging. We concluded that stereotactic radiosurgery is a valuable tool in managing cavernous sinus tumors. There was excellent control and stabilization of benign tumors and palliation of malignant lesions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171089

  12. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  13. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  14. Tumor progression stage: specific losses of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Cavenee, W K

    1989-01-01

    The development of human cancer is generally thought to entail a series of events that cause a progressively more malignant phenotype. This hypothesis predicts that tumor cells of the ultimate stage will carry each of the events, cells of the penultimate stage will carry each of the events less the last one and so on. That is to say, a dissection of the pathway form a normal cell to a fully malignant tumor may be viewed as the unraveling of a nested set of aberrations. In experiments designed to elucidate these events, we have compared genotypic combinations at genomic loci defined by restriction endonuclease recognition site variation in normal and tumor tissues from patients with various forms and stages of cancer. The first step, inherited predisposition, is best described for retinoblastoma in which a recessive mutation of a locus residing in the 13q14 region of the genome is unmasked by aberrant, but specific, mitotic chromosomal segregation. A similar mechanism involving the distal short arm of chromosome 17 is apparent in astrocytic tumors and the event is shared by cells in each malignancy stage. This is distinct from a loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 10 which is restricted to the ultimate stage, glioblastoma multiforme. Further, this approach has has been extended to a wide variety of human cancers and shown to be generally applicable. The results suggest a genetic approach to defining degrees of tumor progression and a means for determining the genomic locations of genes involved in the pathway as a prelude to their molecular isolation and characterization. They have provided a molecular genetic-based oncology with clinical utility in differential pathology, in disease groupings for therapeutic purposes and in prenatal identification of latent disease carriers.

  15. Recent Progress on Plasma-Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esarey, Eric

    2007-04-01

    The physics, research status, and challenges of plasma-based accelerators will be discussed. In 2004, three groups reported the production of high quality electron bunches from laser plasma accelerators in the 100 MeV range with narrow divergence and narrow energy spread [S.P.D. Mangles et al.; C.G.R. Geddes et al.; and J. Faure et al.; Nature, Sep 2004]. These results were obtained using multi-ten TW lasers interacting with few-mm diameter gas jet targets. High quality electron bunches were generated by exciting plasma wakefields to sufficient amplitudes so as to self-trap electrons from the background plasma and accelerate these electrons over distances near the dephasing length. Recent results include production of high quality electron beams at the 1 GeV level, obtained by extending the plasma channel length to a few cm by using a capillary discharge [W.P. Leemans et al., Nature Physics, Oct 2006], as well as controlled injection of electrons using colliding laser pulses to produce stable beams at the 100 MeV level [J. Faure, Nature, Dec 2006]. Also presented will be recent results on plasma wakefield accelerators using the 42 GeV electron beam at SLAC, in which the wakefield driven by the front of the bunch led to energy doubling of electrons in the back of the bunch [I. Bloomfield et al., Nature, 2007].

  16. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This is the second progress report submitted under the author`s current grant and covers progress made since the submission of the first progress report in August 1993. During this period the author has continued to spend approximately one half of his time at SLAC and most of the projects reported here were carried out in collaboration with individuals and groups at SLAC. Except where otherwise noted, reference numbers in the text refer to the attached list of current contract publications. Copies of the publications, numbered in agreement with the publication list, are included with this report.

  17. Researches toward potassium channels on tumor progressions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Yang, Qian; You, Qidong

    2009-01-01

    As trans-membrane proteins located in cytoplasm and organelle membrane, potassium (K(+)) channels are generally divided into four super-families: voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v)), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (K(ir)) and two-pore domain K(+) channels (K(2P)). Since dysfunctions of K(+) channels would induce many diseases, various studies toward their functions in physiologic and pathologic process have been extensively launched. This review focuses on the recent advances of K(+) channels in tumor progression, including the brief introduction of K(+) channels, the role of K(+) channels in tumor cells, the possible mechanism of action at cellular level, and the possible application of K(+) channel modulators in cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Progress Toward NLC/GLC Prototype Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J

    2004-09-13

    The accelerator structure groups for NLC (Next Linear Collider) and GLC (Global Linear Colliders) have successfully collaborated on the research and development of a major series of advanced accelerator structures based on room-temperature technology at X-band frequency. The progress in design, simulation, microwave measurement and high gradient tests are summarized in this paper. The recent effort in design and fabrication of the accelerator structure prototype for the main linac is presented in detail including HOM (High Order Mode) suppression and design of HOM couplers and fundamental mode couplers, optimized accelerator cavities as well as plans for future structures.

  19. Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 expression accelerates skin cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rao, Velidi H; Vogel, Kristen; Yanagida, Jodi K; Marwaha, Nitin; Kandel, Amrit; Trempus, Carol; Repertinger, Susan K; Hansen, Laura A

    2015-10-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause severe damage to the skin and is the primary cause of most skin cancer. UV radiation causes DNA damage leading to mutations and also activates the Erbb2/HER2 receptor through indirect mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species. We hypothesized that Erbb2 activation accelerates the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Following the induction of benign squamous papillomas by UV exposure of v-ras(Ha) transgenic Tg.AC mice, mice were treated topically with the Erbb2 inhibitor AG825 and tumor progression monitored. AG825 treatment reduced tumor volume, increased tumor regression, and delayed the development of malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Progression to malignancy was associated with increased Erbb2 and ADAM12 (A Disintegin And Metalloproteinase 12) transcripts and protein, while inhibition of Erbb2 blocked the increase in ADAM12 message upon malignant progression. Similarly, human SCC and SCC cell lines had increased ADAM12 protein and transcripts when compared to normal controls. To determine whether Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 contributed to malignant progression of skin cancer, Erbb2 expression was modulated in cultured SCC cells using forced over-expression or siRNA targeting, demonstrating up-regulation of ADAM12 by Erbb2. Furthermore, ADAM12 transfection or siRNA targeting revealed that ADAM12 increased both the migration and invasion of cutaneous SCC cells. Collectively, these results suggest Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 as a novel mechanism contributing to the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Inhibition of Erbb2/HER2 reduced tumor burden, increased tumor regression, and delayed the progression of benign skin tumors to malignant SCC in UV-exposed mice. Inhibition of Erbb2 suppressed the increase in metalloproteinase ADAM12 expression in skin tumors, which in turn increased migration and tumor cell invasiveness. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Semaphorins in Angiogenesis and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Gera; Sabag, Adi D.; Rabinovicz, Noa; Kessler, Ofra

    2012-01-01

    The semaphorins were initially described as axon guidance factors, but have recently been implicated in a variety of physiological and developmental functions, including regulation of immune response, angiogenesis, and migration of neural crest cells. The semaphorin family contains more than 30 genes divided into seven subfamilies, all of which are characterized by the presence of a sema domain. The semaphorins transduce their signals by binding to one of the nine receptors belonging to the plexin family, or, in the case of the class 3 semaphorins, by binding to one of the two neuropilin receptors. Additional receptors, which form complexes with these primary semaphorin receptors, are also frequently involved in semaphorin signaling. Recent evidence suggests that some semaphorins can act as antiangiogenic and/or antitumorigenic agents whereas other semaphorins promote tumor progression and/or angiogenesis. Furthermore, loss of endogenous inhibitory semaphorin expression or function on one hand, and overexpression of protumorigenic semaphorins on the other hand, is associated with the progression of some tumor types. PMID:22315716

  1. Hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates growth of breast tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Coticchia, Christine M; Curatolo, Adam S; Schaffner, Carl P; Zurakowski, David; Solomon, Keith R; Moses, Marsha A

    2014-07-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to an increased prevalence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. A common feature of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a Western diet rich in saturated fat is a high level of circulating cholesterol. Epidemiological reports investigating the relationship between high circulating cholesterol levels, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and breast cancer are conflicting. Here, we modeled this complex condition in a well-controlled, preclinical animal model using innovative isocaloric diets. Female severe combined immunodeficient mice were fed a low-fat/no-cholesterol diet and then randomized to four isocaloric diet groups: low-fat/no-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe (cholesterol-lowering drug), and high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe. Mice were implanted orthotopically with MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast tumors from animals fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet exhibited the fastest progression. Significant differences in serum cholesterol level between groups were achieved and maintained throughout the study; however, no differences were observed in intratumoral cholesterol levels. To determine the mechanism of cholesterol-induced tumor progression, we analyzed tumor proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis and found a significantly greater percentage of proliferating cells from mice fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Tumors from hypercholesterolemic animals displayed significantly less apoptosis compared with the other groups. Tumors from high-fat/high-cholesterol mice had significantly higher microvessel density compared with tumors from the other groups. These results demonstrate that hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates breast tumor growth in vivo.

  2. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy.

  3. NRF2 activation by antioxidant antidiabetic agents accelerates tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiufei; Long, Min; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Liao, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yuren; Liao, Qian; Li, Wenjie; Tang, Zili; Tong, Qiang; Wang, Xiaocui; Fang, Fang; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Ouyang, Qin; Zhang, Donna D; Yu, Shicang; Zheng, Hongting

    2016-04-13

    Cancer is a common comorbidity of diabetic patients; however, little is known about the effects that antidiabetic drugs have on tumors. We discovered that common classes of drugs used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the hypoglycemic dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) saxagliptin and sitagliptin, as well as the antineuropathic α-lipoic acid (ALA), do not increase tumor incidence but increase the risk of metastasis of existing tumors. Specifically, these drugs induce prolonged activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated antioxidant response through inhibition of KEAP1-C151-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NRF2, resulting in up-regulated expression of metastasis-associated proteins, increased cancer cell migration, and promotion of metastasis in xenograft mouse models. Accordingly, knockdown of NRF2 attenuated naturally occurring and DPP-4i-induced tumor metastasis, whereas NRF2 activation accelerated metastasis. Furthermore, in human liver cancer tissue samples, increased NRF2 expression correlated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that antioxidants that activate NRF2 signaling may need to be administered with caution in cancer patients, such as diabetic patients with cancer. Moreover, NRF2 may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for tumor metastasis.

  4. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

  5. Progress in Modeling Electron Cloud Effects in HIF Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Azevedo, A.; Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M. A.; Stoltz, P. H.

    2003-10-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) from ionization of gas (ambient or released from walls), or via secondary emission. Their accumulation is affected by the beam potential and duration, and the accelerating and confining fields. We present electron orbit simulations which show the resultant e-cloud distribution; ion simulations with prescribed e-clouds which show the effect on ion beam quality; a gyro-averaged model for including electron dynamics in ion simulations, and its implementation status; and progress in merging the capabilities of WARP (3-D PIC code for HIF) (D.P. Grote, A. Friedman, I. Haber, Proc. 1996 Comp. Accel. Physics Conf., AIP Proc. 391), 51 (1996), with those of POSINST (e-clouds in high-energy accelerators) (M.A. Furman, LBNL-41482/CBP Note 247/LHC Project Report 180, May 20, 1998).

  6. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  7. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  8. Rare Tumors in Children: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Wayne L.; Schultz, Kris A.; Ferrari, Andrea; Helman, Lee; Krailo, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Rare pediatric tumors account for approximately 10% of all childhood cancers, which in themselves are a rare entity. The diverse histologies and clinical behaviors of rare pediatric tumors pose challenges to the investigation of their biologic and clinical features. National and international cooperative groups such as the Rare Tumor Committee of the Children's Oncology Group, Rare Tumors in Pediatric Age Project, and European Cooperative Study Group for Pediatric Rare Tumors have developed several initiatives to advance knowledge about rare pediatric cancers. However, these programs have been only partially effective, necessitating the development of alternative mechanisms to study these challenging diseases. In this article, we review the current national and international collaborative strategies to study rare pediatric cancers and alternative methods under exploration to enhance those efforts, such as independent registries and disease-specific, National Cancer Institute–sponsored clinics. PMID:26304909

  9. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Angiogenesis and Accelerates Growth of Breast Tumors in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, Kristine; Coticchia, Christine M.; Curatolo, Adam S.; Schaffner, Carl P.; Zurakowski, David; Solomon, Keith R.; Moses, Marsha A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to an increased prevalence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. A common feature of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a Western diet rich in saturated fat is a high level of circulating cholesterol. Epidemiological reports investigating the relationship between high circulating cholesterol levels, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and breast cancer are conflicting. Here, we modeled this complex condition in a well-controlled, preclinical animal model using innovative isocaloric diets. Female severe combined immunodeficient mice were fed a low-fat/no-cholesterol diet and then randomized to four isocaloric diet groups: low-fat/no-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe (cholesterol-lowering drug), and high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, with or without ezetimibe. Mice were implanted orthotopically with MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast tumors from animals fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet exhibited the fastest progression. Significant differences in serum cholesterol level between groups were achieved and maintained throughout the study; however, no differences were observed in intratumoral cholesterol levels. To determine the mechanism of cholesterol-induced tumor progression, we analyzed tumor proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis and found a significantly greater percentage of proliferating cells from mice fed the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Tumors from hypercholesterolemic animals displayed significantly less apoptosis compared with the other groups. Tumors from high-fat/high-cholesterol mice had significantly higher microvessel density compared with tumors from the other groups. These results demonstrate that hypercholesterolemia induces angiogenesis and accelerates breast tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24952430

  10. Neutrophils: important contributors to tumor progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Swierczak, Agnieszka; Mouchemore, Kellie A; Hamilton, John A; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-12-01

    The presence of neutrophils in tumors has traditionally been considered to be indicative of a failed immune response against cancers. However, there is now evidence showing that neutrophils can promote tumor growth, and increasingly, the data support an active role for neutrophils in tumor progression to distant metastasis. Neutrophils have been implicated in promoting metastasis in cancer patients, where neutrophil numbers and neutrophil-related factors and functions have been associated with progressive disease. Nevertheless, the role of neutrophils in tumors, both at the primary and secondary sites, remains controversial, with some studies reporting their anti-tumor functions. This review will focus on the data demonstrating a role for neutrophils in both tumor growth and metastasis and will attempt to clarify the discrepancies in the literature.

  11. Regulation of Prostate Cancer Progression by the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease . Experimental data has uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26828013

  12. Regulation of prostate cancer progression by the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Stephen L; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W K

    2016-09-28

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease. Experimental data have uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progress toward a prototype recirculating ion induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Program is developing the physics and technology of ion induction accelerators, with the goal of electric power production by means of heavy ion beam-driven inertial fusion (commonly called heavy ion fusion, or HIF). Such accelerators are the principal candidates for inertial fusion power production applications, because they are expected to enjoy high efficiency, inherently high pulse repetition frequency (power plants are expected to inject and burn several fusion targets per second), and high reliability. In addition (and in contrast with laser beams, which are focused with optical lenses) heavy-ion beams will be focused onto the target by magnetic fields, which cannot be damaged by target explosions. Laser beams are used in present-day and planned near-term facilities (such as LLNUs Nova and the National Ignition Facility, which is being designed) because they can focus beams onto very small, intensely illuminated spots for scaled experiments and because the laser technology is already available. An induction accelerator works by passing the beam through a series of accelerating modules, each of which applies an electromotive force to the beam as it goes by; effectively, the beam acts as the secondary winding of a series of efficient one-turn transformers. The authors present plans for and progress toward the development of a small (4.5-m-diam) prototype recirculator, which will accelerate singly charged potassium ions through 15 laps, increasing the ion energy from 80 to 320 keV and the beam current from 2 to 8 mA. Beam confinement and bending are effected with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and electric dipoles, respectively. The design is based on scaling laws and on extensive particle and fluid simulations of the behavior of the space charge-dominated beam.

  14. Paradoxical dependencies of tumor dormancy and progression on basic cell kinetics.

    PubMed

    Enderling, Heiko; Anderson, Alexander R A; Chaplain, Mark A J; Beheshti, Afshin; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2009-11-15

    Even after a tumor is established, it can early on enter a state of dormancy marked by balanced cell proliferation and cell death. Disturbances to this equilibrium may affect cancer risk, as they may cause the eventual lifetime clinical presentation of a tumor that might otherwise have remained asymptomatic. Previously, we showed that cell death, proliferation, and migration can play a role in shifting this dynamic, making the understanding of their combined influence on tumor development essential. We developed an individual cell-based computer model of the interaction of cancer stem cells and their nonstem progeny to study early tumor dynamics. Simulations of tumor growth show that three basic components of tumor growth--cell proliferation, migration, and death--combine in unexpected ways to control tumor progression and, thus, clinical cancer risk. We show that increased proliferation capacity in nonstem tumor cells and limited cell migration overall lead to space constraints that inhibit proliferation and tumor growth. By contrast, increasing the rate of cell death produces the expected tumor size reduction in the short term, but results ultimately in paradoxical accelerated long-term growth owing to the liberation of cancer stem cells and formation of self-metastases.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency Accelerates Coronary Artery Disease Progression in Swine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcang; Swier, Vicki J; Boosani, Chandra S; Radwan, Mohamed M; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    The role of vitamin D deficiency in coronary artery disease (CAD) progression is uncertain. Chronic inflammation in epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying vitamin D deficiency-enhanced inflammation in the EAT of diseased coronary arteries remains unknown. We examined a mechanistic link between 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transporter, karyopherin α4 (KPNA4) expression and NF-κB activation in preadipocytes. Furthermore, we determined whether vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression by increasing KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in EAT. Nuclear protein levels were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Exogenous KPNA4 was transported into cells by a transfection approach and constituted lentiviral vector. Swine were administered vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D-sufficient hypercholesterolemic diet. After 1 year, the histopathology of coronary arteries and nuclear protein expression of EAT were assessed. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced KPNA4 levels through increased vitamin D receptor expression. Exogenous KPNA4 rescued 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-dependent suppression of NF-κB nuclear translocation and activation. Vitamin D deficiency caused extensive CAD progression and advanced atherosclerotic plaques, which are linked to increased KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in the EAT. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D attenuates NF-κB activation by targeting KPNA4. Vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression at least, in part, through enhanced chronic inflammation of EAT by upregulation of KPNA4, which enhances NF-κB activation. These novel findings provide mechanistic evidence that vitamin D supplementation could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of CAD. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the calendar year 1979 are highlighted, with references to more detailed reports. This report is organized around the major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section covers the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; the second section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be built between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility. A new project that achieved considerable momentum during the year is described next - the free-electron laser studies; the following section discusses the status of the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation program. Next, two more new programs, the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT-Division and the National Bureau of Standards and the radio-frequency (rf) accelerator development for heavy ion fusion, are outlined. Development activities on a new type of high-power, high-efficiency rf amplifier called the gyrocon are then reported, and the final sections cover development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, and linear accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  17. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  18. Loss of Dnmt3b accelerates MLL-AF9 leukemia progression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Li, X; Lu, P; Dong, F; Pang, Y; Ma, S; Cheng, H; Hao, S; Tang, F; Yuan, W; Zhang, X; Cheng, T

    2016-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematopoietic disorder with a poor prognosis. Abnormal DNA methylation is involved in the initiation and progression of AML. The de novo methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are responsible for the generation of genomic methylation patterns. While DNMT3A is frequently mutated in hematological malignancies, DNMT3B is rarely mutated. Although it has been previously reported that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor in a mouse model of Myc-induced lymphomagenesis, its function in AML is yet to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated that deletion of Dnmt3b accelerated the progression of MLL-AF9 leukemia by increasing stemness and enhancing cell cycle progression. Gene profiling analysis revealed upregulation of the oncogenic gene set and downregulation of the cell differentiation gene set. Furthermore, loss of Dnmt3b was able to synergize with Dnmt3a deficiency in leukemia development. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Dnmt3b plays a tumor suppressive role in MLL-AF9 AML progression, thereby providing new insights into the roles of DNA methylation in leukemia development.

  19. An Organotypic Liver System for Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    transgenic rats establish channel-filled organoid cultures in the bioreactor similar to non-GFP- transgenic animal cells, as shown here 5 days after...This task has been fully established. We have moved to generating liver bioreactors with transgenic hepatocytes and/or endothelial cells expressing...GFP to better image the interactions with the tumor cells. These cells form bioreactor structures indistinguishable from non- transgenic cells

  20. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    smaller level TIMP-3. This indicated that invasion stimulating effects of endogenous NO are, at least in part , mediated by downregulation TIMP-2 and...vasculature: Inhibition retards tumor growth in vivo. In: Moncada S, Feelisch M, Busse R, Higgs EA (eds) Biology of Nitric Oxide. Part 4: Enzymology...useful in treating certain human cancers either as single agents or as a part of combination therapies. I. Introduction duction of proliferation

  1. Cell trafficking of endothelial progenitor cells in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2013-07-01

    Blood vessel formation plays an essential role in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including normal tissue growth and healing, as well as tumor progression. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a subtype of stem cells with high proliferative potential that are capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells, thus contributing to neovascularization in tumors. In response to tumor-secreted cytokines, EPCs mobilize from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, home to the tumor site, and differentiate to mature endothelial cells and secrete proangiogenic factors to facilitate vascularization of tumors. In this review, we summarize the expression of surface markers, cytokines, receptors, adhesion molecules, proteases, and cell signaling mechanisms involved in the different steps (mobilization, homing, and differentiation) of EPC trafficking from the bone marrow to the tumor site. Understanding the biologic mechanisms of EPC cell trafficking opens a window for new therapeutic targets in cancer.

  2. Evolutionary Game Theory Analysis of Tumor Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory applied to two interacting cell populations can yield quantitative prediction of the future densities of the two cell populations based on the initial interaction terms. We will discuss how in a complex ecology that evolutionary game theory successfully predicts the future densities of strains of stromal and cancer cells (multiple myeloma), and discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  3. Tumor Stiffening, a Key Determinant of Tumor Progression, is Reversed by Nanomaterial-Induced Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marangon, Iris; Silva, Amanda A. K.; Guilbert, Thomas; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Marchiol, Carmen; Natkhunarajah, Sharuja; Chamming's, Foucault; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bianco, Alberto; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Renault, Gilles; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stiffening, stemming from aberrant production and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM), has been considered a predictive marker of tumor malignancy, non-invasively assessed by ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE). Being more than a passive marker, tumor stiffening restricts the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the tumor and per se could modulate cellular mechano-signaling, tissue inflammation and tumor progression. Current strategies to modify the tumor extracellular matrix are based on ECM-targeting chemical agents but also showed deleterious systemic effects. On-demand excitable nanomaterials have shown their ability to perturb the tumor microenvironment in a spatiotemporal-controlled manner and synergistically with chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the evolution of tumor stiffness as well as tumor integrity and progression, under the effect of mild hyperthermia and thermal ablation generated by light-exposed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in an epidermoid carcinoma mouse xenograft. SWE was used for real-time mapping of the tumor stiffness, both during the two near infrared irradiation sessions and over the days after the treatment. We observed a transient and reversible stiffening of the tumor tissue during laser irradiation, which was lowered at the second session of mild hyperthermia or photoablation. In contrast, over the days following photothermal treatment, the treated tumors exhibited a significant softening together with volume reduction, whereas non-treated growing tumors showed an increase of tumor rigidity. The organization of the collagen matrix and the distribution of CNTs revealed a spatio-temporal correlation between the presence of nanoheaters and the damages on collagen and cells. This study highlights nanohyperthermia as a promising adjuvant strategy to reverse tumor stiffening and normalize the mechanical tumor environment. PMID:28042338

  4. Restore the brake on tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Renata E; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zeng-Jie

    2017-08-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays a key role in regulation of normal development. The negative feedback mechanism mediated by the transcriptional factor, Gli3, acts to finely tune Shh signaling, providing tight control of normal developmental processes. Hyperactivation of Shh signaling often leads to many human malignancies, including basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma (MB). However, how tumor cells sustain the aberrant activation of Shh signaling is still not completely understood. We recently revealed that during MB formation, tumor cells express Nestin, a type VI intermediate filament protein, which maintains uncontrolled Shh signaling by abolishing negative feedback by Gli3. Therefore, Nestin expression is a necessary step for MB formation. These findings highlight the novel function of Nestin in regulating Shh signaling, as well as the important role of a disrupted negative feedback mechanism in MB tumorigenesis. Further, restoration of the intrinsic negative feedback by repressing Nestin expression represents a promising approach to treat MB as well as other Shh signaling associated malignancies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Role of myoepithelial cells in breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Puspa Raj; Saidou, Jamila; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2010-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells form a semi-continuous protective sheet separating the human breast epithelium and the surrounding stroma. They suppress stromal invasion of tumor cells by the secretion of various anti-angiogenic and anti-invasive factors. The disruption of this cell layer results in the release of the growth factors, angiogenic factors, and reactive oxygen species causing an alteration in the microenvironment. This helps in the proliferation of surrounding cells and increases the invasiveness of tumor cells. Two theories are proposed for the mechanism of tumor epithelial cells progression from in situ to invasive stage. According to the first theory, tumor cell invasion is triggered by the overproduction of proteolytic enzymes by myoepithelial cells and surrounding tumor cells. The second theory states that tumor invasion is a multistep process, the interactions between damaged myoepithelial cells and the immunoreactive cells trigger the release of basement membrane degrading enzymes causing tumor progression. Further studies in understanding of molecular mechanism of myoepithelial cell functions in tumor suppression may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer.

  6. Network analysis of skin tumor progression identifies a rewired genetic architecture affecting inflammation and tumor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline polymorphisms can influence gene expression networks in normal mammalian tissues and can affect disease susceptibility. We and others have shown that analysis of this genetic architecture can identify single genes and whole pathways that influence complex traits, including inflammation and cancer susceptibility. Whether germline variants affect gene expression in tumors that have undergone somatic alterations, and the extent to which these variants influence tumor progression, is unknown. Results Using an integrated linkage and genomic analysis of a mouse model of skin cancer that produces both benign tumors and malignant carcinomas, we document major changes in germline control of gene expression during skin tumor development resulting from cell selection, somatic genetic events, and changes in the tumor microenvironment. The number of significant expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) is progressively reduced in benign and malignant skin tumors when compared to normal skin. However, novel tumor-specific eQTL are detected for several genes associated with tumor susceptibility, including IL18 (Il18), Granzyme E (Gzme), Sprouty homolog 2 (Spry2), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (Map2k4). Conclusions We conclude that the genetic architecture is substantially altered in tumors, and that eQTL analysis of tumors can identify host factors that influence the tumor microenvironment, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling, and cancer susceptibility. PMID:21244661

  7. Mechanisms of Accelerated Liver Fibrosis Progression during HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Debes, Jose D.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dramatic reduction in HIV-related morbidity and mortality has been observed. However, it is now becoming increasingly clear that liver-related complications, particularly rapid fibrosis development from ART as well as from the chronic HIV infection itself, are of serious concern to HIV patients. The pathophysiology of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV is a multifactorial process whereby persistent viral replication, and bacterial translocation lead to chronic immune activation and inflammation, which ART is unable to fully suppress, promoting production of fibrinogenic mediators and fibrosis. In addition, mitochondrial toxicity, triggered by both ART and HIV, contributes to intrahepatic damage, which is even more severe in patients co-infected with viral hepatitis. In recent years, new insights into the mechanisms of accelerated fibrosis and liver disease progression in HIV has been obtained, and these are detailed and discussed in this review. PMID:28097102

  8. KSHV-Mediated Angiogenesis in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Uppal, Timsy; Sarkar, Roni; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is a malignant human oncovirus belonging to the gamma herpesvirus family. HHV-8 is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and two other B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD). KS is an invasive tumor of endothelial cells most commonly found in untreated HIV-AIDS or immuno-compromised individuals. KS tumors are highly vascularized and have abnormal, excessive neo-angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of infected endothelial cells. KSHV directly induces angiogenesis in an autocrine and paracrine fashion through a complex interplay of various viral and cellular pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors. KS is believed to originate due to a combination of KSHV’s efficient strategies for evading host immune systems and several pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory stimuli. In addition, KSHV infection of endothelial cells produces a wide array of viral oncoproteins with transforming capabilities that regulate multiple host-signaling pathways involved in the activation of angiogenesis. It is likely that the cellular-signaling pathways of angiogenesis and lymph-angiogenesis modulate the rate of tumorigenesis induction by KSHV. This review summarizes the current knowledge on regulating KSHV-mediated angiogenesis by integrating the findings reported thus far on the roles of host and viral genes in oncogenesis, recent developments in cell-culture/animal-model systems, and various anti-angiogenic therapies for treating KSHV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:27447661

  9. High rates of chromosome missegregation suppress tumor progression but do not inhibit tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Britigan, Eric M. C.; Ryan, Sean D.; Kaur, Charanjeet; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Moser, Amy R.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that deviates from a multiple of the haploid, has been recognized as a common feature of cancers for >100 yr. Previously, we showed that the rate of chromosome missegregation/chromosomal instability (CIN) determines the effect of aneuploidy on tumors; whereas low rates of CIN are weakly tumor promoting, higher rates of CIN cause cell death and tumor suppression. However, whether high CIN inhibits tumor initiation or suppresses the growth and progression of already initiated tumors remained unclear. We tested this using the ApcMin/+ mouse intestinal tumor model, in which effects on tumor initiation versus progression can be discriminated. ApcMin/+ cells exhibit low CIN, and we generated high CIN by reducing expression of the kinesin-like mitotic motor protein CENP-E. CENP-E+/−;ApcMin/+ doubly heterozygous cells had higher rates of chromosome missegregation than singly heterozygous cells, resulting in increased cell death and a substantial reduction in tumor progression compared with ApcMin/+ animals. Intestinal organoid studies confirmed that high CIN does not inhibit tumor cell initiation but does inhibit subsequent cell growth. These findings support the conclusion that increasing the rate of chromosome missegregation could serve as a successful chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27146113

  10. Hyaluronidase Hyal1 Increases Tumor Cell Proliferation and Motility through Accelerated Vesicle Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    McAtee, Caitlin O.; Berkebile, Abigail R.; Elowsky, Christian G.; Fangman, Teresa; Barycki, Joseph J.; Wahl, James K.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) turnover accelerates metastatic progression of prostate cancer in part by increasing rates of tumor cell proliferation and motility. To determine the mechanism, we overexpressed hyaluronidase 1 (Hyal1) as a fluorescent fusion protein and examined its impact on endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. Overexpression of Hyal1 led to increased rates of internalization of HA and the endocytic recycling marker transferrin. Live imaging of Hyal1, sucrose gradient centrifugation, and specific colocalization of Rab GTPases defined the subcellular distribution of Hyal1 as early and late endosomes, lysosomes, and recycling vesicles. Manipulation of vesicular trafficking by chemical inhibitors or with constitutively active and dominant negative Rab expression constructs caused atypical localization of Hyal1. Using the catalytically inactive point mutant Hyal1-E131Q, we found that enzymatic activity of Hyal1 was necessary for normal localization within the cell as Hyal1-E131Q was mainly detected within the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of a HA-binding point mutant, Hyal1-Y202F, revealed that secretion of Hyal1 and concurrent reuptake from the extracellular space are critical for rapid HA internalization and cell proliferation. Overall, excess Hyal1 secretion accelerates endocytic vesicle trafficking in a substrate-dependent manner, promoting aggressive tumor cell behavior. PMID:25855794

  11. NLRC4 suppresses melanoma tumor progression independently of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Ann M.; Colegio, Oscar R.; Hornick, Emma E.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Norian, Lyse A.; Zhang, Weizhou; Cassel, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NLR family can assemble inflammasome complexes with the adaptor protein ASC and caspase-1 that result in the activation of caspase-1 and the release of IL-1β and IL-18. Although the NLRC4 inflammasome is known to have a protective role in tumorigenesis, there is an increased appreciation for the inflammasome-independent actions of NLRC4. Here, we utilized a syngeneic subcutaneous murine model of B16F10 melanoma to explore the role of NLRC4 in tumor suppression. We found that NLRC4-deficient mice exhibited enhanced tumor growth that was independent of the inflammasome components ASC and caspase-1. Nlrc4 expression was critical for cytokine and chemokine production in tumor-associated macrophages and was necessary for the generation of protective IFN-γ–producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Tumor progression was diminished when WT or caspase-1–deficient, but not NLRC4-deficient, macrophages were coinjected with B16F10 tumor cells in NLRC4-deficient mice. Finally, examination of human primary melanomas revealed the extensive presence of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages. In contrast, there was a paucity of NLRC4+ tumor-associated macrophages observed in human metastatic melanoma, supporting the concept that NLRC4 expression controls tumor growth. These results reveal a critical role for NLRC4 in suppressing tumor growth in an inflammasome-independent manner. PMID:27617861

  12. Tumor-derived exosomes and their role in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells actively produce, release and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth. Mechanisms through which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. These exosomes are information carriers, conveying molecular and genetic messages from tumor cells to normal or other abnormal cells residing at close or distant sites. Tumor-derived exosomes are found in all body fluids. Upon the contact with target cells, they alter phenotypic and functional attributes of recipients, reprogramming them into active contributors to angiogenesis, thrombosis, metastasis and immunosuppression. Exosomes produced by tumors carry cargos that in part mimic contents of parent cells and are of potential interest as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. Their role in inhibiting the host antitumor responses and in mediating drug resistance is important for cancer therapy. Tumor-derived exosomes may interfere with cancer immunotherapy, but they also could serve as adjuvants and antigenic components of antitumor vaccines. Their biological roles in cancer development or progression as well as cancer therapy suggest that tumor-derived exosomes are critical components of oncogenic transformation. PMID:27117662

  13. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells actively produce, release, and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth. Mechanisms through which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. These exosomes are information carriers, conveying molecular and genetic messages from tumor cells to normal or other abnormal cells residing at close or distant sites. Tumor-derived exosomes are found in all body fluids. Upon contact with target cells, they alter phenotypic and functional attributes of recipients, reprogramming them into active contributors to angiogenesis, thrombosis, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Exosomes produced by tumors carry cargos that in part mimic contents of parent cells and are of potential interest as noninvasive biomarkers of cancer. Their role in inhibiting the host antitumor responses and in mediating drug resistance is important for cancer therapy. Tumor-derived exosomes may interfere with cancer immunotherapy, but they also could serve as adjuvants and antigenic components of antitumor vaccines. Their biological roles in cancer development or progression as well as cancer therapy suggest that tumor-derived exosomes are critical components of oncogenic transformation.

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of progression and recurrence in breast phyllodes tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Breast phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that need to be distinguished from the common morphologically similar fibroadenomas, because phyllodes tumors can recur and progress to malignancy. Their potentially recurring and metastasizing behavior is attributed to their stromal characteristics, for which categorization between benign, borderline and malignant tumors have not been universally established. Previous clonality studies revealing monoclonal stromal cells versus a polyclonal epithelial component theorized that phyllodes tumors are mainly stromal neoplasms, possibly arising from fibroadenomas. More recent chromosomal imbalances in both epithelium and stroma have challenged this theory to favor neoplasia of both epithelium and stroma, with initial interdependence between the two components. Inverse correlations between epithelial and stromal overexpression for various biological markers like estrogen receptor, p53, c-kit, Ki-67, endothelin-1, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparan sulfate, in addition to findings of epithelial Wnt signalling with stromal insulin growth factors and beta-catenin expression, suggest an initial epithelial-stromal interdependence at the benign phase. Upon progression to malignancy, the stroma is hypothesized to assume an autonomous growth overriding any epithelial influence. Frequent genetic alterations are chromosomal gains of 1q and losses at chromosome 13. Acquisition of new genetic imbalances within the tumor consistent with intratumoral heterogeneity, and subclones within histologically benign phyllodes tumors that recur or metastasize are the current theories explaining these tumors' unpredictable clinical behavior. PMID:19966935

  15. Tumor Suppressor Genes in Early Breast Cancer and its Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    Yamakawa K., Akiyama F., Kasumi F., Sakamoto G. and Nakamura Y. Allelotype of breast cancer: cumulative allele losses promote tumor progression in...and Cancer 4:113-121,1992. 18. Sato T., Akiyama F., Sakamoto G., Kasumi F. and Nakamura Y. Accumulation of genetic alterations and progression of...identified Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 87; 7737-7741, 1990. 23. Saito H., Inazawa J., Saito S., Kasumi F., Koi S., Sagae S., Kudo R., Saito J., Noda K. and

  16. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  17. Senescence and pre-malignancy: how do tumors progress?

    PubMed

    Saab, Raya

    2011-12-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor response that has been observed both in vitro and in vivo, and features of senescence have been documented in various human premalignant lesions, including melanoma, colon and lung adenoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and others. The fact that a subset of these lesions eventually progress to malignant invasive tumors suggests that premalignant cells can either bypass or escape the senescent response. Much work has been done to understand the mechanisms underlying such progression, but it remains unclear whether tumors progress by evasion of senescence induction, or by disruption of senescence maintenance, or whether both mechanisms can occur in human cancer development. This review presents the current evidence for mechanisms of senescence evasion and reversion, and discusses what has been learnt about this process using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems. As we learn more about the key signaling effectors of senescence, the hope is that appropriate targets will be identified for preservation and/or re-induction of senescence in human tumors. Such knowledge may also find application in better estimation of risks of cancer progression in individual premalignant lesions, which will lead to more accurate allocation of appropriate treatment options for such patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutations in the APC or Beta-catenin genes are well-established initiators of colorectal cancer, yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacologic approaches in mouse colorectal cancer and human colorectal cancer x...

  19. Interstitial Inorganic Phosphate as a Tumor Microenvironment Marker for Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Driesschaert, Benoit; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Evans, Jason; Mohammad, Rahman; Tchekneva, Elena E.; Dikov, Mikhail M.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo assessment of chemical tumor microenvironment (TME) parameters such as oxygen (pO2), extracellular acidosis (pHe), and concentration of interstitial inorganic phosphate (Pi) may provide unique insights into biological processes in solid tumors. In this work, we employ a recently developed multifunctional trityl paramagnetic probe and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique for in vivo concurrent assessment of these TME parameters in various mouse models of cancer. While the data support the existence of hypoxic and acidic regions in TME, the most dramatic differences, about 2-fold higher concentrations in tumors vs. normal tissues, were observed for interstitial Pi - the only parameter that also allowed for discrimination between non-metastatic and highly metastatic tumors. Correlation analysis between [Pi], pO2, pHe and tumor volumes reveal an association of high [Pi] with changes in tumor metabolism and supports different mechanisms of protons and Pi accumulation in TME. Our data identifies interstitial inorganic phosphate as a new TME marker for tumor progression. Pi association with tumor metabolism, buffer-mediated proton transport, and a requirement of high phosphorus content for the rapid growth in the “growth rate hypothesis” may underline its potential role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:28117423

  20. Extracellular Galectin-3 in Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna-Costa, Anneliese; Gomes, Angélica M.; Kozlowski, Eliene O.; Stelling, Mariana P.; Pavão, Mauro S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3, the only chimera galectin found in vertebrates, is one of the best-studied galectins. It is expressed in several cell types and is involved in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, such as cell adhesion, cell activation and chemoattraction, cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell growth and differentiation. However, this molecule raises special interest due to its role in regulating cancer cell activities. Galectin-3 has high affinity for β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine branched glycans, which are formed by the action of the β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (Mgat5). Mgat5-related changes in protein/lipid glycosylation on cell surface lead to alterations in the clustering of membrane proteins through lattice formation, resulting in functional advantages for tumor cells. Galectin-3 presence enhances migration and/or invasion of many tumors. Galectin-3-dependent clustering of integrins promotes ligand-induced integrin activation, leading to cell motility. Galectin-3 binding to mucin-1 increases transendothelial invasion, decreasing metastasis-free survival in an experimental metastasis model. Galectin-3 also affects endothelial cell behavior by regulating capillary tube formation. This lectin is found in the tumor stroma, suggesting a role for microenvironmental galectin-3 in tumor progression. Galectin-3 also seems to be involved in the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, possibly contributing to angiogenesis and tumor growth. This lectin can be a relevant factor in turning bone marrow in a sanctuary for leukemia cells, favoring resistance to therapy. Finally, galectin-3 seems to play a relevant role in orchestrating distinct cell events in tumor microenvironment and for this reason, it can be considered a target in tumor therapies. In conclusion, this review aims to describe the processes of tumor progression and metastasis involving extracellular galectin-3 and its expression and regulation. PMID:24982845

  1. Male patients presenting with rapidly progressive puberty associated with malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jung; Ko, A Ra; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    In males, precocious puberty (PP) is defined as the development of secondary sexual characteristics before age 9 years. PP is usually idiopathic; though, organic abnormalities including tumors are more frequently found in male patients with PP. However, advanced puberty in male also can be an important clinical manifestation in tumors. We report 2 cases of rapidly progressive puberty in males, each associated with a germ-cell tumor. First, an 11-year-old boy presented with mild fever and weight loss for 1 month. Physical examination revealed a pubertal stage of G3P3 with 10-mL testes. Investigations revealed advanced bone age (16 years) with elevated basal luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels. An anterior mediastinal tumor was identified by chest radiography and computed tomography, and elevated α-fetoprotein (AFP) and β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels were noted. Histopathologic analysis confirmed a yolk-sac tumor. Second, a 12-year-old boy presented with diplopia, polydipsia, and polyuria for 4 months. Physical examination revealed a pubertal stage of G3P3 with 8-mL testes. Bone age was advanced (16 years) and laboratory tests indicated panhypopituitarism with elevated testosterone level. A mixed germ-cell tumor was diagnosed with elevated AFP and β-hCG levels. Of course, these patients also have other symptoms of suspecting tumors, however, rapidly progressive puberty can be the more earlier screening sign of tumors. Therefore, in male patients with accelerated or advanced puberty, malignancy should be considered, with evaluation of tumor markers. In addition, advanced puberty in male should be recognized more widely as a unique sign of neoplasm. PMID:27104181

  2. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore investigated a congenic C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT model. In the absence of MGAT3, C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT females exhibited accelerated tumor appearance and increased tumor burden, glucose uptake in tumors and lung metastasis. Nevertheless, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 or protein kinase B (AKT) was reduced in ∼20-week C57BL/6 MMTV-PyMT tumors lacking MGAT3. Activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein tyrosine kinase Src, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar to that of controls. All the eight mouse galectin genes were expressed in mammary tumors and tumor epithelial cells (TECs), but galectin-2 and -12 were not detected by western analysis in tumors, and galectin-7 was not detected in 60% of the TEC lines. From microarray data reported for human breast cancers, at least 10 galectin and 7 N-glycan N-acetylglucosaminyl (GlcNAc)-transferase (MGAT) genes are expressed in tumor tissue, and expression often varies significantly between different breast cancer subtypes. Thus, in summary, while MGAT3 and bisected complex N-glycans retard mouse mammary tumor progression, genetic background may modify this effect; identification of key galectins that promote mammary tumor progression in mice is not straightforward because all the eight galectin genes are expressed; and high levels of MGAT3, galectin-4, -8, -10, -13 and -14 transcripts correlate with better relapse-free survival in human breast cancer. PMID:24037315

  3. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore investigated a congenic C57BL/6 Mgat3(-/-)/MMTV-PyMT model. In the absence of MGAT3, C57BL/6 Mgat3(-/-)/MMTV-PyMT females exhibited accelerated tumor appearance and increased tumor burden, glucose uptake in tumors and lung metastasis. Nevertheless, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 or protein kinase B (AKT) was reduced in ∼20-week C57BL/6 MMTV-PyMT tumors lacking MGAT3. Activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein tyrosine kinase Src, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar to that of controls. All the eight mouse galectin genes were expressed in mammary tumors and tumor epithelial cells (TECs), but galectin-2 and -12 were not detected by western analysis in tumors, and galectin-7 was not detected in 60% of the TEC lines. From microarray data reported for human breast cancers, at least 10 galectin and 7 N-glycan N-acetylglucosaminyl (GlcNAc)-transferase (MGAT) genes are expressed in tumor tissue, and expression often varies significantly between different breast cancer subtypes. Thus, in summary, while MGAT3 and bisected complex N-glycans retard mouse mammary tumor progression, genetic background may modify this effect; identification of key galectins that promote mammary tumor progression in mice is not straightforward because all the eight galectin genes are expressed; and high levels of MGAT3, galectin-4, -8, -10, -13 and -14 transcripts correlate with better relapse-free survival in human breast cancer.

  4. Testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by modifying tumor suppressor genes and tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa J.; Xiong, Yin; Nilubol, Naris; He, Mei; Bommareddi, Swaroop; Zhu, Xuguang; Jia, Li; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Jeong-Won; Xu, Xia; Patel, Dhaval; Willingham, Mark C.; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gender disparity has been observed for a variety of human malignancies. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer with a higher incidence in women, but more aggressive disease in men. There is scant evidence on the role of sex hormones on cancer initiation/progression. Using a transgenic mouse model of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), we found castration led to lower rates of cancer in females and less advanced cancer in males. Mechanistically, less advanced cancer in castrated males was due to increased expression of tumor suppressor (Glipr1, Sfrp1) and immune-regulatory genes and higher tumor infiltration with M1 macrophages and CD8 cells. Functional study showed that GLIPR1 reduced cell growth and increased chemokine secretion (Ccl5) that activates immune cells. Our data demonstrate that testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by reducing tumor suppressor gene expression and tumor immunity. PMID:25576159

  5. Radiomics biomarkers for accurate tumor progression prediction of oropharyngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cha, Kenny H.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Prince, Mark; Papagerakis, Silvana

    2017-03-01

    Accurate tumor progression prediction for oropharyngeal cancers is crucial for identifying patients who would best be treated with optimized treatment and therefore minimize the risk of under- or over-treatment. An objective decision support system that can merge the available radiomics, histopathologic and molecular biomarkers in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate assessment of oropharyngeal tumor progression. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of developing individual and combined predictive models based on quantitative image analysis from radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for oropharyngeal tumor progression prediction. With IRB approval, 31, 84, and 127 patients with head and neck CT (CT-HN), tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs) and molecular biomarker expressions, respectively, were collected. For 8 of the patients all 3 types of biomarkers were available and they were sequestered in a test set. The CT-HN lesions were automatically segmented using our level sets based method. Morphological, texture and molecular based features were extracted from CT-HN and TMA images, and selected features were merged by a neural network. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Test AUCs of 0.87, 0.74, and 0.71 were obtained with the individual predictive models based on radiomics, histopathologic, and molecular features, respectively. Combining the radiomics and molecular models increased the test AUC to 0.90. Combining all 3 models increased the test AUC further to 0.94. This preliminary study demonstrates that the individual domains of biomarkers are useful and the integrated multi-domain approach is most promising for tumor progression prediction.

  6. Effect of Pantethine on Ovarian Tumor Progression and Choline Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Wildes, Flonne; Mironchik, Yelena; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Podo, Franca; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy among women in developed countries. New therapeutic strategies evaluated with relevant preclinical models are urgently needed to improve survival rates. Here, we have assessed the effect of pantethine on tumor growth and metabolism using magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a model of ovarian cancer. To evaluate treatment strategies, it is important to use models that closely mimic tumor growth in humans. Therefore, we used an orthotopic model of ovarian cancer where a piece of tumor tissue, derived from an ovarian tumor xenograft, is engrafted directly onto the ovary of female mice, to maintain the tumor physiological environment. Treatment with pantethine, the precursor of vitamin B5 and active moiety of coenzyme A, was started when tumors were ~100 mm3 and consisted of a daily i.p. injection of 750 mg/kg in saline. Under these conditions, no side effects were observed. High-resolution 1H MRS was performed on treated and control tumor extracts. A dual-phase extraction method based on methanol/chloroform/water was used to obtain lipid and water-soluble fractions from the tumors. We also investigated effects on metastases and ascites formation. Pantethine treatment resulted in slower tumor progression, decreased levels of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine, and reduced metastases and ascites occurrence. In conclusion, pantethine represents a novel potential, well-tolerated, therapeutic tool in patients with ovarian cancer. Further in vivo preclinical studies are needed to confirm the beneficial role of pantethine and to better understand its mechanism of action. PMID:27900284

  7. Loss of Dnmt3b function upregulates the tumor modifier Ment and accelerates mouse lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hlady, Ryan A; Novakova, Slavomira; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Peters, Staci L; Bies, Juraj; Hannah, Jay; Iqbal, Javeed; Anderson, Kristi M; Siebler, Hollie M; Smith, Lynette M; Greiner, Timothy C; Bastola, Dhundy; Joshi, Shantaram; Lockridge, Oksana; Simpson, Melanie A; Felsher, Dean W; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Chan, Wing C; Christman, Judith K; Opavsky, Rene

    2012-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (Dnmt3b) belongs to a family of enzymes responsible for methylation of cytosine residues in mammals. DNA methylation contributes to the epigenetic control of gene transcription and is deregulated in virtually all human tumors. To better understand the generation of cancer-specific methylation patterns, we genetically inactivated Dnmt3b in a mouse model of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis. Ablation of Dnmt3b function using a conditional knockout in T cells accelerated lymphomagenesis by increasing cellular proliferation, which suggests that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor. Global methylation profiling revealed numerous gene promoters as potential targets of Dnmt3b activity, the majority of which were demethylated in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas, but not in Dnmt3b-/- pretumor thymocytes, implicating Dnmt3b in maintenance of cytosine methylation in cancer. Functional analysis identified the gene Gm128 (which we termed herein methylated in normal thymocytes [Ment]) as a target of Dnmt3b activity. We found that Ment was gradually demethylated and overexpressed during tumor progression in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas. Similarly, MENT was overexpressed in 67% of human lymphomas, and its transcription inversely correlated with methylation and levels of DNMT3B. Importantly, knockdown of Ment inhibited growth of mouse and human cells, whereas overexpression of Ment provided Dnmt3b+/+ cells with a proliferative advantage. Our findings identify Ment as an enhancer of lymphomagenesis that contributes to the tumor suppressor function of Dnmt3b and suggest it could be a potential target for anticancer therapies.

  8. Overexpression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 correlates with breast tumor formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Serge; Wong, Nau Nau; Muller, William J; Park, Morag; Tremblay, Michel L

    2010-11-01

    The PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3 phosphatases are prenylated protein tyrosine phosphatases with oncogenic activity that are proposed to drive tumor metastasis. We found that PRL-2 mRNA is elevated in primary breast tumors relative to matched normal tissue, and also dramatically elevated in metastatic lymph nodes compared with primary tumors. PRL-2 knockdown in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, suggesting that the malignant phenotype of these cells is mediated at least in part through PRL-2 signaling. In different mouse mammary tumor-derived cell lines overexpressing PRL-2, we confirmed its role in anchorage-independent growth and cell migration. Furthermore, injection of PRL-2-overexpressing cells into the mouse mammary fat pad promoted extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and tumor formation. MMTV-PRL-2 transgenic mice engineered to overexpress the enzyme in mammary tissue did not exhibit spontaneous tumorigenesis, but they exhibited an accelerated development of mammary tumors initiated by introduction of an MMTV-ErbB2 transgene. Together, our results argue that PRL-2 plays a role in breast cancer progression.

  9. Apelin Deficiency Accelerates the Progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Ishihara, Rie; Sakai, Ikumi; Ishimaru, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Yamamuro, Akiko; Ishige, Kumiko; Ito, Yoshihisa; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. Recent studies have implicated that chronic hypoxia and insufficient vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent neuroprotection may lead to the degeneration of motor neurons in ALS. Expression of apelin, an endogenous ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor APJ, is regulated by hypoxia. In addition, recent reports suggest that apelin protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we examined whether apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective factor using SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. In mouse CNS tissues, the highest expressions of both apelin and APJ mRNAs were detected in spinal cord. APJ immunoreactivity was observed in neuronal cell bodies located in gray matter of spinal cord. Although apelin mRNA expression in the spinal cord of wild-type mice was not changed from 4 to 18 weeks age, that of SOD1G93A mice was reduced along with the paralytic phenotype. In addition, double mutant apelin-deficient and SOD1G93A displayed the disease phenotypes earlier than SOD1G93A littermates. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the number of motor neurons was decreased and microglia were activated in the spinal cord of the double mutant mice, indicating that apelin deficiency pathologically accelerated the progression of ALS. Furthermore, we showed that apelin enhanced the protective effect of VEGF on H2O2-induced neuronal death in primary neurons. These results suggest that apelin/APJ system in the spinal cord has a neuroprotective effect against the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:21887354

  10. Antioxidant supplementation accelerates cachexia development by promoting tumor growth in C26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Assi, Mohamad; Derbré, Frédéric; Lefeuvre-Orfila, Luz; Rébillard, Amélie

    2016-02-01

    More than 50% of patients with advanced stages of colon cancer suffer from progressive loss of skeletal muscle, called cachexia, resulting in reduced quality of life and shortened survival. It is becoming evident that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate pathways controlling skeletal muscle atrophy. Herein we tested the hypothesis that antioxidant supplementation could prevent skeletal muscle atrophy in a model of cachectic Colon 26 (C26) tumor-bearing mice. Seven-week-old BALB/c mice were subcutaneously inoculated with colon 26 (C26) cancer cells or PBS. Then C26-mice were daily gavaged during 22 days either with PBS (vehicle) or an antioxidant cocktail whose composition is close to that of commercial dietary antioxidant supplements (rich in catechins, quercetin and vitamin C). We found that antioxidants enhanced weight loss and caused premature death of mice. Antioxidants supplementation failed to prevent (i) the increase in plasma TNF-α levels and systemic oxidative damage, (ii) skeletal muscle atrophy and (iii) activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (MuRF-1, MAFbx and polyubiquitinated proteins). Accordingly, immunohistological staining for Ki-67 and the expression of cell cycle inhibitors demonstrated that tumor of supplemented mice developed faster with a concomitant decrease in oxidative damage. Previous studies have shown that the use of catechins and quercetin separately can improve the musculoskeletal function in cachectic animals. However, our results indicate that the combination of these antioxidants reduced survival and enhanced cachexia in C26-mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Classification of progression free survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Hamidreza; Kim, Joo Y.; Scott, Jacob G.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Harrison, Louis B.

    2016-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an abnormal growth of tissue which arises from the back of the nose. At the time of diagnosis, detection of tumor features with prognostic significance, including patient demographics, imaging characteristics and molecular characteristics, can enable the treating clinician to select a treatment that is optimized for the individual patient. At present, the analysis of tumor imaging features is limited to size criteria and macroscopic textural semantic descriptors, but computerized quantification of intratumoral heterogeneity and their temporal evolution may provide another metric for predicting prognosis. We propose medical imaging feature analysis methods and radiomics machine learning methods to predict failure of treatment. NPC tumors on contrast-enhanced T1 (T1Gd) sequences of 25 NPC patients' diagnostic magnetic resonance images (MRI) were manually contoured. Otsu segmentation was applied to segment the tumor into highly enhancing vs. weakly enhancing signal intensity subregions. Within these subregions, texture features were extracted to numerically quantify the intraregional heterogeneity. Patients were divided into two prognostic groups; a progression-freesurvival group (those without locoregional recurrence or distant metastases), and the disease progression group (those with locoregional recurrence or distant metastases). We used Support Vector Machines (SVM) to perform classification (prediction of prognosis). The features from the highly enhancing subregion classify prognosis with 80% predictive accuracy with AUC=0.60, while the captured features from the weakly enhancing subregion classify prognosis with 76% accuracy with AUC= 0.76.

  12. The role of individual inheritance in tumor progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Kent

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis, the dissemination and growth of tumor cells at secondary sites, is the primary cause of patient mortality from solid tumors. Metastasis is an extremely complex, inefficient process requiring contributions of not only the tumor cell but also local and distant environmental factors, at both the cellular and molecular level. Variation in the function of any of the steps in the metastatic cascade may therefore have profound implications for the ultimate course of the disease. In addition to the somatic and cellular heterogeneity that can affect cancer outcome, an individual's specific ancestry or genetic background can also significantly influence metastatic progression. These inherited variants not only encoded for metastatic susceptibility but also provided a window to study critical factors that are not easily accessible with current technologies. Furthermore, investigations into inherited metastatic susceptibility enable identification of important molecular and cellular processes that are not subject to mutation and are consequently not detectable by standard cancer genome sequencing strategies. Incorporation of inherited variation into metastasis research therefore provides methods to more comprehensively investigate the etiology of the lethal consequences of tumor progression.

  13. Factors for tumor progression in patients with skull base chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Tian, Kaibing; Wang, Ke; Ma, Junpeng; Ru, Xiaojuan; Du, Jiang; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting

    2016-09-01

    Skull base chordoma is a rare and fatal disease, recurrence of which is inevitable, albeit variable. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic features of disease progression, identify prognostic factors, and construct a nomogram for predicting progression in individual patients. Data of 229 patients with skull base chordoma treated by one institution between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved and grouped as primary and recurrent. Kaplan-Meier survival of progression was estimated, taking competing risks into account. Multivariable Cox regression was used to investigate survival predictors. The primary group consisted by 183 cases, gained more benefits on 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (51%) and mean PFS time (66.9 months) than the recurrent group (46 cases), in which 5-year postrecurrent PFS was 14%, and mean postrecurrent PFS time was 29.5 months. In the primary group, visual deficits, pathological subtypes, extent of bone invasion, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, and variation in perioperative KPS were identified as independent predictors of PFS. A nomogram to predict 3-year and 5-year PFS consisted of these factors, was well calibrated and had good discriminative ability (adjusted Harrell C statistic, 0.68). In the recurrent group, marginal resection (P = 0.018) and adjuvant radiotherapy (P = 0.043) were verified as protective factors associated with postrecurrent PFS. Factors for tumor progression demonstrated some differences between primary and recurrent cases. The nomogram appears useful for risk stratification of tumor progression in primary cases. Further studies will be necessary to identify the rapid-growth histopathological subtype as an independent predictor of rapid progression.

  14. Th17 Cells in Protection from Tumor or Promotion of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    The roles of inflammation and inflammatory cells such as Th17 cells in the development and progression of cancer have been extensively studied. However, the results have been varied, with conflicting conclusions. Most studies have focused on changes in inflammatory phenotypes once cancers have developed and disease is progressing. Far fewer studies have looked at the immune phenotypic changes that occur during progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. The impact of inflammation and, in particular, Th17 cells on tumor biology is summarized in this review, with a focus on the differences in the outcomes of studies. Possible explanations for the contradictory conclusions are also suggested. PMID:27453801

  15. Cooperative signaling between Wnt1 and integrin-linked kinase induces accelerated breast tumor development.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Arusha; Maidan, Mykola; Lock, Frances E; Tearle, Howard; McKinney, Steven; Muller, William J; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is genetically and clinically a heterogeneous disease. However, the exact contribution of different cell types and oncogenic mutations to this heterogeneity are not well understood. Recently, we discovered an interaction between Wnt and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) within the signaling cascade that regulates cell growth and survival. Interestingly, mammary-specific expression of either one of these proteins has been shown to promote mammary tumorigenesis. In light of our recent findings and to investigate the potential interaction between Wnt and ILK proteins during mammary tumor formation and progression, we established a transgenic mouse model that expresses both Wnt and ILK in mammary epithelial cells. A novel transgenic mouse model with mammary-specific expression of both Wnt1 and ILK was generated by crossing the two previously characterized mouse models, MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-ILK. The resulting MMTV-Wnt/ILK mice were closely monitored for tumor development and growth, as well as for the tumor onset. The molecular phenotypes of both tumors and premalignant mammary glands were investigated by using biochemical and global gene-expression analysis approaches. A significant acceleration in mammary tumor incidence and growth was observed in the MMTV-Wnt/ILK mice. Pre-neoplastic mammary glands also display lobuloalveolar hyperplasia and an increase in ductal epithelium proliferation. Apart from elevated expression of Wnt/ILK targets, such as beta-catenin and cyclin D1, gene-expression profiling identified the surprising activation of the FOXA1 transcription factor. Upregulation of FOXA1, which is also known as the molecular marker of differentiated mammary luminal cells, was consistent with the expansion of the enriched luminal progenitor population or CD29loCD24hiCD61+ cells in MMTV-Wnt/ILK tumors. These results show cooperation between Wnt1 and ILK transgenes during mammary carcinogenesis, leading to changes in a transcriptional network, which could

  16. Cooperative signaling between Wnt1 and integrin-linked kinase induces accelerated breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is genetically and clinically a heterogeneous disease. However, the exact contribution of different cell types and oncogenic mutations to this heterogeneity are not well understood. Recently, we discovered an interaction between Wnt and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) within the signaling cascade that regulates cell growth and survival. Interestingly, mammary-specific expression of either one of these proteins has been shown to promote mammary tumorigenesis. In light of our recent findings and to investigate the potential interaction between Wnt and ILK proteins during mammary tumor formation and progression, we established a transgenic mouse model that expresses both Wnt and ILK in mammary epithelial cells. Methods A novel transgenic mouse model with mammary-specific expression of both Wnt1 and ILK was generated by crossing the two previously characterized mouse models, MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-ILK. The resulting MMTV-Wnt/ILK mice were closely monitored for tumor development and growth, as well as for the tumor onset. The molecular phenotypes of both tumors and premalignant mammary glands were investigated by using biochemical and global gene-expression analysis approaches. Results A significant acceleration in mammary tumor incidence and growth was observed in the MMTV-Wnt/ILK mice. Pre-neoplastic mammary glands also display lobuloalveolar hyperplasia and an increase in ductal epithelium proliferation. Apart from elevated expression of Wnt/ILK targets, such as β-catenin and cyclin D1, gene-expression profiling identified the surprising activation of the FOXA1 transcription factor. Upregulation of FOXA1, which is also known as the molecular marker of differentiated mammary luminal cells, was consistent with the expansion of the enriched luminal progenitor population or CD29loCD24hiCD61+ cells in MMTV-Wnt/ILK tumors. Conclusions These results show cooperation between Wnt1 and ILK transgenes during mammary carcinogenesis, leading to changes in a

  17. The effect of one additional driver mutation on tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth is caused by the acquisition of driver mutations, which enhance the net reproductive rate of cells. Driver mutations may increase cell division, reduce cell death, or allow cells to overcome density-limiting effects. We study the dynamics of tumor growth as one additional driver mutation is acquired. Our models are based on two-type branching processes that terminate in either tumor disappearance or tumor detection. In our first model, both cell types grow exponentially, with a faster rate for cells carrying the additional driver. We find that the additional driver mutation does not affect the survival probability of the lesion, but can substantially reduce the time to reach the detectable size if the lesion is slow growing. In our second model, cells lacking the additional driver cannot exceed a fixed carrying capacity, due to density limitations. In this case, the time to detection depends strongly on this carrying capacity. Our model provides a quantitative framework for studying tumor dynamics during different stages of progression. We observe that early, small lesions need additional drivers, while late stage metastases are only marginally affected by them. These results help to explain why additional driver mutations are typically not detected in fast-growing metastases.

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  19. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    This report covers the activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the first 6 months of calendar 1981. We discuss the Division's major projects, which reflect a variety of applications and sponsors. The varied technologies concerned with the Proton Storage ring are concerned with the Proton Storage Ring are continuing and are discussed in detail. For the racetrack microtron (RTM) project, the major effort has been the design and construction of the demonstration RTM. Our development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. Frequent contacts from other laboratories have revealed a wide acceptance of the RFQ principle in solving low-velocity acceleration problems. In recent work on heavy ion fusion we have developed ideas for funneling beams from RFQ linacs; the funneling process is explained. To test as many aspects as possible of a fully integrated low-energy portion of a Pion generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) Accelerator, a prototype accelerator was designed to take advantage of several pieces of existing accelerator hardware. The important principles to be tested in this prototype accelerator are detailed. Our prototype gyrocon has been extensively tested and modified; we discuss results from our investigations. Our work with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is reviewed in this report.

  20. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  1. Rb deficiency accelerates progression of carcinoma of the urinary bladder in vivo and in vitro through inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Jiang-Ping; Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Urinary bladder cancer is known as a common cancer diagnosed across the world and results in significant mortality and morbidity rates among patients. The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, as a main tumor suppressor, controls cellular responses to potentially oncogenic stimulation. Rb phosphorylation could disrupt E2F complex formation, resulting in diverse transcription factor dysfunction. In our study, we investigated how Rb is involved in controlling urinary bladder cancer progression. The results indicate that Rb expression is reduced in mice with urinary bladder tumor, and its suppression leads to urinary bladder cancer progression in vivo and in vitro. Rb mutation directly results in tumor size with lower survival rate in vivo. Rb knockdown in vitro promoted bladder tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Interestingly, Rb knockout and knockdown result in autophagy and apoptosis inhibition via suppressing p53 and caspase-3 signaling pathways, enhancing bladder cancer development in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal that Rb deficiency accelerated urinary bladder cancer progression, exposing an important role of Rb in suppressing urinary bladder cancer for treatment in the future.

  2. Transformation of non-tumor host cells during tumor progression: theories and evidence.

    PubMed

    García-Olmo, Dolores C; Picazo, María G; García-Olmo, Damián

    2012-06-01

    Most cancer deaths are due to the development of metastases and this phenomenon is still a hard challenge for researchers. A number of theories have tried to unravel the metastatic machinery, but definitive results that link the evidence with conventional concepts of metastatic disease remain to be reported. Considerable evidence suggests interactions between tumor cells and host cells that might be essential for tumor progression and metastasis. Most such evidence is suggestive of fusion phenomena, but some suggest the transfer of cell-free DNA (cfDNA). Such evidence is often ignored or overlooked in the assessment and management of malignancy. In this article, we review the available evidence for the importance of cell fusion and cfDNA in metastasis, and we present some preliminary data that support the hypothesis that tumor progression might be based not only on the division of tumor cells but also on the transformation of normal cells. Future success in the search for cancer therapies will surely require advances in our knowledge of the pathways of tumor invasion by unexpected mechanisms. Thus, no well supported evidence for roles of cell-free nucleic acids and fusion of cells or of cells with vesicles should be ignored.

  3. Proteolytic Activity of Human Lymphoid Tumor Cells. Correlation with Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, Domenico; Ria, Roberto; Pellegrino, Antonio; Bruno, Michele; Merchionne, Francesca; Dammacco, Franco

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and production are associated with advanced-stage tumor and contribute to tumor progression, invasion and metastases. The current study was designed to determine the expression and production of MMP-2 (gelatinase A) and MMP-9 (gelatinase B) by human lymphoid tumor cells. Changes in expression and production were also investigated during tumor progression of multiple myeloma and mycosis fungoides. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that lymphoblastic leukemia B cells (SB cell line), multiple myeloma (MM) cells (U266 cell line) and lymphoblastic leukemia T cells (CEM and Jurkat cell lines) express constitutively the mRNA for MMP-2 and/or MMP-9. We demonstrated by gelatin-zymography of cell culture medium that both enzymes were secreted in their cleaved (activated) form. In situ hybridization of bone marrow plasma cells and gelatin- zymography of the medium showed that patients with active MM (diagnosis, relapse, leukemic progression) express higher levels of MMP-2 mRNA and protein than patients with non-active MM (complete/objective response, plateau) and with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). MMP-9 expression and secretion was similar in all patient groups. In patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNAs was significantly upregulated with advancing stage, in terms of lesions both positive for one of two mRNAs and with the greatest intensity of expression. Besides MF cells, the MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 mRNAs were expressed by some stromal cell populations (microvascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages), suggesting that these cells cooperate in the process of tumor invasion. Our studies identify MMPs as an important class of proteinases involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by human lymphoid tumors, and suggest that MMPs inhibitors may lead to important new treatment for their control. PMID:11097203

  4. GRK6 deficiency promotes angiogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Smith, Nikia; Rivers, Elizabeth, J.; Thomas, Ariel J.; Sutton, Natalie; Hu, Yuhui; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Chen, Xiaoxin L.; Leung, TinChung; Richardson, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate the activated form of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leading to receptor desensitization and down-regulation. We have recently shown that the chemokine receptor, CXCR2, couples to GRK6 to regulate cellular responses including chemotaxis, angiogenesis and wound healing. In this study, we investigate the role of GRK6 in tumorigenesis using murine models of human lung cancer. Mice deficient in GRK6 (GRK6−/−) exhibited a significant increase in Lewis lung cancer (LLC) growth and metastasis relative to control littermates (GRK6+/+). GRK6 deletion had no effect on the expression of proangiogenic chemokine or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but up-regulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 release, tumor-infiltrating PMNs and microvessel density. Since βarr2−/− mice exhibited increase LLC growth and metastasis similar to that of GRK6−/−we developed a double GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− mouse model. Surprisingly, GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− mice exhibited faster tumor growth relative to GRK6−/− or βarr2−/− mice. Treatment of the mice with anti-CXCR2 antibody inhibited tumor growth in both GRK6−/− and GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− animals. Altogether, the results indicate that CXCR2 couples to GRK6 to regulate angiogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Deletion of GRK6 increases the activity of the host CXCR2, resulting in greater PMN infiltration and MMP release in the tumor microenvironment thereby promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Since GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− showed greater tumor growth relative to GRK6−/− or βarr2−/− mice, the data further suggest that CXCR2 couples to different mechanisms to mediate tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:23589623

  5. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells: triggers for tumor capsule disruption and tumor progression?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Liu, Min-ling; Chen, Wen; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Ding, Shuqing; Ni, Min; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies of human breast and prostate cancer have shown that aberrant immune cell infiltration is associated with focal tumor capsule disruption and tumor cell budding that facilitate invasion and metastasis. Our current study attempted to determine whether aberrant immune cell infiltration would have similar impact on colorectal cancer (CRC). Tissue sections from 100 patients with primary CRC were assessed for the frequencies of focal basement membrane (BM) disruption, muscularis mucosa (MM) fragmentation, and tumor cell dissemination in epithelial structures adjacent and distal to infiltrating lymphoid aggregates using a panel of biomarkers and quantitative digital imaging. Our study revealed: (1) epithelial structures adjacent to lymphoid follicles or aggregates had a significantly higher (p<0.001) frequency of focally disrupted BM, dissociated epithelial cells in the stroma, disseminated epithelial cells within lymphatic ducts or blood vessels, and fragmented MM than their distal counterparts, (2) a majority of dissociated epithelial cells within the stroma or vascular structures were immediately subjacent to or physically associated with infiltrating immune cells, (3) the junctions of pre-invasive and invasive lesions were almost exclusively located at sites adjacent to lymphoid follicles or aggregates, (4) infiltrating immune cells were preferentially associated with epithelial capsules that show distinct degenerative alterations, and (5) infiltrating immune cells appeared to facilitate tumor stem cell proliferation, budding, and dissemination. Aberrant immune cell infiltration may have the same destructive impact on the capsule of all epithelium-derived tumors. This, in turn, may selectively favor the proliferation of tumor stem or progenitor cells overlying these focal disruptions. These proliferating epithelial tumor cells subsequently disseminate from the focal disruption leading to tumor invasion and metastasis.

  6. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yu, Shiyan; Zhang, Xiao; Hoffman, Andrew; Sun, Jiaxin; Das, Soumyashree; Vedula, Pavan; Li, Guangxun; Fu, Jiang; Walker, Francesca; Yang, Chung S.; Yi, Zheng; Hsu, Wei; Yu, Da-Hai; Shen, Lanlan; Rodriguez, Alexis J.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the APC or β-catenin genes are well established initiators of colorectal cancer (CRC), yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches in mouse CRC and human CRC xenograft models, we show that incipient intestinal tumor cells activate CDC42, an APC-interacting small GTPase, as a crucial step in malignant progression. In the mouse, Cdc42 ablation attenuated the tumorigenicity of mutant intestinal cells carrying single APC or β-catenin mutations. Similarly, human CRC with relatively higher levels of CDC42 activity were particularly sensitive to CDC42 blockade. Mechanistic studies suggested that Cdc42 may be activated at different levels, including at the level of transcriptional activation of the stem-cell-enriched Rho family exchange factor Arhgef4. Our results suggest that early-stage mutant intestinal epithelial cells must recruit the pleiotropic functions of Cdc42 for malignant progression, suggesting its relevance as a biomarker and therapeutic target for selective CRC intervention. PMID:25113996

  7. Interaction of tumor cells and lymphatic vessels in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, A; Detmar, M

    2012-10-18

    Metastatic spread of cancer through the lymphatic system affects hundreds of thousands of patients yearly. Growth of new lymphatic vessels, lymphangiogenesis, is activated in cancer and inflammation, but is largely inactive in normal physiology, and therefore offers therapeutic potential. Key mediators of lymphangiogenesis have been identified in developmental studies. During embryonic development, lymphatic endothelial cells derive from the blood vascular endothelium and differentiate under the guidance of lymphatic-specific regulators, such as the prospero homeobox 1 transcription factor. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF receptor 3 signaling are essential for the further development of lymphatic vessels and therefore they provide a promising target for inhibition of tumor lymphangiogenesis. Lymphangiogenesis is important for the progression of solid tumors as shown for melanoma and breast cancer. Tumor cells may use chemokine gradients as guidance cues and enter lymphatic vessels through intercellular openings between endothelial cell junctions or, possibly, by inducing larger discontinuities in the endothelial cell layer. Tumor-draining sentinel lymph nodes show enhanced lymphangiogenesis even before cancer metastasis and they may function as a permissive 'lymphovascular niche' for the survival of metastatic cells. Although our current knowledge indicates that the development of anti-lymphangiogenic therapies may be beneficial for the treatment of cancer patients, several open questions remain with regard to the frequency, mechanisms and biological importance of lymphatic metastases.

  8. A Think Tank of TINK/TANKs: Tumor-Infiltrating/Tumor-Associated Natural Killer Cells in Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This “polarization” has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as “TINKs”) and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call “TANKs”) are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  9. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  10. Tumor progression and the Different Faces of the PERK kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Dariusz; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Diehl, J. Alan

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase, protein kinase R (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), is a pro-adaptive protein kinase whose activity is regulated indirectly by protein misfolding within the ER. Since the oxidative folding environment in the ER is sensitive to a variety of cellular stresses, many of which occur during neoplastic transformation and in the tumor microenvironment, there has been considerable interest in defining whether PERK positively contributes to tumor progression and whether it represents a significant therapeutic target. Herein, we review the current knowledge of PERK-dependent signaling pathways, the contribution of downstream substrates including recently characterized new PERK substrates transcription factors FOXO (Forkhead box O protein) and diacyglycerol (DAG) a lipid signaling second messenger, and efforts to develop small molecule PERK inhibitors. PMID:26028033

  11. Cancer stem cells as the engine of unstable tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard V; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Saldaña, Joan

    2008-08-21

    Genomic instability is considered by many authors the key engine of tumorigenesis. However, mounting evidence indicates that a small population of drug resistant cancer cells can also be a key component of tumor progression. Such cancer stem cells would define a compartment effectively acting as the source of most tumor cells. Here we study the interplay between these two conflicting components of cancer dynamics using two types of tissue architecture. Both mean field and multicompartment models are studied. It is shown that tissue architecture affects the pattern of cancer dynamics and that unstable cancers spontaneously organize into a heterogeneous population of highly unstable cells. This dominant population is in fact separated from the low-mutation compartment by an instability gap, where almost no cancer cells are observed. The possible implications of this prediction are discussed.

  12. Tumor progression and the different faces of the PERK kinase.

    PubMed

    Pytel, D; Majsterek, I; Diehl, J A

    2016-03-10

    The serine/threonine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase, protein kinase R (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK), is a pro-adaptive protein kinase whose activity is regulated indirectly by protein misfolding within the ER. As the oxidative folding environment in the ER is sensitive to a variety of cellular stresses, many of which occur during neoplastic transformation and in the tumor microenvironment, there has been considerable interest in defining whether PERK positively contributes to tumor progression and whether it represents a significant therapeutic target. Herein, we review the current knowledge of PERK-dependent signaling pathways, the contribution of downstream substrates including recently characterized new PERK substrates transcription factors Forkhead box O protein and diacyglycerol a lipid signaling second messenger, and efforts to develop small molecule PERK inhibitors.

  13. The mechanisms by which polyamines accelerate tumor spread

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Increased polyamine concentrations in the blood and urine of cancer patients reflect the enhanced levels of polyamine synthesis in cancer tissues arising from increased activity of enzymes responsible for polyamine synthesis. In addition to their de novo polyamine synthesis, cells can take up polyamines from extracellular sources, such as cancer tissues, food, and intestinal microbiota. Because polyamines are indispensable for cell growth, increased polyamine availability enhances cell growth. However, the malignant potential of cancer is determined by its capability to invade to surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant organs. The mechanisms by which increased polyamine levels enhance the malignant potential of cancer cells and decrease anti-tumor immunity are reviewed. Cancer cells with a greater capability to synthesize polyamines are associated with increased production of proteinases, such as serine proteinase, matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins, and plasminogen activator, which can degrade surrounding tissues. Although cancer tissues produce vascular growth factors, their deregulated growth induces hypoxia, which in turn enhances polyamine uptake by cancer cells to further augment cell migration and suppress CD44 expression. Increased polyamine uptake by immune cells also results in reduced cytokine production needed for anti-tumor activities and decreases expression of adhesion molecules involved in anti-tumor immunity, such as CD11a and CD56. Immune cells in an environment with increased polyamine levels lose anti-tumor immune functions, such as lymphokine activated killer activities. Recent investigations revealed that increased polyamine availability enhances the capability of cancer cells to invade and metastasize to new tissues while diminishing immune cells' anti-tumor immune functions. PMID:21988863

  14. The mechanisms by which polyamines accelerate tumor spread.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kuniyasu

    2011-10-11

    Increased polyamine concentrations in the blood and urine of cancer patients reflect the enhanced levels of polyamine synthesis in cancer tissues arising from increased activity of enzymes responsible for polyamine synthesis. In addition to their de novo polyamine synthesis, cells can take up polyamines from extracellular sources, such as cancer tissues, food, and intestinal microbiota. Because polyamines are indispensable for cell growth, increased polyamine availability enhances cell growth. However, the malignant potential of cancer is determined by its capability to invade to surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant organs. The mechanisms by which increased polyamine levels enhance the malignant potential of cancer cells and decrease anti-tumor immunity are reviewed. Cancer cells with a greater capability to synthesize polyamines are associated with increased production of proteinases, such as serine proteinase, matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins, and plasminogen activator, which can degrade surrounding tissues. Although cancer tissues produce vascular growth factors, their deregulated growth induces hypoxia, which in turn enhances polyamine uptake by cancer cells to further augment cell migration and suppress CD44 expression. Increased polyamine uptake by immune cells also results in reduced cytokine production needed for anti-tumor activities and decreases expression of adhesion molecules involved in anti-tumor immunity, such as CD11a and CD56. Immune cells in an environment with increased polyamine levels lose anti-tumor immune functions, such as lymphokine activated killer activities. Recent investigations revealed that increased polyamine availability enhances the capability of cancer cells to invade and metastasize to new tissues while diminishing immune cells' anti-tumor immune functions.

  15. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-27

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  16. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-01

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  17. Recent progress on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Li, D.; Vier, D.C.; Kroll, N. |; Schultz, S.; Wang, H.

    1997-03-01

    We report on the current status of our program to apply Photonic Band Gap (PBG) concepts to produce novel high-energy, high-intensity accelerator cavities. The PBG design on which we have concentrated our inital efforts consists of a square array of metal cylinders, terminated by conducting or superconducting sheets, and surrounded by microwave absorber on the periphery of the structure. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. In previous work, we have proposed that this structure could be utilized as an accelerator cavity, with advantageous properties over conventional cavity designs. In the present work, we present further studies, including MAFIA-based numerical calculations and experimental measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of using the proposed structure in a real accelerator application. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Recent progress on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Li, D.; Vier, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    We report on the current status of our program to apply Photonic Band Gap (PBG) concepts to produce novel high-energy, high-intensity accelerator cavities. The PBG design on which we have concentrated our initial efforts consists of a square array of metal cylinders, terminated by conducting or superconducting sheets, and surrounded by microwave absorber on the periphery of the structure. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. In previous work, we have proposed that this structure could be utilized as an accelerator cavity, with advantageous properties over conventional cavity designs. In the present work, we present further studies, including MAFIA-based numerical calculations and experimental measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of using the proposed structure in a real accelerator application.

  19. Impact of Tumor Progression on Cancer Incidence Curves

    PubMed Central

    Luebeck, E. Georg; Curtius, Kit; Jeon, Jihyoun; Hazelton, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer arises through a multistage process, but it is not fully clear how this process influences the age-specific incidence curve. Studies of colorectal and pancreatic cancer using the multistage-clonal-expansion (MSCE) model have identified two phases of the incidence curves. One phase is linear beginning about age of 60, suggesting that at least two rare rate-limiting mutations occur prior to clonal expansion of premalignant cells. A second phase is exponential, seen in earlier-onset cancers occurring before the age of 60 that are associated with premalignant clonal expansion. Here we extend the MSCE model to include clonal expansion of malignant cells, an advance that permits study of the effects of tumor growth and extinction on the incidence of colorectal, gastric, pancreatic and esophageal adenocarcinomas in the digestive tract. After adjusting the age-specific incidence for birth-cohort and calendar-year trends, we found that initiating mutations and premalignant cell kinetics can explain the primary features of the incidence curve. However, we also found that the incidence data of these cancers harbored information on the kinetics of malignant clonal expansion prior to clinical detection, including tumor growth rates and extinction probabilities on three characteristic time scales for tumor progression. Additionally, the data harbored information on the mean sojourn times for prema-lignant clones until occurrence of either the first malignant cell or the first persistent (surviving) malignant clone. Lastly, the data also harbored information on the mean sojourn time of persistent malignant clones to the time of diagnosis. In conclusion, cancer incidence curves can harbor significant information about hidden processes of tumor initiation, premalignant clonal expansion and malignant transformation, and even some limited information on tumor growth before clinical detection. PMID:23054397

  20. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    We report on the major projects of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the last 6 months of calendar year 1981. We have continued work on the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator; we are doing studies of octupole focusing. We have completed the design study on an unusual electron-linear radiographic machine that could obtain x rays of turbine engines operating under simulated flight-maneuver conditions on a centrifuge. In September we completed the 5-y PIon Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) program to develop the concept and technology for an accelerator-based facility to treat cancer in a hospital environment. The design and construction package for the site, building, and utilities for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility has been completed, and we have begun to concentrate on tests of the rf power equipment and on the design, procurement, and installation of the 2-MeV proto-type accelerator. The Proton Storage Ring project has continued to mature. The main effort on the racetrack microtron (RTM) has been on the design and construction of various components for the demonstration RTM. On the gyrocon radio-frequency generator project, the gyrocon was rebuilt with a new electron gun and new water-cooled gun-focus coil; these new components have performed well. We have initiated a project to produce a klystron analysis code that will be useful in reducing the electrical-energy demand for accelerators. A free-electron laser amplifier experiment to test the performance of a tapered wiggler at high optical power has been successfully completed.

  1. Tumor-derived exosomes in cancer progression and treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo; Feng, Jifeng

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have diameter within the range of 30-100nm and spherical to cup-shaped nanoparticles with specific surface molecular characteristics, such as CD9 and CD63. These vesicles are present in nearly all human body fluids, including blood plasma/serum, saliva, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, semen, and particularly enriched in tumor microenvironment. Exosomes contain multiple proteins, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, long non-coding RNA, and even genetic materials of viruses/prions. These materials are biochemically and functionally distinct and can be transferred to a recipient cell where they regulate protein expression and signaling pathways. Recently, exosomes are demonstrated to have a close relationship with tumor development and metastasis. Exosomes influence therapeutic effect in cancer patients. In this review, we describe the biogenesis, composition, and function of exosomes. The mechanism on how tumor-derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression and clinical treatment failure is also described, with special focus on their potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26452221

  2. Tumor-derived exosomes in cancer progression and treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaorong; Cao, Haixia; Shen, Bo; Feng, Jifeng

    2015-11-10

    Exosomes have diameter within the range of 30-100 nm and spherical to cup-shaped nanoparticles with specific surface molecular characteristics, such as CD9 and CD63. These vesicles are present in nearly all human body fluids, including blood plasma/serum, saliva, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, semen, and particularly enriched in tumor microenvironment. Exosomes contain multiple proteins, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, long non-coding RNA, and even genetic materials of viruses/prions. These materials are biochemically and functionally distinct and can be transferred to a recipient cell where they regulate protein expression and signaling pathways. Recently, exosomes are demonstrated to have a close relationship with tumor development and metastasis. Exosomes influence therapeutic effect in cancer patients. In this review, we describe the biogenesis, composition, and function of exosomes. The mechanism on how tumor-derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression and clinical treatment failure is also described, with special focus on their potential applications in cancer therapy.

  3. Loss of Mig6 accelerates initiation and progression of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor-driven lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Tapan K.; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Linnoila, Ilona; Cultraro, Constance M.; Giannakou, Andreas; Nemati, Roxanne; Zhang, Xu; Webster, Joshua D.; Ritt, Daniel; Ghosal, Sarani; Hoschuetzky, Heinz; Simpson, R. Mark; Biswas, Romi; Politi, Katerina; Morrison, Deborah K.; Varmus, Harold E.; Guha, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain drive lung adenocarcinoma. We have previously identified MIG6, an inhibitor of ERBB signaling and a potential tumor suppressor, as a target for phosphorylation by mutant EGFRs. Here we demonstrate that Mig6 is a tumor suppressor for the initiation and progression of mutant EGFR-driven lung adenocarcinoma in mouse models. Mutant EGFR-induced lung tumor formation was accelerated in Mig6-deficient mice, even with Mig6 haploinsufficiency. We demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of MIG6 at Y394/395 in EGFR-mutant human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines is associated with an increased interaction of MIG6 with mutant EGFR, which may stabilize EGFR protein. MIG6 also fails to promote mutant EGFR degradation. We propose a model whereby increased tyrosine phosphorylation of MIG6 decreases its capacity to inhibit mutant EGFR. Nonetheless, the residual inhibition is sufficient for Mig6 to delay mutant EGFR-driven tumor initiation and progression in mouse models. PMID:25735773

  4. RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2012-07-01

    Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

  5. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, July-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division are discussed. This report covers the last six months of calendar 1980 and is organized around the Division's major projects. These projects reflect a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The major technological innovations promoted by the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) program have been developed; accelerator technologies relevant to the design of a medically practical PIGMI have been identified. A new group in AT Division deals with microwave and magnet studies; we describe the status of some of their projects. We discuss the prototype gyrocon, which has been completed, and the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, which continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. One section of this report briefly describes the results of a design study for an electron beam ion source that is ideally suited as an injector for a heavy ion linac; another section reports on a turbine engine test facility that will expose operating turbine engines to simulated maneuver forces. In other sections we discuss various activities: the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, the free-electron laser program, the racetrack microtron project, the Proton Storage ring, and H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors.

  6. Recruited brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to brain tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Behnan, Jinan; Isakson, Pauline; Joel, Mrinal; Cilio, Corrado; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Badn, Wiaam

    2014-05-01

    The identity of the cells that contribute to brain tumor structure and progression remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been isolated from normal mouse brain. Here, we report the infiltration of MSC-like cells into the GL261 murine glioma model. These brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BT-MSCs) are defined with the phenotype (Lin-Sca-1+CD9+CD44+CD166+/-) and have multipotent differentiation capacity. We show that the infiltration of BT-MSCs correlates to tumor progression; furthermore, BT-MSCs increased the proliferation rate of GL261 cells in vitro. For the first time, we report that the majority of GL261 cells expressed mesenchymal phenotype under both adherent and sphere culture conditions in vitro and that the non-MSC population is nontumorigenic in vivo. Although the GL261 cell line expressed mesenchymal phenotype markers in vitro, most BT-MSCs are recruited cells from host origin in both wild-type GL261 inoculated into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice and GL261-GFP cells inoculated into wild-type mice. We show the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 on different recruited cell populations. In vivo, the GL261 cells change marker profile and acquire a phenotype that is more similar to cells growing in sphere culture conditions. Finally, we identify a BT-MSC population in human glioblastoma that is CD44+CD9+CD166+ both in freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells. Our data indicate that cells with MSC-like phenotype infiltrate into the tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we suggest that targeting BT-MSCs could be a possible strategy for treating glioblastoma patients. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; O'Malley, Yunxia; Askeland, Ryan W; Sugg, Sonia L; Fisher, Rory A

    2013-08-01

    Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6(-/-) mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6(-/-) animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6(-/-) mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6(-/-) mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6(-/-) but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors.

  8. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rory A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6− /− mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6− /− mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6−/− animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6−/− mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6−/− mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6−/− but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors. PMID:23598467

  9. Luteolin suppresses development of medroxyprogesterone acetate-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matthew T; Mafuvadze, Benford; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Ellersieck, Mark R; Goyette, Sandy; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women undergoing hormone-replacement therapy containing both progestins and estrogens are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women taking estrogen alone. We recently demonstrated that medroxyprogesterone acetate, a progestin commonly used for hormone-replacement therapy, accelerates development of mammary carcinogenesis in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene‑treated Sprague-Dawley rats. Synthetic antiprogestins used to block the deleterious effects of progestins, are themselves associated with toxic side-effects. In order to circumvent this, we used the aforementioned model to identify less toxic natural compounds that may prevent the development of progestin-accelerated tumors. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has previously been shown to possess anticancer properties. In our studies, both low (1 mg/kg) and high (25 mg/kg) doses of luteolin significantly suppressed progestin-dependent increases in tumor incidence, while increasing tumor latency and reducing the occurrence of large (>300 mm3) mammary tumors. However, an intermediate dose of luteolin (10 mg/kg), while suppressing the development of large tumors, did not affect either tumor incidence or latency. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues revealed that all concentrations of luteolin (1, 10, and 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced levels of VEGF within tumors. The suppressive effects of luteolin on tumor incidence and volume, together with its ability to reduce VEGF and blood vessels, persisted even after treatment was terminated. This suggests that luteolin possesses anti‑angiogenic properties which could mechanistically explain its capacity to control tumor progression. Thus luteolin may be a valuable, non-toxic, naturally-occurring anticancer compound which may potentially be used to combat progestin-accelerated mammary tumors.

  10. The Use of Second Harmonic Generation to Image the Extracellular Matrix During Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen; Brown, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality, resulting from changes in the tumor microenvironment which increases tumor cell migration, dispersal to distant organs, and subsequent survival. This is accompanied by changes in tumor collagen which may allow cells to travel more efficiently away from a primary tumor and invade the surrounding tissue. Second Harmonic generation (SHG) is an intrinsic optical signal that has expanded our understanding of collagen evolution throughout tumor progression. This article addresses current research into tumor progression using SHG, as well as the future prospects of using SHG to advance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243512

  11. Caveolin-1 and Accelerated Host Aging in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M.; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G.; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1+/+ versus Cav-1−/− age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1–deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues). PMID:22698676

  12. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  13. Inhibition of TGF-β with neutralizing antibodies prevents radiation-induced acceleration of metastatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Guix, Marta; Rinehart, Cammie; Dugger, Teresa C.; Chytil, Anna; Moses, Harold L.; Freeman, Michael L.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether TGF-β induced by anticancer therapies accelerates tumor progression. Using the MMTV/PyVmT transgenic model of metastatic breast cancer, we show that administration of ionizing radiation or doxorubicin caused increased circulating levels of TGF-β1 as well as increased circulating tumor cells and lung metastases. These effects were abrogated by administration of a neutralizing pan–TGF-β antibody. Circulating polyomavirus middle T antigen–expressing tumor cells did not grow ex vivo in the presence of the TGF-β antibody, suggesting autocrine TGF-β is a survival signal in these cells. Radiation failed to enhance lung metastases in mice bearing tumors that lack the type II TGF-β receptor, suggesting that the increase in metastases was due, at least in part, to a direct effect of TGF-β on the cancer cells. These data implicate TGF-β induced by anticancer therapy as a prometastatic signal in tumor cells and provide a rationale for the simultaneous use of these therapies in combination with TGF-β inhibitors. PMID:17415413

  14. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Irving

    2009-10-31

    The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.

  15. Beyond Subprime Learning: Accelerating Progress in Early Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornfreund, Laura; McCann, Clare; Williams, Conor; Guernsey, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Earlier this year, in "Subprime Learning: Early Education in America since the Great Recession," the current state of early education in the U.S. was surveyed by examining progress over the last five years . It was found that while the public, political, and research consensus is stronger than ever, the field remains in dire need of…

  16. Loss of gastrokine-2 drives premalignant gastric inflammation and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; O’Connor, Louise; Chionh, Yok Teng; Scurr, Michelle; Rollo, Benjamin N.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Jacobs, Shelley; Catubig, Angelique; Kurklu, Bayzar; Mercer, Stephen; Minamoto, Toshinari; Ong, David E.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Judd, Louise M.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucosal inflammation is associated with a greater risk of gastric cancer (GC) and, therefore, requires tight control by suppressive counter mechanisms. Gastrokine-2 (GKN2) belongs to a family of secreted proteins expressed within normal gastric mucosal cells. GKN2 expression is frequently lost during GC progression, suggesting an inhibitory role; however, a causal link remains unsubstantiated. Here, we developed Gkn2 knockout and transgenic overexpressing mice to investigate the functional impact of GKN2 loss in GC pathogenesis. In mouse models of GC, decreased GKN2 expression correlated with gastric pathology that paralleled human GC progression. At baseline, Gkn2 knockout mice exhibited defective gastric epithelial differentiation but not malignant progression. Conversely, Gkn2 knockout in the IL-11/STAT3-dependent gp130F/F GC model caused tumorigenesis of the proximal stomach. Additionally, gastric immunopathology was accelerated in Helicobacter pylori–infected Gkn2 knockout mice and was associated with augmented T helper cell type 1 (Th1) but not Th17 immunity. Heightened Th1 responses in Gkn2 knockout mice were linked to deregulated mucosal innate immunity and impaired myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation. Finally, transgenic overexpression of human gastrokines (GKNs) attenuated gastric tumor growth in gp130F/F mice. Together, these results reveal an antiinflammatory role for GKN2, provide in vivo evidence that links GKN2 loss to GC pathogenesis, and suggest GKN restoration as a strategy to restrain GC progression. PMID:26974160

  17. Overexpression of protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma progression via the Notch signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lijie; Dong, Pingping; Liu, Longzi; Gao, Qiang; Duan, Meng; Zhang, Si; Chen, She; Xue, Ruyi; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-29

    Aberrant activation of Notch signaling frequently occurs in liver cancer, and is associated with liver malignancies. However, the mechanisms regulating pathologic Notch activation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) catalyzes the addition of O-linked fucose to the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch. In the present study, we detected the expression of Pofut1 in 8 HCC cell lines and 253 human HCC tissues. We reported that Pofut1 was overexpressed in HCC cell lines and clinical HCC tissues, and Pofut1 overexpression clinically correlated with the unfavorable survival and high disease recurrence in HCC. The in vitro assay demonstrated that Pofut1 overexpression accelerated the cell proliferation and migration in HCC cells. Furthermore, Pofut1 overexpression promoted the binding of Notch ligand Dll1 to Notch receptor, and hence activated Notch signaling pathway in HCC cells, indicating that Pofut1 overexpression could be a reason for the aberrant activation of Notch signaling in HCC. Taken together, our findings indicated that an aberrant activated Pofut1-Notch pathway was involved in HCC progression, and blockage of this pathway could be a promising strategy for the therapy of HCC. - Highlights: • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was correlated with aggressive tumor behaviors. • Pofut1 overexpression in HCC was associated with poor prognosis. • Pofut1 promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion in hepatoma cells. • Pofut1 activated Notch signaling pathway in hepatoma cells.

  18. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marcos; Iglesias, Pablo; Gonzalez, Teresa; Dominguez, Fernando; Fraga, Maximo; Aliste, Carlos; Forteza, Jeronimo; Costoya, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR) activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb) inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12). Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Autophagy-Dependent Secretion: Contribution to Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Keulers, Tom G.; Schaaf, Marco B. E.; Rouschop, Kasper M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is best known as a lysosomal degradation and recycling pathway to maintain cellular homeostasis. During autophagy, cytoplasmic content is recognized and packed in autophagic vacuoles, or autophagosomes, and targeted for degradation. However, during the last years, it has become evident that the role of autophagy is not restricted to degradation alone but also mediates unconventional forms of secretion. Furthermore, cells with defects in autophagy apparently are able to reroute their cargo, like mitochondria, to the extracellular environment; effects that contribute to an array of pathologies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the physiological roles of autophagy-dependent secretion, i.e., the effect on inflammation and insulin/hormone secretion. Finally, we focus on the effects of autophagy-dependent secretion on the tumor microenvironment (TME) and tumor progression. The autophagy-mediated secreted factors may stimulate cellular proliferation via auto- and paracrine signaling. The autophagy-mediated release of immune modulating proteins changes the immunosuppresive TME and may promote an invasive phenotype. These effects may be either direct or indirect through facilitating formation of the mobilized vesicle, aid in anterograde trafficking, or alterations in homeostasis and/or autonomous cell signaling. PMID:27933272

  20. The role of exosomes in tumor progression and metastasis (Review).

    PubMed

    Suchorska, Wiktoria M; Lach, Michal S

    2016-03-01

    Tumor cells have developed various mechanisms in defense against applied treatment, which prevent their total elimination from an organism. One of the underestimated mechanisms of defense is secretion of highly specialized double-membrane structures called exosomes. They play a crucial role in the control of the local microenvironment and intracellular communication. It has been shown that the exosomes can be carriers of various proteins, lipids, miRNAs and mRNAs. There are extensive data concerning the influence and participation by exosomes in metastasis and cancer progression. It has been demonstrated that exosomes are involved in multidrug resistance mechanisms, radiation-induced bystander effect and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, exosomes are able to form a premetastatic niche and enable the escape of cancer cells from recognition by host immune cells. Moreover, exosomes are responsible for the formation of vessels. This indicates the significance of secreted extracellular vesicles in the development and prognosis of cancer. The aim of the present review is to briefly describe the role of exosomes in tumor biology.

  1. STAT1 drives tumor progression in serous papillary endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kharma, Budiman; Baba, Tsukasa; Matsumura, Noriomi; Kang, Hyun Sook; Hamanishi, Junzo; Murakami, Ryusuke; McConechy, Melissa M; Leung, Samuel; Yamaguchi, Ken; Hosoe, Yuko; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Murphy, Susan K; Mandai, Masaki; Hunstman, David G; Konishi, Ikuo

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies of the interferon-induced transcription factor STAT1 have associated its dysregulation with poor prognosis in some cancers, but its mechanistic contributions are not well defined. In this study, we report that the STAT1 pathway is constitutively upregulated in type II endometrial cancers. STAT1 pathway alteration was especially prominent in serous papillary endometrial cancers (SPEC) that are refractive to therapy. Our results defined a "SPEC signature" as a molecular definition of its malignant features and poor prognosis. Specifically, we found that STAT1 regulated MYC as well as ICAM1, PD-L1, and SMAD7, as well as the capacity for proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, and in vivo tumorigenecity in cells with a high SPEC signature. Together, our results define STAT1 as a driver oncogene in SPEC that modulates disease progression. We propose that STAT1 functions as a prosurvival gene in SPEC, in a manner important to tumor progression, and that STAT1 may be a novel target for molecular therapy in this disease.

  2. Reduced inflammation in the tumor microenvironment delays the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and limits tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie K; Yang, Linglin; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Leips, Jeff; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-10-15

    Chronic inflammation is frequently associated with malignant growth and is thought to promote and enhance tumor progression, although the mechanisms which regulate this relationship remain elusive. We reported previously that interleukin (IL)-1beta promoted tumor progression by enhancing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and hypothesized that inflammation leads to cancer through the production of MDSC which inhibit tumor immunity. If inflammation-induced MDSC promote tumor progression by blocking antitumor immunity, then a reduction in inflammation should reduce MDSC levels and delay tumor progression, whereas an increase in inflammation should increase MDSC levels and hasten tumor progression. We have tested this hypothesis using the 4T1 mammary carcinoma and IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-deficient mice which have a reduced potential for inflammation, and IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice, which have an increased potential for inflammation. Consistent with our hypothesis, IL-1R-deficient mice have a delayed accumulation of MDSC and reduced primary and metastatic tumor progression. Accumulation of MDSC and tumor progression are partially restored by IL-6, indicating that IL-6 is a downstream mediator of the IL-1beta-induced expansion of MDSC. In contrast, excessive inflammation in IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice promotes the accumulation of MDSC and produces MDSC with enhanced suppressive activity. These results show that immune suppression by MDSC and tumor growth are regulated by the inflammatory milieu and support the hypothesis that the induction of suppressor cells which down-regulate tumor immunity is one of the mechanisms linking inflammation and cancer.

  3. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment: connecting aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor microenvironment induces a form of "accelerated aging," which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy ("self-eating") in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy "fuel" and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a "mutagenic motor" and allows cancer cells to buffer-at a distance-exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of "accelerated host aging" in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively "cutting off the fuel supply" for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  4. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  5. Obesity accelerates mouse mammary tumor growth in the absence of ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Nomeli P; Perkins, Susan N; Smith, Nicole C P; Berrigan, David; Berendes, David M; Varticovski, Lyuba; Barrett, J Carl; Hursting, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    Obesity increases incidence and mortality of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. Suitable animal models are needed to elucidate potential mechanisms for this association. To determine the effects of obesity on mammary tumor growth, nonovariectomized and ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice of various body weights (lean, overweight, and obese) were implanted subcutaneously with mammary tumor cells from syngeneic Wnt-1 transgenic mice. In mice, the lean phenotype was associated with reduced Wnt-1 tumor growth regardless of ovarian hormone status. Ovariectomy delayed Wnt-1 tumor growth consistent with the known hormone responsiveness of these tumors. However, obesity accelerated tumor growth in ovariectomized but not in nonovariectomized animals. Diet-induced obesity in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer enhanced tumor growth, specifically in the absence of ovarian hormones. These results support epidemiological evidence that obesity is associated with increased breast cancer incidence and mortality in postmenopausal but not premenopausal women. In contrast, maintaining a lean body weight phenotype was associated with reduced Wnt-1 tumor growth regardless of ovarian hormone status.

  6. Accelerating regulatory progress in multi-institutional research.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Andrea R; Lauf, Sherry Lee; Pieper, Lisa E; Rowe, Jared; Vargas, Ileana M; Goff, Melissa A; Daley, Matthew F; Tuzzio, Leah; Steiner, John F

    2014-01-01

    Multi-institutional collaborations are necessary in order to create large and robust data sets that are needed to answer important comparative effectiveness research (CER) questions. Before scientific work can begin, a complex maze of administrative and regulatory requirements must be efficiently navigated to avoid project delays. Staff from research, regulatory, and administrative teams involved in three HMO Research Network (HMORN) multi-institutional collaborations developed and employed novel approaches: to secure and maintain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals; to enable data sharing, and to expedite subawards for two data-only minimal risk studies. These novel approaches accelerated required processes and approvals while maintaining regulatory, human subjects, and institutional protections. Outcomes from the processes described here are compared with processes outlined in the research and regulatory literature and with processes that have been used in previous multisite research collaborations. Research, regulatory, and administrative staff are essential contributors to the success of multi-institutional collaborations. Their flexibility, creativity, and effective communication skills can lead to the development of efficient approaches to achieving the necessary oversight for these complex projects. Elements of these specific strategies can be adapted and used by other research networks. Other efforts in these areas should be evaluated and shared. The processes that help develop a "learning research system" play an important and complementary role in sustaining multi-institutional research collaborations.

  7. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza,E; Houck, T L; S M, Lidia; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-07-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5"-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  8. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow, G. A.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-07-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5″-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 π-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  9. Postictal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes Masquerading as Brain Tumor Progression: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Pirio, Anastasie M.; Billakota, Santoshi; Peters, Katherine B.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common among patients with brain tumors. Transient, postictal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities are a long recognized phenomenon. However, these radiographic changes are not as well studied in the brain tumor population. Moreover, reversible neuroimaging abnormalities following seizure activity may be misinterpreted for tumor progression and could consequently result in unnecessary tumor-directed treatment. Here, we describe two cases of patients with brain tumors who developed peri-ictal pseudoprogression and review the relevant literature. PMID:27462237

  10. Label-free detection of tumor markers in a colon carcinoma tumor progression model by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Rück, Angelika; Udart, Martin; Hauser, Carmen; Dürr, Christine; Kriebel, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Living colon carcinoma cells were investigated by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. An in vitro model of tumor progression was established. Evaluation of data sets by cluster analysis reveals that lipid bodies might be a valuable diagnostic parameter for early carcinogenesis.

  11. Tumor-propagating cells and Yap/Taz activity contribute to lung tumor progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Allison N; Curtis, Stephen J; Fillmore, Christine M; Rowbotham, Samuel P; Mohseni, Morvarid; Wagner, Darcy E; Beede, Alexander M; Montoro, Daniel T; Sinkevicius, Kerstin W; Walton, Zandra E; Barrios, Juliana; Weiss, Daniel J; Camargo, Fernando D; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kim, Carla F

    2014-03-03

    Metastasis is the leading cause of morbidity for lung cancer patients. Here we demonstrate that murine tumor propagating cells (TPCs) with the markers Sca1 and CD24 are enriched for metastatic potential in orthotopic transplantation assays. CD24 knockdown decreased the metastatic potential of lung cancer cell lines resembling TPCs. In lung cancer patient data sets, metastatic spread and patient survival could be stratified with a murine lung TPC gene signature. The TPC signature was enriched for genes in the Hippo signaling pathway. Knockdown of the Hippo mediators Yap1 or Taz decreased in vitro cellular migration and transplantation of metastatic disease. Furthermore, constitutively active Yap was sufficient to drive lung tumor progression in vivo. These results demonstrate functional roles for two different pathways, CD24-dependent and Yap/Taz-dependent pathways, in lung tumor propagation and metastasis. This study demonstrates the utility of TPCs for identifying molecules contributing to metastatic lung cancer, potentially enabling the therapeutic targeting of this devastating disease.

  12. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  13. Tumor Cell-Independent Estrogen Signaling Drives Disease Progression through Mobilization of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Allegrezza, Michael J; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Payne, Kyle K; Tesone, Amelia J; Nguyen, Jenny M; Curiel, Tyler J; Cadungog, Mark G; Singhal, Sunil; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B; Zhang, Paul; Tchou, Julia; Zhang, Rugang; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2017-01-01

    The role of estrogens in antitumor immunity remains poorly understood. Here, we show that estrogen signaling accelerates the progression of different estrogen-insensitive tumor models by contributing to deregulated myelopoiesis by both driving the mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and enhancing their intrinsic immunosuppressive activity in vivo Differences in tumor growth are dependent on blunted antitumor immunity and, correspondingly, disappear in immunodeficient hosts and upon MDSC depletion. Mechanistically, estrogen receptor alpha activates the STAT3 pathway in human and mouse bone marrow myeloid precursors by enhancing JAK2 and SRC activity. Therefore, estrogen signaling is a crucial mechanism underlying pathologic myelopoiesis in cancer. Our work suggests that new antiestrogen drugs that have no agonistic effects may have benefits in a wide range of cancers, independently of the expression of estrogen receptors in tumor cells, and may synergize with immunotherapies to significantly extend survival.

  14. Smad4 is dispensable for normal pancreas development yet critical in progression and tumor biology of pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bardeesy, Nabeel; Cheng, Kuang-hung; Berger, Justin H.; Chu, Gerald C.; Pahler, Jessica; Olson, Peter; Hezel, Aram F.; Horner, James; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Hanahan, Douglas; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    SMAD4 is inactivated in the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) with concurrent mutational inactivation of the INK4A/ARF tumor suppressor locus and activation of the KRAS oncogene. Here, using genetically engineered mice, we determined the impact of SMAD4 deficiency on the development of the pancreas and on the initiation and/or progression of PDAC—alone or in combination with PDAC-relevant mutations. Selective SMAD4 deletion in the pancreatic epithelium had no discernable impact on pancreatic development or physiology. However, when combined with the activated KRASG12D allele, SMAD4 deficiency enabled rapid progression of KRASG12D-initiated neoplasms. While KRASG12D alone elicited premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that progressed slowly to carcinoma, the combination of KRASG12D and SMAD4 deficiency resulted in the rapid development of tumors resembling intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN), a precursor to PDAC in humans. SMAD4 deficiency also accelerated PDAC development of KRASG12D INK4A/ARF heterozygous mice and altered the tumor phenotype; while tumors with intact SMAD4 frequently exhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), PDAC null for SMAD4 retained a differentiated histopathology with increased expression of epithelial markers. SMAD4 status in PDAC cell lines was associated with differential responses to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in vitro with a subset of SMAD4 wild-type lines showing prominent TGF-β-induced proliferation and migration. These results provide genetic confirmation that SMAD4 is a PDAC tumor suppressor, functioning to block the progression of KRASG12D-initiated neoplasms, whereas in a subset of advanced tumors, intact SMAD4 facilitates EMT and TGF-β-dependent growth. PMID:17114584

  15. Evaluation of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Gamsiz, Hakan; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Although mostly benign and slow-growing, glomus jugulare tumors have a high propensity for local invasion of adjacent vascular structures, lower cranial nerves and the inner ear, which may result in substantial morbidity and even mortality. Treatment strategies for glomus jugulare tumors include surgery, preoperative embolization followed by surgical resection, conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy, radiosurgery in the form of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy, and combinations of these modalities. In the present study, we evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of glomus jugulare tumors and report our 15-year single center experience. Between May 1998 and May 2013, 21 patients (15 females, 6 males) with glomus jugulare tumors were treated using LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. The indication for stereotactic radiosurgery was the presence of residual or recurrent tumor after surgery for 5 patients, whereas 16 patients having growing tumors with symptoms received stereotactic radiosurgery as the primary treatment. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 3-98). Median age was 55 years (range, 24-77). Of the 21 lesions treated, 13 (61.9%) were left-sided and 8 (38.1%) were right-sided. Median dose was 15 Gy (range, 10-20) prescribed to the 85%-100% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local control defined as either tumor shrinkage or the absence of tumor growth on periodical follow-up neuroimaging was 100%. LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and efficacious management strategy for glomus jugulare tumors by providing excellent tumor growth control with few complications.

  16. Identification of Substances for Ubiquitin-Dependent Proteolysis During Breast Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    post-replication repair of UV- damaged DNA ATXN3 Machado - Joseph disease gene product, nucleotide excision repair MARK2 Microtubule binding protein...changes in ubiquitylation activity accompany the progression of breast tumors to more advanced disease . These activities likely drive breast tumor...We have found that key changes in ubiquitylation activity occur as breast tumors progress to advanced disease . The substrates of this activity

  17. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Alessandro; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta; Vitale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue.

  18. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  19. Education for Dynamic Economies: Action Plan To Accelerate Progress towards Education for All (EFA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    The World Bank's development committee met and reviewed the paper, "Education for Dynamic Economies." The paper assessed progress and identified key issues and challenges in meeting the goals of universal primary education. It concluded that these goals were unlikely to be attained without accelerated action at the country level and a…

  20. IgA nephropathy factors that predict and accelerate progression to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Guo, Feng-Ling; Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Ya-Juan

    2014-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is a slowly progressing disease that leads to end-stage renal disease in 50 % of the patients within 25 years of the disease. However, several factors are associated with the accelerated progression of this disease causing early development of end-stage disease. Persistent proteinuria or hematuria, poorly controlled hypertension, elevated serum creatinine and prevalent glomerulosclerosis are some of the risk factors that expedite the deteriorative effects of IgAN. Thus, the progression of the disease can be delayed if the associated risk factors are handled and addressed in the nick of time.

  1. Loss of PI3K blocks cell-cycle progression in a Drosophila tumor model.

    PubMed

    Willecke, M; Toggweiler, J; Basler, K

    2011-09-29

    Tumorigenesis is a complex process, which requires alterations in several tumor suppressor or oncogenes. Here, we use a Drosophila tumor model to identify genes, which are specifically required for tumor growth. We found that reduction of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity resulted in very small tumors while only slightly affecting growth of wild-type tissue. The observed inhibition on tumor growth occurred at the level of cell-cycle progression. We conclude that tumor cells become dependent on PI3K function and that reduction of PI3K activity synthetically interferes with tumor growth. The results presented here broaden our insights into the intricate mechanisms underling tumorigenesis and illustrate the power of Drosophila genetics in revealing weak points of tumor progression.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration. Progress report, June 1, 1991--February 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Danly, B.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. ``Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.`` This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G.

  3. High-LET Radiation Increases Tumor Progression in a K-Ras-Driven Model of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Rampersad, Rishi; Xu, Xia; Ritchie, Matthew E; Michalski, Jacob; Huang, Lingling; Onaitis, Mark W

    2017-09-27

    High-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation encountered by astronauts in space generates clustered DNA damage that is potentially oncogenic. Analysis of the impact of exposure to space radiation on cancer formation is necessary to determine the best ways to prepare astronauts for space travel so they are protected for the duration of the space mission. A mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma driven by oncogenic K-Ras was used to ascertain the effect of low- and high-LET radiation on tumor formation. We observed increased tumor progression and tumor cell proliferation after single dose or fractionated high-LET doses, which was not observed in mice exposed to low-LET radiation. Location of the tumor nodules was not affected by radiation, indicating that the cell of origin of K-Ras-driven tumors was the same in irradiated or nonirradiated mice. Gene expression analysis revealed an upregulation of genes involved in cell proliferation and DNA damage repair. This study provides evidence that exposure to a single dose or fractionated doses of high-LET radiation induces molecular and cellular changes that accelerate lung tumor growth.

  4. Estrogen related receptor alpha in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells promotes tumor progression in bone

    PubMed Central

    Delliaux, Carine; Gervais, Manon; Kan, Casina; Benetollo, Claire; Pantano, Francesco; Vargas, Geoffrey; Bouazza, Lamia; Croset, Martine; Bala, Yohann; Leroy, Xavier; Rosol, Thomas J; Rieusset, Jennifer; Bellahcène, Akeila; Castronovo, Vincent; Aubin, Jane E; Clézardin, Philippe; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Bonnelye, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are one of the main complications of prostate cancer and they are incurable. We investigated whether and how estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is involved in bone tumor progression associated with advanced prostate cancer. By meta-analysis, we first found that ERRα expression is correlated with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the hallmark of progressive disease. We then analyzed tumor cell progression and the associated signaling pathways in gain-of-function/loss-of-function CRPC models in vivo and in vitro. Increased levels of ERRα in tumor cells led to rapid tumor progression, with both bone destruction and formation, and direct impacts on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. VEGF-A, WNT5A and TGFβ1 were upregulated by ERRα in tumor cells and all of these factors also significantly and positively correlated with ERRα expression in CRPC patient specimens. Finally, high levels of ERRα in tumor cells stimulated the pro-metastatic factor periostin expression in the stroma, suggesting that ERRα regulates the tumor stromal cell microenvironment to enhance tumor progression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ERRα is a regulator of CRPC cell progression in bone. Therefore, inhibiting ERRα may constitute a new therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer skeletal-related events. PMID:27776343

  5. Fibroblast activation protein α in tumor microenvironment: Recent progression and implications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZI, FUMING; HE, JINGSONG; HE, DONGHUA; LI, YI; YANG, LI; CAI, ZHEN

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of a given tumor is important in determining its drug resistance, tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. These microenvironments, like tumor cells, are vital targets for cancer therapy. The cross-talk between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, alternatively termed activated fibroblasts) is crucial in regulating the drug resistance, tumorigenesis, neoplastic progression, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis of a tumor. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a transmembrane serine protease and is highly expressed on CAFs present in >90% of human epithelial neoplasms. FAPα activity, alongside that of gelatinase and type I collagenase, has become increasingly important in cancer therapy due to its effectiveness in modulating tumor behavior. In this review, recent progression in the knowledge of the role of FAPα in tumor microenvironments is discussed. PMID:25593080

  6. Targeting Nanomedicine to Brain Tumors: Latest Progress and Achievements.

    PubMed

    Van't Root, Moniek; Lowik, Clemens; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Targeting nanomedicine to brain tumors is hampered by the heterogeneity of brain tumors and the blood brain barrier. These represent the main reasons of unsuccessful treatments. Nanomedicine based approaches hold promise for improved brain tissue distribution of drugs and delivery of combination therapies. In this review, we describe the recent advancements and latest achievements in the use of nanocarriers, virus and cell-derived nanoparticles for targeted therapy of brain tumors. We provide successful examples of nanomedicine based approaches for direct targeting of receptors expressed in brain tumor cells or modulation of pathways involved in cell survival as well as approaches for indirect targeting of cells in the tumor stroma and immunotherapies. Although the field is at its infancy, clinical trials involving nanomedicine based approaches for brain tumors are ongoing and many others will start in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  8. A novel thermal treatment modality for controlling breast tumor growth and progression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2012-01-01

    The new concept of keeping primary tumor under control in situ to suppress distant foci sheds light on the novel treatment of metastatic tumor. Hyperthermia is considered as one of the means for controlling tumor growth. In this study, a novel thermal modality was built to introduce hyperthermia effect on tumor to suppress its growth and progression using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. A mildly raised temperature (i.e.39°C) was imposed on the skin surface of the implanted tumor using a thermal heating pad. Periodic heating (12 hours per day) was carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The tumor growth rate was found significantly decreased in comparison to the control without hyperthermia. Biological evidences associated with tumor angiogenesis and metastasis were examined using histological analyses. Accordingly, the effect of mild hyperthermia on immune cell infiltration into tumors was also investigated. It was demonstrated that a delayed tumor growth and malignancy progression was achieved by mediating tumor cell apoptosis, vascular injury, degrading metastasis potential and as well as inhibiting the immunosuppressive cell myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) recruitment. Further mechanistic studies will be performed to explore the quantitative relationship between tumor progression and thermal dose in the near future.

  9. Antioxidant Activity during Tumor Progression: A Necessity for the Survival of Cancer Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Mark A.; McCallister, Chelsea; Schafer, Zachary T.

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defenses encompass a variety of distinct compounds and enzymes that are linked together through their capacity to neutralize and scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the relationship between ROS and tumorigenesis is clearly complex and context dependent, a number of recent studies have suggested that neutralizing ROS can facilitate tumor progression and metastasis in multiple cancer types through distinct mechanisms. These studies therefore infer that antioxidant activity may be necessary to support the viability and/or the invasive capacity of cancer cells during tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we discuss some of the accumulating evidence suggesting a role for antioxidant activity in facilitating tumor progression. PMID:27754368

  10. Complement component 7 (C7), a potential tumor suppressor, is correlated with tumor progression and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaodan; Chen, Kaiyan; Zhang, Nan; Jin, Jiaoyue; Wu, Junzhou; Feng, Jianguo; Yu, Herbert; Jin, Hongchuan; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study found copy number variation of chromosome fragment 5p13.1-13.3 might involve in the progression of ovarian cancer. In the current study, the alteration was validated and complement component 7 (C7), located on 5p13.1, was identified. To further explore the clinical value of C7 in tumors, 156 malignant, 22 borderline, 33 benign and 24 normal ovarian tissues, as well as 173 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues along with corresponding adjacent and normal tissues from the tissue bank of Zhejiang Cancer Hospital were collected. The expression of C7 was analyzed using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As a result, the C7 expression displayed a gradual downward trend in normal, benign, borderline and malignant ovarian tissues, and the decreased expression of C7 was correlative to poor differentiation in patients with ovarian cancer. Interestingly, a similar change of expression of C7 was found in normal, adjacent and malignant tissues in patients with NSCLC, and low expression of C7 was associated with worse grade and advanced clinical stage. Both results from this cohort and the public database indicated that NSCLC patients with low expression of C7 had a worse outcome. Furthermore, multivariate cox regression analysis showed NSCLC patients with low C7 had a 3.09 or 5.65-fold higher risk for relapse or death than those with high C7 respectively, suggesting C7 was an independent prognostic predictor for prognoses of patients with NSCLC. Additionally, overexpression of C7 inhibited colony formation of NSCLC cells, which hints C7 might be a potential tumor suppressor. PMID:27852032

  11. The Role of Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rabender, Christopher S.; Alam, Asim; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Cardnell, Robert J.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Graves, Paul; Zweit, Jamal; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    Here evidence suggests that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) of tumor cells, in contrast to normal tissues, synthesize predominantly superoxide and peroxynitrite. Based on HPLC analysis, the underlying mechanism for this uncoupling is a reduced tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio (BH4:BH2) found in breast, colorectal, epidermoid and head and neck tumors compared to normal tissues. Increasing BH4:BH2 and reconstitution of coupled NOS activity in breast cancer cells with the BH4 salvage pathway precursor, sepiapterin, causes significant shifts in downstream signaling including increased cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) activity, decreased β-catenin expression and TCF4 promoter activity, and reduced NF-κB promoter activity. Sepiapterin inhibited breast tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo as measured by clonogenic assay, Ki67 staining and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). In summary, using diverse tumor types, it is demonstrated that the BH4:BH2 ratio is lower in tumor tissues and as a consequence nitric oxide synthase activity generates more peroxynitrite and superoxide anion than nitric oxide resulting in important tumor growth promoting and anti-apoptotic signaling properties. Implications The synthetic BH4, Kuvan®, is used to elevate BH4:BH2 in some phenylketonuria patients and to treat diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction suggesting a novel, testable approach for correcting an abnormality of tumor metabolism to control tumor growth. PMID:25724429

  12. Haploid loss of bax leads to accelerated mammary tumor development in C3(1)/SV40-TAg transgenic mice: reduction in protective apoptotic response at the preneoplastic stage.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M A; Liu, M L; Knudson, M C; Shibata, E; Yoshidome, K; Bandey, T; Korsmeyer, S J; Green, J E

    1999-01-01

    The dramatic increase in apoptosis observed during the development of preneoplastic mammary lesions is associated with a significant elevation in Bax expression in C3(1)/SV40 large T antigen (TAg) transgenic mice. The significance of Bax expression during tumor progression in vivo was studied by generating double-transgenic mice carrying the C3(1)/TAg transgene and mutant alleles for bax. C3(1)/TAg transgenic mice carrying mutant bax alleles exhibited accelerated rates of tumor growth, increased tumor numbers, larger tumor mass and decreased survival rates compared with mice carrying wild-type bax. Accelerated tumorigenesis associated with the bax+/- genotype did not require the loss of function of the second bax allele. Thus, haploid insufficiency of bax is enough to accelerate tumor progression, suggesting that the protective effect of Bax is dose-dependent. While levels of apoptosis in the preneoplastic lesions, but not carcinomas, were reduced in bax+/- or bax-/- mice compared with bax+/+ mice, rates of cellular proliferation in mammary lesions were similar among all bax genotypes. These data demonstrate that bax is a critical suppressor of mammary tumor progression at the stage of preneoplastic mammary lesion development through the upregulation of apoptosis, but that this protective effect is lost during the transition from preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma. PMID:10329616

  13. Imaging changes following stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic intracranial tumors: differentiating pseudoprogression from tumor progression and its effect on clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has become standard adjuvant treatment for patients with metastatic intracranial lesions. There has been a growing appreciation for benign imaging changes following radiation that are difficult to distinguish from true tumor progression. These imaging changes, termed pseudoprogression, carry significant implications for patient management. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of pseudoprogression in metastatic brain lesions, research to differentiate pseudoprogression from true progression, and clinical implications of pseudoprogression on treatment decisions. PMID:24233257

  14. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Quantitation of cell-free DNA and RNA in plasma during tumor progression in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To clarify the implications of cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) in the plasma in neoplastic disease, it is necessary to determine the kinetics of their release into the circulation. Methods To quantify non-tumor and tumor DNA and RNA in the plasma of tumor-bearing rats and to correlate such levels with tumor progression, we injected DHD/K12-PROb colon cancer cells subcutaneously into syngenic BD-IX rats. Rats were sacrificed and their plasma was analyzed from the first to the eleventh week after inoculation. Results The release of large amounts of non-tumor DNA into plasma was related to tumor development from its early stages. Tumor-specific DNA was detected in 33% of tumor-bearing rats, starting from the first week after inoculation and at an increasing frequency thereafter. Animals that were positive for tumor DNA in the plasma had larger tumors than those that were negative (p = 0.0006). However, the appearance of both mutated and non-mutated DNA fluctuated with time and levels of both were scattered among individuals in each group. The release of non-tumor mRNA was unaffected by tumor progression and we did not detect mutated RNA sequences in any animals. Conclusions The release of normal and tumor cfDNA into plasma appeared to be related to individual-specific factors. The contribution of tumor DNA to the elevated levels of plasma DNA was intermittent. The release of RNA into plasma during cancer progression appeared to be an even more selective and elusive phenomenon than that of DNA. PMID:23374730

  16. The New Deal: A Potential Role for Secreted Vesicles in Innate Immunity and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Martin, Alberto; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Peinado, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Tumors must evade the immune system to survive and metastasize, although the mechanisms that lead to tumor immunoediting and their evasion of immune surveillance are far from clear. The first line of defense against metastatic invasion is the innate immune system that provides immediate defense through humoral immunity and cell-mediated components, mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and other myeloid-derived cells that protect the organism against foreign invaders. Therefore, tumors must employ different strategies to evade such immune responses or to modulate their environment, and they must do so prior metastasizing. Exosomes and other secreted vesicles can be used for cell–cell communication during tumor progression by promoting the horizontal transfer of information. In this review, we will analyze the role of such extracellular vesicles during tumor progression, summarizing the role of secreted vesicles in the crosstalk between the tumor and the innate immune system. PMID:25759690

  17. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  18. Folic Acid Supplementation Promotes Mammary Tumor Progression in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Deghan Manshadi, Shaidah; Ishiguro, Lisa; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Medline, Alan; Renlund, Richard; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    Folic acid supplementation may prevent the development of cancer in normal tissues but may promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic lesions. However, whether or not folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic mammary lesions is unknown. This is a critically important issue because breast cancer patients and survivors in North America are likely exposed to high levels of folic acid owing to folic acid fortification and widespread supplemental use after cancer diagnosis. We investigated whether folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established mammary tumors. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control diet and mammary tumors were initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenza[a]anthracene at puberty. When the sentinel tumor reached a predefined size, rats were randomized to receive a diet containing the control, 2.5x, 4x, or 5x supplemental levels of folic acid for up to 12 weeks. The sentinel mammary tumor growth was monitored weekly. At necropsy, the sentinel and all other mammary tumors were analyzed histologically. The effect of folic acid supplementation on the expression of proteins involved in proliferation, apoptosis, and mammary tumorigenesis was determined in representative sentinel adenocarcinomas. Although no clear dose-response relationship was observed, folic acid supplementation significantly promoted the progression of the sentinel mammary tumors and was associated with significantly higher sentinel mammary tumor weight and volume compared with the control diet. Furthermore, folic acid supplementation was associated with significantly higher weight and volume of all mammary tumors. The most significant and consistent mammary tumor-promoting effect was observed with the 2.5x supplemental level of folic acid. Folic acid supplementation was also associated with an increased expression of BAX, PARP, and HER2. Our data suggest that folic acid supplementation may promote the progression

  19. Progress Towards a Laboratory Test of Alfvénic Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, J. W. R.; Skiff, F.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Dorfman, S.

    2016-10-01

    Alfvén waves are thought to be a key mechanism for accelerating auroral electrons. Due to inherent limitations of single point measurements, in situ data has been unable to demonstrate a causal relationship between Alfvén waves and accelerated electrons. Electron acceleration occurs in the inner magnetosphere where the Alfvén speed is greater than the electron thermal speed. In these conditions, Alfvén waves can have an electric field aligned with the background magnetic field B0 if the scale of wave structure across B0 is comparable to the electron skin depth. In the Large Plasma Device (LaPD), Alfvén waves are launched in conditions relevant to the inner magnetosphere. The reduced parallel electron distribution function is measured using a whistler-mode wave absorption diagnostic. The linear electron response has been measured as oscillations of the electron distribution function at the Alfvén wave frequency. These measurements agree with linear theory. Current efforts focus on measuring the nonlinear acceleration of electrons that is relevant to auroral generation. We report on recent progress including experiments with a new higher-power Alfvén wave antenna with the goal of measuring nonlinear electron acceleration. This work was supported by the NSF GRFP and by Grants from NSF, DOE, and NASA. Experiments were performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  20. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  1. Progressive and Accelerated Disability Onset by Race/Ethnicity and Education among Late Midlife and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Kenzie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study explores the pace of severe disability onset with an emphasis on the role of race/ethnicity and education. More specifically, this research examines whether race/ethnicity and educational attainment are independent predictors of progressive and accelerated disability onset. Methods Using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) Waves 2–10 (1994–2010), a series of discrete-time Cox proportional hazards models with multiple competing events were created to ascertain whether respondents developed progressive or accelerated disability in subsequent waves. Results Black and Hispanic respondents were at an increased risk of developing progressive disability. Respondents without a high school degree were more likely to experience progressive or accelerated disability. Discussion Low educational attainment was a particularly strong predictor of accelerated disability onset and may represent an acute lack of resources over the life course. Race and ethnicity were important predictors of progressive disability onset, which may reflect racial/ethnic variations in the disabling process. PMID:22982972

  2. Progressive and accelerated disability onset by race/ethnicity and education among late midlife and older adults.

    PubMed

    Latham, Kenzie

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the pace of severe disability onset with an emphasis on the role of race/ethnicity and education. More specifically, this research examines whether race/ethnicity and educational attainment are independent predictors of progressive and accelerated disability onset. Using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) Waves 2 to 10 (1994-2010), a series of discrete-time Cox proportional hazards models with multiple competing events were created to ascertain whether respondents developed progressive or accelerated disability in subsequent waves. Black and Hispanic respondents were at an increased risk of developing progressive disability. Respondents without a high school degree were more likely to experience progressive or accelerated disability. Low educational attainment was a particularly strong predictor of accelerated disability onset and may represent an acute lack of resources over the life course. Race and ethnicity were important predictors of progressive disability onset, which may reflect racial/ethnic variations in the disabling process.

  3. Tumor budding, a novel prognostic indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Keishiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Mikami, Shuji; Ogihara, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-09-01

    Tumor budding has been defined as an isolated single cancer cell or a cluster composed of fewer than five cancer cells scattered in the stroma. It is a strong predictor for lymph node metastasis in T1 colorectal cancer. We introduced this concept to T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and evaluated whether tumor budding could have a prognostic impact on the clinical outcome. We identified 121 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T1 bladder cancer between 1994 and 2014 at Keio University Hospital. All slides were re-reviewed by a dedicated uropathologist. Budding foci were counted under ×200 magnification. When the number of budding foci was 10 or more, tumor budding was defined as positive. The relationship between tumor budding and clinical outcomes was assessed using a multivariate analysis. The median follow-up was 52 months. Tumor budding was positive in 21 patients (17.4%). Tumor budding was significantly associated with T1 substaging, tumor architecture and lymphovascular invasion. The 5-year progression-free survival rate in T1 bladder cancer patients with tumor budding was 53.8%, which was significantly lower than that in patients without tumor budding (88.4%, P = 0.001). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that tumor budding was independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 4.90). In a subgroup of patients treated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation (n = 88), tumor budding was also independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.003, hazard ratio = 5.65). Tumor budding may be a novel indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancer, and would likely be easily introduced in clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    cell clusters of in situ breast tumors. Breast Cancer Res Treat 89:199-208, 2005. 15. Man YG, Fu SW, Pinzone JJ, Schwartz AM, Simmens SJ, Berg PE... Pinzone JJ, Man YG. BP1 expression correlates with breast tumor aggreesiveness. Platform presentation at the 26th San Antonio Breast Cancer...137: 282, 2004 43. Berg P, Fu SW, Pinzone JJ, Man YG. The Expression of BP1, a homeotic protein, increases with breast tumor progression

  5. Progressive deregulation of the cell cycle with higher tumor grade in the stroma of breast phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuijper, Arno; de Vos, Rob A I; Lagendijk, Jaap H; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J

    2005-05-01

    We studied cell cycle-regulating proteins in phyllodes tumor pathogenesis by immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67, cyclin A, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma protein (pRb), p53, p16INK4A, bcl-2, and p21waf1 in the epithelium and stroma of 40 primary (benign, 21; borderline, 8; malignant, 11) and 7 recurrent tumors of different grades. In most cases, the epithelium showed no altered expression of cell cycle regulators. Stromal overexpression of p16INK4A, p53, cyclin A, pRb, and p21waf1 correlated significantly with tumor grade. The number of altered proteins in stroma increased with higher grade and was accompanied by increased proliferation. Stromal cyclin A expression was the best separating marker between tumor grades. Correlations existed between stromal overexpression of p16NK4A and p21waf1, p16INK4A and p53, and p53 and pRb. No immunostaining differences were detected between primary tumors and recurrences. Four or more altered proteins and p53 expression in the stromal component were independent negative prognosticators for disease-free survival. The stromal component of mammary phyllodes tumors displays an increasing level of cell cycle deregulation with higher tumor grade; the epithelial compartment mostly remains inconspicuous. Several combinations of aberrantly expressed cell cycle proteins seem important in the stromal progression of phyllodes tumors. The number of stromal cell cycle aberrations and stromal p53 expression might predict clinical behavior.

  6. AIP1 expression in tumor niche suppresses tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weidong; Li, Yonghao; He, Yun; Yin, Mingzhu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Boggon, Titus J.; Zhang, Haifeng; Min, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Studies from tumor cells suggest that tumor suppressor AIP1 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the role of AIP1 in the tumor microenvironment has not been examined. We show that a global or vascular endothelial cell (EC)-specific deletion of the AIP1 gene in mice augments tumor growth and metastasis in melanoma and breast cancer models. AIP1-deficient vascular environment not only enhances tumor neovascularization and increases pre-metastatic niche formation, but also secrets tumor EMT-promoting factors. These effects from AIP1 loss are associated with increased VEGFR2 signaling in the vascular EC and could be abrogated by systemic administration of VEGFR2 kinase inhibitors. Mechanistically, AIP1 blocks VEGFR2-dependent signaling by directly binding to the phosphotyrosine residues within the activation loop of VEGFR2. Our data reveal that AIP1, by inhibiting VEGFR2-dependent signaling in tumor niche, suppresses tumor EMT switch, tumor angiogenesis and tumor pre-metastatic niche formation to limit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26139244

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transition to Tumor-Associated Fibroblasts Contributes to Fibrovascular Network Expansion and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, A. Kate; Watson, Keri; Klopp, Ann; Hall, Brett; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF), are essential for tumor progression providing both a functional and structural supportive environment. TAF, known as activated fibroblasts, have an established biological impact on tumorigenesis as matrix synthesizing or matrix degrading cells, contractile cells, and even blood vessel associated cells. The production of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and immunomodulatory mechanisms by these cells augment tumor progression by providing a suitable environment. There are several suggested origins of the TAF including tissue-resident, circulating, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transitioned cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We provide evidence that TAF are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that acquire a TAF phenotype following exposure to or systemic recruitment into adenocarcinoma xenograft models including breast, pancreatic, and ovarian. We define the MSC derived TAF in a xenograft ovarian carcinoma model by the immunohistochemical presence of 1) fibroblast specific protein and fibroblast activated protein; 2) markers phenotypically associated with aggressiveness, including tenascin-c, thrombospondin-1, and stromelysin-1; 3) production of pro-tumorigenic growth factors including hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-6; and 4) factors indicative of vascularization, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We demonstrate that under long-term tumor conditioning in vitro, MSC express TAF–like proteins. Additionally, human MSC but not murine MSC stimulated tumor growth primarily through the paracrine production of secreted IL6. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest the dependence of in vitro Skov-3 tumor cell proliferation is due to the presence of tumor-stimulated MSC secreted IL6. The subsequent TAF phenotype arises from the MSC which ultimately promotes tumor growth through the contribution of

  8. Cables1 is a tumor suppressor gene that regulates intestinal tumor progression in Apc(Min) mice.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Thomas; Pino, Maria S; Yilmaz, Omer; Kirley, Sandra D; Rueda, Bo R; Chung, Daniel C; Zukerberg, Lawrence R

    2013-07-01

    The transformation of colonic mucosal epithelium to adenocarcinoma requires progressive oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation. Loss of chromosome 18q is common in colon cancer but not in precancerous adenomas. A few candidate tumor suppressor genes have been identified in this region, including CABLES1 at 18q11.2-12.1. This study investigates the role of CABLES1 in an in vivo mouse model of intestinal adenocarcinoma and in human colon cancer cell culture. Apc(Min/+) mice were crossed with mice harboring targeted inactivation of the Cables1 gene (Cables1(-/-)). The intestinal tumor burden and tumor expression of β-catenin and PCNA was compared in Cables1(+/+)Apc(Min/+) and Cables1(-/-)Apc(Min/+) mice. β-catenin activity in human colon cancer cells with CABLES1 inactivation and intestinal progenitor cell function in Cables1(-/-) mice were assayed in vitro. The mean number of small intestinal tumors per mouse was 3.1 ± 0.6 in Cables1(+/+)Apc(Min/+) mice, compared with 32.4 ± 3.5 in the Cables1(-/-)Apc(Min/+) mice (P < 0.0001). Fewer colonic tumors were observed in Cables1(+/+)Apc(Min/+) mice (mean 0.6 ± 0.1) compared with the Cables1(-/-)Apc(Min/+) mice (mean 1.3 ± 0.3, P = 0.01). Tumors from Cables1(-/-)Apc(Min/+) mice demonstrated increased nuclear expression of β-catenin and an increased number of PCNA-positive cells. In vitro studies revealed that CABLES1 deficiency increased β-catenin dependent transcription and increased intestinal progenitor cell activity. Loss of Cables1 enhances tumor progression in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model and activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Cables1 is a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 18q in this in vivo mouse model and likely has a similar role in human colon cancer.

  9. Roles of glycosaminoglycans and glycanmimetics in tumor progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Various tumor cells exhibit structural alterations in the sulfated modifications to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The altered expression of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) on the surfaces of tumor cells is known to play a key role in malignant transformation and tumor metastasis. The receptor molecule for the CS chains containing E-disaccharide units (CS-E) expressed on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells was recently revealed to be Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE). RAGE is also involved in the development of various pathological conditions including aging, infection, pulmonary fibrosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease, by binding to a wide range of ligands. RAGE binds strongly not only to CS-E, but also to HS-expressing LLC cells. Recombinant RAGE bound CS-E and HS with high affinity. Furthermore, in a mouse model, the colonization of the lungs by LLC cells was inhibited by intravenously injected CS-E, an anti-CS-E antibody, or an anti-RAGE antibody. These findings demonstrated that RAGE is at least one of the critical receptors for CS and HS chains expressed on the tumor cell surface and is involved in experimental lung metastasis, and also that CS/HS and RAGE are potential molecular targets for the treatment of pulmonary metastasis. We, hence, reviewed these findings and also several chemically synthesized small GAGmimetics that exhibit potent anti-metastatic and/or anti-tumor activities.

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is associated with tumor growth and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Li, Wei-Wei; Yang, Bi-Wei; Tao, Zhong-Hua; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Lu; Xia, Jing-Lin; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You; Fan, Jia; Wu, Wei-Zhong

    2012-04-15

    bHLH/PAS proteins play important roles in tumor progression. Lost or reduced expression of single-minded homolog 2 (SIM) as well as aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) has been observed in cancerous human tissues. Here, we investigated the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), another bHLH/PAS protein, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry, we found that intratumoral ARNT was inversely correlated with time to recurrence and overall survival of HCC patients after resection. Knockdown of ARNT in HepG2, HCCLM3 and HCCLM6 cells significantly shortened cell doubling time, increased S-phase cell populations and accelerated in vivo HCCLM6 growth and metastasis. After ARNT expression was rescued, prolonged cell doubling time and decreased S-phase cell populations were observed in HepG2, HCCLM3 and HCCLM6 cells. And, HCCLM6 growth and metastasis in vivo were remarkably inhibited. Screening by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and PCR arrays revealed that cyclin E1, CDK2, Fos and Jun were negatively regulated by ARNT, whereas CDKN1C, CNKN2A, CDKN2B, MAPK11 and MAPK14 were positively regulated in HCC. According to the results of immunoprecipitation assay, both ARNT/ARNT and ARNT/AHRR complexes were clearly formed in HCCLM6 xenograft with increased ARNT expression. In summary, ARNT is an important regulator of HCC growth and metastasis and could be a promising prognostic candidate in HCC patients. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  11. Expression of Mast Cell Proteases Correlates with Mast Cell Maturation and Angiogenesis during Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Toso, Vanina Danuza; Campos, Maria Rita de Cássia; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells are surrounded by infiltrating inflammatory cells, such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and mast cells. A body of evidence indicates that mast cells are associated with various types of tumors. Although role of mast cells can be directly related to their granule content, their function in angiogenesis and tumor progression remains obscure. This study aims to understand the role of mast cells in these processes. Tumors were chemically induced in BALB/c mice and tumor progression was divided into Phases I, II and III. Phase I tumors exhibited a large number of mast cells, which increased in phase II and remained unchanged in phase III. The expression of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-4, mMCP-5, mMCP-6, mMCP-7, and carboxypeptidase A were analyzed at the 3 stages. Our results show that with the exception of mMCP-4 expression of these mast cell chymase (mMCP-5), tryptases (mMCP-6 and 7), and carboxypeptidase A (mMC-CPA) increased during tumor progression. Chymase and tryptase activity increased at all stages of tumor progression whereas the number of mast cells remained constant from phase II to III. The number of new blood vessels increased significantly in phase I, while in phases II and III an enlargement of existing blood vessels occurred. In vitro, mMCP-6 and 7 are able to induce vessel formation. The present study suggests that mast cells are involved in induction of angiogenesis in the early stages of tumor development and in modulating blood vessel growth in the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22815822

  12. The value of neuroscience strategies to accelerate progress in psychological treatment research.

    PubMed

    Moras, Karla

    2006-11-01

    Major findings from the past 55 years of psychological treatment research indicate that 3 questions are now pivotal to continued practice-relevant progress: What is the nature of the problem(s) to be treated? What are the causal change mechanisms of efficacious psychological treatments? Can more efficient and broadly effective psychological treatments be developed? Contemporary cognitive, affective, and behavioural neurosciences offer particularly promising resources for psychological treatment research that can help accelerate progress regarding these questions. This article explains why the questions are pivotal and presents neuroscience findings to illustrate how progress can be made on each one and for diverse problems and disorders such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, drug addiction, and regulation of negative affect.

  13. Targeting macrophage anti-tumor activity to suppress melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luhong; Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Linjing

    2017-01-01

    By phagocytosing cancer cells and their cellular debris, macrophages play a critical role in nonspecific defense (innate immunity) and, as antigen presenters, they help initiate specific defense mechanisms (adaptive immunity). Malignant melanoma is a lethal disease due to its aggressive capacity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. For decades, considerable effort has gone into development of an effective immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic melanoma. In this review, we focus on the anti-tumor activities of macrophages in melanoma and their potential as therapeutic targets in melanoma. Although macrophages can be re-educated through intercellular signaling to promote tumor survival owing to their plasticity, we expect that targeting the anti-tumor activity of macrophages remains a promising strategy for melanoma inhibition. The combination of tumoricidal macrophage activation and other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may provide an effective and comprehensive anti-melanoma strategy. PMID:28060744

  14. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  15. The Use of MR Perfusion Imaging in the Evaluation of Tumor Progression in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Brian; Shah, Ashish H.; Buttrick, Simon; Benveniste, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Objective Diagnosing tumor progression and pseudoprogression remains challenging for many clinicians. Accurate recognition of these findings remains paramount given necessity of prompt treatment. However, no consensus has been reached on the optimal technique to discriminate tumor progression. We sought to investigate the role of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) to evaluate tumor progression in glioma patients. Methods An institutional retrospective review of glioma patients undergoing MRP with concurrent clinical follow up visit was performed. MRP was evaluated in its ability to predict tumor progression, defined clinically or radiographically, at concurrent clinical visit and at follow up visit. The data was then analyzed based on glioma grade and subtype. Resusts A total of 337 scans and associated clinical visits were reviewed from 64 patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were reported for each tumor subtype and grade. The sensitivity and specificity for high-grade glioma were 60.8% and 87.8% respectively, compared to low-grade glioma which were 85.7% and 89.0% respectively. The value of MRP to assess future tumor progression within 90 days was 46.9% (sensitivity) and 85.0% (specificity). Conclusion Based on our retrospective review, we concluded that adjunct imaging modalities such as MRP are necessary to help diagnose clinical disease progression. However, there is no clear role for stand-alone surveillance MRP imaging in glioma patients especially to predict future tumor progression. It is best used as an adjunctive measure in patients in whom progression is suspected either clinically or radiographically. PMID:28061488

  16. Tumor growth accelerated by chemotherapy-induced senescent cells is suppressed by treatment with IL-12 producing cellular vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Simova, Jana; Sapega, Olena; Imrichova, Terezie; Stepanek, Ivan; Kyjacova, Lenka; Mikyskova, Romana; Indrova, Marie; Bieblova, Jana; Bubenik, Jan; Bartek, Jiri; Hodny, Zdenek; Reinis, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Standard-of-care chemo- or radio-therapy can induce, besides tumor cell death, also tumor cell senescence. While senescence is considered to be a principal barrier against tumorigenesis, senescent cells can survive in the organism for protracted periods of time and they can promote tumor development. Based on this emerging concept, we hypothesized that elimination of such potentially cancer-promoting senescent cells could offer a therapeutic benefit. To assess this possibility, here we first show that tumor growth of proliferating mouse TC-1 HPV-16-associated cancer cells in syngeneic mice becomes accelerated by co-administration of TC-1 or TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer cells made senescent by pre-treatment with the anti-cancer drug docetaxel, or lethally irradiated. Phenotypic analyses of tumor-explanted cells indicated that the observed acceleration of tumor growth was attributable to a protumorigenic environment created by the co-injected senescent and proliferating cancer cells rather than to escape of the docetaxel-treated cells from senescence. Notably, accelerated tumor growth was effectively inhibited by cell immunotherapy using irradiated TC-1 cells engineered to produce interleukin IL-12. Collectively, our data document that immunotherapy, such as the IL-12 treatment, can provide an effective strategy for elimination of the detrimental effects caused by bystander senescent tumor cells in vivo. PMID:27448982

  17. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  18. Progressive Enrichment of Stemness Features and Tumor Stromal Alterations in Multistep Hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Eun; Kim, Young-Joo; Rhee, Hyungjin; Kim, Haeryoung; Ahn, Ei Yong; Choi, Jin Sub; Roncalli, Massimo; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subset of tumor cells, contribute to an aggressive biological behavior, which is also affected by the tumor stroma. Despite the role of CSCs and the tumor stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), features of stemness have not yet been studied in relation to tumor stromal alterations in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the expression status of stemness markers and tumor stromal changes in B viral carcinogenesis, which is the main etiology of HCC in Asia. Stemness features of tumoral hepatocytes (EpCAM, K19, Oct3/4, c-KIT, c-MET, and CD133), and tumor stromal cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), CD68, CD163, and IL-6 were analyzed in 36 low grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 48 high grade DNs, 30 early HCCs (eHCCs), and 51 progressed HCCs (pHCCs) by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. Stemness features (EpCAM and K19 in particular) were progressively acquired during hepatocarcinogenesis in combination with enrichment of stromal cells (CAFs, TAMs, IL-6+ cells). Stemness features were seen sporadically in DNs, more consistent in eHCCs, and peaked in pHCCs. Likewise, stromal cells were discernable in DNs, showed up as consistent cell densities in eHCCs and peaked in pHCCs. The stemness features and tumor stromal alterations also peaked in less differentiated or larger HCCs. In conclusion, progression of B viral multistep hepatocarcinogenesis is characterized by an enrichment of stemness features of neoplastic hepatocytes and a parallel alteration of the tumor stroma. The modulation of neoplastic hepatocytes and stromal cells was at low levels in precancerous lesions (DNs), consistently increased in incipient cancer (eHCCs) and peaked in pHCCs. Thus, in B viral hepatocarcinogenesis, interactions between CSCs and the tumor stroma, although starting early, seem to play a major role in tumor progression.

  19. Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Models Mimic Hallmarks of Size-Induced Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and, consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates ("microtumors") of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150-600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes, such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity, and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor-positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3732-43. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Three-dimensional breast cancer models mimic hallmarks of size-induced tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates (“microtumors”) of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150–600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. PMID:27216179

  1. Progressive Enrichment of Stemness Features and Tumor Stromal Alterations in Multistep Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hyungjin; Kim, Haeryoung; Ahn, Ei Yong; Choi, Jin Sub; Roncalli, Massimo; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subset of tumor cells, contribute to an aggressive biological behavior, which is also affected by the tumor stroma. Despite the role of CSCs and the tumor stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), features of stemness have not yet been studied in relation to tumor stromal alterations in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the expression status of stemness markers and tumor stromal changes in B viral carcinogenesis, which is the main etiology of HCC in Asia. Stemness features of tumoral hepatocytes (EpCAM, K19, Oct3/4, c-KIT, c-MET, and CD133), and tumor stromal cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), CD68, CD163, and IL-6 were analyzed in 36 low grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 48 high grade DNs, 30 early HCCs (eHCCs), and 51 progressed HCCs (pHCCs) by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. Stemness features (EpCAM and K19 in particular) were progressively acquired during hepatocarcinogenesis in combination with enrichment of stromal cells (CAFs, TAMs, IL-6+ cells). Stemness features were seen sporadically in DNs, more consistent in eHCCs, and peaked in pHCCs. Likewise, stromal cells were discernable in DNs, showed up as consistent cell densities in eHCCs and peaked in pHCCs. The stemness features and tumor stromal alterations also peaked in less differentiated or larger HCCs. In conclusion, progression of B viral multistep hepatocarcinogenesis is characterized by an enrichment of stemness features of neoplastic hepatocytes and a parallel alteration of the tumor stroma. The modulation of neoplastic hepatocytes and stromal cells was at low levels in precancerous lesions (DNs), consistently increased in incipient cancer (eHCCs) and peaked in pHCCs. Thus, in B viral hepatocarcinogenesis, interactions between CSCs and the tumor stroma, although starting early, seem to play a major role in tumor progression. PMID:28114366

  2. Regulatory T Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Progression: Role and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Belal; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant efforts in understanding and modulating the immune response in cancer. In this context, immunosuppressive cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have come under intense investigation for their proposed roles in suppressing tumor-specific immune responses and establishing an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, thus enabling tumor immune evasion. Additionally, recent evidence indicates that Tregs comprise diverse and heterogeneous subsets; phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating Tregs could contribute differently to cancer prognosis and clinical outcomes. Understanding Treg biology in the setting of cancer, and specifically the tumor microenvironment, is important for designing effective cancer therapies. In this review, we critically examine the role of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment and in cancer progression focusing on human studies. We also discuss the impact of current therapeutic modalities on Treg biology and the therapeutic opportunities for targeting Tregs to enhance anti-tumor immune responses and clinical benefits. PMID:27509527

  3. Accelerated progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weili; Caracciolo, Barbara; Wang, Hui-Xin; Winblad, Bengt; Bäckman, Lars; Qiu, Chengxuan; Fratiglioni, Laura

    2010-11-01

    The effect of diabetes on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its conversion to dementia remains controversial. We sought to examine whether diabetes and pre-diabetes are associated with MCI and accelerate the progression from MCI to dementia. In the Kungsholmen Project, 963 cognitively intact participants and 302 subjects with MCI (120 with amnestic MCI [aMCI] and 182 with other cognitive impairment no dementia [oCIND]) age ≥ 75 years were identified at baseline. The two cohorts were followed for 9 years to detect the incident MCI and dementia following international criteria. Diabetes was ascertained based on a medical examination, hypoglycemic medication use, and random blood glucose level ≥ 11.0 mmol/l. Pre-diabetes was defined as random blood glucose level of 7.8-11.0 mmol/l in diabetes-free participants. Data were analyzed using standard and time-dependent Cox proportional-hazards models. During the follow-up period, in the cognitively intact cohort, 182 people developed MCI (42 aMCI and 140 oCIND), and 212 developed dementia. In the MCI cohort, 155 subjects progressed to dementia, the multi-adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) of dementia was 2.87 (1.30-6.34) for diabetes, and 4.96 (2.27-10.84) for pre-diabetes. In a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, diabetes and pre-diabetes accelerated the progression from MCI to dementia by 3.18 years. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were neither cross-sectionally nor longitudinally associated with MCI. Diabetes and pre-diabetes substantially accelerate the progression from MCI to dementia, and anticipate dementia occurrence by more than 3 years in people with MCI. The association of diabetes with the development of MCI is less evident in old people.

  4. Insulin receptor functionally enhances multistage tumor progression and conveys intrinsic resistance to IGF-1R targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ulanet, Danielle B.; Ludwig, Dale L.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) tyrosine kinase is an important mediator of the protumorigenic effects of IGF-I/II, and inhibitors of IGF-1R signaling are currently being tested in clinical cancer trials aiming to assess the utility of this receptor as a therapeutic target. Despite mounting evidence that the highly homologous insulin receptor (IR) can also convey protumorigenic signals, its direct role in cancer progression has not been genetically defined in vivo, and it remains unclear whether such a role for IR signaling could compromise the efficacy of selective IGF-1R targeting strategies. A transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis engages the IGF signaling pathway, as revealed by its dependence on IGF-II and by accelerated malignant progression upon IGF-1R overexpression. Surprisingly, preclinical trials with an inhibitory monoclonal antibody to IGF-1R did not significantly impact tumor growth, prompting us to investigate the involvement of IR. The levels of IR were found to be significantly up-regulated during multistep progression from hyperplastic lesions to islet tumors. Its functional involvement was revealed by genetic disruption of the IR gene in the oncogene-expressing pancreatic β cells, which resulted in reduced tumor burden accompanied by increased apoptosis. Notably, the IR knockout tumors now exhibited sensitivity to anti–IGF-1R therapy; similarly, high IR to IGF-1R ratios demonstrably conveyed resistance to IGF-1R inhibition in human breast cancer cells. The results predict that elevated IR signaling before and after treatment will respectively manifest intrinsic and adaptive resistance to anti–IGF-1R therapies. PMID:20457905

  5. E2f binding-deficient Rb1 protein suppresses prostate tumor progression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huifang; Wang, Yanqing; Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Zhang, Xiaojing; Hayward, Simon W.; Foster, Barbara A.; Nikitin, Alexander Y.; Wills, Marcia; Goodrich, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene initiates retinoblastoma and other human cancers. RB1 protein (pRb) restrains cell proliferation by binding E2f transcription factors and repressing the expression of cell cycle target genes. It is presumed that loss of pRb/E2f interaction accounts for tumor initiation, but this has not been directly tested. RB1 mutation is a late event in other human cancers, suggesting a role in tumor progression as well as initiation. It is currently unknown whether RB1 mutation drives tumor progression and, if so, whether loss of pRb/E2f interaction is responsible. We have characterized tumorigenesis in mice expressing a mutant pRb that is specifically deficient in binding E2f. In endocrine tissue, the mutant pRb has no detectable effect on tumorigenesis. In contrast, it significantly delays progression to invasive and lethal prostate cancer. Tumor delay is associated with induction of a senescence response. We conclude that the pRb/E2f interaction is critical for preventing tumor initiation, but that pRb can use additional context-dependent mechanisms to restrain tumor progression. PMID:21187395

  6. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Tobin, Nicholas P; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-10-20

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse.

  7. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Stolt, Marianne Frostvik; Tobin, Nicholas P.; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse. PMID:26375671

  8. Serial circulating immune complex levels and mitogen responses during progressive tumor growth in WF rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrick, M L; Steele, G; Ross, D S; Lahey, S J; Deasy, J M; Rayner, A A; Harte, P J; Wilson, R E; Munroe, A E; King, V P

    1983-06-01

    Inbred male WF rats were given im injections of one of two antigenically and histologically distinct syngeneic tumor isografts, adenocarcinoma DMH-W 163 or spontaneous renal cell carcinoma SPK. Serum and peripheral blood lymphocytes were harvested from tumor-bearing and normal age-matched controls before and after isograft challenge at weekly intervals. Serial circulating immune complex (CIC) levels were quantitated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) insolubilization. T-cell mitogen responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) were followed serially. Tumor growth was measured at least weekly. PEG-CIC values rose early after tumor injection, increased with tumor growth, and declined in some animals just before death. Mitogen response to PHA was significantly decreased in isografted tumor-bearing rats, particularly at later stages of tumor development, compared to normal uninoculated controls. Responses to Con A were variable, and suppression was not always seen in tumor bearers. In animals that did not have progressive tumor growth after isograft injection, PEG-CIC levels did not change and responses to PHA were not suppressed. Patterns of CIC change and responses to PHA were not affected by differences in tumor histology or growth rates. Thus serial CIC levels measured by the PEG assay correlate with tumor growth and precede nonspecific suppression of T-cell mitogenic response in these animal tumor models.

  9. Neuropilin-1 expression by tumor cells promotes tumor angiogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Miao, H Q; Lee, P; Lin, H; Soker, S; Klagsbrun, M

    2000-12-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a VEGF(165) and semaphorin receptor expressed by vascular endothelial cells (EC) and tumor cells. The function of NRP1 in tumor cells is unknown. NRP1 was overexpressed in Dunning rat prostate carcinoma AT2.1 cells using a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Concomitant with increased NRP1 expression in response to a tetracycline homologue, doxycycline (Dox), basal cell motility, and VEGF(165) binding were increased three- to fourfold in vitro. However, induction of NRP1 did not affect tumor cell proliferation. When rats injected with AT2.1/NRP1 tumor cells were fed Dox, NRP1 synthesis was induced in vivo and AT2.1 cell tumor size was increased 2.5- to 7-fold in a 3-4 wk period compared to controls. The larger tumors with induced NRP1 expression were characterized by markedly increased microvessel density, increased proliferating EC, dilated blood vessels, and notably less tumor cell apoptosis compared to noninduced controls. It was concluded that NRP1 expression results in enlarged tumors associated with substantially enhanced tumor angiogenesis.

  10. Rb knockdown accelerates bladder cancer progression through E2F3 activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-Ping; Jiao, Yong; Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in the world and leads to significant mortality and morbidity among affected patients. The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a main tumor suppressor, controlling cellular responses to potentially oncogenic stimulation. E2F3 was invariably disrupted in different human cancers for its central role in the control of cellular proliferation. Here, we investigated how Rb is integrated to control bladder cancer progression through E2F3 and p53 regulation. The results exhibit that Rb expression is lower in patients with bladder tumor, while E2F3 level is high. Rb knockdown enhanced bladder tumor cell proliferation and migration, aggravated with p53 silence. Interestingly, Rb silence results in E2F3, Myc and mTOR signaling pathway activation, contributing to bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis suppression mainly through caspase-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Rb is highly expressed in normal bladder cells, but was repressed in tumor tissues of the bladder completely, suggesting a possible role of Rb as a tumor suppressor.

  11. Current understanding of the tumor microenvironment of laryngeal dysplasia and progression to invasive cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Sumita; Rosen, Clark A.; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines the historical tumor progression genetic model of laryngeal carcinomas, from dysplasia to invasive carcinoma and the role of infiltrating immune and inflammatory cells as contributors to this process. Recent findings Classically, the genetic model of carcinogenesis describes overexpression of oncogenes and/or silencing of tumor suppressor genes which, when combined with exposure to environmental carcinogens over the course of time, results in damage to cellular DNA. Increasing evidence indicates that innate and adaptive immune mediators also play an important role in tumor progression of laryngeal carcinomas. Cellular mediators of immune suppression are often over represented in the tumor microenvironment and these cells release cytokines, which perpetuate immune suppression allowing for tumor immune evasion. Summary Future therapies targeting laryngeal malignancies should focus on a combined approach which targets both genetic variations and immune mediators. PMID:26963671

  12. Caveolin-1 in tumor progression: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Jacky G; Lajoie, Patrick; Wiseman, Sam M; Nabi, Ivan R

    2008-12-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein with multiple binding partners that is associated with cell surface caveolae and the regulation of lipid raft domains. Cav1 regulates multiple cancer-associated processes including cellular transformation, tumor growth, cell migration and metastasis, cell death and survival, multidrug resistance and angiogenesis. However, Cav1 has been reported to impact both positively and negatively on various aspects of tumor progression and while reported to function as a tumor suppressor, it has also been identified as a poor prognostic factor in various human cancers. In this review, we survey the functional roles of Cav1 in cancer and argue that Cav1 function is interdependent on tumor stage and the expression of molecular effectors that impact on its role during tumor progression.

  13. Role of adenosine A2b receptor overexpression in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Cesar; Palomo, Iván; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The adenosine A2b receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor. Its activation occurs with high extracellular adenosine concentration, for example in inflammation or hypoxia. These conditions are generated in the tumor environment. Studies show that A2b receptor is overexpressed in various tumor lines and biopsies from patients with different cancers. This suggests that A2b receptor can be used by tumor cells to promote progression. Thus A2b participates in different events, such as angiogenesis and metastasis, besides exerting immunomodulatory effects that protect tumor cells. Therefore, adenosine A2b receptor appears as an interesting therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  14. Non-muscle myosins in tumor progression, cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ouderkirk, J. L.; Krendel, M.

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, which regulates cell polarity, adhesion, and migration, can influence cancer progression, including initial acquisition of malignant properties by normal cells, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis to distant sites. Actin-dependent molecular motors, myosins, play key roles in regulating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we examine how non-muscle myosins regulate neoplastic transformation and cancer cell migration and invasion. Members of the myosin superfamily can act as either enhancers or suppressors of tumor progression. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on how mutations or epigenetic changes in myosin genes and changes in myosin expression may affect tumor progression and patient outcomes and discusses the proposed mechanisms linking myosin inactivation or upregulation to malignant phenotype, cancer cell migration, and metastasis. PMID:25087729

  15. Growth hormone therapy and risk of recurrence/progression in intracranial tumors: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Sun, Chun Ming; Li, Xue Tao; Liu, Chuan Jin; Zhou, You Xin

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency is common in intracranial tumors, which is usually treated with surgery and radiotherapy. A number of previous studies have investigated the relationship between the growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) and risk of tumor recurrence/progression; however, the evidence remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to estimate the potential relation between GHRT and intracranial tumors recurrence/progression. Three comprehensive databases, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, were researched with no limitations, covering all published studies till the end of July, 2014. Reference lists from identified studies were also screened for additional database. The summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by fixed-effects models for estimation. Fifteen eligible studies, involving more than 2232 cases and 3606 controls, were included in our meta-analysis. The results indicated that intracranial tumors recurrence/progression was not associated with GHRT (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.39-0.56), and for children, the pooled RR was 0.44 and 95% CI was 0.34-0.54. In subgroup analysis, risks of recurrence/progression were decreased for craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, glioma, but not for pituitary adenomas, and non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA), ependymoma. Results from our analysis indicate that GHRT decreases the risk of recurrence/progression in children with intracranial tumors, craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, or glioma. However, GHRT for pituitary adenomas, NFPA, and ependymoma was not associated with the recurrence/progression of the tumors. GH replacement seems safe from the aspect of risk of tumor progression.

  16. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  17. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` (Co-P.I.`s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,`` (Co-P.I.`s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  18. Circadian Clock in a Mouse Colon Tumor Regulates Intracellular Iron Levels to Promote Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Hiroki; Hamamura, Kengo; Tsuruta, Akito; Tsurudome, Yuya; Ogino, Takashi; Hara, Yukinori; Suzuki, Takuya; Hyodo, Kenji; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; To, Hideto; Aramaki, Hironori; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an important biological catalyst and is critical for DNA synthesis during cell proliferation. Cellular iron uptake is enhanced in tumor cells to support increased DNA synthesis. Circadian variations in DNA synthesis and proliferation have been identified in tumor cells, but their relationship with intracellular iron levels is unclear. In this study, we identified a 24-h rhythm in iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) levels in colon-26 tumors implanted in mice. Our findings suggest that IRP2 regulates the 24-h rhythm of transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) mRNA expression post-transcriptionally, by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron-response elements. We also found that Irp2 mRNA transcription is promoted by circadian clock genes, including brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (BMAL1) and the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) heterodimer. Moreover, growth in colon-26(Δ19) tumors expressing the clock-mutant protein (CLOCKΔ19) was low compared with that in wild-type colon-26 tumor. The time-dependent variation of cellular iron levels, and the proliferation rate in wild-type colon-26 tumor was decreased by CLOCKΔ19 expression. Our findings suggest that circadian organization contributes to tumor cell proliferation by regulating iron metabolism in the tumor. PMID:26797126

  19. Matrix Crosslinking Forces Tumor Progression by Enhancing Integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Levental, Kandice R.; Yu, Hongmei; Kass, Laura; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Egeblad, Mikala; Erler, Janine T.; Fong, Sheri F.T.; Csiszar, Katalin; Giaccia, Amato; Weninger, Wolfgang; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Gasser, David L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tumors are characterized by extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and stiffening. The importance of ECM remodeling to cancer is appreciated; the relevance of stiffening is less clear. We found that breast tumorigenesis is accompanied by collagen crosslinking, ECM stiffening and increased focal adhesions. Inducing collagen crosslinking stiffened the ECM, promoted focal adhesions, enhanced PI3 Kinase (PI3K) activity, and induced the invasion of an oncogene-initiated epithelium. Inhibiting integrin signaling repressed the invasion of a premalignant epithelium into a stiffened, crosslinked ECM, and forced integrin clustering promoted focal adhesions, enhanced PI3K signaling and induced the invasion of a premalignant epithelium. Consistently, reducing lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen crosslinking prevented MMTV-Neu-induced fibrosis, decreased focal adhesions and PI3K activity, impeded malignancy and lowered tumor incidence. These data show how collagen crosslinking can modulate tissue fibrosis and stiffness to force focal adhesions, growth factor signaling and breast malignancy. PMID:19931152

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Epithelial Ovarian Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    histological subtype of ovarian cancer and is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. The relationship between stage at presentation and survival in serous ...among and within stages of epithelial ovarian cancer , focusing on serous , mucinous and endometrioid subtypes (1-18 Months). a. Collections and...not serous or mucinous epithelial ovarian tumors. Cancer Res 58: 2095-2097, 1998. 7. Aikhionbare FO et al:.: Is cumulative frequency of mitochondrial

  1. Gangliosides During Tumor Progression in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    LSCFM, Thiruverkadu S. Saravanan, Ph.D. and Meena Verma, M.B., B.S., for other technical support. 15 References 1. P. M . Gullino , Prostaglandins and...121-135. 3. G. Alessandri, P. Cornaglia-Ferraris, P. M . Gullino , Angiogenic and angiostatic microenvironment in tumors-role of gangliosides. Acta...Wiegandt (Ed), Glycolipids, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1985, pp. 199-260. 11. M . L . Freimer, K. McIntosh, R. A. Adams, C. R. Alving, D. B. Drachman

  2. Biomarkers of Renal Tumor Burden and Progression in TSC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10- 1 -0433 TITLE: Biomarkers of Renal Tumor Burden and...reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE September 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 September 2010 - 31 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a

  3. Tumor microenvironment-derived proteins dominate the plasma proteome response during breast cancer induction and progression.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Gurley, Kay E; Kennedy, Jacob; Buson, Tina Busald; Chin, Alice; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Chodosh, Lewis A; Nelson, Peter S; Hanash, Samir M; Kemp, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Tumor development relies upon essential contributions from the tumor microenvironment and host immune alterations. These contributions may inform the plasma proteome in a manner that could be exploited for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to characterize the plasma proteome response in the inducible HER2/neu mouse model of breast cancer during tumor induction, progression, and regression. Mass spectrometry data derived from approximately 1.6 million spectra identified protein networks involved in wound healing, microenvironment, and metabolism that coordinately changed during tumor development. The observed alterations developed prior to cancer detection, increased progressively with tumor growth and reverted toward baseline with tumor regression. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the cancer-associated plasma proteome was derived from transcriptional responses in the noncancerous host tissues as well as the developing tumor. The proteomic signature was distinct from a nonspecific response to inflammation. Overall, the developing tumor simultaneously engaged a number of innate physiologic processes, including wound repair, immune response, coagulation and complement cascades, tissue remodeling, and metabolic homeostasis that were all detectable in plasma. Our findings offer an integrated view of tumor development relevant to plasma-based strategies to detect and diagnose cancer.

  4. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litviakov, N. V.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Perelmuter, V. M.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Tsyganov, M. M.; Zheravin, A. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats' iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant's influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  5. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    SciTech Connect

    Litviakov, N. V. Tsyganov, M. M. Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I. Bolbasov, E. N.; Perelmuter, V. M. Kulbakin, D. E.; Zheravin, A. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats’ iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant’s influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  6. Longitudinal changes of the serum calcium levels and accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazutaka; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Chisa; Odaira, Mari; Shiina, Kazuki; Nagata, Mikio; Yamashina, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The progression of arterial stiffness is accelerated by aging, although the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clarified. This prospective observational study was conducted to clarify whether longitudinal changes in the serum calcium/phosphate levels are associated with the accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age. In a cohort of employees at a construction company (1507 middle-aged Japanese men), the serum calcium/phosphate levels and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured at the start and at the end of a 3-year study period. A general linear model multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction of the 2 factors {age and longitudinal changes of the serum calcium levels (delCa) during the follow-up period} on the longitudinal changes of the baPWV during the study period (delPWV). The delCa was significantly correlated with the delPWV even after adjustments for covariates in subjects aged ≥48 years. The delPWV in subjects aged ≥48 years with the delCa in the upper tertile (69 ± 137 cm/s) was significantly larger than that in the other groups even after adjustments for covariates (e.g., del PWV in subjects aged <48 years with the delCa in the lower tertile = 1 ± 94 cm/s) (p < 0.01). The association between the arterial stiffness and serum calcium levels differed with age. Pathophysiological abnormalities related to increased serum calcium levels appeared to be associated with accelerated progression of arterial stiffness with age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Global Nutrition Report 2014: actions and accountability to accelerate the world's progress on nutrition.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Lawrence; Achadi, Endang; Bendech, Mohamed Ag; Ahuja, Arti; Bhatia, Komal; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Blössner, Monika; Borghi, Elaine; Colecraft, Esi; de Onis, Mercedes; Eriksen, Kamilla; Fanzo, Jessica; Flores-Ayala, Rafael; Fracassi, Patrizia; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Nago Koukoubou, Eunice; Krasevec, Julia; Newby, Holly; Nugent, Rachel; Oenema, Stineke; Martin-Prével, Yves; Randel, Judith; Requejo, Jennifer; Shyam, Tara; Udomkesmalee, Emorn; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-04-01

    In 2013, the Nutrition for Growth Summit called for a Global Nutrition Report (GNR) to strengthen accountability in nutrition so that progress in reducing malnutrition could be accelerated. This article summarizes the results of the first GNR. By focusing on undernutrition and overweight, the GNR puts malnutrition in a new light. Nearly every country in the world is affected by malnutrition, and multiple malnutrition burdens are the "new normal." Unfortunately, the world is off track to meet the 2025 World Health Assembly (WHA) targets for nutrition. Many countries are, however, making good progress on WHA indicators, providing inspiration and guidance for others. Beyond the WHA goals, nutrition needs to be more strongly represented in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) framework. At present, it is only explicitly mentioned in 1 of 169 SDG targets despite the many contributions improved nutritional status will make to their attainment. To achieve improvements in nutrition status, it is vital to scale up nutrition programs. We identify bottlenecks in the scale-up of nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive approaches and highlight actions to accelerate coverage and reach. Holding stakeholders to account for delivery on nutrition actions requires a well-functioning accountability infrastructure, which is lacking in nutrition. New accountability mechanisms need piloting and evaluation, financial resource flows to nutrition need to be made explicit, nutrition spending targets should be established, and some key data gaps need to be filled. For example, many UN member states cannot report on their WHA progress and those that can often rely on data >5 y old. The world can accelerate malnutrition reduction substantially, but this will require stronger accountability mechanisms to hold all stakeholders to account. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. A human prostatic bacterial isolate alters the prostatic microenvironment and accelerates prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Brian W; Durham, Nicholas M; Bruno, Tullia C; Grosso, Joseph F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Ross, Ashley E; Hurley, Paula J; Berman, David M; Drake, Charles G; Thumbikat, Praveen; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with several diseases of the prostate including benign enlargement and cancer, but a causal relationship has not been established. Our objective was to characterize the prostate inflammatory microenvironment after infection with a human prostate-derived bacterial strain and to determine the effect of inflammation on prostate cancer progression. To this end, we mimicked typical human prostate infection with retrograde urethral instillation of CP1, a human prostatic isolate of Escherichia coli. CP1 bacteria were tropic for the accessory sex glands and induced acute inflammation in the prostate and seminal vesicles, with chronic inflammation lasting at least 1 year. Compared to controls, infection induced both acute and chronic inflammation with epithelial hyperplasia, stromal hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In areas of inflammation, epithelial proliferation and hyperplasia often persist, despite decreased expression of androgen receptor (AR). Inflammatory cells in the prostates of CP1-infected mice were characterized at 8 weeks post-infection by flow cytometry, which showed an increase in macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly Th17 cells. Inflammation was additionally assessed in the context of carcinogenesis. Multiplex cytokine profiles of inflamed prostates showed that distinct inflammatory cytokines were expressed during prostate inflammation and cancer, with a subset of cytokines synergistically increased during concurrent inflammation and cancer. Furthermore, CP1 infection in the Hi-Myc mouse model of prostate cancer accelerated the development of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma, with 70% more mice developing cancer by 4.5 months of age. This study provides direct evidence that prostate inflammation accelerates prostate cancer progression and gives insight into the microenvironment changes induced by inflammation that may accelerate tumour initiation or progression. PMID:25348195

  9. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  10. UCLA accelerator research and development. Progress report, [November 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  11. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies.

  12. A new role of the Rac-GAP β2-chimaerin in cell adhesion reveals opposite functions in breast cancer initiation and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Casado-Medrano, Victoria; Barrio-Real, Laura; García-Rostán, Ginesa; Baumann, Matti; Rocks, Oliver; Caloca, María J.

    2016-01-01

    β2-chimaerin is a Rac1-specific negative regulator and a candidate tumor suppressor in breast cancer but its precise function in mammary tumorigenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we study for the first time the role of β2-chimaerin in breast cancer using a mouse model and describe an unforeseen role for this protein in epithelial cell-cell adhesion. We demonstrate that expression of β2-chimaerin in breast cancer epithelial cells reduces E-cadherin protein levels, thus loosening cell-cell contacts. In vivo, genetic ablation of β2-chimaerin in the MMTV-Neu/ErbB2 mice accelerates tumor onset, but delays tumor progression. Finally, analysis of clinical databases revealed an inverse correlation between β2-chimaerin and E-cadherin gene expressions in Her2+ breast tumors. Furthermore, breast cancer patients with low β2-chimaerin expression have reduced relapse free survival but develop metastasis at similar times. Overall, our data redefine the role of β2-chimaerin as tumor suppressor and provide the first in vivo evidence of a dual function in breast cancer, suppressing tumor initiation but favoring tumor progression. PMID:27058424

  13. Early postoperative tumor progression predicts clinical outcome in glioblastoma-implication for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Andreas; Soeldner, Dorothea; Wendl, Christina; Urkan, Dilek; Kuramatsu, Joji B; Seliger, Corinna; Proescholdt, Martin; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Hau, Peter; Uhl, Martin

    2017-01-18

    Molecular markers define the diagnosis of glioblastoma in the new WHO classification of 2016, challenging neuro-oncology centers to provide timely treatment initiation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a time delay to treatment initiation was accompanied by signs of early tumor progression in an MRI before the start of radiotherapy, and, if so, whether this influences the survival of glioblastoma patients. Images from 61 patients with early post-surgery MRI and a second MRI just before the start of radiotherapy were examined retrospectively for signs of early tumor progression. Survival information was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and a Cox multivariate analysis was performed to identify independent variables for survival prediction. 59 percent of patients showed signs of early tumor progression after a mean time of 24.1 days from the early post-surgery MRI to the start of radiotherapy. Compared to the group without signs of early tumor progression, which had a mean time of 23.3 days (p = 0.685, Student's t test), progression free survival was reduced from 320 to 185 days (HR 2.3; CI 95% 1.3-4.0; p = 0.0042, log-rank test) and overall survival from 778 to 329 days (HR 2.9; CI 95% 1.6-5.1; p = 0.0005). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that the Karnofsky performance score, O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and signs of early tumor progression are prognostic markers of overall survival. Early tumor progression at the start of radiotherapy is associated with a worse prognosis for glioblastoma patients. A standardized baseline MRI might allow for better patient stratification.

  14. Initial clinical experience with image-guided linear accelerator-based spinal radiosurgery for treatment of benign nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Selch, Michael T; Lin, Kevin; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Tenn, Steve; Gorgulho, Alessandra; DeMarco, John J; DeSalles, Antonio A F

    2009-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has proven a safe and effective treatment of cranial nerve sheath tumors. A similar approach should be successful for histologically identical spinal nerve sheath tumors. The preliminary results of linear accelerator-based spinal radiosurgery were retrospectively reviewed for a group of 25 nerve sheath tumors. Tumor location was cervical 11, lumbar 10, and thoracic 4. Thirteen tumors caused sensory disturbance, 12 pain, and 9 weakness. Tumor size varied from 0.9 to 4.1 cm (median, 2.1 cm). Radiosurgery was performed with a 60-MV linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Median peripheral dose and prescription isodose were 12 Gy and 90%, respectively. Image guidance involved optical tracking of infrared reflectors, fusion of amorphous silicon radiographs with dynamically reconstructed digital radiographs, and automatic patient positioning. Follow-up varied from 12 to 58 months (median, 18). There have been no local failures. Tumor size remained stable in 18 cases, and 7 (28%) demonstrated more than 2 mm reduction in tumor size. Of 34 neurologic symptoms, 4 improved. There has been no clinical or imaging evidence for spinal cord injury. One patient had transient increase in pain and one transient increase in numbness. Results of this limited experience indicate linear accelerator-based spinal radiosurgery is feasible for treatment of benign nerve sheath tumors. Further follow-up is necessary, but our results imply spinal radiosurgery may represent a therapeutic alternative to surgery for nerve sheath tumors. Symptom resolution may require a prescribed dose of more than 12 Gy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Progress on accelerated calculation of 3D MHD equilibrium with the PIES code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raburn, Daniel; Reiman, Allan; Monticello, Donald

    2016-10-01

    Continuing progress has been made in accelerating the 3D MHD equilibrium code, PIES, using an external numerical wrapper. The PIES code (Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver) is capable of calculating 3D MHD equilibria with islands. The numerical wrapper has been demonstrated to greatly improve the rate of convergence in numerous cases corresponding to equilibria in the TFTR device where magnetic islands are present; the numerical wrapper makes use of a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solver along with adaptive preconditioning and a sophisticated subspace-restricted Levenberg backtracking algorithm. The wrapper has recently been improved by automation which combines the preexisting backtracking algorithm with insights gained from the stability of the Picard algorithm traditionally used with PIES. Improved progress logging and stopping criteria have also been incorporated in to the numerical wrapper.

  16. Sustained trophism of the mammary gland is sufficient to accelerate and synchronize development of ErbB2/Neu-induced tumors

    PubMed Central

    Landis, MD; Seachrist, DD; Abdul-Karim, FW; Keri, RA

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that parity enhances HER2/ErbB2/Neu-induced breast tumorigenesis. Furthermore, recent studies using multiparous, ErbB2/Neu-overexpressing mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-Neu) mice have shown that parity induces a population of cells that are targeted for ErbB2/Neu-induced transformation. Although parity accelerates mammary tumorigenesis, the pattern of tumor development in multiparous MMTV-Neu mice remains stochastic, suggesting that additional events are required for ErbB2/Neu to cause mammary tumors. Whether such events are genetic in nature or reflective of the dynamic hormonal control of the gland that occurs with pregnancy remains unclear. We postulated that young age at pregnancy initiation or chronic trophic maintenance of mammary epithelial cells might provide a cellular environment that significantly increases susceptibility to ErbB2/Neu-induced tumorigenesis. MMTV-Neu mice that were maintained pregnant or lactating beginning at 3 weeks of age demonstrated accelerated tumorigenesis, but this process was still stochastic, indicating that early pregnancy does not provide the requisite events of tumorigenesis. However, bitransgenic mice that were generated by breeding MMTV-Neu mice with a luteinizing hormone-overexpressing mouse model of ovarian hyperstimulation developed multifocal mammary tumors in an accelerated, synchronous manner compared to virgin MMTV-Neu animals. This synchrony of tumor development in the bitransgenic mice suggests that trophic maintenance of the mammary gland provides the additional events required for tumor formation and maintains the population of cells that are targeted by ErbB2/Neu for transformation. Both the synchrony of tumor appearance and the ability to characterize a window of commitment by ovariectomy/palpation studies permitted microarray analysis to evaluate changes in gene expression over a defined timeline that spans the progression from normal to preneoplastic mammary tissue. These

  17. Looking back and moving forward: can we accelerate progress on adolescent pregnancy in the Americas?

    PubMed

    Caffe, Sonja; Plesons, Marina; Camacho, Alma Virginia; Brumana, Luisa; Abdool, Shelly N; Huaynoca, Silvia; Mayall, Katherine; Menard-Freeman, Lindsay; de Francisco Serpa, Luis Andres; Gomez Ponce de Leon, Rodolfo; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman

    2017-07-14

    Adolescent fertility rates in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) remain unacceptably high, especially compared to the region's declining total fertility rates. The Region has experienced the slowest progress of all regions in the world, and shows major differences between countries and between subgroups in countries. In 2013, LAC was also noted as the only region with a rising trend in pregnancies in adolescents younger than 15 years. In response to the lack of progress in the LAC region, PAHO/WHO, UNFPA and UNICEF held a technical consultation with global, regional and country-level stakeholders to take stock of the situation and agree on strategic approaches and priority actions to accelerate progress. The meeting concluded that there is no single portrait of an adolescent mother in LAC and that context and determinants of adolescent pregnancy vary across and within countries. However, lack of knowledge about their sexual and reproductive health and rights, poor access to and inadequate use of contraceptives resulting from restrictive laws and policies, weak programs, social and cultural norms, limited education and income, sexual violence and abuse, and unequal gender relations were identified as key factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy in LAC. The meeting participants highlighted the following seven priority actions to accelerate progress: 1. Make adolescent pregnancy, its drivers and impact, and the most affected groups more visible with disaggregated data, qualitative reports, and stories. 2. Design interventions targeting the most vulnerable groups, ensuring the approaches are adapted to their realities and address their specific challenges. 3. Engage and empower youth to contribute to the design, implementation and monitoring of strategic interventions. 4. Abandon ineffective interventions and invest resources in applying proven ones. 5. Strengthen inter-sectoral collaboration to effectively address the drivers of adolescent pregnancy in LAC. 6

  18. Active Vitamin D and Accelerated Progression of Aortic Stiffness in Hemodialysis Patients: A Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Catherine; Mac-Way, Fabrice; De Serres, Sacha A.; Marquis, Karine; Douville, Pierre; Desmeules, Simon; Larivière, Richard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that high-dose active vitamin D therapy in the form of alphacalcidol (α-calcidol), used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease, could lead to vascular calcification and accelerated progression of aortic stiffness. METHODS We conducted an observational study in 85 patients on chronic hemodialysis, among which 70 were taking a weekly dose of α-calcidol of <2 µg and 15 were taking a weekly dose of ≥2 µg (pharmacological dose). Parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, fibroblast growth factor 23, and α-klotho were determined. Aortic stiffness was assessed by determination of carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 1.2 years. A multivariable regression model was used to evaluate the impact of pharmacological dose of α-calcidol on the progression of aortic stiffness. RESULTS At baseline, clinical, biological, and hemodynamic parameters were similar. At follow-up, cf-PWV increased more in patients with pharmacological dose of α-calcidol (0.583±2.291 m/s vs. 1.948±1.475 m/s; P = 0.04). After adjustment for changes in mean blood pressure and duration of follow-up, pharmacological dose of α-calcidol was associated with a higher rate of progression of cf-PWV (0.969 m/s; 95% confidence interval = 0.111–1.827; P = 0.03), and this association persisted after further adjustments for parameters of mineral metabolism. CONCLUSIONS In this study, pharmacological dose of α-calcidol was associated with accelerated progression of aortic stiffness. This study suggest that the vascular safety of active vitamin D posology may need to be specifically addressed in the treatment of chronic kidney disease–related bone mineral disorder. PMID:24695980

  19. Role of NuSAP in Prostate Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    E., Johansson,J.E., Gerstein,M.B., Golub,T.R., Rubin,M.A., and Andren ,O. (2010). Molecular sampling of prostate cancer: a dilemma for predicting... disease progression. BMC. Med Genomics 3, 8. Taylor,B.S., Schultz,N., Hieronymus,H., Gopalan,A., Xiao,Y., Carver,B.S., Arora,V.K., Kaushik,P., Cerami,E

  20. Mitochondrial metabolism and energy sensing in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-02-14

    Energy homeostasis is pivotal for cell fate since metabolic regulation, cell proliferation and death are strongly dependent on the balance between catabolic and anabolic pathways. In particular, metabolic and energetic changes have been observed in cancer cells even before the discovery of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, but have been neglected for a long time. Instead, during the past 20years a renaissance of the study of tumor metabolism has led to a revised and more accurate sight of the metabolic landscape of cancer cells. In this scenario, genetic, biochemical and clinical evidences place mitochondria as key actors in cancer metabolic restructuring, not only because there are energy and biosynthetic intermediates manufacturers, but also because occurrence of mutations in metabolic enzymes encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA has been associated to different types of cancer. Here we provide an overview of the possible mechanisms modulating mitochondrial energy production and homeostasis in the intriguing scenario of neoplastic cells, focusing on the double-edged role of 5'-AMP activated protein kinase in cancer metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux.

  1. Adipocytes and Macrophages Interplay in the Orchestration of Tumor Microenvironment: New Implications in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Luís Henrique; Corrêa, Rafael; Farinasso, Cecília Menezes; de Sant’Ana Dourado, Lívia Pimentel; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been known as one of the main keys to the establishment and progression of cancers. Chronic low-grade inflammation is also a strategic condition that underlies the causes and development of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Moreover, obesity has been largely related to poor prognosis of tumors by modulating tumor microenvironment with secretion of several inflammatory mediators by tumor-associated adipocytes (TAAs), which can modulate and recruit tumor-associated macrophages. Thus, the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlay and link inflammation, obesity, and cancer is crucial to identify potential targets that interfere with this important route. Knowledge about the exact role of each component of the tumor microenvironment is not yet fully understood, but the new insights in literature highlight the essential role of adipocytes and macrophages interplay as key factor to determine the fate of cancer progression. In this review article, we focus on the functions of adipocytes and macrophages orchestrating cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to inflammatory modulation in tumor microenvironment, which will be crucial to cancer establishment. We also emphasized the mechanisms by which the tumor promotes itself by recruiting and polarizing macrophages, discussing the role of adipocytes in this process. In addition, we discuss here the newest possible anticancer therapeutic treatments aiming to retard the development of the tumor based on what is known about cancer, adipocyte, and macrophage polarization. PMID:28970834

  2. Oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus does not affect mucositis severity or tumor progression in the tumor-bearing rat.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Lymn, Kerry A; Lawrence, Andrew; Butler, Ross N

    2011-07-15

    Preventative or adjunctive agents for the amelioration of small intestinal chemotherapy-induced mucositis are not currently available for clinical use. We have previously demonstrated that oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus (TH-4) partially attenuated chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the rat. Here we assess the effects of TH-4 on small intestinal damage and tumor progression in tumor-bearing rats with experimentally-induced mucositis. Female Dark Agouti tumor-bearing (mammary adenocarcinoma) rats (n = 36; 139 ± 1 g) had small intestinal damage induced via the administration of methotrexate (MTX). Rats were administered MTX; (1.5 mg/kg intramuscular) or saline at 0 and 24 h; with daily gavage administration of TH-4 (109 cfu/mL) or skim milk from -48 to +96 h post-MTX. Rats were allocated to groups (n=9): saline control, TH-4 control, MTX control or TH-4+MTX. The non-invasive ( 13) C-sucrose breath test (SBT) was conducted prior to tumor inoculation, pre-MTX (-24 h) and prior to sacrifice (96 h) to monitor gut function. At sacrifice small intestinal segments were excised and assessed for sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity as well as histological damage. Irrespective of TH-4 treatment, MTX-treated rats had a significant decrease in bodyweight, SBT levels, sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity, and histological damage score (p < 0.05) compared to saline and TH-4 control rats. TH-4 treatment did not result in tumor progression (p > 0.05) but failed to alleviate mucositis indices. Although TH-4, at a dose of 109 cfu/mL, yielded neither protection nor amelioration of chemotherapy-induced mucositis, progression of mammary adenocarcinoma was unaffected.

  3. New Mechanisms of Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Promoting Tumor Progression: Recent Research Advances and Potential Targets for Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Shulin; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The majority of basic and clinical studies have shown a protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which represent a large proportion of matrix cells. TAMs promote tumorigenesis, and their number is related to the malignancy degree and poor prognosis of many kinds of tumors. Macrophage plasticity makes it possible to change the tumor microenvironment and remodel antitumor immunity during cancer immunotherapy. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed the effects of TAMs on the tumor microenvironment, for example, via promotion of tumor growth and tumorigenesis and through an increase in the number of cancer stem cells or via facilitation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis. Investigators also proposed tumor-immunological treatments targeting TAMs by inhibiting TAM recruitment and differentiation, by regulating TAM polarization, and by blocking factors and pathways associated with the protumor function of TAMs. This comprehensive review presents recent research on TAMs in relation to prediction of poor outcomes, remodeling of the tumor immune microenvironment, and immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27975071

  4. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  5. Whole Exome Sequencing of Rapid Autopsy Tumors and Xenograft Models Reveals Possible Driver Mutations Underlying Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tao; Musteanu, Monica; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P.; Shields, David J.; Olson, Peter; Rejto, Paul A.; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to its propensity to invade and rapidly metastasize and remains very difficult to manage clinically. One major hindrance towards a better understanding of PDAC is the lack of molecular data sets and models representative of end stage disease. Moreover, it remains unclear how molecularly similar patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are to the primary tumor from which they were derived. To identify potential molecular drivers in metastatic pancreatic cancer progression, we obtained matched primary tumor, metastases and normal (peripheral blood) samples under a rapid autopsy program and performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on tumor as well as normal samples. PDX models were also generated, sequenced and compared to tumors. Across the matched data sets generated for three patients, there were on average approximately 160 single-nucleotide mutations in each sample. The majority of mutations in each patient were shared among the primary and metastatic samples and, importantly, were largely retained in the xenograft models. Based on the mutation prevalence in the primary and metastatic sites, we proposed possible clonal evolution patterns marked by functional mutations affecting cancer genes such as KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4 that may play an important role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. These results add to our understanding of pancreatic tumor biology, and demonstrate that PDX models derived from advanced or end-stage likely closely approximate the genetics of the disease in the clinic and thus represent a biologically and clinically relevant pre-clinical platform that may enable the development of effective targeted therapies for PDAC. PMID:26555578

  6. Two-Year Accelerated Corneal Cross-Linking Outcome in Patients with Progressive Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Jurowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the long-term results of accelerated corneal cross-linking (CXL) in patients with progressive keratoconus. Methods. Sixteen patients underwent accelerated CXL at 6 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes in one eye. The follow-up visits were scheduled on 7 days, 14 days, and 3, 12, and 24 months after the treatment. Results. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between preoperative and 2-year postoperative mean values, respectively, in terms of uncorrected visual acuity, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, maximum keratometry K max⁡, minimum keratometry K min⁡, corneal astigmatism, and corneal eccentricity index. We noted a significant flattening of the cornea in 18.7% of patients with a higher preoperative K max⁡ value (>50 D) and its steepening in patients with a lower K max⁡ value (<50 D) (6.25%). There was no significant difference in the central corneal thickness and the apical corneal thickness preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. The mean demarcation line depth was 282 ± 11 μm. Persistent corneal haze was noted in 25% of patients. Conclusions. Accelerated CXL appears to be a relatively effective procedure for the treatment of keratoconus in 2-year follow-up. PMID:25629044

  7. Accelerating Progress in Eating Disorders Prevention: A Call for Policy Translation Research and Training.

    PubMed

    Austin, S Bryn

    2016-01-01

    The public health burden of eating disorders is well documented, and over the past several decades, researchers have made important advances in the prevention of eating disorders and related problems with body image. Despite these advances, however, several critical limitations to the approaches developed to date leave the field far from achieving the large-scale impact that is needed. This commentary provides a brief review of what achievements in prevention have been made and identifies the gaps that limit the potential for greater impact on population health. A plan is then offered with specific action steps to accelerate progress in high-impact prevention, most compellingly by promoting a shift in priorities to policy translation research and training for scholars through the adoption of a triggers-to-action framework. Finally, the commentary provides an example of the application of the triggers-to-action framework as practiced at the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders, a program based at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston Children's Hospital. Much has been achieved in the nearly 30 years of research carried out for the prevention of eating disorders and body image problems, but several critical limitations undermine the field's potential for meaningful impact. Through a shift in the field's priorities to policy translation research and training with an emphasis on macro-environmental influences, the pace of progress in prevention can be accelerated and the potential for large-scale impact substantially improved.

  8. Differentiation of tumor progression from pseudoprogression in patients with posttreatment glioblastoma using multiparametric histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Cha, J; Kim, S T; Kim, H-J; Kim, B-J; Kim, Y K; Lee, J Y; Jeon, P; Kim, K H; Kong, D-S; Nam, D-H

    2014-07-01

    The multiparametric imaging can show us different aspects of tumor behavior and may help differentiation of tumor recurrence from treatment related change. Our aim was to differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression in patients with glioblastoma by using multiparametric histogram analysis of 2 consecutive MR imaging studies with relative cerebral blood volume and ADC values. Thirty-five consecutive patients with glioblastoma with new or increased size of enhancing lesions after concomitant chemoradiation therapy following surgical resection were included. Combined histograms were made by using the relative cerebral blood volume and ADC values of enhancing areas for initial and follow-up MR imaging, and subtracted histograms were also prepared. The histogram parameters between groups were compared. The diagnostic accuracy of tumor progression based on the histogram parameters of initial and follow-up MR imaging and subtracted histograms was compared and correlated with overall survival. Twenty-four pseudoprogressions and 11 tumor progressions were determined. Diagnosis based on the subtracted histogram mode with a multiparametric approach was more accurate than the diagnosis based on the uniparametric approach (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.877 versus 0.801), with 81.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity. A high mode of relative cerebral blood volume on the subtracted histogram by using a multiparametric approach (relative cerebral blood volume ×ADC) was the best predictor of true tumor progression (P < .001) and worse survival (P = .003). Multiparametric histogram analysis of posttreatment glioblastoma was useful to predict true tumor progression and worse survival. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Fibroblasts—a key host cell type in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Rundqvist, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between the host environment and cancer cells. Fibroblasts are now recognized as a key host cell type involved in host–cancer signaling. This review discusses some recent studies that highlight the roles of fibroblasts in tumor initiation, early progression, invasion, and metastasis. Some clinical studies describing the prognostic significance of fibroblast-derived markers and signatures are also discussed. PMID:22509805

  10. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Plasticity underlies tumor progression: Role of Nodal signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bodenstine, Thomas M.; Chandler, Grace S.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Hendrix, Mary J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily member Nodal is an established regulator of early embryonic development, with primary roles in endoderm induction, left-right asymmetry and primitive streak formation. Nodal signals through TGFβ family receptors at the plasma membrane and induces signaling cascades leading to diverse transcriptional regulation. While conceptually simple, the regulation of Nodal and its molecular effects are profoundly complex and context dependent. Pioneering work by developmental biologists has characterized the signaling pathways, regulatory components, and provided detailed insight into the mechanisms by which Nodal mediates changes at the cellular and organismal levels. Nodal is also an important factor in maintaining pluripotency of embryonic stem cells through regulation of core transcriptional programs. Collectively, this work has led to an appreciation for Nodal as a powerful morphogen capable of orchestrating multiple cellular phenotypes. Although Nodal is not active in most adult tissues, its re-expression and signaling have been linked to multiple types of human cancer, and Nodal has emerged as a driver of tumor growth and cellular plasticity. In vitro and in vivo experimental evidence has demonstrated that inhibition of Nodal signaling reduces cancer cell aggressive characteristics, while clinical data have established associations with Nodal expression and patient outcomes. As a result, there is great interest in the potential targeting of Nodal activity in a therapeutic setting for cancer patients that may provide new avenues for suppressing tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we evaluate our current understanding of the complexities of Nodal function in cancer and highlight recent experimental evidence that sheds light on the therapeutic potential of its inhibition. PMID:26951550

  12. Molecular Pathways: Mitochondrial Reprogramming in Tumor Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caino, M. Cecilia; Altieri, Dario C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt and mTOR pathway currently in the clinic produce a paradoxical reactivation of the pathway they are intended to suppress. Furthermore, fresh experimental evidence with PI3K antagonists in melanoma, glioblastoma and prostate cancer shows that mitochondrial metabolism drives an elaborate process of tumor adaptation culminating with drug resistance and metastatic competency. This is centered on reprogramming of mitochondrial functions to promote improved cell survival and to fuel the machinery of cell motility and invasion. Key players in these responses are molecular chaperones of the Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) family compartmentalized in mitochondria, which suppress apoptosis via phosphorylation of the pore component, Cyclophilin D, and enable the subcellular repositioning of active mitochondria to membrane protrusions implicated in cell motility. An inhibitor of mitochondrial Hsp90s in preclinical development (Gamitrinib) prevents adaptive mitochondrial reprogramming and shows potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Other therapeutic strategies to target mitochondria for cancer therapy include small molecule inhibitors of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) IDH1 (AG-120) and IDH2 (AG-221) which opened new therapeutic prospects for high-risk AML patients. A second approach of mitochondrial therapeutics focuses on agents that elevate toxic ROS levels from a leaky electron transport chain, nevertheless the clinical experience with these compounds, including a quinone derivative, ARQ 501, and a copper chelator, elesclomol (STA-4783) is limited. In light of these evidences, we discuss how best to target a resurgence of mitochondrial bioenergetics for cancer therapy. PMID:26660517

  13. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:28106852

  14. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-19

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression.

  15. Depression in cancer: The many biobehavioral pathways driving tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Beatrice; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Valpione, Sara; Perini, Giulia; Maes, Michael; Morris, Gerwyn; Kubera, Marta; Köhler, Cristiano A; Fernandes, Brisa S; Stubbs, Brendon; Pavlidis, Nicholas; Carvalho, André F

    2017-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is common among cancer patients, with prevalence rates up to four-times higher than the general population. Depression confers worse outcomes, including non-adherence to treatment and increased mortality in the oncology setting. Advances in the understanding of neurobiological underpinnings of depression have revealed shared biobehavioral mechanisms may contribute to cancer progression. Moreover, psychosocial stressors in cancer promote: (1) inflammation and oxidative/nitrosative stress; (2) a decreased immunosurveillance; and (3) a dysfunctional activation of the autonomic nervous system and of the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal axis. Consequently, the prompt recognition of depression among patients with cancer who may benefit of treatment strategies targeting depressive symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, fatigue and sleep disturbances, is a public health priority. Moreover, behavioral strategies aiming at reducing psychological distress and depressive symptoms, including addressing unhealthy diet and life-style choices, as well as physical inactivity and sleep dysfunction, may represent important strategies not only to treat depression, but also to improve wider cancer-related outcomes. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the intertwined biobehavioral pathways linking depression to cancer progression. In addition, the clinical implications of these findings are critically reviewed.

  16. Contribution of galectin-1, a glycan-binding protein, to gastrointestinal tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, María L; Carabias, Pablo; Troncoso, María F

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer is a group of tumors that affect multiple sites of the digestive system, including the stomach, liver, colon and pancreas. These cancers are very aggressive and rapidly metastasize, thus identifying effective targets is crucial for treatment. Galectin-1 (Gal-1) belongs to a family of glycan-binding proteins, or lectins, with the ability to cross-link specific glycoconjugates. A variety of biological activities have been attributed to Gal-1 at different steps of tumor progression. Herein, we summarize the current literature regarding the roles of Gal-1 in gastrointestinal malignancies. Accumulating evidence shows that Gal-1 is drastically up-regulated in human gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues, both in tumor epithelial and tumor-associated stromal cells. Moreover, Gal-1 makes a crucial contribution to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, favoring tumor development, aggressiveness, metastasis, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. We also highlight that alterations in Gal-1-specific glycoepitopes may be relevant for gastrointestinal cancer progression. Despite the findings obtained so far, further functional studies are still required. Elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms modulated by Gal-1 underlying gastrointestinal tumor progression, might lead to the development of novel Gal-1-based diagnostic methods and/or therapies. PMID:28839427

  17. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors limits tumor progression in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M.Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) accumulate in both neoplastic and inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment and impact the progression of a variety of diseases, including colorectal cancer. Pharmacological HIF inhibition represents a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. We show here that acriflavine (ACF), a naturally occurring compound known to repress HIF transcriptional activity, halts the progression of an autochthonous model of established colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) in immunocompetent mice. ACF treatment resulted in decreased tumor number, size and advancement (based on histopathological scoring) of CAC. Moreover, ACF treatment corresponded with decreased macrophage infiltration and vascularity in colorectal tumors. Importantly, ACF treatment inhibited the hypoxic induction of M-CSFR, as well as the expression of the angiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), a canonical HIF target, with little to no impact on the Nuclear factor-kappa B pathway in bone marrow-derived macrophages. These effects probably explain the observed in vivo phenotypes. Finally, an allograft tumor model further confirmed that ACF treatment inhibits tumor growth through HIF-dependent mechanisms. These results suggest pharmacological HIF inhibition in multiple cell types, including epithelial and innate immune cells, significantly limits tumor growth and progression. PMID:24408928

  18. Contribution of galectin-1, a glycan-binding protein, to gastrointestinal tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, María L; Carabias, Pablo; Troncoso, María F

    2017-08-07

    Gastrointestinal cancer is a group of tumors that affect multiple sites of the digestive system, including the stomach, liver, colon and pancreas. These cancers are very aggressive and rapidly metastasize, thus identifying effective targets is crucial for treatment. Galectin-1 (Gal-1) belongs to a family of glycan-binding proteins, or lectins, with the ability to cross-link specific glycoconjugates. A variety of biological activities have been attributed to Gal-1 at different steps of tumor progression. Herein, we summarize the current literature regarding the roles of Gal-1 in gastrointestinal malignancies. Accumulating evidence shows that Gal-1 is drastically up-regulated in human gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues, both in tumor epithelial and tumor-associated stromal cells. Moreover, Gal-1 makes a crucial contribution to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, favoring tumor development, aggressiveness, metastasis, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. We also highlight that alterations in Gal-1-specific glycoepitopes may be relevant for gastrointestinal cancer progression. Despite the findings obtained so far, further functional studies are still required. Elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms modulated by Gal-1 underlying gastrointestinal tumor progression, might lead to the development of novel Gal-1-based diagnostic methods and/or therapies.

  19. S100A8/A9 activate key genes and pathways in colon tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mie; Williams, Roy; Wang, Ling; Vogl, Thomas; Srikrishna, Geetha

    2011-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in modulating tumor progression. Earlier, we showed that S100A8/A9 proteins secreted by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) present within tumors and metastatic sites promote an autocrine pathway for accumulation of MDSC. In a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, we also showed that S100A8/A9-positive cells accumulate in all regions of dysplasia and adenoma. Here we present evidence that S100A8/A9 interact with RAGE and carboxylated glycans on colon tumor cells and promote activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Comparison of gene expression profiles of S100A8/A9-activated colon tumor cells versus unactivated cells led us to identify a small cohort of genes upregulated in activated cells, including Cxcl1, Ccl5 and Ccl7, Slc39a10, Lcn2, Zc3h12a, Enpp2, and other genes, whose products promote leukocyte recruitment, angiogenesis, tumor migration, wound healing, and formation of premetastatic niches in distal metastatic organs. Consistent with this observation, in murine colon tumor models we found that chemokines were upregulated in tumors, and elevated in sera of tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Mice lacking S100A9 showed significantly reduced tumor incidence, growth and metastasis, reduced chemokine levels, and reduced infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells within tumors and premetastatic organs. Studies using bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that S100A8/A9 expression on myeloid cells is essential for development of colon tumors. Our results thus reveal a novel role for myeloid-derived S100A8/A9 in activating specific downstream genes associated with tumorigenesis and in promoting tumor growth and metastasis.

  20. Disseminated oligodendroglial-like leptomeningeal tumor with anaplastic progression and presumed extraneural disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Brice A; Bookhout, Christine; Jaikumar, Sivakumar; Hipps, John; Lee, Yueh Z

    2015-01-01

    We report the neuroimaging and histopathologic findings of a 12-year-old female patient with a disseminated oligodendroglial-like leptomeningeal tumor with anaplastic progression and presumed extraneural metastatic disease. These tumors may represent distinct pathology primarily seen in pediatric patients. Neuroimaging demonstrates diffuse, progressive enhancement of the leptomeninges often with interval development of intraparenchymal lesions on follow-up. Disease is typically confined to the central nervous system, though diffuse peritoneal disease was seen in our case, possibly through metastatic seeding of the abdomen via ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

  1. Accelerated (18 mW/cm²) Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Progressive Keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Alnawaiseh, Maged; Rosentreter, André; Böhm, Michael R R; Eveslage, Maria; Eter, Nicole; Zumhagen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of accelerated riboflavin-ultraviolet A-induced corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) (irradiance of 18 mW/cm² for 5 minutes). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts and anterior segment data of patients after accelerated CXL. Visual, topographic, pachymetry, and densitometry data were extracted and analyzed before surgery and at follow-up (minimum 12 months) after treatment. A total of 28 eyes of 20 patients (mean age, 28.1 ± 8.1 years) were included in this study. The mean follow-up time was 21.7 ± 7.2 months (range, 12-34 months). No statistically significant changes were found in the mean corrected distance visual acuity, corneal astigmatism, Kmean, Kflat, Ksteep, corneal pachymetry (at the apex and at the thinnest point), and corneal densitometry at follow-up. A significant reduction of Kmax, index of surface variance, index of vertical asymmetry, and Km of the posterior corneal surface (Km(B)) was observed (Kmax: P = 0.018; index of surface variance: P = 0.016; index of vertical asymmetry: P = 0.038; Km(B): P = 0.008). No complications were reported during the postoperative follow-up period in this study. Based on a mean follow-up time of 21.7 months, accelerated CXL (18 mW/cm; 5 minutes) is effective in stopping the progression of keratoconus without raising any safety concerns. Improvement in Kmax and stabilization of corrected distance visual acuity were noted after treatment. However, prospective studies with longer follow-up using different accelerated CXL settings are needed to validate these findings.

  2. Progress towards a 1 GeV laser-plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim

    2003-10-01

    Recent experimental progress towards the realization of a 1 GeV laser-plasma accelerator will be discussed. The l'OASIS Group has a 12 TW, 45 fs, 10 Hz Ti:sapphire laser system that is capable of delivering up to five synchronized laser pulses on target. An upgrade to 100 TW is underway, and should be completed later this year. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Two approaches to the all-optical injector are underway. The first is the self-modulated LWFA, wherein a single pulse interacting with a relatively dense plasma generates an electron bunch with a large energy spread.(W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 174802 (2002).) The second is the colliding pulse injector, wherein two counter-propagating laser pulses are used to generate electron bunches with low energy spread. Recent experimental results include measuring the electron energy distribution in the self-modulated regime; data showing that the electron yield is enhanced by adding a counter-propagating laser pulse; and the first experimental demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities (> 10^18 W/cm^2) over tens of Rayleigh lengths in a plasma channel. Also measured was the emission of THz radiation at the plasma-vacuum boundary due to coherent transition radiation produced by the electron bunch.(W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., accepted (2003).) Such a THz source is capable of generating in excess of 100 μJ/pulse (>100 times more than conventional sources), and is also a convenient method for diagnosing the fs bunch duration.

  3. Monosomy 3 status of uveal melanoma metastases is associated with rapidly progressive tumors and short survival.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Cebulla, Colleen M; Verma, Vishal; Christopher, Benjamin N; Carson, William E; Olencki, Thomas; Davidorf, Frederick H

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular genetics of uveal melanoma (UM) metastases and correlate it with disease progression. Twelve pathologically confirmed UM metastases from 11 patients were included. Molecular genetic alterations in chromosomes 3 (including the BAP1 region), 8q, 6p, and 1p were investigated by microsatellite genotyping. Mutations in codon 209 of GNAQ and GNA11 genes were studied by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We identified monosomy of chromosome 3 in tumors from four patients with an average survival of 5 months (range 1-8 months) from time of diagnosis of metastatic disease. In contrast, tumors with either disomy or partial chromosome 3 alterations showed significantly slower metastatic disease progression with an average survival of 69 months (range 40-123 months, p = 0.003). Alterations in chromosomal arms 1p, 6p, and 8q and mutations in either GNAQ or GNA11 showed no association with disease progression. Prominent mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate was observed in tumors from patients with slowly progressive disease. In conclusion, in UM metastases, monosomy 3 is associated with highly aggressive, rapidly progressive disease while disomy or partial change of 3 and prominent mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate in the tumor is associated with better prognosis. These findings should be considered when designing clinical trials testing effectiveness of various therapies of metastatic UM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Catastrophic shifts and lethal thresholds in a propagating front model of unstable tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Daniel R.; Solé, Ricard V.

    2014-08-01

    Unstable dynamics characterizes the evolution of most solid tumors. Because of an increased failure of maintaining genome integrity, a cumulative increase in the levels of gene mutation and loss is observed. Previous work suggests that instability thresholds to cancer progression exist, defining phase transition phenomena separating tumor-winning scenarios from tumor extinction or coexistence phases. Here we present an integral equation approach to the quasispecies dynamics of unstable cancer. The model exhibits two main phases, characterized by either the success or failure of cancer tissue. Moreover, the model predicts that tumor failure can be due to either a reduced selective advantage over healthy cells or excessive instability. We also derive an approximate, analytical solution that predicts the front speed of aggressive tumor populations on the instability space.

  5. Catastrophic shifts and lethal thresholds in a propagating front model of unstable tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Amor, Daniel R; Solé, Ricard V

    2014-08-01

    Unstable dynamics characterizes the evolution of most solid tumors. Because of an increased failure of maintaining genome integrity, a cumulative increase in the levels of gene mutation and loss is observed. Previous work suggests that instability thresholds to cancer progression exist, defining phase transition phenomena separating tumor-winning scenarios from tumor extinction or coexistence phases. Here we present an integral equation approach to the quasispecies dynamics of unstable cancer. The model exhibits two main phases, characterized by either the success or failure of cancer tissue. Moreover, the model predicts that tumor failure can be due to either a reduced selective advantage over healthy cells or excessive instability. We also derive an approximate, analytical solution that predicts the front speed of aggressive tumor populations on the instability space.

  6. Epithelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Facilitates the Progression of Colon Tumors through Recruiting Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Triner, Daniel; Xue, Xiang; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Jung, Inkyung; Colacino, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation is a significant risk factor for colon cancer. Recent work has demonstrated essential roles for several infiltrating immune populations in the metaplastic progression following inflammation. Hypoxia and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are hallmark features of inflammation and solid tumors. Previously, we demonstrated an important role for tumor epithelial HIF-2α in colon tumors; however, the function of epithelial HIF-2α as a critical link in the progression of inflammation to cancer has not been elucidated. In colitis-associated colon cancer models, epithelial HIF-2α was essential in tumor growth. Concurrently, epithelial disruption of HIF-2α significantly decreased neutrophils in the colon tumor microenvironment. Intestinal epithelial HIF-2α-overexpressing mice demonstrated that neutrophil recruitment was a direct response to increased epithelial HIF-2α signaling. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of HIF-2α-overexpressing mice in conjunction with data mining from the Cancer Genome Atlas showed that the neutrophil chemokine CXCL1 gene was highly upregulated in colon tumor epithelium in a HIF-2α-dependent manner. Using selective peptide inhibitors of the CXCL1-CXCR2 signaling axis identified HIF-2α-dependent neutrophil recruitment as an essential mechanism to increase colon carcinogenesis. These studies demonstrate that HIF-2α is a novel regulator of neutrophil recruitment to colon tumors and that it is essential in shaping the protumorigenic inflammatory microenvironment in colon cancer. PMID:27956697

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Roles in Tumor Growth, Progression, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huaijun; Yang, Yazhi; Wu, Qiong

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ubiquitously present in many tissues. Due to their unique advantages, MSCs have been widely employed in clinical studies. Emerging evidences indicate that MSCs can also migrate to the tumor surrounding stroma and exert complex effects on tumor growth and progression. However, the effect of MSCs on tumor growth is still a matter of debate. Several studies have shown that MSCs could favor tumor growth. On the contrary, other groups have demonstrated that MSCs suppressed tumor progression. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication in the development of tumor diseases. MSCs-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) could mimic the effects of the mesenchymal stem cells from which they originate. Different studies have reported that MSC-EVs may exert various effects on the growth, metastasis, and drug response of different tumor cells by transferring proteins, messenger RNA, and microRNA to recipient cells. In the present review, we summarize the components of MSC-EVs and discuss the roles of MSC-EVs in different malignant diseases, including the related mechanisms that may account for their therapeutic potential. MSC-EVs open up a promising opportunity in the treatment of cancer with increased efficacy. PMID:28377788

  8. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000 mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential.

  9. Role of the tumor microenvironment in regulating apoptosis and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Yaacoub, Katherine; Pedeux, Remy; Tarte, Karin; Guillaudeux, Thierry

    2016-08-10

    Apoptosis is a gene-directed program that is engaged to efficiently eliminate dysfunctional cells. Evasion of apoptosis may be an important gate to tumor initiation and therapy resistance. Like any other developmental program, apoptosis can be disrupted by several genetic aberrations driving malignant cells into an uncontrolled progression and survival. For its sustained growth, cancer develops in a complex environment, which provides survival signals and rescues malignant cells from apoptosis. Recent studies have clearly shown a wide interaction between tumor cells and their microenvironment, confirming the influence of the surrounding cells on tumor expansion and invasion. These non-malignant cells not only intensify tumor cells growth but also upgrade the process of metastasis. The strong crosstalk between malignant cells and a reactive microenvironment is mediated by soluble chemokines and cytokines, which act on tumor cells through surface receptors. Disturbing the microenvironment signaling might be an encouraging approach for patient's treatment. Therefore, the ultimate knowledge of "tumor-microenvironment" interactions facilitates the identification of novel therapeutic procedures that mobilize cancer cells from their supportive cells. This review focuses on cancer progression mediated by the dysfunction of apoptosis and by the fundamental relationship between tumor and reactive cells. New insights and valuable targets for cancer prevention and therapy are also presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumor Microenvironment, a Paradigm in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Maryam; Carloni, Vinicio

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most lethal and prevalent cancers in the human population. Different etiological factors such as hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol and diabetes cause liver injury followed by inflammation, necrosis and hepatocytes proliferation. Continuous cycles of this destructive–regenerative process culminates in liver cirrhosis which is characterized by regenerating nodules that progress to dysplastic nodules and ultimately HCC. Despite its significance, there is only an elemental understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms, and there are only limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the study of the involved molecular mechanisms can open a new insight to define more effective treatment strategies. A variety of alterations have been reported in HCC patients, particularly the cancer-associated microenvironment components including immune cells, fibroblast cells, endothelial cells and extracellular matrix can support the neoplastic cells to proliferate, growth and invade. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and highlights the principal challenges that are relevant to controlling this milieu. PMID:28216578

  11. Tumor-derived exosomes in oncogenic reprogramming and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sarmad N; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, effective communication between cells is a crucial part of cellular and tissue homeostasis. This communication mainly involves direct cell-cell contact as well as the secretion of molecules that bind to receptors at the recipient cells. However, a more recently characterized mode of intercellular communication-the release of membrane vesicles known as exosomes-has been the subject of increasing interest and intensive research over the past decade. Following the discovery of the exosome-mediated immune activation, the pathophysiological roles of exosomes have been recognized in different diseases, including cancer. In this review, we describe the biogenesis and main physical characteristics that define exosomes as a specific population of secreted vesicles, with a special focus on their role in oncogenic transformation and cancer progression.

  12. Tumor-Derived Exosomes in Oncogenic Reprogramming and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sarmad N; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B

    2014-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, effective communication between cells is a crucial part of cellular and tissue homeostasis. This communication mainly involves direct cell–cell contact as well as the secretion of molecules that bind to receptors at the recipient cells. However, a more recently characterized mode of intercellular communication — the release of membrane vesicles known as exosomes — has been the subject of increasing interest and intensive research over the past decade. Following the discovery of the exosome-mediated immune activation, the pathophysiological roles of exosomes have been recognized in different diseases, including cancer. In this review, we describe the biogenesis and main physical characteristics that define exosomes as a specific population of secreted vesicles, with a special focus on their role in oncogenic transformation and cancer progression. PMID:25156068

  13. Vitamin D, intermediary metabolism and prostate cancer tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Lin W.; Tenniswood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data have demonstrated an inverse association between serum vitamin D3 levels, cancer incidence and related mortality. However, the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer biology and its utility for prevention of prostate cancer progression are not as well-defined. The data are often conflicting: some reports suggest that vitamin D3 induces apoptosis in androgen dependent prostate cancer cell lines, while others suggest that vitamin D3 only induces cell cycle arrest. Recent molecular studies have identified an extensive synergistic crosstalk between the vitamin D- and androgen-mediated mRNA and miRNA expression, adding an additional layer of post-transcriptional regulation to the known VDR- and AR-regulated gene activation. The Warburg effect, the inefficient metabolic pathway that converts glucose to lactate for rapid energy generation, is a phenomenon common to many different types of cancer. This process supports cell proliferation and promotes cancer progression via alteration of glucose, glutamine and lipid metabolism. Prostate cancer is a notable exception to this general process since the metabolic switch that occurs early during malignancy is the reverse of the Warburg effect. This “anti-Warburg effect” is due to the unique biology of normal prostate cells that harbor a truncated TCA cycle that is required to produce and secret citrate. In prostate cancer cells, the TCA cycle activity is restored and citrate oxidation is used to produce energy for cancer cell proliferation. 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgen together modulates the TCA cycle via transcriptional regulation of zinc transporters, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgen maintain normal prostate metabolism by blocking citrate oxidation. These data demonstrate the importance of androgens in the anti-proliferative effect of vitamin D in prostate cancer and highlight the importance of understanding the crosstalk between these two signaling pathways. PMID:24860512

  14. Evaluation of performance of an accelerator-based BNCT facility for the treatment of different tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M S; González, S J; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2013-09-01

    Encouraging Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) clinical results obtained in recent years have stimulated intense research to develop accelerator-based neutron sources to be installed in clinical facilities. In this work an assessment of an accelerator-based BNCT facility for the treatment of different tumor targets was performed, comparing the accelerator-derived results with reported reactor-based trials under similar conditions and subjected to the same clinical protocols. A set of real image studies was used to cover clinical-like cases of brain and head-and-neck tumors. In addition, two clinical cases of malignant nodular melanoma treated at the RA-6 BNCT facility in Argentina were used to thoroughly compare the clinical dosimetry with the accelerator-derived results. The minimum weighted dose delivered to the clinical target volume was higher than 30 Gy and 14 Gy for the brain tumor and head-and-neck cases, respectively, in agreement with those achieved in clinical applications. For the melanoma cases, the minimum tumor doses were equal or higher than those achieved with the RA-6 reactor for identical field orientation and protocol. The whole-body dose assessment showed that the maximum photon-equivalent doses for those normal organs close to the beam direction were below the upper limits considered in the protocols used in the present work. The obtained results indicate not only the good performance of the proposed beam shaping assembly design associated to the facility but also the potential applicability of accelerator-based BNCT in the treatment of both superficial and deep-seated tumors. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detecting circulating tumor material and digital pathology imaging during pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Radim; Divi, Rao; Verma, Mukesh

    2017-06-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Clinical symptoms typically present late when treatment options are limited and survival expectancy is very short. Metastatic mutations are heterogeneous and can accumulate up to twenty years before PC diagnosis. Given such genetic diversity, detecting and managing the complex states of disease progression may be limited to imaging modalities and markers present in circulation. Recent developments in digital pathology imaging show potential for early PC detection, making a differential diagnosis, and predicting treatment sensitivity leading to long-term survival in advanced stage patients. Despite large research efforts, the only serum marker currently approved for clinical use is CA 19-9. Utility of CA 19-9 has been shown to improve when it is used in combination with PC-specific markers. Efforts are being made to develop early-screening assays that can detect tumor-derived material, present in circulation, before metastasis takes a significant course. Detection of markers that identify circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in biofluid samples offers a promising non-invasive method for this purpose. Circulating tumor cells exhibit varying expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers depending on the state of tumor differentiation. This offers a possibility for monitoring disease progression using minimally invasive procedures. EVs also offer the benefit of detecting molecular cargo of tumor origin and add the potential to detect circulating vesicle markers from tumors that lack invasive properties. This review integrates recent genetic insights of PC progression with developments in digital pathology and early detection of tumor-derived circulating material.

  16. Detecting circulating tumor material and digital pathology imaging during pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Moravec, Radim; Divi, Rao; Verma, Mukesh

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Clinical symptoms typically present late when treatment options are limited and survival expectancy is very short. Metastatic mutations are heterogeneous and can accumulate up to twenty years before PC diagnosis. Given such genetic diversity, detecting and managing the complex states of disease progression may be limited to imaging modalities and markers present in circulation. Recent developments in digital pathology imaging show potential for early PC detection, making a differential diagnosis, and predicting treatment sensitivity leading to long-term survival in advanced stage patients. Despite large research efforts, the only serum marker currently approved for clinical use is CA 19-9. Utility of CA 19-9 has been shown to improve when it is used in combination with PC-specific markers. Efforts are being made to develop early-screening assays that can detect tumor-derived material, present in circulation, before metastasis takes a significant course. Detection of markers that identify circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in biofluid samples offers a promising non-invasive method for this purpose. Circulating tumor cells exhibit varying expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers depending on the state of tumor differentiation. This offers a possibility for monitoring disease progression using minimally invasive procedures. EVs also offer the benefit of detecting molecular cargo of tumor origin and add the potential to detect circulating vesicle markers from tumors that lack invasive properties. This review integrates recent genetic insights of PC progression with developments in digital pathology and early detection of tumor-derived circulating material. PMID:28656074

  17. Early impact of social isolation and breast tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kelley S; Szpunar, Mercedes J; Brown, Edward B

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from cancer patients and animal models of cancer indicates that exposure to psychosocial stress can promote tumor growth and metastasis, but the pathways underlying stress-induced cancer pathogenesis are not fully understood. Social isolation has been shown to promote tumor progression. We examined the impact of social isolation on breast cancer pathogenesis in adult female severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice using the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, a high β-adrenergic receptor (AR) expressing line. When group-adapted mice were transferred into single housing (social isolation) one week prior to MB-231 tumor cell injection into a mammary fat pad (orthotopic), no alterations in tumor growth or metastasis were detected compared to group-housed mice. When social isolation was delayed until tumors were palpable, tumor growth was transiently increased in singly-housed mice. To determine if sympathetic nervous system activation was associated with increased tumor growth, spleen and tumor norepinephrine (NE) was measured after social isolation, in conjunction with tumor-promoting macrophage populations. Three days after transfer to single housing, spleen weight was transiently increased in tumor-bearing and non-tumor-bearing mice in conjunction with reduced splenic NE concentration and elevated CD11b+Gr-1+ macrophages. At day 10 after social isolation, no changes in spleen CD11b+ populations or NE were detected in singly-housed mice. In the tumors, social isolation increased CD11b+Gr-1+, CD11b+Gr-1-, and F4/80+ macrophage populations, with no change in tumor NE. The results indicate that a psychological stressor, social isolation, elicits dynamic but transient effects on macrophage populations that may facilitate tumor growth. The transiency of the changes in peripheral NE suggest that homeostatic mechanisms may mitigate the impact of social isolation over time. Studies are underway to define the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the

  18. [Hormone risk factors during breast tumoral promotion, progression and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Edith Lucia Salazar; López, Adrián Paredes; Sánchez, Leobardo Calzada

    2004-11-01

    Several hormonal factors, as menstrual irregularities, early ovarian maturation and long estrogen stimulation during women's reproductive life, have been pointed out as risk factors in the breast cancer promotion. To study the various involved factors during breast cancer evolution. Hormonal and reproductive factors were studied in 200 women with breast cancer. The greater incidence was showed in postmenopausal patients (118 patients). Nulliparity was presented in 29% of the patients, while late menopause and early menarche were presented in 25 and 8%, respectively. Having the first child at age > 30 years and family history of breast cancer (8.5%) were risk factors presented in 40% of the patients. Thirty percent of the patients showed low risk factors such as: high parity (26%), low parity (15%) and first child at age < 20 years. On the other hand, the left mammary gland was the most affected. The lesion was mainly situated in the upper-outer quadrant and upper-inside quadrant (36 and 26% in 72 and 52 patients, respectively). The decade of highest incidence was 40 to 50 years. During the first six months, 60% of the patients showed tumour progression. Nulliparity, late menopause, early menarche, first child at age > 30 years and family history of breast cancer are risk factors for serious breast cancer prognostic.

  19. Optimal technique of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for tumors adjacent to brainstem.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiou-Shiung; Hwang, Jing-Min; Tai, Po-An; Chang, You-Kang; Wang, Yu-Nong; Shih, Rompin; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a well-established technique that is replacing whole-brain irradiation in the treatment of intracranial lesions, which leads to better preservation of brain functions, and therefore a better quality of life for the patient. There are several available forms of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS, and the goal of the present study is to identify which of these techniques is best (as evaluated by dosimetric outcomes statistically) when the target is located adjacent to brainstem. We collected the records of 17 patients with lesions close to the brainstem who had previously been treated with single-fraction radiosurgery. In all, 5 different lesion catalogs were collected, and the patients were divided into 2 distance groups-1 consisting of 7 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of less than 0.5cm, and the other of 10 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of ≥ 0.5 and < 1cm. Comparison was then made among the following 3 types of LINAC-based radiosurgery: dynamic conformal arcs (DCA), intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS), and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). All techniques included multiple noncoplanar beams or arcs with or without intensity-modulated delivery. The volume of gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.2cm(3) to 21.9cm(3). Regarding the dose homogeneity index (HIICRU) and conformity index (CIICRU) were without significant difference between techniques statistically. However, the average CIICRU = 1.09 ± 0.56 achieved by VMAT was the best of the 3 techniques. Moreover, notable improvement in gradient index (GI) was observed when VMAT was used (0.74 ± 0.13), and this result was significantly better than those achieved by the 2 other techniques (p < 0.05). For V4Gy of brainstem, both VMAT (2.5%) and IMRS (2.7%) were significantly lower than DCA (4.9%), both at the p < 0.05 level. Regarding V2Gy of normal brain, VMAT plans had attained 6.4 ± 5%; this was significantly better (p < 0.05) than

  20. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  1. Metabolic genes in cancer: their roles in tumor progression and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Eiji; Okuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Aya; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2010-01-01

    Re-programming of metabolic pathways is a hallmark of physiological changes in cancer cells. The expression of certain genes that directly control the rate of key metabolic pathways including glycolysis, lipogenesis and nucleotide synthesis are drastically altered at different stages of tumor progression. These alterations are generally considered as an adaptation of tumor cells; however, they also contribute to the progression of tumor cells to become more aggressive phenotypes. This review summarizes the recent information about the mechanistic link of these genes to oncogenesis and their potential utility as diagnostic markers as well as for therapeutic targets. We particularly focus on three groups of genes; GLUT1, G6PD, TKTL1 and PGI/AMF in glycolytic pathway, ACLY, ACC1 and FAS in lipogenesis and RRM1, RRM2 and TYMS for nucleotide synthesis. All these genes are highly up-regulated in a variety of tumor cells in cancer patients, and they play active roles in tumor progression rather than expressing merely as a consequence of phenotypic change of the cancer cells. Molecular dissection of their orchestrated networks and understanding the exact mechanism of their expression will provide a window of opportunity to target these genes for specific cancer therapy. We also reviewed existing database of gene microarray to validate the utility of these genes for cancer diagnosis. PMID:20122995

  2. CD47 blockade inhibits tumor progression human osteosarcoma in xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shui-Jun; Zhao, Chen; Qiu, Bin-Song; Gu, Hai-Feng; Hong, Jian-Fei; Cao, Li; Chen, Yu; Xia, Bing; Bi, Qin; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumors in children and adolescents. Despite intensive chemotherapy, patients with advanced disease still have a poor prognosis, illustrating the need for alternative therapies. In this study, we explored the use of antibodies that block CD47 with a tumor growth suppressive effect on osteosarcoma. We first found that up-regulation of CD47 mRNA levels in the tumorous tissues from eight patients with osteosarcoma when compared with that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Further western-blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that CD47 protein level was highly expressed in osteosarcoma compared to normal osteoblastic cells and adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Osteosarcoma cancer stem cell markers staining shown that the majority of CD44+ cells expressed CD47 albeit with different percentages (ranging from 80% to 99%). Furthermore, high CD47 mRNA expression levels were associated with a decreased probability of progression-free and overall survival. In addition, blockade of CD47 by specific Abs suppresses the invasive ability of osteosarcoma tumor cells and further inhibits spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of KRIB osteosarcoma cells in vivo. Finally, CD47 blockade increases macrophage phagocytosis of osteosarcoma tumor cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CD47 is a critical regulator in the metastasis of osteosarcoma and suggest that targeted inhibition of this antigen by anti-CD47 may be a novel immunotherapeutic approach in the management of this tumor. PMID:26093091

  3. A novel strategy for designing specific gelatinase A inhibitors: potential use to control tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Augé, Franck; Hornebeck, William; Laronze, Jean-Yves

    2004-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are zinc endopeptidases deeply implicated in tumor progression. MMP inhibitors are attractive potential anti-cancer agent. Unfortunately, until now, clinical trials remain disappointing, that could be the result of a lack of selectivity. We propose second generation selective MMPs, directed toward gelatinase A (MMP-2), based on a non-hydroxamate Zn-ligand grafted on the galardin (ilomastat) skeleton.

  4. Deletion of tumor progression locus 2 attenuates alcohol induced hepatic inflammation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves the interaction of several inflammatory signaling pathways. Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), also known as Cancer Osaka Thyroid (COT) and MAP3K8, is a serine threonine kinase that functions as a critical regulator of inflammator...

  5. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  6. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  7. Disappearance of breach rhythm heralding recurrent tumor progression in a patient with astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Christina; Grossmann, Annette; Benecke, Reiner; Rösche, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    The breach rhythm is sometimes considered the consequence of reduced resistance between the cortex and the scalp electrode in the region of a skull defect. On the other hand, the electroencephalographic (EEG) changes after craniotomy were attributed to an activation of EEG activity by meningocortical adhesions with admixed gliosis. We report changes of the breach rhythm in a patient with astrocytoma, which give further evidence that the breach rhythm is not merely the result of physical changes in the area of a skull defect. In our patient, the breach rhythm was no longer detectable before a new tumor progression took place, showed up again, and at the end changed into localized slowing before the deterioration of the patient's general medical condition. This case suggests that in patients with brain tumors, the loss or attenuation in frequency of an established breach rhythm might be considered as an indication of a new tumor progression.

  8. Tissue-Resident Macrophages in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Originate from Embryonic Hematopoiesis and Promote Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Herndon, John M; Sojka, Dorothy K; Kim, Ki-Wook; Knolhoff, Brett L; Zuo, Chong; Cullinan, Darren R; Luo, Jingqin; Bearden, Audrey R; Lavine, Kory J; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are essential components of the cancer microenvironment and play critical roles in the regulation of tumor progression. Optimal therapeutic intervention requires in-depth understanding of the sources that sustain macrophages in malignant tissues. In this study, we investigated the ontogeny of TAMs in murine pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) models. We identified both inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages as sources of TAMs. Unexpectedly, significant portions of pancreas-resident macrophages originated from embryonic development and expanded through in situ proliferation during tumor progression. Whereas monocyte-derived TAMs played more potent roles in antigen presentation, embryonically derived TAMs exhibited a pro-fibrotic transcriptional profile, indicative of their role in producing and remodeling molecules in the extracellular matrix. Collectively, these findings uncover the heterogeneity of TAM origin and functions and could provide therapeutic insight for PDAC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 4th international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance: meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Varun V; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-01-01

    The fourth international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance organized in association with GTCbio was held in Boston, MA from March 9 to 11, 2014. The meeting attracted a diverse group of experts in the field of cancer biology, therapeutics and medical oncology from academia and industry. The meeting addressed the current challenges in the treatment of cancer including tumor heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis along with the need for improved biomarkers of tumor progression and clinical trial design. Keynote speakers included Clifton Leaf, Editor at Fortune Magazine, Dr. Mina Bissell from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Dr. Levi Garraway from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The meeting featured cutting edge tools, preclinical models and the latest basic, translational and clinical research findings in the field. PMID:25782066

  10. Sparking Thinking: Studying Modern Precision Medicine Will Accelerate the Progression of Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-Cheng; Ji, Guang

    2017-07-01

    Incorporating "-omics" studies with environmental interactions could help elucidate the biological mechanisms responsible for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) patterns. Based on the authors' own experiences, this review outlines a model of an ideal combination of "-omics" biomarkers, environmental factors, and TCM pattern classifications; provides a narrative review of the relevant genetic and TCM studies; and lists several successful integrative examples. Two integration tools are briefly introduced. The first is the integration of modern devices into objective diagnostic methods of TCM patterning, which would improve current clinical decision-making and practice. The second is the use of biobanks and data platforms, which could broadly support biological and medical research. Such efforts will transform current medical management and accelerate the progression of precision medicine.

  11. Detection and Clinical Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Colorectal Cancer—20 Years of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Hardingham, Jennifer E; Grover, Phulwinder; Winter, Marnie; Hewett, Peter J; Price, Timothy J; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) may be defined as tumor- or metastasis-derived cells that are present in the bloodstream. The CTC pool in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients may include not only epithelial tumor cells, but also tumor cells undergoing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor stem cells. A significant number of patients diagnosed with early stage CRC subsequently relapse with recurrent or metastatic disease despite undergoing “curative” resection of their primary tumor. This suggests that an occult metastatic disease process was already underway, with viable tumor cells being shed from the primary tumor site, at least some of which have proliferative and metastatic potential and the ability to survive in the bloodstream. Such tumor cells are considered to be responsible for disease relapse in these patients. Their detection in peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis or after resection of the primary tumor may identify those early-stage patients who are at risk of developing recurrent or metastatic disease and who would benefit from adjuvant therapy. CTC may also be a useful adjunct to radiological assessment of tumor response to therapy. Over the last 20 years many approaches have been developed for the isolation and characterization of CTC. However, none of these methods can be considered the gold standard for detection of the entire pool of CTC. Recently our group has developed novel unbiased inertial microfluidics to enrich for CTC, followed by identification of CTC by imaging flow cytometry. Here, we provide a review of progress on CTC detection and clinical significance over the last 20 years. PMID:26605644

  12. Fibroblast-derived MT1-MMP promotes tumor progression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyue; Matrisian, Lynn M; Holmbeck, Kenn; Vick, Catherine C; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2006-03-06

    Identification of fibroblast derived factors in tumor progression has the potential to provide novel molecular targets for modulating tumor cell growth and metastasis. Multiple matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are expressed by both mesenchymal and epithelial cells within head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), but the relative importance of these enzymes and the cell source is the subject of controversy. The invasive potential of HNSCC tumor cells were assessed in vitro atop type I collagen gels in coculture with wild-type (WT), MMP-2 null, MMP-9 null or MT1-MMP null fibroblasts. A floor of mouth mouse model of HNSCC was used to assess in vivo growth after co-injection of FaDu tumor cells with MMP null fibroblasts. Here we report changes in tumor phenotype when FaDu HNSCCs cells are cocultured with WT, MMP-2 null, MMP-9 null or MT1-MMP null fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. WT, MMP-2 null and MMP-9 null fibroblasts, but not MT1-MMP null fibroblasts, spontaneously invaded into type I collagen gels. WT fibroblasts stimulated FaDu tumor cell invasion in coculture. This invasive phenotype was unaffected by combination with MMP-9 null fibroblasts, reduced with MMP-2 null fibroblasts (50%) and abrogated in MT1-MMP null fibroblasts. Co-injection of FaDu tumor cells with fibroblasts in an orthotopic oral cavity SCID mouse model demonstrated a reduction of tumor volume using MMP-9 and MMP-2 null fibroblasts (48% and 49%, respectively) compared to WT fibroblasts. Consistent with in vitro studies, MT1-MMP null fibroblasts when co-injected with FaDu cells resulted in a 90% reduction in tumor volume compared to FaDu cells injected with WT fibroblasts. These data suggest a role for fibroblast-derived MMP-2 and MT1-MMP in HNSCC tumor invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

  13. Epigenetic Modifications and Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Tumor Progression and Resistance to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Squarize, Cristiane H.; Almeida, Luciana O.

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most prevalent cancer and one of the most aggressive malignancies worldwide. Despite continuous efforts to identify molecular markers for early detection, and to develop efficient treatments, the overall survival and prognosis of HNSCC patients remain poor. Accumulated scientific evidences suggest that epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation, histone covalent modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNAs, are frequently involved in oral carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and resistance to therapy. Epigenetic alterations occur in an unsystematic manner or as part of the aberrant transcriptional machinery, which promotes selective advantage to the tumor cells. Epigenetic modifications also contribute to cellular plasticity during tumor progression and to the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of tumor cells with self-renewal ability. CSCs are involved in the development of intrinsic or acquired therapy resistance, and tumor recurrences or relapse. Therefore, the understanding and characterization of epigenetic modifications associated with head and neck carcinogenesis, and the prospective identification of epigenetic markers associated with CSCs, hold the promise for novel therapeutic strategies to fight tumors. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on epigenetic modifications observed in HNSCC and emerging Epi-drugs capable of sensitizing HNSCC to therapy. PMID:28704968

  14. Molecular genetics of bladder cancer: Emerging mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    McConkey, David J; Lee, Sangkyou; Choi, Woonyoung; Tran, Mai; Majewski, Tadeusz; Lee, Sooyong; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Dinney, Colin; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Urothelial cancer has served as one of the most important sources of information about the mutational events that underlie the development of human solid malignancies. Although "field effects" that affect the entire bladder mucosa appear to initiate disease, tumors develop along 2 distinct biological "tracks" that present vastly different challenges for clinical management. Recent whole genome methodologies have facilitated even more rapid progress in the identification of the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder cancer initiation and progression. Specifically, whole organ mapping combined with high resolution, high throughput SNP analyses have identified a novel class of candidate tumor suppressors ("forerunner genes") that localize near more familiar tumor suppressors but are disrupted at an earlier stage of cancer development. Furthermore, whole genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and mRNA expression profiling have demonstrated that the 2 major subtypes of urothelial cancer (papillary/superficial and non-papillary/muscle-invasive) are truly distinct molecular entities, and in recent work our group has discovered that muscle-invasive tumors express molecular markers characteristic of a developmental process known as "epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition" (EMT). Emerging evidence indicates that urothelial cancers contain subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells ("cancer stem cells") but the phenotypes of these cells in different tumors are heterogeneous, raising questions about whether or not the 2 major subtypes of cancer share a common precursor. This review will provide an overview of these new insights and discuss priorities for future investigation.

  15. Plasminogen activators, their inhibitors, and urokinase receptor emerge in late stages of melanocytic tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, T. J.; Quax, P. H.; Denijn, M.; Verrijp, K. N.; Verheijen, J. H.; Verspaget, H. W.; Weidle, U. H.; Ruiter, D. J.; van Muijen, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix and other tissue barriers by proteases like plasminogen activators (PAs) is a prerequisite for neoplastic growth and metastasis. Recently, we reported that highly metastatic behavior of human melanoma cells in nude mice correlates with urokinase-type PA (u-PA) expression and activity and with PA inhibitor type 1 and 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2) expression. Here we report on the occurrence of components of the PA system in the various stages of human melanoma tumor progression in situ. We studied the protein distribution on freshly frozen lesions of common nevocellular nevi (n = 25), dysplastic (= atypical) nevi (n = 16), early primary melanomas (n = 8), advanced primary melanomas (n = 11), and melanoma metastases (n = 17). Tissue-type PA was present in endothelial cells in all lesions, whereas in metastases it could be detected in tumor cells in a minority of the lesions. u-PA, its receptor, PAI-1, and PAI-2 could not be detected in benign and in early stages but appeared frequently in advanced primary melanoma and melanoma metastasis lesions. u-PA was detected in stromal cells and in tumor cells at the invasive front, the u-PA receptor and PAI-2 in tumor cells, and PAI-1 in the extracellular matrix surrounding tumor cells. Localization of the corresponding messenger RNAs and enzyme activities revealed a similar distribution. We conclude that plasminogen activation is a late event in melanoma tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291613

  16. Mineral metabolism factors predict accelerated progression of common carotid intima-media thickness in chronic kidney disease: the NEFRONA study.

    PubMed

    Abajo, Maria; Betriu, Àngels; Arroyo, David; Gracia, Marta; Del Pino, M Dolores; Martínez, Isabel; Valdivielso, Jose M; Fernández, Elvira

    2016-08-27

    The leading cause of premature death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), but risk assessment in renal patients is challenging. The aim of the study was to analyse the factors that predict accelerated progression of common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT) in a CKD cohort after 2 years of follow-up (2010-12). The study included 1152 patients from the NEFRONA cohort with CKD stages 3-5D and without a clinical history of CVD. CCIMT was measured at the far wall on both common carotids. CCIMT progression was defined as the change between CCIMT at baseline and at 24 months for each side, averaged and normalized as change per year. Accelerated progressors were defined as those with a CCIMT change ≥75th percentile. The median CCIMT progression rate was 0.0125 mm/year, without significant differences between CKD stages. The cut-off value for defining accelerated progression was 0.0425 mm/year. After adjustment, age was a common factor among all CKD stages. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes and systolic blood pressure, were predictors of progression in CKD stages 4-5, whereas high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicted progression in women in stage 3. Mineral metabolism factors predicting accelerated progression were serum phosphorus in stages 3 and 5D; low 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels >110 pg/mL in stages 4-5 and intact parathyroid hormone levels out of the recommended range in stage 5D. Mineral metabolism parameters might predict accelerated CCIMT progression from early CKD stages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Progress in Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Accelerator Magnet Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Prestemon, S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.; Hikichi, Y.; Nishioka, J.; Hasegawa, T.

    2009-08-16

    We report on our progress in the development of the technology for the application of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}(Bi-2212) in Wind-and-React accelerator magnets. A series of superconducting subscale coils has been manufactured at LBNL and reacted at the wire manufacturer SWCC. Selected coils are impregnated and tested in self-field, even though the coils exhibited leakage during the partial melt heat treatment. Other coils have been disassembled after reaction and submitted to critical current (Ic) tests on individual cable sections. We report on the results of the current carrying capacity of the coils. Voltage-current (VI) transitions were reproducibly measured up to a quench currents around 1400 A, which is 25% of the expected performance. The results indicate that the coils are limited by the inner windings. We further compare possibilities to use Bi-2212 and Nb{sub 3}Sn tilted solenoid, and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) racetrack inserts to increase the magnetic field in HD2, a 36 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet which recently achieved a bore magnetic field of 13.8 T. The application of Bi-2212 and/or YBCO in accelerator type magnets, if successful, will open the road to higher magnetic fields, far surpassing the limitations of Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology.

  18. Deletion of ErbB4 accelerates polycystic kidney disease progression in cpk mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fenghua; Miyazawa, Tomoki; Kloepfer, Lance A.; Harris, Raymond C.

    2014-01-01

    ErbB4 is highly expressed in the cystic kidneys with polycystic kidney diseases. To investigate its potential role in cystogenesis, cpk mice carrying a heart-rescued ErbB4 deletion were generated. Accelerated cyst progression and renal function deterioration were noted as early as 10 days postnatally in cpk mice with ErbB4 deletion compared to cpk mice, as indicated by increased cystic index, higher kidney weight to body weight ratios and elevated BUN levels. No apparent defects in renal development were noted with ErbB4 deletion itself. Increased cell proliferation was predominately seen in the cortex of cystic kidneys with or without ErbB4 deletion. However, there was significantly more cell proliferation in the cyst-lining epithelial cells in cpk mice with ErbB4 deletion. TUNEL staining localized apoptotic cells mainly to the renal medulla. There were significantly more apoptotic cells in the cyst-lining epithelial cells in ErbB4-deleted cpk kidneys, with decreased levels of cyclin D1, increased levels of p21, p27 and cleaved caspase 3. Thus, lack of ErbB4 may contribute to elevated cell proliferation and unbalanced cell apoptosis, resulting in accelerated cyst formation and early renal function deterioration. These studies suggest that the high level of ErbB4 expression seen in cpk mice may exert relative cytoprotective effects in renal epithelia. PMID:24670412

  19. Progress on laser plasma accelerator development using transversely and longitudinally shaped plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C. B.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Panasenko, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G. R.; Lin, C.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cary, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    A summary of progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is given on: (1) experiments on down-ramp injection; (2) experiments on acceleration in capillary discharge plasma channels; and (3) simulations of a staged laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Control of trapping in a LWFA using plasma density down-ramps produced electron bunches with absolute longitudinal and transverse momentum spreads more than ten times lower than in previous experiments (0.17 and 0.02 MeV/c FWHM, respectively) and with central momenta of 0.76±0.02 MeV/c, stable over a week of operation. Experiments were also carried out using a 40 TW laser interacting with a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 μm diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic bunches up to 300 MeV were observed. By detuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 μm capillary, a parameter regime with high energy bunches, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, peak electron energy was correlated with the amount of trapped charge. Simulations show that bunches produced on a down-ramp and injected into a channel-guided LWFA can produce stable beams with 0.2 MeV/c-class momentum spread at high energies. To cite this article: W.P. Leemans et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  20. A novel thermal accelerant for augmentation of microwave energy during image-guided tumor ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, William K. C.; Maxwell, Aaron W. P.; Frank, Victoria E.; Primmer, Michael P.; Paul, Jarod B.; Susai, Cynthia; Collins, Scott A.; Borjeson, Tiffany M.; Baird, Greyson L.; Lombardo, Kara A.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2017-02-01

    The greatest challenge in image-guided thermal ablation (IGTA) of liver tumors is a relatively high recurrence rate (ca. 30%) due to incomplete ablation. To meet this challenge, we have developed a novel Thermal Accelerator (TA) to demonstrate its capability to, 1) augment microwave (MW) energy from a distance unattainable by antenna alone; 2) turn into a gel at body temperature; 3) act as a CT or US contrast. We have examined the TA efficiency using in vitro and ex vivo models: microwave power, TA dose, frequencies and TA-to-tip distance were varied, and temperature readings compared with and without TA. Using the in vitro model, it was established that both the rate and magnitude of increase in ablation zone temperature were significantly greater with TA under all tested conditions (p<0.0001). On ultrasound imaging, the TA was echogenic as gel. On CT, TA density was proportional to dose, with average values ranging from 329 HU to 3071 HU at 10 mg/mL and 1,000mg/mL, respectively. TA can be accurately deposited to a target area using CT or US as image-guidance and augment MW energy effectively so that ablation time is significantly reduced, which will contribute to complete ablation. The preliminary results obtained from in vivo experiments using swine as an animal model are consistent with the observations made in in vitro and en vivo studies.

  1. Mutant PIK3CA accelerates HER2-driven transgenic mammary tumors and induces resistance to combinations of anti-HER2 therapies.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Ariella B; Pfefferle, Adam D; Balko, Justin M; Kuba, María Gabriela; Young, Christian D; Sánchez, Violeta; Sutton, Cammie R; Cheng, Hailing; Perou, Charles M; Zhao, Jean J; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-08-27

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ERBB2) amplification and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutations often co-occur in breast cancer. Aberrant activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been shown to correlate with a diminished response to HER2-directed therapies. We generated a mouse model of HER2-overexpressing (HER2(+)), PIK3CA(H1047R)-mutant breast cancer. Mice expressing both human HER2 and mutant PIK3CA in the mammary epithelium developed tumors with shorter latencies compared with mice expressing either oncogene alone. HER2 and mutant PIK3CA also cooperated to promote lung metastases. By microarray analysis, HER2-driven tumors clustered with luminal breast cancers, whereas mutant PIK3CA tumors were associated with claudin-low breast cancers. PIK3CA and HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors expressed elevated transcripts encoding markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stem cells. Cells from HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors more efficiently formed mammospheres and lung metastases. Finally, HER2(+)/PIK3CA tumors were resistant to trastuzumab alone and in combination with lapatinib or pertuzumab. Both drug resistance and enhanced mammosphere formation were reversed by treatment with a PI3K inhibitor. In sum, PIK3CA(H1047R) accelerates HER2-mediated breast epithelial transformation and metastatic progression, alters the intrinsic phenotype of HER2-overexpressing cancers, and generates resistance to approved combinations of anti-HER2 therapies.

  2. The fat and the bad: Mature adipocytes, key actors in tumor progression and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Geneste, Aline; Fallone, Frederique; Li, Xia; Dumontet, Charles; Muller, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has raised the important roles of adipocytes as an active player in the tumor microenvironment. In many tumors adipocytes are in close contact with cancer cells. They secrete various factors that can mediate local and systemic effects. The adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk leads to phenotypical and functional changes of both cell types, which can further enhance tumor progression. Moreover, obesity, which is associated with an increase in adipose mass and an alteration of adipose tissue, has been established as a risk factor for cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of the adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk in both obese and lean conditions as well as its impact on cancer cell growth, local invasion, metastatic spread and resistance to treatments. Better characterization of cancer-associated adipocytes and the key molecular events in the adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk will provide insights into tumor biology and suggest efficient therapeutic opportunities.

  3. The fat and the bad: Mature adipocytes, key actors in tumor progression and resistance.

    PubMed

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Geneste, Aline; Fallone, Frederique; Li, Xia; Dumontet, Charles; Muller, Catherine

    2017-08-22

    Growing evidence has raised the important roles of adipocytes as an active player in the tumor microenvironment. In many tumors adipocytes are in close contact with cancer cells. They secrete various factors that can mediate local and systemic effects. The adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk leads to phenotypical and functional changes of both cell types, which can further enhance tumor progression. Moreover, obesity, which is associated with an increase in adipose mass and an alteration of adipose tissue, has been established as a risk factor for cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of the adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk in both obese and lean conditions as well as its impact on cancer cell growth, local invasion, metastatic spread and resistance to treatments. Better characterization of cancer-associated adipocytes and the key molecular events in the adipocyte-cancer cell crosstalk will provide insights into tumor biology and suggest efficient therapeutic opportunities.

  4. Accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites: moving from guidance to practice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Todd S; Nadeau, Steven C; McCulloch, Megan C

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated sediments are a pervasive problem in the United States. Significant economic, ecological, and social issues are intertwined in addressing the nation's contaminated sediment problem. Managing contaminated sediments has become increasingly resource intensive, with some investigations costing tens of millions of dollars and the majority of remediation projects proceeding at a slow pace. At present, the approaches typically used to investigate, evaluate, and remediate contaminated sediment sites in the United States have largely fallen short of producing timely, risk-based, cost-effective, long-term solutions. With the purpose of identifying opportunities for accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites, the US Army Corps of Engineers-Engineer Research and Development Center and the Sediment Management Work Group convened a workshop with experienced experts from government, industry, consulting, and academia. Workshop participants identified 5 actions that, if implemented, would accelerate the progress and increase the effectiveness of risk management at contaminated sediment sites. These actions included: 1) development of a detailed and explicit project vision and accompanying objectives, achievable short-term and long-term goals, and metrics of remedy success at the outset of a project, with refinement occurring as needed throughout the duration of the project; 2) strategic engagement of stakeholders in a more direct and meaningful process; 3) optimization of risk reduction, risk management processes, and remedy selection addressing 2 important elements: a) the deliberate use of early action remedies, where appropriate, to accelerate risk reduction; and b) the systematic and sequential development of a suite of actions applicable to the ultimate remedy, starting with monitored natural recovery and adding engineering actions as needed to satisfy the project's objectives; 4) an incentive process that encourages and rewards risk reduction; and 5

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages of the M2 phenotype contribute to progression in gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takahisa; Fushida, Sachio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Oyama, Katsunobu; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Ninomiya, Itasu; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Harada, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) of the M2 phenotype are known to promote tumor proliferation and to be associated with a poor prognosis in numerous cancers. Here, we investigated whether M2 macrophages participate in the development of peritoneal dissemination in gastric cancer. The characteristics of peritoneal macrophages in gastric cancer patients with or without peritoneal dissemination were examined by flow cytometry and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The effects of M2 macrophages on phenotypic changes of the gastric cancer cell line MKN45 were assessed with a direct or indirect co-culture system in vitro and an in vivo mouse xenograft model. The number of peritoneal macrophages with the M2 phenotype (CD68(+)CD163(+) or CD68(+)CD204(+)) was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination than in those without peritoneal dissemination. Higher expression of the M2-related messenger RNAs (IL-10, vascular endothelial growth factor A, vascular endothelial growth factor C, matrix metalloproteinase 1, and amphiregulin) and lower expression of M1-related messenger RNAs (TNF-α, CD80, CD86, and IL-12p40) were also confirmed in the TAMs. Macrophage co-culture with gastric cancer cells converted M1 phenotype into M2 phenotype. Moreover, the coexistence of MKN45 cells with M2 macrophages resulted in cancer cell proliferation and an acceleration of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Intraperitoneal TAMs in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination were polarized to the M2 phenotype, and could contribute to tumor proliferation and progression. Therefore, intraperitoneal TAMs are expected to be a promising target in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination in gastric cancer.

  6. Cathepsin S-mediated autophagic flux in tumor-associated macrophages accelerate tumor development by promoting M2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major component of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. TAMs are heterogeneous, with distinct phenotypes influenced by the microenvironment surrounding tumor tissues, but relatively little is known about the key molecular in these cells that contribute to malignant phenotypes. Autophagic activity is a critical factor in tumor development that contributes to enhancing cellular fitness and survival in the hostile tumor microenvironment. However, the molecular basis and relations between autophagy and TAMs polarization remain unclear. Methods Cathepsin S (Cat S) expression was analyzed in human colon carcinoma and normal colon tissues. In vivo effects were evaluated using PancO2 subcutaneous tumor model and SL4 hepatic metastasis model. Immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry and real-time PCR were done to examine TAMs polarization. Western blotting assay, transmission electron microscopy, mCherry-GFP-LC3 transfection and DQ-BSA degradation assays were carried out to determine its role in regulating autophagy. Results In the present study, we showed that the enhanced expression of Cat S correlated with the severity of histologic grade as well as clinical stage, metastasis, and recurrence, which are known indicators of a relatively poor prognosis of human colon carcinoma. Cat S knockout led to decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Moreover, Cat S knockout inhibited M2 macrophage polarization during tumor development. We further demonstrated that Cat S was required for not only autophagic flux but also the fusion processes of autophagosomes and lysosomes in TAMs. Importantly, we found that Cat S contributed to tumor development by regulating the M2 phenotype of TAMs through the activation of autophagy. Conclusions These results indicated that Cat S-mediated autophagic flux is an important mechanism for inducing M2-type polarization of TAMs, which leads to tumor development. These data provide strong evidence for a

  7. Vitamin D Receptor Protein Expression in Tumor Tissue and Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Whitney K.; Flavin, Richard; Kasperzyk, Julie L.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Fang, Fang; Lis, Rosina; Fiore, Christopher; Penney, Kathryn L.; Ma, Jing; Kantoff, Philip W.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Data suggest that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to decrease proliferation and increase apoptosis for some malignancies, although evidence for prostate cancer is less clear. How VDR expression in tumor tissue may influence prostate cancer progression has not been evaluated in large studies. Patients and Methods We examined protein expression of VDR in tumor tissue among 841 patients with prostate cancer in relation to risk of lethal prostate cancer within two prospective cohorts, the Physicians' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. We also examined the association of VDR expression with prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and with two VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI. Results Men whose tumors had high VDR expression had significantly lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis (P for trend < .001), lower Gleason score (P for trend < .001), and less advanced tumor stage (P for trend < .001) and were more likely to have tumors harboring the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion (P for trend = .009). Compared with the lowest quartile, men whose tumors had the highest VDR expression had significantly reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.17; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.41). This association was only slightly attenuated after adjustment for Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.83) or, additionally, for tumor stage (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.94). Neither prediagnostic plasma vitamin D levels nor VDR polymorphisms were associated with VDR expression. Conclusion High VDR expression in prostate tumors is associated with a reduced risk of lethal cancer, suggesting a role of the vitamin D pathway in prostate cancer progression. PMID:21537045

  8. Glioblastoma progression is assisted by induction of immunosuppressive function of pericytes through interaction with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; García-Bernal, David; Bueno, Carlos; Ródenas, Mónica; Moraleda, José M; Macian, Fernando; Martínez, Salvador

    2017-09-15

    The establishment of immune tolerance during Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) progression, is characterized by high levels expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which suppress the function of tumor assocciated myeloid cells, and the activation and expansion of tumor antigen specific T cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the failed anti-tumor immune response around the blood vessels during GBM, are poorly understood. The consequences of possible interactions between cancer cells and the perivascular compartment might affect the tumor growth. In this work we show for the first time that GBM cells induce immunomodulatory changes in pericytes in a cell interaction-dependent manner, acquiring an immunosuppresive function that possibly assists the evasion of the anti-tumor immune response and consequently participates in tumor growth promotion. Expression of high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected in vitro and in vivo in brain pericytes that interacted with GBM cells (GBC-PC). Furthermore, reduction of surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules and major histocompatibility complex molecules in GBC-PC correlated with a failure of antigen presentation to T cells and the acquisition of the ability to supress T cell responses. In vivo, orthotopic xenotransplant of human glioblastoma in an immunocompetent mouse model showed significant GBM cell proliferation and tumor growth after the establishment of interspecific immunotolerance that followed GMB interaction with pericytes.

  9. Inhibiting the HSP90 chaperone destabilizes macrophage migration inhibitory factor and thereby inhibits breast tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Ramona; Marchenko, Natalia D.; Holembowski, Lena; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Pesic, Marina; Zender, Lars; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) often becomes stabilized in human cancer cells. MIF can promote tumor cell survival, and elevated MIF protein correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism facilitating MIF stabilization in tumors is not understood. We show that the tumor-activated HSP90 chaperone complex protects MIF from degradation. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 activity, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of HSP90 or HDAC6, destabilizes MIF in a variety of human cancer cells. The HSP90-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP mediates the ensuing proteasome-dependent MIF degradation. Cancer cells contain constitutive endogenous MIF–HSP90 complexes. siRNA-mediated MIF knockdown inhibits proliferation and triggers apoptosis of cultured human cancer cells, whereas HSP90 inhibitor-induced apoptosis is overridden by ectopic MIF expression. In the ErbB2 transgenic model of human HER2-positive breast cancer, genetic ablation of MIF delays tumor progression and prolongs overall survival of mice. Systemic treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17AAG reduces MIF expression and blocks growth of MIF-expressing, but not MIF-deficient, tumors. Together, these findings identify MIF as a novel HSP90 client and suggest that HSP90 inhibitors inhibit ErbB2-driven breast tumor growth at least in part by destabilizing MIF. PMID:22271573

  10. IL-35 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is associated with tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jun; Guo, Hongyan; Cui, Shichang; Zhang, Haiyan; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Danning; Han, Zimeng; Xi, Linfeng; Kou, Wenyi; Xu, Jiangnan; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ding, Yaozhong

    2016-01-01

    IL-35 has recently been demonstrated to play significant roles in the progression of various malignant tumors. We investigated the expression of IL-35 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the regulatory mechanisms in HCC progression. Tissue microarray from 75 HCC patients revealed that IL-35 was primarily localized in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and peri-tumoral hepatocytes. Quantitative analysis showed that IL-35 expression was significantly lower in patients in the advanced stages than in the early stages. Significantly lower expression of IL-35 was also observed in HCC patients with higher histological grades, larger tumor size, positive microvascular invasion and lymph node/distant metastasis. IL-35 over-expression in HepG2 cells significantly upregulated HLA-ABC and CD95, reduced activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and decreased cell migration, invasion and colony formation capacities. Our data indicated that decreased expression of IL-35 in tumor tissues might contribute to the progression of HCC, and IL-35 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:27329841

  11. Loss of TRPV2 Homeostatic Control of Cell Proliferation Drives Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Sonia; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Farfariello, Valerio; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Nabissi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; Santoni, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Herein we evaluate the involvement of the TRPV2 channel, belonging to the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid channel family (TRPVs), in development and progression of different tumor types. In normal cells, the activation of TRPV2 channels by growth factors, hormones, and endocannabinoids induces a translocation of the receptor from the endosomal compartment to the plasma membrane, which results in abrogation of cell proliferation and induction of cell death. Consequently, loss or inactivation of TRPV2 signaling (e.g., glioblastomas), induces unchecked proliferation, resistance to apoptotic signals and increased resistance to CD95-induced apoptotic cell death. On the other hand, in prostate cancer cells, Ca2+-dependent activation of TRPV2 induced by lysophospholipids increases the invasion of tumor cells. In addition, the progression of prostate cancer to the castration-resistant phenotype is characterized by de novo TRPV2 expression, with higher TRPV2 transcript levels in patients with metastatic cancer. Finally, TRPV2 functional expression in tumor cells can also depend on the presence of alternative splice variants of TRPV2 mRNA that act as dominant-negative mutant of wild-type TRPV2 channels, by inhibiting its trafficking and translocation to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, as TRP channels are altered in human cancers, and their blockage impair tumor progression, they appear to be a very promising targets for early diagnosis and chemotherapy. PMID:24709905

  12. Inflammation, DAMPs, tumor development, and progression: a vicious circle orchestrated by redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Patrizia; Balza, Enrica; Rubartelli, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that cancer development and progression are promoted by the joint action of redox distress and inflammation, supporting the potential impact of therapies aimed at restoring the redox homeostasis and fighting inflammation. Most of the literature of the last 40 years converges to the view that continuous oxidative stress and chronic inflammation sustain each other, leads to transformation of a normal cell to a neoplastic cell, and promotes tumor progression. Some recent findings, however, support an alternative model whereby the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an attempt to defend more than a pathogenetic factor in cancer. Rather, tumor development and progression may be promoted by an excess of antioxidants, induced in both transformed cells and recruited inflammatory cells as an adaptive response to ROS. Although the link among redox stress, chronic inflammation, and cancer is widely recognized, the underlying mechanisms are far to be understood. The redox unbalance of the microenvironment is likely to modulate the bioactivity of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules such as HMGB1, which are released by stressed tissues and play pleiotropic functions on tumor and inflammatory cells, but how this occur, and the relevant consequences, are still unclear. In vivo measurement of cell redox status is an important challenge for future investigations. The improvement of the methodologies for ROS and antioxidant detection will allow a better understanding of the redox-related events in the tumor microenvironment with tremendous application potential in the development of rational combination therapies for cancer treatment.

  13. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T.; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P.; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J.; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5′-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment. PMID:27956623

  14. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-12-27

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5'-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment.

  15. Prospects For and Progress Towards Laser-Driven Particle Therapy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.; Burris-Mog, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kraft, S. D.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Gaillard, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kluge, T.; Schmidt, B.; Sobiella, M.; Sauerbrey, R.; Baumann, M.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Flippo, K.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.

    2010-11-04

    Recent advances in laser-ion acceleration have motivated research towards laser-driven compact accelerators for medical therapy. Realizing laser-ion acceleration for medical therapy will require adapting the medical requirements to the foreseeable laser constraints, as well as advances in laser-acceleration physics, beam manipulation and delivery, real-time dosimetry, treatment planning and translational research into a clinical setting.

  16. Role of stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator in treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Rossitch, E; Siddon, R; Moore, M R; Rockoff, M A; Alexander, E

    1990-05-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, 16 children were treated for 10 arteriovenous malformations and 6 recurrent intracranial tumors with stereotactic radiation therapy using a modified Clinac 6/100 linear accelerator. The median age of our patients was 10.5 years. For the group with arteriovenous malformation, follow-up ranged from 6 months to 37 months (median was 20 months). No patient bled during the follow-up period. Five of eight patients with follow-up longer than 12 months have achieved complete obliteration of their arteriovenous malformation by angiogram. The four remaining patients who have not achieved a complete obliteration are awaiting their 2-year posttreatment angiogram. The other patient has been treated within the year and have not yet been studied. Five of the six recurrent tumor patients are alive with a median follow-up of 8 months. The remaining patient was controlled locally, but he died of recurrent disease outside the area treated with radiosurgery. The radiographic responses of these patients have included three complete responses, two substantial reductions in tumor volume (greater than 50%) and one stabilization. Despite previous radiotherapy, there have been no significant complications in these patients. We conclude that stereotactic radiation therapy using a standard linear accelerator is an effective and safe technique in the treatment of selected intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children. In addition, stereotactic radiosurgery may have unique applications in the treatment of localized primary and recurrent pediatric brain tumors.

  17. Estimating cancer survival and clinical outcome based on genetic tumor progression scores.

    PubMed

    Rahnenführer, Jörg; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Hartmann, Christian; von Deimling, Andreas; Wullich, Bernd; Lengauer, Thomas

    2005-05-15

    In cancer research, prediction of time to death or relapse is important for a meaningful tumor classification and selecting appropriate therapies. Survival prognosis is typically based on clinical and histological parameters. There is increasing interest in identifying genetic markers that better capture the status of a tumor in order to improve on existing predictions. The accumulation of genetic alterations during tumor progression can be used for the assessment of the genetic status of the tumor. For modeling dependences between the genetic events, evolutionary tree models have been applied. Mixture models of oncogenetic trees provide a probabilistic framework for the estimation of typical pathogenetic routes. From these models we derive a genetic progression score (GPS) that estimates the genetic status of a tumor. GPS is calculated for glioblastoma patients from loss of heterozygosity measurements and for prostate cancer patients from comparative genomic hybridization measurements. Cox proportional hazard models are then fitted to observed survival times of glioblastoma patients and to times until PSA relapse following radical prostatectomy of prostate cancer patients. It turns out that the genetically defined GPS is predictive even after adjustment for classical clinical markers and thus can be considered a medically relevant prognostic factor. Mtreemix, a software package for estimating tree mixture models, is freely available for non-commercial users at http://mtreemix.bioinf.mpi-sb.mpg.de. The raw cancer datasets and R code for the analysis with Cox models are available upon request from the corresponding author.

  18. Metabolic Tumor Burden Predicts for Disease Progression and Death in Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Percy; Weerasuriya, Dilani K.; Lavori, Philip W.; Quon, Andrew; Hara, Wendy; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wakelee, Heather A.; Donington, Jessica S.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: In lung cancer, stage is an important prognostic factor for disease progression and survival. However, stage may be simply a surrogate for underlying tumor burden. Our purpose was to assess the prognostic value of tumor burden measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Patients and Methods: We identified 19 patients with lung cancer who had staging PET-CT scans before any therapy, and adequate follow-up (complete to time of progression for 18, and death for 15 of 19). Metabolically active tumor regions were segmented on pretreatment PET scans semi-automatically using custom software. We determined the relationship between times to progression (TTP) and death (OS) and two PET parameters: total metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The estimated median TTP and OS for the cohort were 9.3 months and 14.8 months. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, an increase in MTV of 25 ml (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with increased hazard of progression and of death (5.4-fold and 7.6-fold), statistically significant (p = 0.0014 and p = 0.001) after controlling for stage, treatment intent (definitive or palliative), age, Karnofsky performance status, and weight loss. We did not find a significant relationship between SUV and TTP or OS. Conclusions: In this study, high tumor burden assessed by PET MTV is an independent poor prognostic feature in lung cancer, promising for stratifying patients in randomized trials and ultimately for selecting risk-adapted therapies. These results will need to be validated in larger cohorts with longer follow-up, and evaluated prospectively.

  19. Tumor progression, metastasis, and modulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati

    2016-02-01

    Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC), also known as type 1 endometrial cancer (EC), accounts for over 70-80% of all cases that are usually associated with estrogen stimulation and often develops in a background of atypical endometrial hyperplasia. The increased incidence of EC is mainly confined to this type of cancer. Most EEC patients present at an early stage and generally have a favorable prognosis; however, up to 30% of EEC present as high risk tumors, which have invaded deep into the myometrium at diagnosis and progressively lead to local or extra pelvic metastasis. The poor survival of advanced EC is related to the lack of effective therapies, which can be attributed to poor understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of disease toward invasion and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence illustrate that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like events are central to tumor progression and malignant transformation, endowing the incipient cancer cell with invasive and metastatic properties. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on molecular events associated with EMT in progression, invasion, and metastasis of EEC. Further, the role of epigenetic modifications and microRNA regulation, tumor microenvironment, and microcystic elongated and fragmented glands like invasion pattern have been discussed. We believe this article may perhaps stimulate further research in this field that may aid in identifying high risk patients within this clinically challenging patient group and also lead to the recognition of novel targets for the prevention of metastasis - the most fatal consequence of endometrial carcinogenesis.

  20. 14-3-3ζ Orchestrates Mammary Tumor Onset and Progression via miR221-Mediated Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wyszomierski, Shannon L.; Wang, Qingfei; Li, Ping; Sahin, Ozgur; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Siyuan; Xiong, Yan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Hai; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Jitao D.; Medina, Daniel; Muller, William J.; Yu, Dihua

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3ζ is overexpressed in over 40% of breast cancers but its pathophysiological relevance to tumorigenesis has not been established. Here we show that 14-3-3ζ overexpression is sufficient to induce tumorigenesis in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. MMTV-LTR promoter driven HA-14-3-3ζ transgenic mice (MMTV-HA-14-3-3ζ) developed mammary tumors whereas control mice did not. Whey acidic protein promoter driven HA-14-3-3ζ transgenic mice (WAP-HA-14-3-3ζ) developed hyperplastic lesions and showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. When crossed with MMTV-neu transgenic mice, 14-3-3ζ.neu transgenic mice exhibited accelerated mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis compared to MMTV-neu mice. Mechanistically, 14-3-3ζ overexpression enhanced MAPK/c-Jun signaling leading to increased miR-221 transcription, which inhibited p27 CDKI translation, and consequently, promoted cell proliferation. Importantly, this 14-3-3ζ/miR-221/p27/proliferation axis is also functioning in patients' breast tumors and associates with high grade cancers. Taken together, our findings show that 14-3-3ζ overexpression has a causal role in mammary tumorigenesis and progression, acting through miR-221 in cooperation with known oncogenic events to drive neoplastic cell proliferation. PMID:24197133

  1. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Independence in human tochemical and morphometric study. Anticancer Res 2002, 22: breast cancer. In vivo 1998, 2:95-106. 1231-1238. 17. Sheikh MS, Garcia ...breast Am J Surg 11. Zapata-Benavides P, Tuna M, Lopez -Berestein G, Tari AM: Down- Pathol. 2001, 25:1054-1060. regulation of Wilms’ tumor 1 protein...1998;2:95-106. cells at different stages during tumor progression, to identify 15. Sheikh MS, Garcia M, Pujol P, et al. Why are estrogen receptor

  2. Human Subperitoneal Fibroblast and Cancer Cell Interaction Creates Microenvironment That Enhances Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Mitsuru; Ishii, Genichiro; Saito, Norio; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Peritoneal invasion in colon cancer is an important prognostic factor. Peritoneal invasion can be objectively identified as periotoneal elastic laminal invasion (ELI) by using elastica stain, and the cancer microenvironment formed by the peritoneal invasion (CMPI) can also be observed. Cases with ELI more frequently show distant metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, CMPI may represent a particular milieu that facilitates tumor progression. Pathological and biological investigations into CMPI may shed light on this possibly distinctive cancer microenvironment. Methods We analyzed area-specific tissue microarrays to determine the pathological features of CMPI, and propagated subperitoneal fibroblasts (SPFs) and submucosal fibroblasts (SMFs) from human colonic tissue. Biological characteristics and results of gene expression profile analyses were compared to better understand the peritoneal invasion of colon cancer and how this may form a special microenvironment through the interaction with SPFs. Mouse xenograft tumors, derived by co-injection of cancer cells with either SPFs or SMFs, were established to evaluate their active role on tumor progression and metastasis. Results We found that fibrosis with alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression was a significant pathological feature of CMPI. The differences in proliferation and gene expression profile analyses suggested SPFs and SMFs were distinct populations, and that SPFs were characterized by a higher expressions of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes. Furthermore, compared with SMFs, SPFs showed more variable alteration in gene expressions after cancer-cell-conditioned medium stimulation. Gene ontology analysis revealed that SPFs-specific upregulated genes were enriched by actin-binding or contractile-associated genes including α-SMA encoding ACTA2. Mouse xenograft tumors derived by co-injection of cancer cells with SPFs showed enhancement of tumor growth, metastasis, and capacity for

  3. Progression is Accelerated from Pre-Hypertension to Hypertension in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Selassie, Anbesaw; Wagner, C. Shaun; Laken, Marilyn L.; Ferguson, M. LaFrance; Ferdinand, Keith C.; Egan, Brent M.

    2011-01-01

    Pre-hypertension is a major risk factor for hypertension. African Americans (blacks) have more prevalent and severe hypertension than whites, but it is unknown whether progression from pre-hypertension is accelerated in blacks. We examined this question in a prospective cohort study of 18,865 non-hypertensive persons (5,733 [30.4% black, 13,132 [69.6%]) white) 18–85 years old. Electronic health record data were obtained from 197 community-based outpatient clinics in the Southeast U.S. Days elapsing from study entry to hypertension diagnosis, mainly blood pressure [BP] ≥140 systolic and/or ≥90 mmHg diastolic on two consecutive visits established conversion time within a maximum observation period of 2550 days. Cox regression modeling was used to examine conversion to hypertension as a function of race, while controlling for age, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, body mass index [BMI], diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. The covariable adjusted median conversion time when 50% became hypertensive was 365 days earlier for blacks than whites (626 vs 991 days, p<0.001). Among covariables, baseline systolic BP 130–139 (Hazard Ratio 1.77, 95% Confidence Intervals [1.69–1.86]) and 120–129 mmHg (1.52 [1.44–1.60] as well as age ≥75 (1.40 [1.29–1.51] and 55–74 years (1.29 [1.23–1.35] were the strongest predictors of hypertension. Additional predictors included age 35–54 years, diastolic BP 80–89 mmHg, overweight and obesity, and diabetes mellitus (all p<0.001). Conversion from pre-hypertension to hypertension is accelerated in blacks, which suggests that effective interventions in pre-hypertension could reduce racial disparities in prevalent hypertension. PMID:21911708

  4. Cocaine Reduces Thymic Endocrine Function: Another Mechanism for Accelerated HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Adriana; Smith, Sylvia; Huffman, Fatma; Newman, Fred; Baum, Marianna K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Thymulin is a thymic peptide important for the maturation and differentiation of immature thymocytes, which have been found to be depressed in patients with low-level CD4+ cell recovery despite viral control. Substance use is associated with faster progression of HIV disease, which has been ascribed to poor adherence to antiretroviral medication. Recent findings of an association between cocaine use and decline in CD4+ cell counts independent of antiretroviral adherence indicate alternative mechanisms for disease progression. We evaluated the relationship between thymulin activity, CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and the covariate effects of substance use cross-sectionally in 80 HIV+ active substance users and over 12 months in 40 participants. Thymulin activity was analyzed in plasma using a modification of the sheep rosette bioassay. Thymulin activity was negatively associated with cocaine use (β = −0.908,95% CI: −1.704, −0.112; p = 0.026). Compared to those who do not use cocaine, cocaine users were 37% less likely to have detectable thymulin activity (RR = 0.634, 95% CI: 0.406, 0.989 p = 0.045) and were 75 times more likely to show a decrease in thymulin activity (OR = 74.7, 95% CI: 1.59, 3519.74; p = 0.028) over time. CD4+ cell count was positively associated with thymulin activity (β = 0.127, 95% CI: 0.048,0.205; p = 0.002), detectable thymulin activity was 2.32 times more likely in those with a CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/μl (RR = 2.324, 95% CI: 1.196, 4.513, p = 0.013), and those with an increase in CD4 cell counts were more likely to show an increase in thymulin activity (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.034; p = 0.041) over time. Thymulin activity is predictive of HIV disease progression and is depressed in cocaine users independent of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral load. Understanding the mechanisms for accelerated HIV disease progression provides

  5. Cocaine reduces thymic endocrine function: another mechanism for accelerated HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Rafie, Carlin; Campa, Adriana; Smith, Sylvia; Huffman, Fatma; Newman, Fred; Baum, Marianna K

    2011-08-01

    Thymulin is a thymic peptide important for the maturation and differentiation of immature thymocytes, which have been found to be depressed in patients with low-level CD4(+) cell recovery despite viral control. Substance use is associated with faster progression of HIV disease, which has been ascribed to poor adherence to antiretroviral medication. Recent findings of an association between cocaine use and decline in CD4(+) cell counts independent of antiretroviral adherence indicate alternative mechanisms for disease progression. We evaluated the relationship between thymulin activity, CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell counts and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, and the covariate effects of substance use cross-sectionally in 80 HIV(+) active substance users and over 12 months in 40 participants. Thymulin activity was analyzed in plasma using a modification of the sheep rosette bioassay. Thymulin activity was negatively associated with cocaine use (β = -0.908,95% CI: -1.704, -0.112; p = 0.026). Compared to those who do not use cocaine, cocaine users were 37% less likely to have detectable thymulin activity (RR = 0.634, 95% CI: 0.406, 0.989 p = 0.045) and were 75 times more likely to show a decrease in thymulin activity (OR = 74.7, 95% CI: 1.59, 3519.74; p = 0.028) over time. CD4(+) cell count was positively associated with thymulin activity (β = 0.127, 95% CI: 0.048,0.205; p = 0.002), detectable thymulin activity was 2.32 times more likely in those with a CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/μl (RR = 2.324, 95% CI: 1.196, 4.513, p = 0.013), and those with an increase in CD4 cell counts were more likely to show an increase in thymulin activity (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.034; p = 0.041) over time. Thymulin activity is predictive of HIV disease progression and is depressed in cocaine users independent of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral load. Understanding the mechanisms for accelerated HIV disease progression provides opportunities to find alternative strategies to counteract

  6. Extract of Vernonia condensata, Inhibits Tumor Progression and Improves Survival of Tumor-allograft Bearing Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered as one of the ideal sources for cancer therapy due to their bioactive contents and low toxicity to humans. Vernonia genus is one of the common medicinal plants, which has wide spread usage in food and medicine. However, there are limited studies to explore its anticancer properties. In the current study, we have used Vernonia condensata, to explore its anticancer activity using various approaches. Here, we show that extract prepared from Vernonia condensata (VCE) exhibits cytotoxic properties against various cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, when treated with VCE, there was no significant cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that although VCE induced cell death, arrest was not observed. VCE treatment led to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in a concentration dependent manner resulting in activation of apoptosis culminating in cell death. Immunoblotting studies revealed that VCE activated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, VCE treatment resulted in tumor regression leading to significant enhancement in life span in treated mice, without showing any detectable side effects. Therefore, for the first time our study reveals the potential of extract from Vernonia condensata to be used as an anticancer agent. PMID:27009490

  7. Differential mechanisms of tumor progression in clones from a single heterogeneous human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Walburga; Jenkins, Molly H; Ye, Siying; Mullins, David W; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2013-04-01

    We used vertical growth phase (VGP) human VMM5 melanoma cells to ask whether the tumor microenvironment could induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in vivo, and whether this induction correlated with metastasis. We isolated two clones from parental VMM5 cells: a low MMP-1 producing clone (C4) and high producing clone (C9). When these clones were injected orthotopically (intradermally) into nude mice, both were equally tumorigenic and produced equivalent and abundant amounts of MMP-1. However, the tumors from the C4 clones displayed different growth kinetics and distinct profiles of gene expression from the C9 population. The C4 tumors, which had low MMP-1 levels in vitro, appeared to rely on growth factors and cytokines in the microenvironment to increase MMP-1 expression in vivo, while MMP-1 levels remained constant in the C9 tumors. C9 cells, but not C4 cells, grew as spheres in culture and expressed higher levels of JARID 1B, a marker associated with melanoma initiating cells. We conclude that VMM5 melanoma cells exhibit striking intra-tumor heterogeneity, and that the tumorigenicity of these clones is driven by different molecular pathways. Our data suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for melanoma progression within a tumor, which may require different therapeutic strategies.

  8. NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN-DEPENDENT CONTRIBUTIONS OF PERICYTES AND MACROPHAGES TO BRAIN TUMOR VASCULARIZATION AND PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Stallcup, William B.; You, Weon-Kyoo; Kucharova, Karolina; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Yotsumoto, Fusanori

    2015-01-01

    The NG2 proteoglycan promotes tumor growth as a component of both tumor and stromal cells. Using intracranial, NG2-negative B16F10 melanomas, we have investigated the importance of pericyte and macrophage NG2 in brain tumor progression. Reduced melanoma growth in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) and pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice demonstrates the importance of NG2 in both stromal compartments. In each genotype, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction diminishes formation of endothelial junctions and assembly of the basal lamina. Tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have smaller diameters, reduced patency, and increased leakiness compared to PC-NG2ko mice, thus decreasing tumor blood supply and increasing hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice results from loss of pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice results from 90% reduced macrophage recruitment. The absence of macrophage-derived signals in Mac-NG2ko mice causes loss of pericyte association with endothelial cells. Reduced macrophage recruitment may be due to diminished activation of integrins in the absence of NG2, causing decreased macrophage interaction with endothelial adhesion molecules that are needed for extravasation. These results reflect the complex interplay that occurs between macrophages, pericytes, and endothelial cells during tumor vascularization. PMID:26465118

  9. Aptamer-mediated blockade of IL4Rα triggers apoptosis of MDSCs and limits tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Roth, Felix; De La Fuente, Adriana C; Vella, Jennifer L; Zoso, Alessia; Inverardi, Luca; Serafini, Paolo

    2012-03-15

    In addition to promoting tumor progression and metastasis by enhancing angiogenesis and invasion, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) also inhibit antitumor T-cell functions and limit the efficacy of immunotherapeutic interventions. Despite the importance of these leukocyte populations, a simple method for their specific depletion has not been developed. In this study, we generated an RNA aptamer that blocks the murine or human IL-4 receptor-α (IL4Rα or CD124) that is critical for MDSC suppression function. In tumor-bearing mice, this anti-IL4Rα aptamer preferentially targeted MDSCs and TAM and unexpectedly promoted their elimination, an effect that was associated with an increased number of tumor-infiltrating T cells and a reduction in tumor growth. Mechanistic investigations of aptamer-triggered apoptosis in MDSCs confirmed the importance of IL4Ra-STAT6 pathway activation in MDSC survival. Our findings define a straightforward strategy to deplete MDSCs and TAMs in vivo, and they strengthen the concept that IL4Rα signaling is pivotal for MDSC survival. More broadly, these findings suggest therapeutic strategies based on IL4Rα signaling blockades to arrest an important cellular mechanism of tumoral immune escape mediated by MDSCs and TAM in cancer.

  10. Biology, Therapy and Implications of Tumor Exosomes in the Progression of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Isola, Allison L.; Eddy, Kevinn; Chen, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and about 6% of the estimated cancer diagnoses this year will be melanoma cases. Melanomas are derived from transformation of the pigment producing cells of the skin, melanocytes. Early stage melanoma is usually curable by surgical resection, but late stage or subsequent secondary metastatic tumors are treated with some success with chemotherapies, radiation and/or immunotherapies. Most cancer patients die from metastatic disease, which is especially the case in melanoma. A better understanding of tumor metastasis will provide insights and guide rational therapeutic designs. Recently, the importance of melanoma-derived exosomes in the progression of that cancer has become more apparent, namely, their role in various stages of metastasis, including the induction of migration, invasion, primary niche manipulation, immune modulation and pre-metastatic niche formation. This review focuses on the critical roles that melanoma exosomes play in the progression of this deadly disease. PMID:27941674

  11. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  12. Meeting report: The international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2005-06-01

    A multidisciplinary conference was held November 7 to 9, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA to focus on the problem of drug resistance in cancer. A great deal of knowledge is beginning to unravel the complex molecular and cellular changes associated with malignant tumor progression. With this comes many opportunities for therapeutic development. Featuring the latest tools, models, and research findings, this conference which included over 250 members of both academia and industry was a great opportunity to learn and develop new approaches and collaborations. The Keynote speaker was Dr. Robert Horvitz (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who won the 2002 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his pioneering work on the cell death pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. Speakers covered various aspects of tumor progression and therapy from simple models to clinical trials.

  13. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge toward their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes. PMID:26157794

  14. IMPACT OF OBESITY ON DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF MAMMARY TUMORS IN PRECLINICAL MODELS OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Margot P.

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and/or obesity are known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. More recently increased body weight has also been associated with poor prognosis for both pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. This relationship has primarily been identified through epidemiological studies. Additional information from in vitro studies has also been produced in attempts to delineate mechanisms of action for the association of obesity and body weight and breast cancer. This approach has identified potential growth factors such as insulin, leptin, estrogen and IGF-I which are reported to be modulated by body weight changes. However, in vitro studies are limited in scope and frequently use non-physiological concentrations of growth factors, while long follow-up is needed for human studies. Preclinical animal models provide an intermediary approach to investigate the impact of body weight and potential growth factors on mammary/breast tumor development and progression. Here results of a number of studies addressing this issue are presented. In the majority of the studies either genetically-obese or diet-induced obese rodent models have been used to investigate spontaneous, transgenic and carcinogen-induced mammary tumor development. To study tumor progression the major focus has been allograft studies in mice with either genetic or dietary-induced obesity. In general, obesity has been demonstrated to shorten mammary tumor latency and to impact tumor pathology. However, in rodents with defects in leptin and other growth factors the impact of obesity is not as straightforward. Future studies using more physiologically relevant obesity models and clearly distinguishing diet composition from body weight effects will be important in continuing to understand the factors associated with body weight’s impact on the mammary/breast cancer development and progression. PMID:24122258

  15. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Child mortality estimation: accelerated progress in reducing global child mortality, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kenneth; You, Danzhen; Inoue, Mie; Oestergaard, Mikkel Z

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring development indicators has become a central interest of international agencies and countries for tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. In this review, which also provides an introduction to a collection of articles, we describe the methodology used by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation to track country-specific changes in the key indicator for Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4), the decline of the under-five mortality rate (the probability of dying between birth and age five, also denoted in the literature as U5MR and (5)q(0)). We review how relevant data from civil registration, sample registration, population censuses, and household surveys are compiled and assessed for United Nations member states, and how time series regression models are fitted to all points of acceptable quality to establish the trends in U5MR from which infant and neonatal mortality rates are generally derived. The application of this methodology indicates that, between 1990 and 2010, the global U5MR fell from 88 to 57 deaths per 1,000 live births, and the annual number of under-five deaths fell from 12.0 to 7.6 million. Although the annual rate of reduction in the U5MR accelerated from 1.9% for the period 1990-2000 to 2.5% for the period 2000-2010, it remains well below the 4.4% annual rate of reduction required to achieve the MDG 4 goal of a two-thirds reduction in U5MR from its 1990 value by 2015. Thus, despite progress in reducing child mortality worldwide, and an encouraging increase in the pace of decline over the last two decades, MDG 4 will not be met without greatly increasing efforts to reduce child deaths.

  17. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-07-10

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression.

  18. Sapodilla plum (Achras sapota) induces apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2014-08-21

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice.

  19. Sapodilla Plum (Achras sapota) Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cell Lines and Inhibits Tumor Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  20. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M.; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26036260

  1. Surveillance of the tumor mutanome by T cells during progression from primary to recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wick, Darin A; Webb, John R; Nielsen, Julie S; Martin, Spencer D; Kroeger, David R; Milne, Katy; Castellarin, Mauro; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Watson, Peter H; Holt, Rob A; Nelson, Brad H

    2014-03-01

    Cancers accumulate mutations over time, each of which brings the potential for recognition by the immune system. We evaluated T-cell recognition of the tumor mutanome in patients with ovarian cancer undergoing standard treatment. Tumor-associated T cells from 3 patients with ovarian cancer were assessed by ELISPOT for recognition of nonsynonymous mutations identified by whole exome sequencing of autologous tumor. The relative levels of mutations and responding T cells were monitored in serial tumor samples collected at primary surgery and first and second recurrence. The vast majority of mutations (78/79) were not recognized by tumor-associated T cells; however, a highly specific CD8(+) T-cell response to the mutation hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-like protein 1 (HSDL1)(L25V) was detected in one patient. In the primary tumor, the HSDL1(L25V) mutation had low prevalence and expression, and a corresponding T-cell response was undetectable. At first recurrence, there was a striking increase in the abundance of the mutation and corresponding MHC class I epitope, and this was accompanied by the emergence of the HSDL1(L25V)-specific CD8(+) T-cell response. At second recurrence, the HSDL1(L25V) mutation and epitope continued to be expressed; however, the corresponding T-cell response was no longer detectable. The immune system can respond to the evolving ovarian cancer genome. However, the T-cell response detected here was rare, was transient, and ultimately failed to prevent disease progression. These findings reveal the limitations of spontaneous tumor immunity in the setting of standard treatments and suggest a high degree of ignorance of tumor mutations that could potentially be reversed by immunotherapy. ©2013 AACR

  2. Hypothyroidism reduces mammary tumor progression via Β-catenin-activated intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    López Fontana, C M; Zyla, L E; Santiano, F E; Sasso, C V; Cuello-Carrión, F D; Pistone Creydt, V; Fanelli, M A; Carón, R W

    2017-02-13

    Experimental hypothyroidism retards mammary carcinogenesis promoting apoptosis of tumor cells. β-catenin plays a critical role in cell adhesion and intracellular signaling pathways conditioning the prognosis of breast cancer. However, the mechanistic connections associated with the expression of β-catenin in thyroid status and breast cancer are not known. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the expression and localization of β-catenin and apoptosis in mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in hypothyroid (Hypot) and euthyroid (EUT) rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with a dose of DMBA (15 mg/rat) at 55 days of age and were then divided into two groups: HypoT (0.01% 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil in drinking water, n = 54) and EUT (untreated control, n = 43). Latency, incidence and progression of tumors were determined. At sacrifice, tumors were obtained for immunohistological studies and Western Blot. The latency was longer (p < 0.05), the incidence was lower (p < 0.0001) and tumor growth was slower (p < 0.01) in HypoT rats compared to EUT. The expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 was significantly higher in tumors of HypoT than in EUT (p < 0.05) indicating the activation of the intrinsic pathway. In this group, β-catenin was expressed in the plasma membrane and with less intensity, while its expression was nuclear and with greater intensity in the EUT (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression of survivin was reduced in tumors of HypoT rats (p < 0.05). In conclusion, decreased expression of β-catenin and its normal location in membrane of mammary tumors are associated with augmented apoptosis via activation of the intrinsic pathway in HypoT rats.

  3. Intracellular Iron Chelation Modulates the Macrophage Iron Phenotype with Consequences on Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christina; Akam, Eman Abureida; Rehwald, Claudia; Brüne, Bernhard; Tomat, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that macrophage polarization dictates the expression of iron-regulated genes. Polarization towards iron sequestration depletes the microenvironment, whereby extracellular pathogen growth is limited and inflammation is fostered. In contrast, iron release contributes to cell proliferation, which is important for tissue regeneration. Moreover, macrophages constitute a major component of the infiltrates in most solid tumors. Considering the pivotal role of macrophages for iron homeostasis and their presence in association with poor clinical prognosis in tumors, we approached the possibility to target macrophages with intracellular iron chelators. Analyzing the expression of iron-regulated genes at mRNA and protein level in primary human macrophages, we found that the iron-release phenotype is a characteristic of polarized macrophages that, in turn, stimulate tumor cell growth and progression. The application of the intracellular iron chelator (TC3-S)2 shifted the macrophage phenotype from iron release towards sequestration, as determined by the iron-gene profile and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Moreover, whereas the addition of macrophage supernatants to tumor cells induced tumor growth and metastatic behavior, the supernatant of chelator-treated macrophages reversed this effect. Iron chelators demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties in a number of cancers, both in cell culture and in clinical trials. Our results suggest that iron chelation could affect not only cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by altering the iron-release phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). The study of iron chelators in conjunction with the effect of TAMs on tumor growth could lead to an improved understanding of the role of iron in cancer biology and to novel therapeutic avenues for iron chelation approaches. PMID:27806101

  4. HIF-1α mediates tumor hypoxia to confer a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype for malignant progression.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Gun; Christensen, Jared; Gu, Jie; Huang, L Eric

    2011-06-21

    Although tumor progression involves genetic and epigenetic alterations to normal cellular biology, the underlying mechanisms of these changes remain obscure. Numerous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in many human cancers and up-regulates a host of hypoxia-responsive genes for cancer growth and survival. We recently identified an alternative mechanism of HIF-1α function that induces genetic alterations by suppressing DNA repair. Here, we show that long-term hypoxia, which mimics the tumor microenvironment, drives a perpetual epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through up-regulation of the zinc finger E-box binding homeobox protein ZEB2, whereas short-term hypoxia induces a reversible EMT that requires the transcription factor Twist1. Moreover, we show that the perpetual EMT driven by chronic hypoxia depends on HIF-1α induction of genetic alterations rather than its canonical transcriptional activator function. These mesenchymal tumor cells not only acquire tumorigenicity but also display characteristics of advanced cancers, including necrosis, aggressive invasion, and metastasis. Hence, these results reveal a mechanism by which HIF-1α promotes a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype, thereby advancing tumor progression.

  5. [Value of perineural invasion in prostatectomy specimen in the assessment on tumor progression and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y J; Wang, Y Q; Pan, J H; Dong, B J; Xu, F; Sha, J J; Xue, W; Huang, Y R

    2016-03-01

    To assess perineural invasion in prostatectomy specimen(PNIp)on tumor progression and prognosis after radical prostatectomy. Retrospective analysis including 502 prostate cancer patients admitted in Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University from December 2002 to May 2014 was studied.Differences of serum prostate specific antigen(PSA), Gleason score of prostate biopsy, Gleason score of prostatectomy specimen, tumor stage, capsular invasion, positive surgical margin, seminal invasion, pelvic lymph node metastasis, nadir PSA were analyzed in patients with PNIp and without PNIp. Logistic regression analysis, Log-rank test and Cox regression analysis was used to analyzed the data, respectively. There were 91 patients with PNIp(18.1%) and 411 patients without PNIp(81.9%). Differences of serum PSA, Gleason score of prostate biopsy, Gleason score of prostatectomy specimen, tumor stage, capsular invasion, seminal invasion, nadir PSA between the two groups were found(all P<0.05). In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, PNIp was independent predictor of Gleason score of prostate biopsy, Gleason score of prostatectomy specimen, tumor stage, capsular invasion(OR=1.515, 1.955, 2.069, 1.859, all P<0.05). One hundred and twenty-one patients with biochemical serum recurrence(26.7%). Serum PSA, Gleason score of prostate biopsy, Gleason score of prostatectomy specimen, tumor stage, PNIp, seminal invasion were related to biochemical serum recurrence(P<0.05). In the multivariable cox regression analysis, serum PSA, Gleason score of prostate biopsy, PNIp, seminal invasion were independent predictors of biochemical serum recurrence(HR=1.021, 1.441, 1.663, 3.257, all P<0.05). PNIp is the important predictor of the tumor progression and prognosis of prostate cancer.

  6. Disruption of Klf4 in Villin-Positive Gastric Progenitor Cells Promotes Formation and Progression of Tumors of the Antrum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIANG; JIA, ZHILIANG; WANG, LI; KONG, XIANGYU; LI, QI; GUO, KUN; TAN, DONGFENG; LE, XIANGDONG; WEI, DAOYAN; HUANG, SUYUN; MISHRA, LOPA; XIE, KEPING

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a putative gastric tumor suppressor gene. Rare, villin-positive progenitor cells in the gastric antrum have multi-lineage potential. We investigated the function of Klf4 in these cells and in gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS We created mice with disruption of Klf4 in villin-positive antral mucosa cells (Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl mice). Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl and control mice were given drinking water with or without 240 ppm N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) at 5 weeks of age and thereafter on alternating weeks for a total of 10 weeks. Gastric mucosa samples were collected at 35, 50, or 80 weeks of age from mice that were and were not given MNU, and analyzed by histopathologic and molecular analyses. Findings were compared with those from human gastric tumor specimens. RESULTS Preneoplasia formed progressively in the antrum in 35- to 80-week-old Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl mice. Gastric tumors developed in 29% of 80-week-old Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl mice, which were located exclusively in the lesser curvature of the antrum. MNU accelerated tumor formation, and tumors developed significantly more frequently in Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl mice than in control mice, at 35 and 50 weeks of age. Mouse and human gastric tumors had reduced expression of KLF4 and increased expression of FoxM1, compared with healthy gastric tissue. Expression of KLF4 suppressed transcription of FoxM1. CONCLUSIONS Inactivation of Klf4 in villin-positive gastric progenitor cells induces transformation of the gastric mucosa and tumorigenesis in the antrum in mice. Villin-Cre+;Klf4fl/fl have greater susceptibility than control mice to chemical-induced gastric carcinogenesis and increased rates of gastric tumor progression. PMID:22155367

  7. Activin A accelerates the progression of fetal oocytes throughout meiosis and early oogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Jin; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Wang, Jun-Jie; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Li, Lan; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Activins can exert several roles in ovary development. However, little is known about their involvement in early mammalian oogenesis. In this study, we reported that activin receptors (including ActRIA, ActRIB, ActRIIA, and ActRIIB) are expressed throughout the development of the mouse ovaries from 12.5 days postcoitum (dpc) to 21 days postparturition (dpp). Moreover, we found that in vitro, the addition of activin A (ActA) to the culture medium of 12.5 dpc ovarian tissues accelerated the progression of oocytes throughout meiotic prophase I stages. This result was reproduced in vivo following administration of ActA to pregnant mice. The in vitro effect of ActA was associated with increased expression of premeiotic and meiotic genes (including Dazl, Spo11, Stra8, Scp3, and Rec8) in the ovarian tissues. Mechanistically, ActA-dependent SMAD3 signaling modulated the expression of members of the retinoic acid (RA) system, including the RA degradation CYP26B1 enzyme and the RA receptors. Finally, ActA promoted the survival and growth of fetal and early postnatal oocytes and primordial follicle assembly both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study identifies new roles of ActA in early oogenesis and suggested that ActA and RA might cooperate in promoting meiosis in female germ cells.

  8. Overexpression of protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma progression via the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijie; Dong, Pingping; Liu, Longzi; Gao, Qiang; Duan, Meng; Zhang, Si; Chen, She; Xue, Ruyi; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-29

    Aberrant activation of Notch signaling frequently occurs in liver cancer, and is associated with liver malignancies. However, the mechanisms regulating pathologic Notch activation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) catalyzes the addition of O-linked fucose to the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch. In the present study, we detected the expression of Pofut1 in 8 HCC cell lines and 253 human HCC tissues. We reported that Pofut1 was overexpressed in HCC cell lines and clinical HCC tissues, and Pofut1 overexpression clinically correlated with the unfavorable survival and high disease recurrence in HCC. The in vitro assay demonstrated that Pofut1 overexpression accelerated the cell proliferation and migration in HCC cells. Furthermore, Pofut1 overexpression promoted the binding of Notch ligand Dll1 to Notch receptor, and hence activated Notch signaling pathway in HCC cells, indicating that Pofut1 overexpression could be a reason for the aberrant activation of Notch signaling in HCC. Taken together, our findings indicated that an aberrant activated Pofut1-Notch pathway was involved in HCC progression, and blockage of this pathway could be a promising strategy for the therapy of HCC.

  9. Old age at diagnosis increases risk of tumor progression in nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao-Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Di; Zhang, Guo-Ye; Li, Zhi-Kun; Hong, Jing; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Age at diagnosis has been found to be a prognostic factor of outcomes in various cancers. However, the effect of age at diagnosis on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) progression has not been explored. We retrospectively evaluated the relationship between age and disease progression in 3,153 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy between 2007 and 2009. Patients were randomly assigned to either a testing cohort or a validation cohort by computer-generated random assignment. X-tile plots determined the optimal cut-point of age based on survival status to be ≤61 vs. >61 years. Further correlation analysis showed that age >61 years was significantly correlated with the tumor progression and therapeutic regimen in both testing and validation cohorts (P <0.05). In the present study, we observed that older age (>61 years) was a strong and independent predictor of poor disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Age was also found to be a significant prognostic predictor as well (P <0.05) when evaluating patients with the same disease stage. ROC analysis confirmed the predictive value of age on NPC-specific survival in both cohorts (P <0.001) and suggested that age may improve the ability to discriminate outcomes in NPCs, especially regarding tumor progression. In conclusion, our study suggests that older age at NPC diagnosis is associated with a higher incidence of tumor progression and cancer-specific mortality. Age is a strong and independent predictor of poor outcomes and may allow for more tailored therapeutic decision-making and individualized patient counseling. PMID:27463012

  10. Oxystressed tumor microenvironment potentiates epithelial to mesenchymal transition and alters cellular bioenergetics towards cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Dhivya; Ramamoorthi, Ganesan; MahaboobKhan, Rasool; Kumpati, Premkumar

    2016-10-01

    During tumorigenesis, cancer cells generate complex, unresolved interactions with the surrounding oxystressed cellular milieu called tumor microenvironment (TM) that favors spread of cancer to other body parts. This dissemination of cancer cells from the primary tumor site is the main clinical challenge in cancer treatment. In addition, the significance of enhanced oxidative stress in TM during cancer progression still remains elusive. Thus, the present study was performed to investigate the molecular and cytoskeletal alterations in breast cancer cells associated with oxystressed TM that potentiates metastasis. Our results showed that depending on the extent of oxidative stress in TM, cancer cells exhibited enhanced migration and survival with reduction of chemosensitivity. Corresponding ultrastructural analysis showed radical cytoskeletal modifications that reorganize cell-cell interactions fostering transition of epithelial cells to mesenchymal morphology (EMT) marking metastasis, which was reversed upon antioxidant treatment. Decreased E-cadherin and increased vimentin, Twist1/2 expression corroborated the initiation of EMT in oxystressed TM-influenced cells. Further evaluation of cellular energetics demonstrated significant metabolic reprogramming with inclination towards glucose or external glutamine from TM as energy source depending on the breast cancer cell type. These observations prove the elemental role of oxystressed TM in cancer progression, initiating EMT and metabolic reprogramming. Further cell-type specific metabolomic analysis would unravel the alternate mechanisms in cancer progression for effective therapeutic intervention. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of the study and proposed mechanism of oxystressed TM influenced cancer progression. Cancer cells exhibit a close association with tumor microenvironment (TM), and oxystressed TM enhances cancer cell migration and survival and reduces chemosensitivity. Oxystressed TM induces dynamic

  11. An Examination of the Impact of Accelerating Community College Students' Progression through Developmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodara, Michelle; Jaggars, Shanna Smith

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve developmental education students' outcomes, community colleges have been experimenting with acceleration strategies. Models of acceleration allow students to complete their developmental requirements in a shorter amount of time. However, there has been limited empirical research on the effects of accelerating students'…

  12. An Examination of the Impact of Accelerating Community College Students' Progression through Developmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodara, Michelle; Jaggars, Shanna Smith

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve developmental education students' outcomes, community colleges have been experimenting with acceleration strategies. Models of acceleration allow students to complete their developmental requirements in a shorter amount of time. However, there has been limited empirical research on the effects of accelerating students'…

  13. Tumor-Absorbed Dose Predicts Progression-Free Survival Following 131I-Tositumomab Radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Schipper, Matthew J.; Shen, Jincheng; Smith, Lauren B.; Murgic, Jure; Savas, Hatice; Youssef, Ehab; Regan, Denise; Wilderman, Scott J.; Roberson, Peter L.; Kaminski, Mark S.; Avram, Anca M.

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying patient-specific dosimetric and nondosimetric factors predicting outcome of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients after 131I-tositumomab radioimmunotherapy for potential use in treatment planning. Methods Tumor-absorbed dose measures were estimated for 130 tumors in 39 relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients by coupling SPECT/CT imaging with the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code. Equivalent biologic effect was calculated to assess the biologic effects of nonuniform absorbed dose including the effects of the unlabeled antibody. Evaluated nondosimetric covariates included histology, presence of bulky disease, and prior treatment history. Tumor level outcome was based on volume shrinkage assessed on follow-up CT. Patient level outcome measures were overall response (OR), complete response (CR), and progression-free survival (PFS), determined from clinical assessments that included PET/CT. Results The estimated mean tumor-absorbed dose had a median value of 275 cGy (range, 94–711 cGy). A high correlation was observed between tracer-predicted and therapy-delivered mean tumor-absorbed doses (P < 0.001; r = 0.85). In univariate tumor-level analysis, tumor shrinkage correlated significantly with almost all of the evaluated dosimetric factors, including equivalent biologic effect. Regression analysis showed that OR, CR, and PFS were associated with the dosimetric factors and equivalent biologic effect. Both mean tumor-absorbed dose (P = 0.025) and equivalent biologic effect (P = 0.035) were significant predictors of PFS whereas none of the nondosimetric covariates were found to be statistically significant factors affecting PFS. The most important finding of the study was that in Kaplan–Meier curves stratified by mean dose, longer PFS was observed in patients receiving mean tumor-absorbed doses greater than 200 cGy than in those receiving 200 cGy or less (median PFS, 13.6 vs. 1.9 mo for the 2 dose groups; log-rank P < 0

  14. The angiotensin receptor blocker, Losartan, inhibits mammary tumor development and progression to invasive carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Rhiannon; Liew, Seng H.; Connelly, Angela A.; Yee, Nicholas S.; Deb, Siddhartha; Kumar, Beena; Vargas, Ana C.; O’Toole, Sandra A.; Parslow, Adam C.; Poh, Ashleigh; Putoczki, Tracy; Morrow, Riley J.; Alorro, Mariah; Lazarus, Kyren A.; Yeap, Evie F.W.; Walton, Kelly L.; Harrison, Craig A.; Hannan, Natalie J.; George, Amee J.; Clyne, Colin D.; Ernst, Matthias; Allen, Andrew M.; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs that target the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) have recently come into focus for their potential utility as cancer treatments. The use of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (ACEIs) to manage hypertension in cancer patients is correlated with improved survival outcomes for renal, prostate, breast and small cell lung cancer. Previous studies demonstrate that the Angiotensin Receptor Type I (AT1R) is linked to breast cancer pathogenesis, with unbiased analysis of gene-expression studies identifying significant up-regulation of AGTR1, the gene encoding AT1R in ER+ve/HER2−ve tumors correlating with poor prognosis. However, there is no evidence, so far, of the functional contribution of AT1R to breast tumorigenesis. We explored the potential therapeutic benefit of ARB in a carcinogen-induced mouse model of breast cancer and clarified the mechanisms associated with its success. Mammary tumors were induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]antracene (DMBA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in female wild type mice and the effects of the ARB, Losartan treatment assessed in a preventative setting (n = 15 per group). Tumor histopathology was characterised by immunohistochemistry, real-time qPCR to detect gene expression signatures, and tumor cytokine levels measured with quantitative bioplex assays. AT1R was detected with radiolabelled ligand binding assays in fresh frozen tumor samples. We showed that therapeutic inhibition of AT1R, with Losartan, resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden; and no mammary tumor incidence in 20% of animals. We observed a significant reduction in tumor progression from DCIS to invasive cancer with Losartan treatment. This was associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation and a significant reduction in IL-6, pSTAT3 and TNFα levels. Analysis of tumor immune cell infiltrates, however, demonstrated no significant differences in the recruitment of lymphocytes or tumour

  15. Prostaglandin E2 promotes tumor progression by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Fulton, Amy M; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    A causative relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer has been postulated for many years, and clinical observations and laboratory experiments support the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to tumor onset and progression. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the relationship are not known. We recently reported that the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1beta, induces the accumulation and retention of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are commonly found in many patients and experimental animals with cancer and are potent suppressors of adaptive and innate immunity. This finding led us to hypothesize that inflammation leads to cancer through the induction of MDSC, which inhibit immunosurveillance and thereby allow the unchecked persistence and proliferation of premalignant and malignant cells. We now report that host MDSC have receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and that E-prostanoid receptor agonists, including PGE2, induce the differentiation of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) MDSC from bone marrow stem cells, whereas receptor antagonists block differentiation. BALB/c EP2 knockout mice inoculated with the spontaneously metastatic BALB/c-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma have delayed tumor growth and reduced numbers of MDSC relative to wild-type mice, suggesting that PGE2 partially mediates MDSC induction through the EP2 receptor. Treatment of 4T1-tumor-bearing wild-type mice with the cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, SC58236, delays primary tumor growth and reduces MDSC accumulation, further showing that PGE2 induces MDSC and providing a therapeutic approach for reducing this tumor-promoting cell population.

  16. Microfluidic culture models to study the hydrodynamics of tumor progression and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Cara; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2013-08-01

    The integration of tissue engineering strategies with microfluidic technologies has enabled the design of in vitro microfluidic culture models that better adapt to morphological changes in tissue structure and function over time. These biomimetic microfluidic scaffolds accurately mimic native 3D microenvironments, as well as permit precise and simultaneous control of chemical gradients, hydrodynamic stresses, and cellular niches within the system. The recent application of microfluidic in vitro culture models to cancer research offers enormous potential to aid in the development of improved therapeutic strategies by supporting the investigation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis under physiologically relevant flow conditions. The intrinsic material properties and fluid mechanics of microfluidic culture models enable high-throughput anti-cancer drug screening, permit well-defined and controllable input parameters to monitor tumor cell response to various hydrodynamic conditions or treatment modalities, as well as provide a platform for elucidating fundamental mechanisms of tumor physiology. This review highlights recent developments and future applications of microfluidic culture models to study tumor progression and therapeutic targeting under conditions of hydrodynamic stress relevant to the complex tumor microenvironment.

  17. Apoptosis, autophagy, accelerated senescence and reactive oxygen in the response of human breast tumor cells to adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Di, Xu; Shiu, Robert P; Newsham, Irene F; Gewirtz, David A

    2009-04-01

    Although the primary response to Adriamycin (doxorubicin) in p53 mutant MDA-MB231 and p53 null MCF-7/E6 breast tumor cells is apoptotic cell death, the residual surviving population appears to be in a state of senescence, based on cell morphology, beta galactosidase staining, induction of p21(waf1/cip1) and down regulation of cdc2/cdk1. Suppression of apoptosis in MDA-MB231 and MCF-7/E6 cells treated with Adriamycin using the broad spectrum caspase inhibitor, zvad-Fmk, results in substantial induction of autophagy. Overall sensitivity to Adriamycin, measured by clonogenic survival, is not altered in the cells undergoing autophagy, consistent with autophagy contributing to cell death in response to Adriamycin. The free radical scavengers, glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine attenuate the accelerated senescence response to Adriamycin in MCF-7 cells as well as in MDA-MB231 and MCF-7/E6 cells, but protect primarily the MCF-7 cells, indicating that reactive oxygen is unlikely to be directly responsible for Adriamycin toxicity in breast tumor cells. Expression of caspase 3 or induced expression of c-myc in MCF-7 cells fails to abrogate accelerated senescence induced by Adriamycin. Taken together, these studies suggest that accelerated senescence induced by Adriamycin is similar in cells with wild type p53 and in cells lacking functional p53 with regard to the upregulation of p21(waf1/cip1), down regulation of cdc2 and the involvement of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, accelerated senescence, autophagy and apoptosis all appear to be effective in suppressing self-renewal capacity in breast tumor cells exposed to Adriamycin.

  18. Establishment of linear accelerator-based image guided radiotherapy for orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Choi, Jinho; Lee, Seok-Ho; Sung, Ki-Hoon; Ahn, So-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumor using linear accelerator (LINAC). Eighteen Balb/C mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells on left mammary fat pad and nine of them were irradiated using LINAC. Tumors, planning target volumes (PTV), bowels adjacent to tumors, bones and lungs were delineated on planning CT images. IGRT plans were generated to irradiate prescription dose to at least 90% of the PTV and then compared with conventional 2-dimensional plans with anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior beams with 5 mm margins (2D AP/PA plan). Homemade dose-build-up-cradle was designed to encompass mouse bed for homogeneous dose build up. To confirm the irradiated dose, tumor doses were measured using diode detector placed on the surface of tumors. Plan comparison demonstrated equivalent doses to PTV while sparing more doses to normal tissues including bowel (from 90.9% to 40.5%, median value of mean doses) and bone marrow (from 12.9% to 4.7%, median value of mean doses) than 2D AP/PA plan. Quality assurance using diode detector confirmed that IGRT could deliver 95.3-105.3% of the planned doses to PTV. Tumors grew 505.2-1185.8% (mean 873.3%) in the control group and 436.1-771.8% (mean 615.5%) in the irradiated group. These results demonstrate that LINAC-based IGRT provides a reliable approach with accurate dose delivery in the radiobiological study for orthotropic tumor model maintaining tumor microenvironment. PMID:24999360

  19. The Shh receptor Boc promotes progression of early medulloblastoma to advanced tumors.

    PubMed

    Mille, Frédéric; Tamayo-Orrego, Lukas; Lévesque, Martin; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Cardin, Julie; Bouchard, Nicolas; Izzi, Luisa; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Pfister, Stefan M; Charron, Frédéric

    2014-10-13

    During cerebellar development, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling drives the proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs). Aberrant activation of Shh signaling causes overproliferation of GCPs, leading to medulloblastoma. Although the Shh-binding protein Boc associates with the Shh receptor Ptch1 to mediate Shh signaling, whether Boc plays a role in medulloblastoma is unknown. Here, we show that BOC is upregulated in medulloblastomas and induces GCP proliferation. Conversely, Boc inactivation reduces proliferation and progression of early medulloblastomas to advanced tumors. Mechanistically, we find that Boc, through elevated Shh signaling, promotes high levels of DNA damage, an effect mediated by CyclinD1. High DNA damage in the presence of Boc increases the incidence of Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity, an important event in the progression from early to advanced medulloblastoma. Together, our results indicate that DNA damage promoted by Boc leads to the demise of its own coreceptor, Ptch1, and consequently medulloblastoma progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decursin inhibits vasculogenesis in early tumor progression by suppression of endothelial progenitor cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seok Yun; Choi, Jin Hwa; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Masuda, Haruchika; Asahara, Takayuki; Lee, You-Mie

    2012-05-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to the tumor vasculature during tumor progression. Decursin isolated from the herb Angelica gigas is known to possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. Recently, we reported that decursin is a novel candidate for an angiogenesis inhibitor [Jung et al., 2009]. In this study, we investigated whether decursin regulates EPC differentiation and function to inhibit tumor vasculogenesis. We isolated AC133+ cells from human cord blood and decursin significantly decreased the number of EPC colony forming units of human cord blood-derived AC133+ cells that produce functional EPC progenies. Decursin dose-dependently decreased the cell number of EPC committing cells as demonstrated by EPC expansion studies. Decursin inhibited EPC differentiation from progenitor cells into spindle-shaped EPC colonies. Additionally, decursin inhibited proliferation and migration of early EPCs isolated from mouse bone marrow. Furthermore, decursin suppressed expression of angiopoietin-2, angiopoietin receptor Tie-2, Flk-1 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in mouse BM derived EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Decursin suppressed tube formation ability of EPCs in collaboration with HUVEC. Decursin (4 mg/kg) inhibited tumor-induced mobilization of circulating EPCs (CD34 + /VEGFR-2+ cells) from bone marrow and early incorporation of Dil-Ac-LDL-labeled or green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ EPCs into neovessels of xenograft Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in wild-type- or bone-marrow-transplanted mice. Accordingly, decursin attenuated EPC-derived endothelial cells in neovessels of Lewis lung carcinoma tumor masses grown in mice. Together, decursin likely affects EPC differentiation and function, thereby inhibiting tumor vasculogenesis in early tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-11-15

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

  2. The ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH enhances breast tumor progression by inhibiting the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zaidoun; Itzhaki, Ella; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis. Recently, we reported that the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH negatively regulates LATS1, thereby increasing YAP activity, which leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Here, we investigated the role of ITCH in breast tumorigenesis. In particular, we show that ITCH enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through boosting YAP oncogenic function. By contrast, a point mutation in the catalytic domain or WW1 domain of ITCH abolished its EMT-mediated effects. Furthermore, while overexpression of ITCH expression in breast cells is associated with increased incidence of mammary tumor formation and progression, its knockdown inhibited breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and metastasis. Importantly, YAP knockdown was able to attenuate ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions. Lastly, we found that ITCH expression is significantly upregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases and is associated with worse survival. Together, our results reveal that ITCH pro-tumorigenic functions in breast cancer are mediated, at least in part, through inactivation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. PMID:25350971

  3. Locoregional Tumor Progression After Radiation Therapy Influences Overall Survival in Pediatric Patients With Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; McGregor, Lisa; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is renewed attention to primary site irradiation and local control for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). We conducted a retrospective review to identify factors that might predict for locoregional tumor control and its impact on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 through August 2006, a total of 44 pediatric patients with NB received radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent using computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning. The median age was 3.4 years and the median cumulative dose was 23.4 Gy. Overall survival and locoregional tumor control were measured from the start of RT to the date of death or event as determined by CT/magnetic resonance imaging/meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The influence of age at irradiation, gender, race, cumulative radiation dose, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, treatment protocol and resection status was determined with respect to locoregional tumor control. Results: With a median follow-up of 34 months +- 21 months, locoregional tumor progression was observed in 11 (25%) and was evenly divided between primary site and adjacent nodal/visceral site failure. The influence of locoregional control reached borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06). Age (p = 0.5), dose (p = 0.6), resection status (p = 0.7), and International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage (p = 0.08) did not influence overall survival. Conclusions: Overall survival in high-risk neuroblastoma is influenced by locoregional tumor control. Despite CT-based planning, progression in adjacent nodal/visceral sites appears to be common; this requires further investigation regarding target volume definitions, dose, and the effects of systemic therapy.

  4. Tumor initiation and progression in hepatocellular carcinoma: risk factors, classification, and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Severi, Tamara; van Malenstein, Hannah; Verslype, Chris; van Pelt, Jos F

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide responsible for 500 000 deaths annually. A number of risk factors are associated with either the induction of the disease or its progression; these include infection with hepatitis B or C virus, alcohol consumption, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and certain congenital disorders. In around 80% of the cases, HCC is associated with cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis and with inflammation and oxidative stress. In this review we focus firstly on the different risk factors for HCC and summarize the mechanisms by which each is considered to contribute to HCC. In the second part we look at the molecular processes involved in cancer progression. HCC development is recognized as a multistep process that normally develops over many years. Over this period several mutations accumulate in the cell and that stimulate malign transformation, growth, and metastatic behavior. Over the recent years it has become evident that not only the tumor cell itself but also the tumor microenviroment plays a major role in the development of a tumor. There is a direct link between the role of inflammation and cirrhosis with this microenviroment. Both in vitro and in vivo it has been shown that tumor formation and metastatic properties are linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process by which facillitates the tumor cell's attempts to migrate to a more favourable microenviroment. Several groups have analyzed the gene expression in HCC and its surrounding tissue by microarray and this has resulted in the molecular classification into a distinct number of classes. Here we also found a role for hypoxia induced gene expression leading to a clinically more aggressive gene expression in HCC. Molecular analysis also helped to identify important cellular pathways and possible therapeutic targets. The first molecule that in this way has shown clinical application for liver cancer is the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, others

  5. Enhanced neutrophil activity is associated with shorter time to tumor progression in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Cederarv, Madeleine; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Peredo, Inti; Fornara, Olesja; Xu, Xinling; Dzabic, Mensur; Taher, Chato; Skarman, Petra; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with a poor outcome that is often positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GBM patients often have excessive numbers of neutrophils and macrophages near and within the tumor. Here, we characterized the cytokine patterns in the blood of GBM patients with and without Valganciclovir treatment. Furthermore, we determined whether neutrophil activation is related to HCMV status and patient outcome. Blood samples for analyses of cytokines and growth factors were collected from 42 GBM patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 42) and at weeks 12 and 24 after surgery. Blood neutrophils of 28 GBM patients were examined for CD11b expression. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon-γ, interferon-α, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1were analyzed with a bead-based flow cytometry assay. During the first six months after surgery, neutrophil activity was increased in 12 patients and was unchanged or decreased in 16. Patients with increased neutrophil activity had enhanced IL-12p70, high grade HCMV and a shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) than patients without or decreased neutrophil activity (median TTP; 5.4 vs. 12 months, 95% confidence interval; 1.6–10 vs. 0.1–0.6, hazard ratio = 3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.004). The levels of IL-12p70 were significantly decreased in Valganciclovir treated patients (n = 22, T 12W vs. T 24W, p = 0.03). In conclusion, our findings suggest that neutrophil activation is an early sign of tumor progression in GBM patients. PMID:27057448

  6. A new experimental system for irradiating tumors in mice using a linear accelerator under specific pathogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Inamura, K; Tahara, S; Kurabayashi, Y; Akagi, T; Asaumi, J; Togami, I; Takemoto, M; Honda, O; Morioka, Y; Kawasaki, S; Hiraki, Y

    1999-06-01

    We developed a reliable system for the irradiation of xenografted tumors in mice which allows for accurate local irradiation under specific pathogen-free conditions. The system presented here consists of acrylic supports for mice and an acrylic box connected to a pump through 0.22 microns pore-sized filters. Mice with xenotransplanted tumors growing on their right hind legs were set on the supports and put into the box in a laminar flow hood. The tumors of 7 mice were irradiated simultaneously with X-rays of 6 and 10 MV generated by a linear accelerator at a dose rate of 3.1-4.7 Gy/min. The air was ventilated through filters during irradiation in the closed box. Microorganism tests confirmed that no bacteria entered or left the box. One of the significant characteristics of this setup is that it allows for irradiation under conditions of acute hypoxia, which is obtained using an integrated tourniquet. The dose variation among 7 tumors was less than 1%. The rest of the mouse's body was shielded effectively by a half-field technique and a lead block. As a result, the whole body dose for the mice was 0-4% of the total dose absorbed by the tumor. Due to the high dose rate and the ability to irradiate 7 mice simultaneously under specific pathogen-free conditions, this new system can be considered a time-saving and valuable tool for radiation oncology research.

  7. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S.

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  8. Linear-accelerator-based modified radiosurgical treatment of pituitary tumors in cats: 11 cases (1997-2008).

    PubMed

    Sellon, R K; Fidel, J; Houston, R; Gavin, P R

    2009-01-01

    Determine the efficacy and safety of a linear-accelerator-based single fraction radiosurgical approach to the treatment of pituitary tumors in cats. Retrospective study. Eleven client-owned cats referred for treatment of pituitary tumors causing neurological signs, or poorly controlled diabetes mellitus (DM) secondary either to acromegaly or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocortism. Cats underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain to manually plan radiation therapy. After MRI, modified radiosurgery was performed by delivering a single large dose (15 or 20 Gy) of radiation while arcing a linear-accelerator-generated radiation beam around the cat's head with the pituitary mass at the center of the beam. Eight cats were treated once, 2 cats were treated twice, and 1 cat received 3 treatments. Treated cats were evaluated for improvement in endocrine function or resolution of neurological disease by review of medical records or contact with referring veterinarians and owners. Improvement in clinical signs occurred in 7/11 (63.6%) of treated cats. Five of 9 cats with poorly regulated DM had improved insulin responses, and 2/2 cats with neurological signs had clinical improvement. There were no confirmed acute or late adverse radiation effects. The overall median survival was 25 months (range, 1-60), and 3 cats were still alive. Single fraction modified radiosurgery is a safe and effective approach to the treatment of pituitary tumors in cats.

  9. Hypertension accelerates the progression of Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Dere, Ekrem; Broquères-You, Dong; Bonnin, Philippe; Benessiano, Joëlle; Pocard, Marc; Mariani, Jean; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular impairment is frequent in patients with Alzheimer disease and is believed to influence clinical manifestation and severity of the disease. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially hypertension, have been associated with higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypertension, Alzheimer disease cross talk, we established a mouse model of dual pathology by infusing hypertensive doses of angiotensin II into transgenic APPPS1 mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor and presenilin 1 proteins. At 4.5 months, at the early stage of disease progression, only hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented impairment of temporal order memory performance in the episodic-like memory task. This cognitive deficit was associated with an increased number of cortical amyloid deposits (223±5 versus 207±5 plaques/mm(2); P<0.05) and a 2-fold increase in soluble amyloid levels in the brain and in plasma. Hypertensive APPPS1 mice presented several cerebrovascular alterations, including a 25% reduction in cerebral microvessel density and a 30% to 40% increase in cerebral vascular amyloid deposits, as well as a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor A expression in the brain, compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice. Moreover, the brain levels of nitric oxide synthase 1 and 3 and the nitrite/nitrate levels were reduced in hypertensive APPPS1 mice (by 49%, 34%, and 33%, respectively, compared with wild-type mice; P<0.05). Our results indicate that hypertension accelerates the development of Alzheimer disease-related structural and functional alterations, partially through cerebral vasculature impairment and reduced nitric oxide production. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. EMX2 is downregulated in endometrial cancer and correlated with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haifeng; Yan, Qin; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Huijuan; Bao, Wei; Wan, Xiaoping

    2013-03-01

    EMX2 (the human homologue of Drosophila empty spiracles gene 2) is a candidate tumor suppressor. However, its roles in endometrial cancer are still unknown. In this study, we evaluated EMX2 expression in different subtypes of endometrial cancer and its relationships with clinicopathologic characteristics. By immunohistochemical staining, we investigated the level of EMX2 protein in 122 endometrial cancer and 25 normal endometrium tissues. Correlations between EMX2 expression and clinicopathologic features of patients were analyzed using a statistical software. Compared with the normal endometrium, the expression of EMX2 was significantly downregulated in endometrial cancer tissues (P< 0.001). Reduced EMX2 expression was correlated with the tumor stage (P = 0.023), grade (P = 0.016), and the depth of myometrial invasion (P = 0.04), but not with age, pathologic subtype, lymph node metastasis, lymph vascular space invasion, or ER/PR/p53 status. Downregulation of EMX2 was associated with tumor progression and may be a critical factor in the carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial cancer, which provided a novel therapeutic target and a potential marker for prognostic prediction.

  11. Genotype tunes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue tension to induce matricellular-fibrosis and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Laklai, Hanane; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A.; Pickup, Michael W.; Collisson, Eric A.; Kim, Grace E.; Barrett, Alex S.; Hill, Ryan C.; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Schlaepfer, David D.; Mouw, Janna K.; LeBleu, Valerie S.; Roy, Nilotpal; Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Johansen, Julia S.; Poli, Valeria; Kalluri, Raghu; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wood, Laura D.; Hebrok, Matthias; Hansen, Kirk; Moses, Harold L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis compromises pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) treatment and contributes to patient mortality yet anti-stromal therapies are controversial. We found that human PDACs with impaired epithelial transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling have elevated epithelial Stat3 activity and develop a stiffer, matricellular-enriched fibrosis associated with high epithelial tension and shorter patient survival. In several Kras-driven mouse models, both the loss of TGF-β signaling and elevated β1-integrin mechanosignaling engaged a positive feedback loop whereby Stat3 signaling promotes tumor progression by increasing matricellular fibrosis and tissue tension. In contrast, epithelial Stat3 ablation attenuated tumor progression by reducing the stromal stiffening and epithelial contractility induced by loss of TGF-β signaling. In PDAC patient biopsies, higher matricellular protein and activated Stat3 associated with SMAD4 mutation and shorter survival. The findings implicate epithelial tension and matricellular fibrosis in the aggressiveness of SMAD4 mutant pancreatic tumors, and highlight Stat3 and mechanics as key drivers of this phenotype. PMID:27089513

  12. Antibody-based antiangiogenic and antilymphangiogenic therapies to prevent tumor growth and progression.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Monika; Mężyk-Kopeć, Renata; Próchnicki, Tomasz; Kulesza, Małgorzata; Klaus, Tomasz; Bereta, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessel formation is an indispensable factor for cancer progression and metastasis. Therefore, various strategies designed to block angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are being investigated in the hope to arrest and reverse tumor development. Monoclonal antibodies, owing to their unequalled diversity and specificity, might be applied to selectively inhibit the pathways that cancer cells utilize to build up a network of blood vessels and lymphatics. Among the possible targets of antibody-based therapies are proangiogenic and prolymphangiogenic growth factors from the VEGF family and the receptors to which they bind (VEGFRs). Here, we present molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis exploited by tumors to progress and metastasise, with examples of antibody-based therapeutic agents directed at interfering with these processes. The expanding knowledge of vascular biology helps to explain some of the problems encountered in such therapies, that arise due to the redundancy in signaling networks controlling the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels, and lead to tumor drug resistance. Nonetheless, combined treatments and treatments focused on newly discovered proangiogenic and prolymphangiogenic factors give hope that more prominent therapeutic effects might be achieved in the future.

  13. Pediatric Targeted Therapy: Clinical Feasibility of Personalized Diagnostics in Children with Relapsed and Progressive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selt, Florian; Deiß, Alica; Korshunov, Andrey; Capper, David; Witt, Hendrik; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Ruth; Sahm, Felix; Reuss, David; Kölsche, Christian; Ecker, Jonas; Oehme, Ina; Hielscher, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Kulozik, Andreas E; Pfister, Stefan M; Witt, Olaf; Milde, Till

    2016-07-01

    The "pediatric targeted therapy" (PTT) program aims to identify the presence and activity of druggable targets and evaluate the clinical benefit of a personalized treatment approach in relapsed or progressive tumors on an individual basis. 10 markers (HDAC2, HR23B, p-AKT, p-ERK, p-S6, p-EGFR, PDGFR-alpha/beta, p53 and BRAFV600E) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Pediatric patients with tumors independent of the histological diagnosis, with relapse or progression after treatment according to standard protocols were included. N = 61/145 (42%) cases were eligible for analysis between 2009 and 2013, the most common entities being brain tumors. Immunohistochemical stainings were evaluated by the H-Score (0-300). In 93% of the cases potentially actionable targets were identified. The expressed or activated pathways were histone deacetylase (HDACs; 83.0% of cases positive), EGFR (87.2%), PDGFR (75.9%), p53 (50.0%), MAPK/ERK (43.3%) and PI3K/mTOR (36.1%). Follow-up revealed partial or full implementation of PTT results in treatment decision-making in 41% of the cases. Prolonged disease stabilization responses in single cases were noticed, however, response rates did not differ from cases treated with other modalities. Further studies evaluating the feasibility and clinical benefit of personalized diagnostic approaches using paraffin material are warranted.

  14. Role and molecular mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family, which exists in the nucleus and the cytoplasm simultaneously. It is a multifunctional protein that can participate in a variety of regulatory progressions of gene expression and signal transduction, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, RNA alternative splicing and translation. hnRNP K not only directly binds to the kinases, but also recruits the associated factors regarding transcription, splicing and translation to control gene expression, and therefore, it serves as a docking platform for integrating transduction pathways to nucleic acid-directed processes. Numerous studies also show that abnormal expression of hnRNP K is closely associated with the tumor formation. This protein is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer and its aberrant cytoplasmic localization is also associated with a worse prognosis for patients. These results consistently indicate that hnRNP K has a key role in cancer progression. To understand the hnRNP K pathophysiological process in tumor disease, the previous research results regarding the association between hnRNP K and tumors were reviewed.

  15. [Cancer Cells as Dynamic System - Molecular and Phenotypic Changes During Tumor Formation, Progression and Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Sommerová, L; Ondroušková, E; Hrstka, R

    Dynamic, punctual and perfectly coordinated cellular response to internal and external stimuli is a crucial prerequisite for adaptation of mammalian cells to all changes that occur during cellular development under physiological conditions. Hijacking this ability is characteristic for tumor cells that are capable to adapt to unfavorable conditions which contribute to the formation and development of cancer during the process of tumor formation and progression. By changing key mechanisms, malignant cells can avoid cell death and thus allow development and spread of the tumor. The changes at the genetic level are manifested by various phenotypic characteristics, through which tumor cells are able to escape defense mechanisms, to acquire resistance to treatment, to invade and to create secondary tumors. In recent years, one of the most studied properties include changes in energy metabolism, when tumor cells specifically control reprogramming of the main metabolic pathways for their own benefit and to satisfy their increased needs not only for energy, but also for building materials required for increased proliferation. To adapt to extracellular conditions, it is necessary that cells undergo morphological changes, where modifications in the cell shape through reorganization of cytoskeletal filaments allow tumor cells to increase their invasiveness and other aggressive features. Clarifying these changes together with understanding of the switch in the genetic program within cancer cells, which allows them to overcome different stages of differentiation from cancer stem cells to fully differentiated cells, would be an important prerequisite for identification of the cancer cell "weaknesses" and may lead to improved cancer treatment. The ability of tumor cells to alter the rules of their own organism thus represents an important challenge for oncological research.Key words: cellular reprogramming - cancer cell plasticity - cancer metabolism - tumor heterogeneity

  16. Nanoparticle-based sorting of circulating tumor cells by epithelial antigen expression during disease progression in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Muhanna, Nidal; Mepham, Adam; Mohamadi, Reza M; Chan, Harley; Khan, Tahsin; Akens, Margarete; Besant, Justin D; Irish, Jonathan; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used as markers for the detection, characterization, and targeted therapeutic management of cancer. We recently developed a nanoparticle-mediated approach for capture and sorting of CTCs based on their specific epithelial phenotype. In the current study, we investigate the phenotypic transition of tumor cells in an animal model and show the correlation of this transition with tumor progression. VX2 tumor cells were injected into rabbits, and CTCs were evaluated during tumor progression and correlated with computerized tomography (CT) measurements of tumor volume. The results showed a dramatic increase of CTCs during the four weeks of tumor growth. Following resection, CTC levels dropped but then rebounded, likely due to lymph node metastases. Additionally, CTCs showed a marked loss of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) relative to precursor cells. In conclusion, the device accurately traces disease progression and CTC phenotypic shift in an animal model. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been used to predict disease prognosis. In this study, the authors developed a nanoparticle-mediated platform based on microfluidics to analyze the differential expressions of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on CTCs in an animal model. It was found that the loss of EpCAM correlated with disease progression. Hence, the use of this platform may be further applied in other cancer models in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphologic MRI features, diffusion tensor imaging and radiation dosimetric analysis to differentiate pseudo-progression from early tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ajay; Kumar, Sanath; Narang, Jayant; Schultz, Lonni; Mikkelsen, Tom; Wang, Sumei; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Poptani, Harish; Jain, Rajan

    2013-05-01

    Pseudo-progression (PsP) refers to the paradoxical increase of contrast enhancement within 12 weeks of chemo-radiation therapy in gliomas attributable to treatment effects rather than early tumor progression (ETP). This study was performed to evaluate the utility of morphologic imaging features, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and radiation dosimetric analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in differentiating PsP from ETP. Serial MRI examinations of 163 patients treated for high-grade glioma were reviewed. 46 patients showed a recurrent or progressive enhancing lesion within 12 weeks of radiotherapy. We used an in-house modified scoring system based on 20 different morphologic features (modified VASARI features) to assess the MRI studies. DTI analyses were performed in 24 patients. MRI changes were defined as recurrent volume (Vrec) and registered with pretreatment computed tomography dataset, and the actual dose received by the Vrec during treatment was calculated using dose-volume histograms. Bidimensional product of T2-FLAIR signal abnormality and enhancing component was larger in the ETP group. DTI metrics revealed no significant difference between the two groups. There was no statistically significant difference in the location of Vrec between PsP and ETP groups. Morphologic MRI features and DTI have a limited role in differentiating between PsP and ETP. The larger sizes of the T2-FLAIR signal abnormality and the enhancing component of the lesion favor ETP. There was no correlation between the pattern of MRI changes and radiation dose distribution between PsP and ETP groups.

  18. Biliary Phospholipids Sustain Enterocyte Proliferation and Intestinal Tumor Progression via Nuclear Receptor Lrh1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Piccinin, Elena; Pinto, Claudio; Peres, Claudia; Bellafante, Elena; Moschetta, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative-crypt compartment of the intestinal epithelium is enriched in phospholipids and accumulation of phospholipids has been described in colorectal tumors. Here we hypothesize that biliary phospholipid flow could directly contribute to the proliferative power of normal and dysplastic enterocytes. We used Abcb4−/− mice which lack biliary phospholipid secretion. We first show that Abcb4−/− mice are protected against intestinal tumorigenesis. At the molecular level, the transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (Lrh1) is reduced in Abcb4−/− mice and its re-activation re-establishes a tumor burden comparable to control mice. Feeding Abcb4−/− mice a diet supplemented with phospholipids completely overcomes the intestinal tumor protective phenotype, thus corroborating the hypothesis that the absence of biliary phospholipids and not lack of Abcb4 gene per se is responsible for the protection. In turn, phospholipids cannot re-establish intestinal tumorigenesis in Abcb4−/− mice crossed with mice with intestinal specific ablation of Lrh1, a nuclear hormone receptor that is activates by phospholipids. Our data identify the key role of biliary phospholipids in sustaining intestinal mucosa proliferation and tumor progression through the activation of nuclear receptor Lrh1. PMID:27995969

  19. Antiangiogenic Therapy Elicits Malignant Progression of Tumors to Increased Local Invasion and Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pàez-Ribes, Marta; Allen, Elizabeth; Hudock, James; Takeda, Takaaki; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Viñals, Francesc; Inoue, Masahiro; Bergers, Gabriele; Hanahan, Douglas; Casanovas, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple angiogenesis inhibitors have been therapeutically validated in preclinical cancer models, and several in clinical trials. Here we report that angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the VEGF pathway demonstrate antitumor effects in mouse models of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma and glioblastoma but concomitantly elicit tumor adaptation and progression to stages of greater malignancy, with heightened invasiveness and in some cases increased lymphatic and distant metastasis. Increased invasiveness is also seen by genetic ablation of the Vegf-A gene in both models, substantiating the results of the pharmacological inhibitors. The realization that potent angiogenesis inhibition can alter the natural history of tumors by increasing invasion and metastasis warrants clinical investigation, as the prospect has important implications for the development of enduring antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:19249680

  20. [Current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingjie; Zhang, Ruiping; Li, Jianding

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are derived from non-directed differentiation of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tissue, which lack of typical clinical symptoms, and many asymptomatic GISTs are often found on physical examination. The tumor is primarily through implantation metastasis and blood metastasis. Currently, conventional medical imaging methods, such as X-ray barium meal, US, CT, MRI, PET/CT and ES, are still the main means of diagnosis of GISTs. Early diagnosis and early treatment are key factors of the prognosis in GISTs. Therefore, we need to be proficient in various medical imaging methods, then apply them to the diagnosis of GISTs, and to provide comprehensive and valuable information for clinical practice. Through retrieving and consulting literature of medical imaging associated with GISTs, this paper reviews the current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of GISTs.

  1. Impact of Dose Tapering of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor on Radiographic Progression in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Won; Kwon, Hyun Mi; Park, Jin Kyun; Choi, Ja-Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of dose reduction of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) on radiographic progression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods One hundred and sixty-five patients treated with etanercept or adalimumab were selected from a consecutive single-center observational cohort based on the availability of radiographs at baseline and after two- and/or four-years of follow up. Radiographs were assessed by two blinded readers using the modified Stokes AS Spinal Score (mSASSS). Radiographic progression in patients treated with standard-dose TNFi (standard-dose group, n = 49) was compared with patients whose dosage was tapered during the treatment (tapering group, n = 116) using linear mixed models. Results Baseline characteristics between two groups were comparable except for higher BASDAI (7.1 vs. 6.3, p = 0.003) in the standard-dose group. At two years after the treatment, mean dose quotient (S.D.) of the tapering group was 0.59 (0.17). During follow up, rate of radiographic progression in overall patients was 0.90 mSASSS units/year. Radiographic progression over time between the two groups was similar at the entire group level. However, in the subgroup of patients with baseline syndesmophytes, progression occurred significantly faster in the tapering group after the adjustment for baseline status (1.23 vs. 1.72 mSASSS units/year, p = 0.023). Results were consistent when radiographic progression was assessed by the number of newly developed syndesmophytes (0.52 vs. 0.73/year, p = 0.047). Sensitivity analysis after multiple imputation of missing radiographs also showed similar results. Conclusion A dose tapering strategy of TNFi is associated with more rapid radiographic progression in AS patients who have syndesmophytes at baseline. PMID:28033420

  2. Evidence for self-renewing lung cancer stem cells and their implications in tumor initiation, progression, and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James P.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of rare tumor cells with stem cell features first in leukemia and later in solid tumors has emerged as an important area in cancer research. It has been determined that these stem-like tumor cells, termed cancer stem cells, are the primary cellular component within a tumor that drives disease progression and metastasis. In addition to their stem-like ability to self-renew and differentiate, cancer stem cells are also enriched in cells resistant to conventional radiation therapy and to chemotherapy. The immediate implications of this new tumor growth paradigm not only require a re-evaluation of how tumors are initiated, but also on how tumors should be monitored and treated. However, despite the relatively rapid pace of cancer stem cell research in solid tumors such as breast, brain, and colon cancers, similar progress in lung cancer remains hampered in part due to an incomplete understanding of lung epithelial stem cell hierarchy and the complex heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we provide a critical summary of what is known about the role of normal and malignant lung stem cells in tumor development, the progress in characterizing lung cancer stem cells and the potential for therapeutically targeting pathways of lung cancer stem cell self-renewal. PMID:20094757

  3. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptors in cancer cells: involvement in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyu; Huang, Shuguang; Peng, Sheng-Bin

    2005-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in a variety of biological and pathological processes. They are considered among the most desirable targets for drug development. Recent studies have demonstrated that many GPCRs, such as endothelin receptors, chemokine receptors and lysophosphatidic acid receptors have been implicated in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of multiple human cancers. In this study, we conducted an in silico analysis of GPCR gene expression in primary human tumors by analyzing some publicly available gene expression profiling data. Statistical analysis was performed on eight microarray data sets of non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, gastric cancer and diffused large B cell lymphoma to identify GPCRs that are up-regulated in primary or metastatic cancer cells. Our analysis has demonstrated overexpression of several GPCRs in primary tumor cells, including chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors that were shown to be important for tumorigenesis by previous studies. In addition, we have uncovered several GPCRs, such as neuropeptide receptors, adenosine A2B receptor, P2Y purinoceptor, calcium-sensing receptor and metabotropic glutamate receptors, that are expressed at a significantly higher level in some cancer tissue and may play a role in cancer progression. Analysis of cancer samples in different disease stages also suggests that some GPCRs, such as endothelin receptor A, may be involved in early tumor progression and others, such as CXCR4, may play a critical role in tumor invasion and metastasis. The present study demonstrates the value of publicly available microarray data as a resource to gain more understanding of cancer biology, to validate previous findings from in vitro experiments, and to identify potential novel anticancer targets and biomarkers.

  4. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C.; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  5. MUC16 (CA125): tumor biomarker to cancer therapy, a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Felder, Mildred; Kapur, Arvinder; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Horibata, Sachi; Heintz, Joseph; Albrecht, Ralph; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjyot; Hu, Kevin; Shojaei, Hadi; Whelan, Rebecca J; Patankar, Manish S

    2014-05-29

    Over three decades have passed since the first report on the expression of CA125 by ovarian tumors. Since that time our understanding of ovarian cancer biology has changed significantly to the point that these tumors are now classified based on molecular phenotype and not purely on histological attributes. However, CA125 continues to be, with the recent exception of HE4, the only clinically reliable diagnostic marker for ovarian cancer. Many large-scale clinical trials have been conducted or are underway to determine potential use of serum CA125 levels as a screening modality or to distinguish between benign and malignant pelvic masses. CA125 is a peptide epitope of a 3-5 million Da mucin, MUC16. Here we provide an in-depth review of the literature to highlight the importance of CA125 as a prognostic and diagnostic marker for ovarian cancer. We focus on the increasing body of literature describing the biological role of MUC16 in the progression and metastasis of ovarian tumors. Finally, we consider previous and on-going efforts to develop therapeutic approaches to eradicate ovarian tumors by targeting MUC16. Even though CA125 is a crucial marker for ovarian cancer, the exact structural definition of this antigen continues to be elusive. The importance of MUC16/CA125 in the diagnosis, progression and therapy of ovarian cancer warrants the need for in-depth research on the biochemistry and biology of this mucin. A renewed focus on MUC16 is likely to culminate in novel and more efficient strategies for the detection and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  6. Laminin C1 expression by uterine carcinoma cells is associated with tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hiroyasu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Wang, Yihong; Sinno, Abdulrahman K; Miyamoto, Tsutomu; Shiozawa, Tanri; Wang, Tian-Li; Fader, Amanda N; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2015-11-01

    Molecular markers associated with tumor progression in uterine carcinoma are poorly defined. In this study, we determine whether upregulation of LAMC1, a gene encoding extracellular matrix protein, laminin γ1, is associated with various uterine carcinoma subtypes and stages of tumor progression. An analysis of the immunostaining patterns of laminin γ1 in normal endometrium, atypical hyperplasia, and a total of 150 uterine carcinomas, including low-grade and high-grade endometrioid carcinomas, uterine serous and clear cell carcinoma, was performed. Clinicopathological correlation was performed to determine biological significance. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data set was used to validate our results. As compared to normal proliferative and secretory endometrium, for which laminin γ1 immunoreactivity was almost undetectable, increasing laminin C1 staining intensity was observed in epithelial cells from atypical hyperplasia to low-grade endometrioid to high-grade endometrioid carcinoma, respectively. Laminin γ1 expression was significantly associated with FIGO stage, myometrial invasion, cervical/adnexal involvement, angiolymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Similarly, analysis of the endometrial carcinoma data set from TCGA revealed that LAMC1 transcript levels were higher in high-grade than those in low-grade endometrioid carcinoma. Silencing LAMC1 expression by siRNAs in a high-grade endometrioid carcinoma cell line did not affect its proliferative activity but significantly suppressed cell motility and invasion in vitro. These data suggest that laminin γ1 may contribute to the development and progression of uterine carcinoma, likely through enhancing tumor cell motility and invasion. Laminin γ1 warrants further investigation regarding its role as a biomarker and therapeutic target in uterine carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemopreventive effects of oral gallic acid feeding on tumor growth and progression in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Raina, Komal; Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Meenakshi; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2008-05-01

    Our recent studies have identified gallic acid as one of the major constituents of grape seed extract showing strong in vitro anticancer efficacy against human prostate cancer cells. Herein, for the first time, we established the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy of gallic acid against prostate cancer by evaluating its activity against prostate tumor growth and progression in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. At 4 weeks of age, male TRAMP mice were fed with drinking water supplemented with 0.3% and 1% (w/v) gallic acid until 24 weeks of age. Positive control group was fed with regular drinking water for the same period. Our results showed that gallic acid-fed groups had a higher incidence of differentiated lower-grade prostatic tumors at the expense of strong decrease ( approximately 60%; P < 0.01) in poorly differentiated tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of prostate tissue showed a decrease in proliferative index by 36% to 41% (P < 0.05) in 0.3% to 1% gallic acid-fed groups, with an increase in the apoptotic cells by 3-fold (P < 0.05). Further, both doses of gallic acid completely diminished the expression of Cdc2 in the prostatic tissue together with strong decrease in the expression of Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6. The protein levels of cyclin B1 and E were also decreased by gallic acid feeding. Together, for the first time, we identified that oral gallic acid feeding inhibits prostate cancer growth and progression to advanced-stage adenocarcinoma in TRAMP mice via a strong suppression of cell cycle progression and cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis.

  8. Evaluation of a Novel Thermal Accelerant for Augmentation of Microwave Energy during Image-guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Park, William Keun Chan; Maxwell, Aaron Wilhelm Palmer; Frank, Victoria Elizabeth; Primmer, Michael Patrick; Collins, Scott Andrew; Baird, Grayson Luderman; Dupuy, Damian Edward

    2017-01-01

    The primary challenge in thermal ablation of liver tumors (e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal cancer) is the relatively high recurrence rate (~30%) for which incomplete ablation at the periphery of the tumor is the most common reason. In an attempt to overcome this, we have developed a novel thermal accelerant (TA) agent capable of augmenting microwave energy from a distance normally unattainable by a single microwave ablation antenna. This cesium-based block co-polymer compound transforms from a liquid to a gel at body temperature and is intrinsically visible by computed tomography. Using an agarose phantom model, herein we demonstrate that both the rate and magnitude of temperature increase during microwave ablation were significantly greater in the presence of TA when compared with controls. These results suggest robust augmentation of microwave energy, and may translate into larger ablation zone volumes within biologic tissues. Further work using in vivo techniques is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:28382173

  9. The role of ING tumor suppressors in UV stress response and melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wang, Yemin; Wong, Ronald P C; Li, Gang

    2009-05-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) genes were discovered during the past decade and identified as type II tumor suppressor genes. Previous studies demonstrated that ING family members participate in various cellular stress responses and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of various types of cancers, including melanoma. Epidemiological studies showed that UV radiation is the primary etiological factor in melanoma development. Here we review the studies on the role of ING proteins in cellular responses to UV irradiation, melanoma cell motility, and melanoma progression.

  10. FAM13A is associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) progression and controls tumor cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Felix; Heim, Lisanne; Trump, Sonja; Mittler, Susanne; Sopel, Nina; Andreev, Katerina; Ferrazzi, Fulvia; Ekici, Arif B; Rieker, Ralf; Springel, Rebekka; Assmann, Vera L; Lechmann, Matthias; Koch, Sonja; Engelhardt, Marina; Warnecke, Christina; Trufa, Denis I; Sirbu, Horia; Hartmann, Arndt; Finotto, Susetta

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) associated Family with sequence similarity 13, member A (FAM13A) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) occurrence. Here, we found increased numbers of FAM13A protein expressing cells in the tumoral region of lung tissues from a cohort of patients with NSCLC. Moreover, FAM13A inversely correlated with CTLA4 but directly correlated with HIF1α levels in the control region of these patients. Consistently, FAM13A RhoGAP was found to be associated with T cell effector molecules like HIF1α and Tbet and was downregulated in immunosuppressive CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)CTLA4(+) T cells. TGFβ, a tumor suppressor factor, as well as siRNA to FAM13A, suppressed both isoforms of FAM13A and inhibited tumor cell proliferation. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed this finding. Moreover, siRNA to FAM13A induced TGFβ levels. Finally, in experimental tumor cell migration, FAM13A was induced and TGFβ accelerated this process by inducing cell migration, HIF1α, and the FAM13A RhoGAP isoform. Furthermore, siRNA to FAM13A inhibited tumor cell proliferation and induced cell migration without affecting HIF1α. In conclusion, FAM13A is involved in tumor cell proliferation and downstream of TGFβ and HIF1α, FAM13A RhoGAP is associated with Th1 gene expression and lung tumor cell migration. These findings identify FAM13A as key regulator of NSCLC growth and progression.

  11. Adrenergic receptor β2 activation by stress promotes breast cancer progression through macrophages M2 polarization in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun-fang; Jin, Feng-jiao; Li, Ning; Guan, Hai-tao; Lan, Lan; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-05-01

    Stress and its related hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) play a crucial role in tumor progression. Macrophages in the tumor microenvironment (TME) polarized to M2 is also a vital pathway for tumor deterioration. Here, we explore the underlying role of macrophages in the effect of stress and E promoting breast cancer growth. It was found that the weight and volume of tumor in tumor bearing mice were increased, and dramatically accompanied with the rising E level after chronic stress using social isolation. What is most noteworthy, the number of M2 macrophages inside tumor was up-regulated with it. The effects of E treatment appear to be directly related to the change of M2 phenotype is reproduced in vitro. Moreover, E receptor ADRβ2 involved in E promoting M2 polarization was comprehended simultaneously. Our results imply psychological stress is influential on specific immune system, more essential for the comprehensive treatment against tumors.

  12. An inducible mouse model of colon carcinogenesis for the analysis of sporadic and inflammation-driven tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a life-threatening disease that can develop spontaneously or as a complication of inflammatory bowel diseases. Mouse models are essential tools for the preclinical testing of novel therapeutic options in vivo. Here, we provide a highly reliable protocol for an experimental mouse model to study the development of colon cancers. It is based on the mutagenic agent azoxymethane (AOM), which exerts colonotropic carcinogenicity. Repeated intraperitoneal administration of AOM results in the development of spontaneous tumors within 30 weeks. As an alternative option, inflammation-dependent tumor growth can be investigated by combining the administration of AOM with the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water, which causes rapid growth of multiple colon tumors per mouse within 10 weeks. Different scoring systems including number of tumors and tumor size identify factors promoting or inhibiting tumor initiation and/or tumor progression, respectively.

  13. A minority of carcinoma cells producing acidic fibroblast growth factor induces a community effect for tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Jouanneau, J; Moens, G; Bourgeois, Y; Poupon, M F; Thiery, J P

    1994-01-01

    It is generally accepted that primary tumors become heterogeneous as a consequence of tumor-cell genetic instability. Clonal dominance has been shown to occur in some experimental models allowing a subpopulation of cells to overgrow the primary heterogeneous tumor and to metastasize. Alternatively, interactions among coexisting tumor subpopulations may contribute to the emergence of a malignant invasive primary solid tumor. We asked the question whether emergence of carcinoma cells producing a growth/dissociating factor within a tumor cell population may be a determinant for tumor progression and for clonal dominance. To mimic such a situation, we have investigated the impact of tumor subpopulation heterogeneity in an in vivo model in which mixtures of carcinoma cells that differ in their ability to produce acidic fibroblast growth factor are injected into nude mice. Our data indicate that a growth-factor-producing cell subpopulation can confer increased tumorigenicity to an entire cell population and subsequently elicit a shorter delay for appearance of metastasis. A community effect via cell interactions may account for a heterogeneous tumor cell population rather than clonal dominance during progression of certain tumor types. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7506417

  14. The Warburg effect in tumor progression: Mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as an anti-metastasis mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming; Cai, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Compared to normal cells, cancer cells strongly upregulate glucose uptake and glycolysis to give rise to increased yield of intermediate glycolytic metabolites and the end product pyruvate. Moreover, glycolysis is uncoupled from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cancer cells. Consequently, the majority of glycolysis-derived pyruvate is diverted to lactate fermentation and kept away from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. This metabolic phenotype is known as the Warburg effect. While it has become widely accepted that the glycolytic intermediates provide essential anabolic support for cell proliferation and tumor growth, it remains largely elusive whether and how the Warburg metabolic phenotype may play a role in tumor progression. We hereby review the cause and consequence of the restrained oxidative metabolism, in particular in tumor metastasis. Cells change or lose their extracellular matrix during the metastatic process. Inadequate/inappropriate matrix attachment generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes a specific type of cell death, termed anoikis, in normal cells. Although anoikis is a barrier to metastasis, cancer cells have often acquired elevated threshold for anoikis and hence heightened metastatic potential. As ROS are inherent byproducts of oxidative metabolism, forced stimulation of glucose oxidation in cancer cells raises oxidative stress and restores cells’ sensitivity to anoikis. Therefore, by limiting the pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, the Warburg effect enables cancer cells to avoid excess ROS generation from mitochondrial respiration and thus gain increased anoikis resistance and survival advantage for metastasis. Consistent with this notion, pro-metastatic transcription factors HIF and Snail attenuate oxidative metabolism, whereas tumor suppressor p53 and metastasis suppressor KISS1 promote mitochondrial oxidation. Collectively, these findings reveal

  15. Wound healing-like immune program facilitates postpartum mammary gland involution and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Holly A; Jindal, Sonali; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Borges, Virginia F; Schedin, Pepper

    2015-04-15

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer within 5 years postpartum have poor survival rates. The process of postpartum mammary gland involution, whereby the lactating gland remodels to its prepregnant state, promotes breast cancer progression in xenograft models. Macrophage influx occurs during mammary gland involution, implicating immune modulation in the promotion of postpartum breast cancer. Herein, we characterize the postpartum murine mammary gland and find an orchestrated influx of immune cells similar to that which occurs during wound healing. Further, the normal involuting gland may be in an immunosuppressed state as discerned by the transient presence of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and IL-10(+) macrophages with T cell suppressive function. To determine the influence of the postpartum immune microenvironment on mammary tumor promotion, we developed an immune-competent model. In this model, mammary tumors in the involution group are sixfold larger than nulliparous group tumors, have decreased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltrates and contain a greater number of macrophages with the ability to inhibit T cell activation. Targeting involution with a neutralizing antibody against the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 reduces tumor growth in involution group mice but not in nulliparous mice, implicating the involution microenvironment as the primary target of αIL-10 treatment. Relevance to women is implicated, as we find postlactational human breast tissue has transient high IL-10(+) and Foxp3(+) immune cell infiltrate. These data show an immune modulated microenvironment within the normal involuting mammary gland suggestive of immunosuppression, that when targeted reduces tumor promotion, revealing possible immune-based strategies for postpartum breast cancer.

  16. Therapeutic inhibition of Jak activity inhibits progression of gastrointestinal tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Emma; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy; Thiem, Stefan; Farid, Ryan; Elzer, Joachim; Huszar, Dennis; Waring, Paul M; Phesse, Toby J; Ernst, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the latent transcription factor STAT3 and its downstream targets is a common feature of epithelial-derived human cancers, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Mouse models of gastrointestinal malignancy implicate Stat3 as a key mediator of inflammatory-driven tumorigenesis, in which its cytokine/gp130/Janus kinase (Jak)-dependent activation provides a functional link through which the microenvironment sustains tumor promotion. Although therapeutic targeting of STAT3 is highly desirable, such molecules are not available for immediate clinical assessment. Here, we investigated whether the small-molecule Jak1/2 inhibitor AZD1480 confers therapeutic benefits in two mouse models of inflammation-associated gastrointestinal cancer, which are strictly dependent of excessive Stat3 activation. We confirm genetically that Cre-mediated, tumor cell-specific reduction of Stat3 expression arrests the growth of intestinal-type gastric tumors in gp130(F/F) mice. We find that systemic administration of AZD1480 readily replicates this effect, which is associated with reduced Stat3 activation and correlates with diminished tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Likewise, AZD1480 therapy also conferred a cytostatic effect on established tumors in a colitis-associated colon cancer model in wild-type mice. As predicted from our genetic observations in gp130(F/F) mice, the therapeutic effect of AZD1480 remains fully reversible upon cessation of compound administration. Collectively, our results provide the first evidence that pharmacologic targeting of excessively activated wild-type Jak kinases affords therapeutic suppression of inflammation-associated gastrointestinal cancers progression in vivo.

  17. Loss of circadian clock gene expression is associated with tumor progression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, Cristina; van de Sandt, Leonie; Edlund, Karolina; Lohr, Miriam; Hellwig, Birte; Marchan, Rosemarie; Schmidt, Marcus; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Oster, Henrik; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between circadian rhythm disturbances and tumorigenesis. However, the association between circadian clock genes and prognosis in breast cancer has not been systematically studied. Therefore, we examined the expression of 17 clock components in tumors from 766 node-negative breast cancer patients that were untreated in both neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. In addition, their association with metastasis-free survival (MFS) and correlation to clinicopathological parameters were investigated. Aiming to estimate functionality of the clockwork, we studied clock gene expression relationships by correlation analysis. Higher expression of several clock genes (e.g., CLOCK, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY2, NPAS2 and RORC) was found to be associated with longer MFS in univariate Cox regression analyses (HR<1 and FDR-adjusted P < 0.05). Stratification according to molecular subtype revealed prognostic relevance for PER1, PER3, CRY2 and NFIL3 in the ER+/HER2- subgroup, CLOCK and NPAS2 in the ER-/HER2- subtype, and ARNTL2 in HER2+ breast cancer. In the multivariate Cox model, only PER3 (HR = 0.66; P = 0.016) and RORC (HR = 0.42; P = 0.003) were found to be associated with survival outcome independent of established clinicopathological parameters. Pairwise correlations between functionally-related clock genes (e.g., PER2-PER3 and CRY2-PER3) were stronger in ER+, HER2- and low-grade carcinomas; whereas, weaker correlation coefficients were observed in ER- and HER2+ tumors, high-grade tumors and tumors that progressed to metastatic disease. In conclusion, loss of clock genes is associated with worse prognosis in breast cancer. Coordinated co-expression of clock genes, indicative of a functional circadian clock, is maintained in ER+, HER2-, low grade and non-metastasizing tumors but is compromised in more aggressive carcinomas.

  18. Telomere-based crisis: functional differences between telomerase activation and ALT in tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sandy; Khoo, Christine M.; Naylor, Maria L.; Maser, Richard S.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase activation is a common feature of most advanced human cancers and is postulated to restore genomic stability to a level permissive for cell viability and tumor progression. Here, we used genetically defined transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cultures derived from late generation mTerc−/− Ink4a/Arf−/− mice to explore more directly how telomere-based crisis relates to the evolution of cancer cell genomes and to tumor biology. An exhaustive serial analysis of cytogenetic profiles over extensive passage in culture revealed that the emergence of chromosomal fusions (including dicentrics) coincided with onset of deletions and complex nonreciprocal translocations (NRTs), whereas mTerc-transduced cultures maintained intact chromosomes and stable genomes. Despite a high degree of telomere dysfunction and genomic instability, transformed late passage mTerc−/− Ink4a/Arf−/− cultures retained the capacity to form subcutaneous tumors in immunocompromised mice. However, even moderate levels of telomere dysfunction completely abrogated the capacity of these cells to form lung metastases after tail-vein injection, whereas mTerc reconstitution alone conferred robust metastatic activity in these cells. Finally, serial subcutaneous tumor formation using late passage transformed mTerc−/− Ink4a/Arf−/− cultures revealed clear evidence of telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Significantly, despite a marked increase in telomere reserve, cells derived from the ALT+ subcutaneous tumors were unable to generate lung metastases, indicating in vivo functional differences in these principal mechanisms of telomere maintenance. Together, these results are consistent with the model that although telomere dysfunction provokes chromosomal aberrations that initiate carcinogenesis, telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance enables such initiated cells to efficiently achieve a fully malignant endpoint, including metastasis. PMID

  19. The Warburg effect in tumor progression: mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as an anti-metastasis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming; Cai, Qingsong

    2015-01-28

    Compared to normal cells, cancer cells strongly upregulate glucose uptake and glycolysis to give rise to increased yield of intermediate glycolytic metabolites and the end product pyruvate. Moreover, glycolysis is uncoupled from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cancer cells. Consequently, the majority of glycolysis-derived pyruvate is diverted to lactate fermentation and kept away from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. This metabolic phenotype is known as the Warburg effect. While it has become widely accepted that the glycolytic intermediates provide essential anabolic support for cell proliferation and tumor growth, it remains largely elusive whether and how the Warburg metabolic phenotype may play a role in tumor progression. We hereby review the cause and consequence of the restrained oxidative metabolism, in particular in the context of tumor metastasis. Cells change or lose their extracellular matrix during the metastatic process. Inadequate/inappropriate matrix attachment generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes a specific type of cell death, termed anoikis, in normal cells. Although anoikis is a barrier to metastasis, cancer cells have often acquired elevated threshold for anoikis and hence heightened metastatic potential. As ROS are inherent byproducts of oxidative metabolism, forced stimulation of glucose oxidation in cancer cells raises oxidative stress and restores cells' sensitivity to anoikis. Therefore, by limiting the pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, the Warburg effect enables cancer cells to avoid excess ROS generation from mitochondrial respiration and thus gain increased anoikis resistance and survival advantage for metastasis. Consistent with this notion, pro-metastatic transcription factors HIF and Snail attenuate oxidative metabolism, whereas tumor suppressor p53 and metastasis suppressor KISS1 promote mitochondrial oxidation. Collectively, these

  20. Wound healing-like immune program facilitates postpartum mammary gland involution and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Holly A.; Jindal, Sonali; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer within 5 years postpartum have poor survival rates. The process of postpartum mammary gland involution, whereby the lactating gland remodels to its pre-pregnant state, promotes breast cancer progression in xenograft models. Macrophage influx occurs during mammary gland involution, implicating immune modulation in the promotion of postpartum breast cancer. Herein, we characterize the postpartum murine mammary gland and find an orchestrated influx of immune cells similar to that which occurs during wound healing. Further, the normal involuting gland may be in an immunosuppressed state as discerned by the transient presence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and IL-10+ macrophages with T cell suppressive function. To determine the influence of the postpartum immune microenvironment on mammary tumor promotion, we developed an immune-competent model. In this model, mammary tumors in the involution group are six-fold larger than nulliparous group tumors, have decreased CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltrates and contain a greater number of macrophages with the ability to inhibit T cell activation. Targeting involution with a neutralizing antibody against the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 reduces tumor growth in involution group mice but not in nulliparous mice, implicating the involution microenvironment as the primary target of αIL-10 treatment. Relevance to women is implicated, as we find post-lactational human breast tissue has transient high IL-10+ and Foxp3+ immune cell infiltrate. These data show an immune modulated microenvironment within the normal involuting mammary gland suggestive of immunosuppression, that when targeted reduces tumor promotion, revealing possible immune-based strategies for postpartum breast cancer. PMID:25187059

  1. Interleukin-6 promotes tumor progression in colitis-associated colorectal cancer through HIF-1α regulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Xi, Qiulei; Meng, Qingyang; Liu, Jingzheng; Zhang, Yongxian; Han, Yusong; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a well-known etiological factor of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) and has a significant role in CAC progression. In addition, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) serves a primary role in the progression of CAC. However, the association between IL-6 and HIF-1α during the progression of CAC remains unclear. To investigate this association, the present study induced CAC in a mouse model using azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium. In addition, an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody was used to inhibit IL-6. In this model, anti-IL-6 receptor antibody treatment significantly inhibited the development of CAC and the expression of HIF-1α, in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. In patients with CAC, the HIF-1α gene was demonstrated to be overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with adjacent non-malignant tissue. Furthermore, HIF-1α mRNA expression was positively correlated with serum IL-6 concentration. The results of the present study suggest that IL-6 promotes CAC progression, in the early stage of the disease, through HIF-1α regulation. PMID:28105173

  2. PTHrP drives breast tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis in mice and is a potential therapy target

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiarong; Karaplis, Andrew C.; Huang, Dao C.; Siegel, Peter M.; Camirand, Anne; Yang, Xian Fang; Muller, William J.; Kremer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) is a secreted factor expressed in almost all normal fetal and adult tissues. It is involved in a wide range of developmental and physiological processes, including serum calcium regulation. PTHrP is also associated with the progression of skeletal metastases, and its dysregulated expression in advanced cancers causes malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Although PTHrP is frequently expressed by breast tumors and other solid cancers, its effects on tumor progression are unclear. Here, we demonstrate in mice pleiotropic involvement of PTHrP in key steps of breast cancer — it influences the initiation and progression of primary tumors and metastases. Pthrp ablation in the mammary epithelium of the PyMT-MMTV breast cancer mouse model caused a delay in primary tumor initiation, inhibited tumor progression, and reduced metastasis to distal sites. Mechanistically, it reduced expression of molecular markers of cell proliferation (Ki67) and angiogenesis (factor VIII), antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2, cell-cycle progression regulator cyclin D1, and survival factor AKT1. PTHrP also influenced expression of the adhesion factor CXCR4, and coexpression of PTHrP and CXCR4 was crucial for metastatic spread. Importantly, PTHrP-specific neutralizing antibodies slowed the progression and metastasis of human breast cancer xenografts. Our data identify what we believe to be new functions for PTHrP in several key steps of breast cancer and suggest that PTHrP may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22056386

  3. Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and Progression of Childhood Astrocytic Brain Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0303 TITLE: Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and...W81XWH-13-1-0303 Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and Progression of Childhood Astrocytic...lineages during the progression of gliomas, and We observed bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells have only minimal effort on tumor progression. We

  4. p28 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Central Nervous System Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Teratoid Tumor, Atypical; Choroid Plexus Neoplasms; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brainstem Tumors; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Medulloblastoma; Neuroectodermal Tumor, Primitive

  5. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-02-23

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development-a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  6. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development—a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  7. Progress in radiocarbon dating with the Chalk River MP tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.; Brown, R.M.; Davies, W.G.; Imahori, Y.; Milton, J.C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of a tandem accelerator /sup 14/C dating system at Chalk River is recounted. Background problems and sources of instability are discussed and solutions are described. Details of sample chemistry and source preparation are presented.

  8. Progress Toward E-157: A 1 GeV Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R

    1999-07-07

    A plasma based wakefield acceleration (PWFA) experiment, scheduled to run this summer, will accelerate parts of a 28.5 GeV bunch from the SLAC linac by up to 1 GeV over a length of 1 meter. A single 28.5 GeV bunch will both induce the wakefields in the one meter long plasma and witness the resulting acceleration fields. The experiment will explore and further develop the techniques that are needed to apply high-gradient PWFA to large scale accelerators. This paper summarizes the goals of the first round of experiments as well as the status of the individual components: construction and diagnosis of the homogeneous lithium oven plasma source and associated ionization laser, commissioning of the electron beam, simulated performance of the electron beam energy measurement, and first PIC simulations of the full meter long experiment.

  9. Progress of the Felsenkeller Shallow-Underground Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Cavanna, F.; Cowan, T. E.; Grieger, M.; Hensel, T.; Junghans, A. R.; Ludwig, F.; Müller, S. E.; Rimarzig, B.; Reinicke, S.; Schulz, S.; Schwengner, R.; Stöckel, K.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.; Zuber, K.

    Low-background experiments with stable ion beams are an important tool for putting the model of stellar hydrogen, helium, and carbon burning on a solid experimental foundation. The pioneering work in this regard has been done by the LUNA collaboration at Gran Sasso, using a 0.4 MV accelerator. In the present contribution, the status of the project for a higher-energy underground accelerator is reviewed. Two tunnels of the Felsenkeller underground site in Dresden, Germany, are currently being refurbished for the installation of a 5 MV high-current Pelletron accelerator. Construction work is on schedule and expected to complete in August 2017. The accelerator will provide intense, 50 µA, beams of 1H+, 4He+, and 12C+ ions, enabling research on astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions with unprecedented sensitivity.

  10. MiR-145 expression accelerates esophageal adenocarcinoma progression by enhancing cell invasion and anoikis resistance.

    PubMed

    Derouet, Mathieu Francois; Liu, Geoffrey; Darling, Gail Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the esophagus has a high case fatality ratio and is now the 6th most common cause of cancer deaths in the world. We previously conducted a study to profile the expression of miRNAs in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) pre and post induction therapy. Of the miRNAs differentially expressed post induction chemoradiation, miR-145, a known tumor suppressor miRNA, was upregulated 8-fold following induction therapy, however, its expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival. This unexpected result was explored in this current study. In order to study the role of miR-145 in EAC, miRNA-145 was overexpressed in 3 EAC cell lines (OE33, FLO-1, SK-GT-4) and one ESCC cell line (KYSE-410). After validation of the expression of miR-145, hallmarks of cancer such as cell proliferation, resistance to chemotherapy drugs or anoikis, and cell invasion were analyzed. There were no differences in cell proliferation and 5 FU resistance between miR145 cell lines and the control cell lines. miR-145 expression also had no effect on cisplatin resistance in two of three cell lines (OE33 and FLO-1), but miR-145 appeared to protect SK-GT-4 cells against cisplatin treatment. However, there was a significant difference in cell invasion, cell adhesion and resistance to anoikis. All three EAC miR-145 cell lines invaded more than their respective controls. Similarly, OE33 and SK-GT-4 miR-145 cell lines were able to survive longer in a suspension state. While expression of miR-145 in ESCC stopped proliferation and invasion, expression of miR-145 in EAC cells enhanced invasion and anoikis resistance. Although more work is required to understand how miR-145 conveys these effects, expression of miR-145 appears to promote EAC progression by enhancing invasion and protection against anoikis, which could in turn facilitate distant metastasis.

  11. Promoter methylation of PCDH10 by HOTAIR regulates the progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Won Kyu; Yun, Seongju; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Chan Hyuk; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Hogeun; Lee, Sang Kil

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and metastasis by interacting with the PRC2 complex and the modulation of its target genes. The role of HOTAIR in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is remains unclear. Herein we investigate the mechanism of HOTAIR in the genesis and promotion of GISTs. The expression of HOTAIR was found to be higher in surgically resected high-risk GISTs than that in low- and intermediate-risk GISTs. Using GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, we demonstrated that HOTAIR repressed apoptosis, was associated with cell cycle progression, and controlled the invasion and migration of GIST cells. Using a gene expression microarray and lists of HOTAIR-associated candidate genes, we suggested that protocadherin 10 (PCDH10) is a key molecule. PCDH10 expression was significantly decreased in GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, possibly as a consequence of hypermethylation. We observed that HOTAIR induced PCDH10 methylation in a SUZ12-dependent manner. In this study, we found that the malignant character of GISTs was initiated and amplified by PCDH10 in a process regulated by HOTAIR. In summary, our findings imply that PCDH10 and HOTAIR may be useful markers of disease progression and therapeutic targets. PMID:27659532

  12. The role of adhesions between homologous cancer cells in tumor progression and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jie; Cheng, Yuhao; Zhang, Hang; Li, Rutian; Hu, Yiqiao; Liu, Baorui

    2017-06-01

    Adhesions between homologous cancer cells play an important role in promoting tumor progression and designing tumor-targeting methods. Known as 'homologous adhesions' of cancerous cells, these are usually more specific than adhesions to normal cells and heterogenic cells, and they have been widely discovered both in vivo and in vitro. The aberrant expression of cell adhesion-related molecules (CARMs) on each species of cancer cells is mainly responsible for inducing more specific homologous adhesions. Based on the improvement of biomimetic technologies, such adhesion has been investigated and applied deeply in drug delivery systems recently. Areas covered: This review focuses on the discovery, mechanism and application of homologous adhesion and aims to assist researchers with a clear understanding for more effective development. The advantages and challenges of recent research progress and therapeutic applications are also described and discussed. Expert commentary: Homologous adhesion shows promise in providing new strategies for targeted drug delivery and tailored cancer treatments. However, the 'homing' property of certain cancer cell types remains unclear and needs to be further defined.

  13. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  14. [Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1994-10-01

    During the past several years, the authors have made considerable progress in modeling carcinogenesis in general, and in modeling radiation carcinogenesis, in particular. They present an overview of their progress in developing stochastic carcinogenesis models and applying them to experimental and epidemiologic data sets. Traditionally, cancer models have been used for the analysis of incidence (or prevalence) data in epidemiology and time to tumor data in experimental studies. The relevant quantities for the analysis of these data are the hazard function and the probability of tumor. The derivation of these quantities is briefly described here. More recently, the authors began to use these models for the analysis of data on intermediate lesions on the pathway to cancer. Such data are available in experimental carcinogenesis studies, in particular in initiation and promotion studies on the mouse skin and the rat liver. If however, quantitative information on intermediate lesions on the pathway to lung cancer were to be come available at some future date, the methods that they have developed for the analysis of initiation-promotion experiments could easily be applied to the analysis of these lesions. The mathematical derivations here are couched in terms of a particular two-mutation model of carcinogenesis. Extension to models postulating more than two mutations is not always straightforward.

  15. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of esophagus during the early phase of tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancer and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a novel optical tool of choice for imaging tissue architecture and cellular morphology based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation. In this study, we used MPM to image microstructure of human normal esophagus, carcinoma in situ, and early invasive carcinoma in order to investigate the morphological change of tissue structure during the early phase of tumor progression. The diagnostic features such as the appearance of cancerous cells, the absence of the basement membrane were extracted to distinguish between normal and cancerous esophagus tissue. The infiltration depth during tumor progression was determined by the appearance of cancerous cells. The significant change of layer structure between cancerous tissue and normal esophagus was described. We also quantitatively described the differences of morphology between normal and cancerous cells. These results correlated well with the corresponding histological findings. With the advancement of clinically miniaturized MPM and the multi-photon probe, combining MPM with standard endoscopy will therefore allow us to make a real-time in vivo diagnosis of early esophageal cancer at the cellular level. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tumor suppressor Lzap regulates cell cycle progression, doming and zebrafish epiboly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Wang, Wen-Der; Melville, David B.; Cha, Yong I.; Yin, Zhirong; Issaeva, Natalia; Knapik, Ela W.; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2012-01-01

    Initial stages of embryonic development rely on rapid, synchronized cell divisions of the fertilized egg followed by a set of morphogenetic movements collectively called epiboly and gastrulation. Lzap is a putative tumor suppressor whose expression is lost in 30% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Lzap activities include regulation of cell cycle progression and response to therapeutic agents. Here we explore developmental roles of the lzap gene during zebrafish morphogenesis. Lzap is highly conserved among vertebrates and is maternally deposited. Expression is initially ubiquitous during gastrulation, and later becomes more prominent in the pharyngeal arches, digestive tract and brain. Antisense morpholino-mediated depletion of Lzap resulted in delayed cell divisions and apoptosis during blastomere formation, resulting in fewer, larger cells. Cell cycle analysis suggested that Lzap loss in early embryonic cells resulted in a G2/M arrest. Furthermore, the Lzap-deficient embryos failed to initiate epiboly – the earliest morphogenetic movement in animal development – which has been shown to be dependent on cell adhesion and migration of epithelial sheets. Our results strongly implicate Lzap in regulation of cell cycle progression, adhesion and migratory activity of epithelial cell sheets during early development. These functions provide further insight into Lzap activity that may contribute not only to development, but also to tumor formation. PMID:21523853

  17. High KRT8 expression promotes tumor progression and metastasis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hao; Liu, Yun; Ding, Fangfang; Ni, Ying; Shao, Shihe

    2017-02-01

    Keratin8 (KRT8) is the major component of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton and predominantly expressed in simple epithelial tissues. Aberrant expression of KRT8 is associated with multiple tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of KRT8 in gastric cancer (GC) remains unclear. In this study, KRT8 expression was investigated and it was found to be upregulated along with human GC progression and metastasis at both mRNA and protein levels in human gastric cancer tissues. In addition, KRT8 overexpression enhanced the proliferation and migration of human gastric cancer cells, whereas the knock-down of KRT8 by siRNA only inhibited migration of human gastric cancer cells. Integrinβ1-FAK-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) only existed in the high KRT8 cells. Furthermore, KRT8 overexpression led to increase in p-smad2/3 levels and TGFβ dependent signaling events. KRT8 expression in GC was related to tumor clinical stage and worse survival. Kaplan-Meier analysis proved that KRT8 was associated with overall survival of patients with GC that patients with high KRT8 expression tend to have unfavorable outcome. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis showed that high KRT8 expression was a prognostic marker of poor outcome. These results provided that KRT8 expression may therefore be a biomarker or potential therapeutic target to identify patients with worse survival.

  18. PPARδ promotes tumor progression via activation of Glut1 and SLC1-A5 transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Xu, Ying; Xu, Qinggang; Shi, Haifeng; Shi, Juanjuan; Hou, Yongzhong

    2017-07-01

    Malignant cancer cell uncontrolled growth depends on the persistent nutrient availability such as glucose and amino acids, which is required for cancer cell energetic and biosynthetic pathways. As a nuclear hormone receptor, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) plays a critical role in inflammation and cancer, however, it is still unclear the regulatory mechanism of PPARδ on cancer cell metabolism. Here, we found that PPARδ directly regulated neutral amino acid transporter SLC1-A5 (solute carrier family 1 member 5) and glucose transporter-1 (Glut1) gene transcription, leading to uptake of glucose and amino acid, activation of mTOR signaling, and tumor progression. In contrast, silence of PPARδ or its antagonist inhibited this event. More importantly, PPARδ promoted cancer cell metabolic reprogramming resulting in chemoresistance, which was alleviated by PPARδ antagonist. These findings revealed a novel mechanism of PPARδ-mediated tumor progression, which provided a potential strategy for cancer treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Abnormal expression of paxillin correlates with tumor progression and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paxillin (PXN) has been found to be aberrantly regulated in various malignancies and involved in tumor growth and invasion. The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of PXN in gastric cancer is still unclear. Methods The expression of PXN was determined in paired gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of PXN in 239 gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis was applied to investigate the correlation between PXN expression and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in patients. Additionally, the effects of PXN on gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration were also evaluated. Results PXN was up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines as compared with adjacent normal tissues and normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. Overexpression of PXN was correlated with distant metastasis (P = 0.001) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.021) in gastric cancer patients. Patients with high PXN expression tended to have poor prognosis compared with patients with low PXN expression (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that PXN expression was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.020). Moreover, ectopic expression of PXN promotes cell proliferation and migration in AGS cells whereas knockdown of PXN inhibits cell proliferation and migration in SGC7901 cells. Conclusions PXN plays an important role in tumor progression and may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. PMID:24180516

  20. Abnormal c-myc oncogene DNA methylation in human bladder cancer: possible role in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Sardi, I; Dal Canto, M; Bartoletti, R; Montali, E

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that the hypermethylation of normally unmethylated DNA sequences plays a critical role in the genesis and progression of human tumors. Although the molecular bases of this mechanism have not been completely explained, the altered methylation pattern of the c-myc oncogene is supposed to represent an important step in tumor development. We have analyzed tissue samples from 47 urinary bladder tumors (43 primary transitional and 4 squamous cell carcinomas) and the respective blood with HpaII methyl-sensitive endonuclease digestion and the Southern blotting technique to detect the methylation pattern in a widespread area in and around the c-myc oncogene. Data presented in this study showed significant differences between the c-myc methylation pattern and pathological grade (p < 0.05). On the other hand, we did not find a significant correlation between the c-myc methylation pattern and clinical stage. However, a variable covalent alteration of c-myc DNA existed in bladder cancer as compared to normal tissue. Although the correlation between superficial and infiltrating forms was not statistically significant, we did, however, find differences in aggressive neoplastic behavior. This suggested that local hypermethylation may be considered as one potential mechanism for increasing genetic alterations in bladder cancer formation.

  1. Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Christopher J; Carpenter, Austin B; Waitkus, Matthew S; Wang, Catherine Y; Zhu, Huishan; Hansen, Landon J; Chen, Lee H; Greer, Paula K; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yu; Bock, Cheryl B; Fan, Ping; Spasojevic, Ivan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2017-02-01

    IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo, Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. Additionally, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell of origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. Additionally, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1-mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy.

  2. Loss of ERβ expression as a common step in estrogen-dependent tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, Allison; Boulle, Nathalie; Lazennec, Gwendal; Vignon, Françoise; Pujol, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The characterization of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) brought new insight into the mechanisms underlying estrogen signaling. Estrogen induction of cell proliferation is a crucial step in carcinogenesis of gynecologic target tissues and the mitogenic effects of estrogen in these tissues (e.g. breast, endometrium and ovary) are well documented both in vitro and in vivo. There is also an emerging body of evidence that colon and prostate cancer growth is influenced by estrogens. In all of these tissues, most studies have shown decreased ERβ expression in cancer as compared to benign tumors or normal tissues, whereas ERα expression persists. The loss of ERβ expression in cancer cells could reflect tumor cell dedifferentiation but may also represent a critical stage in estrogen-dependent tumor progression. Modulation of the expression of ERα target genes by ERβ, or ERβ specific gene induction could indicate that ERβ has a differential effect on proliferation as compared to ERα. ERβ may exert a protective effect and thus constitute a new target for hormone therapy, e.g. via ligand specific activation. The potential distinct roles of ERα and ERβ expression in carcinogenesis, as suggested by experimental and clinical data, are discussed in this review. PMID:15369453

  3. Contribution of membrane mucins to tumor progression through modulation of cellular growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Kermit L; Funes, Melanie; Workman, Heather C; Sweeney, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    Mucins are large, heavily O-glycosylated proteins expressed by epithelial tissues. The canonical function of membrane mucins is to provide protection to vulnerable epithelia by forming a steric barrier against assault, and by contributing to the formation of protective extracellular mucin gels. The aberrant overexpression of mucins is thought to contribute to tumor progression by allowing tumor cells to evade immune recognition, and by aiding in the breakdown of cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts to facilitate migration and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that we should now modify our thinking about mucin function by considering their roles in signaling pathways leading to cellular growth control. Here we review the markedly divergent mechanisms by which membrane mucins, specifically MUC1 and MUC4, influence pathways contributing to cellular proliferation and survival. The cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 serves as a scaffold for the assembly of a variety of signaling proteins, while MUC4 influences the trafficking and localization of growth factor receptors, and hence their responses to external stimuli. We also discuss how tumor cells exploit these mechanisms to promote their own growth and metastasis.

  4. Sensitivity to macrophages decreases with tumor progression in the AKR lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kaptzan, T; Skutelsky, E; Michowitz, M; Siegal, A; Itzhaki, O; Hoenig, S; Hiss, J; Kay, S; Leibovici, J

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to immune reactions, innate or acquired, may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the progression of tumors. We have, indeed shown higher numbers of macrophages surrounding low- as compared to high-malignancy cells. In the present study we examined the level of cell surface molecules known to determine sensitivity to macrophages, namely galactose (GAL) and sialic acid (SA) residues. A histochemical assay for identification of SA by electron microscopy showed a higher cell surface content on metastatic (MT) than on primary (PT) tumor cells. The FACS data seen with fluorescent lectins showed a higher binding of Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which identifies SA attached to terminal GAL in -2.6 or -2.3 linkage, in MT than in PT cells. Binding of Maakia amurensis lectin (MAL-1), which identifies SA at position 3 of GAL, showed that the MT cells contain two subpopulations, one binding more MAL-1 and another less. Cell sorting showed a more aggressive behavior of the first population. The comparison of Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding, which identifies GAL, demonstrated a decreased amount of PNA receptors in MT as compared to PT cells. Western blot analysis of the membranal proteins with different lectins, identified 3 sialylated glycoproteins. The 88 kDa glycoprotein had no significance for metastatic potential. The 130 kDa glycoprotein was higher in MT than on PT cells. The 220 kDa glycoprotein was practically present only on MT cells. The tendency observed was of a higher level of membranal glycoconjugates terminally sialylated with subterminal galactose residues, inMT cells as compared to PT cells. This may explain the recently found decrease in apoptotic cell death with increasing aggressiveness of the AKR lymphoma and suggests a lower sensitivity to macrophages with tumor progression. Treatment based on the reduction in sialic acid content might render the tumor cells more vulnerable to macrophages. We found, indeed, that Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA

  5. A nationwide quality improvement project to accelerate Ghana's progress toward Millennium Development Goal Four: design and implementation progress.

    PubMed

    Twum-Danso, Nana A Y; Akanlu, George B; Osafo, Enoch; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Boadu, Richard O; Atinbire, Solomon; Adondiwo, Ane; Amenga-Etego, Isaac; Ashagbley, Francis; Boadu, Eric A; Dasoberi, Ireneous; Kanyoke, Ernest; Yabang, Elma; Essegbey, Ivan T; Adjei, George A; Buckle, Gilbert B; Awoonor-Williams, J Koku; Nang-Beifubah, Alexis; Twumasi, Akwasi; McCannon, C Joseph; Barker, Pierre M

    2012-12-01

    The gap between evidence-based guidelines and practice of care is reflected, in low- and middle-income countries, by high rates of maternal and child mortality and limited effectiveness of large-scale programing to decrease those rates. We designed a phased, rapid, national scale-up quality improvement (QI) intervention to accelerate the achievement of Millennium Development Goal Four in Ghana. Our intervention promoted systems thinking, active participation of managers and frontline providers, generation and testing of local change ideas using iterative learning from transparent district and local data, local ownership and sustainability. After 50 months of implementation, we have completed two prototype learning phases and have begun regional spread phases to all health facilities in all 38 districts of the three northernmost regions and all 29 Catholic hospitals in the remaining regions of the country. To accelerate the spread of improvement, we developed 'change packages' of rigorously tested process changes along the continuum of care from pregnancy to age 5 in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The primary successes for the project so far include broad and deep adoption of QI by local stakeholders for improving system performance, widespread capacitation of leaders, managers and frontline providers in QI methods, incorporation of local ideas into change packages and successful scale-up to approximately 25% of the country's districts in 3 years. Implementation challenges include variable leadership uptake and commitment at the district level, delays due to recruiting and scheduling barriers, weak data systems and repeated QI training due to high staff turnover.

  6. Interleukin-1-induced changes in the glioblastoma secretome suggest its role in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Tarassishin, Leonid; Lim, Jihyeon; Weatherly, D Brent; Angeletti, Ruth H; Lee, Sunhee C

    2014-03-17

    The tumor microenvironment including glial cells and their inflammatory products regulates brain tumor development and progression. We have previously established that human glioma cells are exquisitely sensitive to IL-1 stimulation leading us to undertake a comparative analysis of the secretome of unstimulated and cytokine (IL-1)-stimulated glioblastoma cells. We performed label-free quantitative proteomic analysis and detected 190 proteins which included cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix (ECM) and related proteins. Measuring area under the curve (AUC) of peptides for quantitation, the IL-1-induced secretome contained 13 upregulated and 5 downregulated extracellular proteins (p<0.05) compared to controls. Of these, IL-8, CCL2, TNC, Gal-1 and PTX3 were validated as upregulated and SERPINE1, STC2, CTGF and COL4A2 were validated as downregulated factors by immunochemical methods. A major representation of the ECM and related proteins in the glioblastoma secretome and their modulation by IL-1 suggested that IL-1 induces its effect in part by altering TGFβ expression, activity and signaling. These findings enhance our understanding of IL-1-induced modulation of glioma microenvironment, with implications for increased tumor invasion, migration and angiogenesis. They further provide novel targets for the glioblastoma intervention. Present study is on an unbiased screening of the glioblastoma secretome stimulated by IL-1 which triggers neuroinflammatory cascades in the central nervous system. Network of secreted proteins were shown to be regulated revealing their possible contribution to glioma progression. Label free quantitative proteomics has provided unique novel targets for potential glioblastoma intervention. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  8. Differential distribution of tumor-associated macrophages and Treg/Th17 cells in the progression of malignant and benign epithelial ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the predominant causes of cancer-associated mortality in women with gynecological oncology. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and T helper cell 17 (Th17) cells have been hypothesized to be involved in the progression of EOC. However, the association between TAMs and T cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the differential distribution of TAMs, Treg cells and Th17 cells in benign ovarian tumor tissues and in tissues from patients with EOC, and to examine their association with the clinical pathology of EOC. A total of 126 tissue samples from patients with EOC and 26 tissue samples from patients with benign ovarian tumors were analyzed, and it was identified that the distribution of TAMs, Treg cells, Th17 cells and the ratio of Treg/Th17 cells were higher in the patients with EOC using triple color immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. The high frequency of TAMs and ratio of Treg/Th17 cells in late tumor grades suggested that they may be significant in tumor progression. The frequency of TAMs was different between the histological types of EOC. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the microvessel density (MVD) in the EOC and benign ovarian tumor tissues. A higher MVD was observed in the EOC patient tissues, particularly, in the late tumor grade tissues. The present study provided clinical data demonstrating the high distribution of TAMs and T-cells in EOC, which may contribute to tumor progression through angiogenesis. The mechanisms by which TAMs are associated with Treg cells and Th17 cells requires further investigation as prognostic factors and therapeutic targets for EOC. PMID:28123537

  9. GRP78 as a regulator of liver steatosis and cancer progression mediated by loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-T; Zhu, G; Pfaffenbach, K; Kanel, G; Stiles, B; Lee, A S

    2014-10-16

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a molecular chaperone widely elevated in human cancers, is critical for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein folding, stress signaling and PI3K/AKT activation. Genetic knockout models of GRP78 revealed that GRP78 maintains homeostasis of metabolic organs, including liver, pancreas and adipose tissues. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are the most common liver cancers. There is a lack of effective therapeutics for HCC and CC, highlighting the need to further understand liver tumorigenic mechanisms. PTEN (phosphatase and tenson homolog deleted on chromosome 10), a tumor suppressor that antagonizes the PI3K/AKT pathway, is inactivated in a wide range of tumors, including 40-50% of human liver cancers. To elucidate the role of GRP78 in liver cancer, we created a mouse model with biallelic liver-specific deletion of Pten and Grp78 mediated by Albumin-Cre-recombinase (cP(f/f)78(f/f)). Interestingly, in contrast to PTEN, deletion of GRP78 was progressive but incomplete. At 3 months, cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers showed hepatomegaly, activation of lipogenic genes, exacerbated steatosis and liver injury, implying that GRP78 protects the liver against PTEN-null-mediated pathogenesis. Furthermore, in response to liver injury, we observed increased proliferation and expansion of bile duct and liver progenitor cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers. Strikingly, bile duct cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers maintained wild-type (WT) GRP78 level, whereas adjacent areas showed GRP78 reduction. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed selective JNK activation, β-catenin downregulation, along with PDGFRα upregulation, which was unique to cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 6 months. Development of both HCC and CC was accelerated and was evident in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 8-9 months, coinciding with intense GRP78 expression in the cancer lesions, and GRP78 expression in adjacent normal areas reverted back to the WT level. In contrast, c78(f/f) livers

  10. Androgen Regulated SPARCL1 in the Tumor Microenvironment Inhibits Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Paula J.; Hughes, Robert M.; Simons, Brian W.; Huang, Jessie; Miller, Rebecca M.; Shinder, Brian; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David; Kimura, Yasunori; Jabbari, Javaneh; Ross, Ashley E.; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A.; Faraj, Sheila F.; Davicioni, Elai; Netto, George J.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; An, Steven S.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men due to the subset of cancers that progress to metastasis. Prostate cancers are thought to be hardwired to androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but AR-regulated changes in the prostate that facilitate metastasis remain poorly understood. We previously noted a marked reduction in Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) expression during invasive phases of androgen-induced prostate growth, suggesting that this may be a novel invasive program governed by AR. Herein, we show that SPARCL1 loss occurs concurrently with AR amplification or overexpression in patient based data. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SPARCL1 expression is directly suppressed by androgen-induced AR activation and binding at the SPARCL1 locus via an epigenetic mechanism, and these events can be pharmacologically attenuated with either AR antagonists or HDAC inhibitors. We establish using the Hi-Myc model of prostate cancer that in Hi-Myc/Sparcl1−/− mice, SPARCL1 functions to suppress cancer formation. Moreover, metastatic progression of Myc-CaP orthotopic allografts is restricted by SPARCL1 in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, we show that SPARCL1 both tethers to collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and binds to the cell's cytoskeleton. SPARCL1 directly inhibits the assembly of focal adhesions thereby constraining the transmission of cell traction forces. Our findings establish a new insight into AR-regulated prostate epithelial movement and provide a novel framework whereby, SPARCL1 in the ECM microenvironment restricts tumor progression by regulating the initiation of the network of physical forces that may be required for metastatic-invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:26294211

  11. Chemopreventive efficacy of inositol hexaphosphate against prostate tumor growth and progression in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Raina, Komal; Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2008-05-15

    Herein, for the first time, we evaluated the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a major constituent of high-fiber diets, against prostate tumor growth and progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Beginning at 4 weeks of age, male TRAMP mice were fed 2% (w/v) IP6 in drinking water or only drinking water till 24 weeks of age, and then sacrificed. Prostate tissue was subjected to histopathologic analysis and to immunohistochemical analyses for proliferation and apoptosis. IP6 feeding did not show any adverse effect on fluid and diet consumption and body weight. There was a significant reduction (40%; P < 0.01) in lower urogenital tract weight in IP6-fed mice. IP6 inhibited prostate cancer progression at prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia stage and strongly reduced the incidence of adenocarcinoma (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia/adenocarcinoma, 75:25% in the IP6 group versus 39:61% in the control group; P < 0.05). The incidences of well-differentiated and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas in the IP6-fed group were reduced by 44% and 62%, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis of prostate tissue showed a 26% decrease (P < 0.05) in proliferation cell nuclear antigen-positive cells and a 3.5-fold increase in apoptotic cells with no effect on Tag expression by IP6. These findings are both novel and highly significant in establishing for the first time that oral IP6, without any toxicity, suppresses prostate tumor growth and progression at the neoplastic stage, thereby reducing the incidence of adenocarcinoma through its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects, and thus indicating that IP6 could have potential chemopreventive effects against human prostate cancer.

  12. Significance of interstitial tumor-associated macrophages in the progression of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing-Sheng; Pei, Bao-Xiang; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Lu-Chang; Zhang, Guang-Jing; Liu, Ji-Kuan; Cui, Hong-Wei; Pan, Fen; Zhang, Zhen-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Stepwise progression from adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) to lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA) was proposed by various scholars. Interstitial tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and various potential chemokines involved in the progression from AIS/MIA to LPA were hypothesized. In the present study, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescent double staining was used to detect the expression of the TAMs marker cluster of differentiation (CD) 68, tumor-derived colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1, interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, E-cadherin and Snail in lung adenocarcinoma specimens, including AIS/MIA, LPA and other types. It was observed that infiltrating TAMs were negatively associated with the prognosis of patients, and that the infiltration degree of interstitial TAMs was higher in LPA than that in AIS/MIA. In addition, E-cadherin, Snail and MMP-2 expression were significantly correlated with the infiltration degree of TAMs. Survival analysis revealed that co-expression of CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 was an independent prognostic factor. Stratified analysis demonstrated that, in AIS/MIA patients, there was a statistically significant difference between the number of TAMs (TAMs ≤25 and TAMs >25) in the CD68+CSF-1+IL-6+ group compared with other groups (including CD68+CSF-1-IL-6-, CD68+CSF-1+IL-6-, CD68+CSF-1-IL-6+ and CD68- groups). By contrast, in patients with TAMs >25 and in patients with positive CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 expression, the survival rates were not significantly different between AIS/MIA and LPA. These results suggested that co-expression of TAMs marker CD68, CSF-1 and IL-6 may be a valuable independent prognostic predictor in lung adenocarcinoma. TAMs may facilitate AIS/MIA progression to LPA, which may be closely associated with the induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:28101209

  13. Decreased RNA-binding motif 5 expression is associated with tumor progression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takahiko; Ishida, Junich; Shimizu, Yuichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Suda, Goki; Muranaka, Tetsuhito; Komatsu, Yoshito; Asaka, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-03-01

    RNA-binding motif 5 is a putative tumor suppressor gene that modulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We recently demonstrated that RNA-binding motif 5 inhibits cell growth through the p53 pathway. This study evaluated the clinical significance of RNA-binding motif 5 expression in gastric cancer and the effects of altered RNA-binding motif 5 expression on cancer biology in gastric cancer cells. RNA-binding motif 5 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using the surgical specimens of 106 patients with gastric cancer. We analyzed the relationships of RNA-binding motif 5 expression with clinicopathological parameters and patient prognosis. We further explored the effects of RNA-binding motif 5 downregulation with short hairpin RNA on cell growth and p53 signaling in MKN45 gastric cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that RNA-binding motif 5 expression was decreased in 29 of 106 (27.4%) gastric cancer specimens. Decreased RNA-binding motif 5 expression was correlated with histological differentiation, depth of tumor infiltration, nodal metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and prognosis. RNA-binding motif 5 silencing enhanced gastric cancer cell proliferation and decreased p53 transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays. Conversely, restoration of RNA-binding motif 5 expression suppressed cell growth and recovered p53 transactivation in RNA-binding motif 5-silenced cells. Furthermore, RNA-binding motif 5 silencing reduced the messenger RNA and protein expression of the p53 target gene p21. Our results suggest that RNA-binding motif 5 downregulation is involved in gastric cancer progression and that RNA-binding motif 5 behaves as a tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer.

  14. Oral consumption of pomegranate fruit extract inhibits growth and progression of primary lung tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Kweon, Mee-Hyang; Kim, Kyungmann; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2007-04-01

    To develop novel mechanism-based preventive approaches for lung cancer, we examined the effect of oral consumption of a human achievable dose of pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) on growth, progression, angiogenesis, and signaling pathways in two mouse lung tumor protocols. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] and N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) were used to induce lung tumors, and PFE was given in drinking water to A/J mice. Lung tumor yield was examined on the 84th day and 140 days after B(a)P dosing and 240 days after NTCU treatment. Mice treated with PFE and exposed to B(a)P and NTCU had statistically significant lower lung tumor multiplicities than mice treated with carcinogens only. Tumor reduction was 53.9% and 61.6% in the B(a)P + PFE group at 84 and 140 days, respectively, compared with the B(a)P group. The NTCU + PFE group had 65.9% tumor reduction compared with the NTCU group at 240 days. Immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to determine effect on cell survival pathways and markers of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. PFE treatment caused inhibition of (a) activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and IkappaBalpha kinase, (b) degradation and phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha, (c) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1/2, and p38), (d) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (p85 and p110), (e) phosphorylation of Akt at Thr(308), (f) activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, (g) phosphorylation of c-met, and (h) markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and angiogenesis (inducible nitric oxide synthase, CD31, and vascular endothelial growth factor) in lungs of B(a)P- and NTCU-treated mice. Thus, our data show that PFE significantly inhibits lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice and merits investigation as a chemopreventive agent for human lung cancer.

  15. miR-221/222 control luminal breast cancer tumor progression by regulating different targets.

    PubMed

    Dentelli, Patrizia; Traversa, Matteo; Rosso, Arturo; Togliatto, Gabriele; Olgasi, Cristina; Marchiò, Caterina; Provero, Paolo; Lembo, Antonio; Bon, Giulia; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Falcioni, Rita; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2014-01-01

    α6β4 integrin is an adhesion molecule for laminin receptors involved in tumor progression. We present a link between β4 integrin expression and miR-221/222 in the most prevalent human mammary tumor: luminal invasive carcinomas (Lum-ICs). Using human primary tumors that display different β4 integrin expression and grade, we show that miR-221/222 expression inversely correlates with tumor proliferating index, Ki67. Interestingly, most high-grade tumors express β4 integrin and low miR-221/222 levels. We ectopically transfected miR-221/222 into a human-derived mammary tumor cell line that recapitulates the luminal subtype to investigate whether miR-221/222 regulates β4 expression. We demonstrate that miR-221/222 overexpression results in β4 expression downregulation, breast cancer cell proliferation, and invasion inhibition. The role of miR-221/222 in driving β4 integrin expression is also confirmed via mutating the miR-221/222 seed sequence for β4 integrin 3'UTR. Furthermore, we show that these 2 miRNAs are also key breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion regulators, via the post-transcriptional regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) and of a disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM-17). We further confirm these data by silencing ADAM-17, using a dominant-negative or an activated STAT5A form. miR-221/222-driven β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 did not occur in MCF-10A cells, denoted "normal" breast epithelial cells, indicating that the mechanism is cancer cell-specific.   These results provide the first evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism that regulates β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 expression, thus controlling breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Pre-miR-221/222 use in the aggressive luminal subtype may be a powerful therapeutic anti-cancer strategy.

  16. Chemical sympathectomy increases neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in tumor-bearing rats but does not influence cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Horvathova, Lubica; Tillinger, Andrej; Sivakova, Ivana; Mikova, Lucia; Mravec, Boris; Bucova, Maria

    2015-01-15

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates many immune functions and modulates the anti-tumor immune defense response, too. Therefore, we studied the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine induced sympathectomy on selected hematological parameters and inflammatory markers in rats with Yoshida AH130 ascites hepatoma. We found that chemically sympathectomized tumor-bearing rats had significantly increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, leukocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio, and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although our findings showed that sympathetic denervation in tumor-bearing rats led to increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, that is an indicator of the disease progression, we found no significant changes in tumor growth and survival of sympathectomized tumor-bearing rats.

  17. Benzyl isothiocyanate suppresses high-fat diet-stimulated mammary tumor progression via the alteration of tumor microenvironments in obesity-resistant BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Cho, Han Jin; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kang, Young-Hee; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Her, Song; Park, Taesung; Kim, Yongkang; Kee, Yun; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that a high-fat diet (HFD) and M2-macrophages induce changes in tumor microenvironments and stimulate tumor growth and metastasis of 4T1 mammary cancer cells in BALB/c mice. In this study, we attempted to determine whether benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) inhibits HFD-induced changes in tumor progression and in tumor microenvironments. Four groups of female BALB/c mice (4-week-old) were fed on a control diet (CD, 10 kcal% fat) and HFD (60 kcal% fat) containing BITC (0, 25, or 100 mg/kg diet) for 20 weeks. Following 16 weeks of feeding, 4T1 cells (5×10(4) cells) were injected into the mammary fat pads, and animals were killed 30 d after the injection. HFD feeding increased solid tumor growth and the number of tumor nodules in the lung and liver, as compared to the CD group, and these increases were inhibited by BITC supplementation. The number of lipid vacuoles, CD45+ leukocytes and CD206+ M2-macrophages, expression of Ki67, levels of cytokines/chemokines, including macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and mRNA levels of F4/80, CD86, Ym1, CD163, CCR2, and M-CSF receptor were increased in the tumor tissues of HFD-fed mice, and these increases were inhibited by BITC supplementation. In vitro culture results demonstrated that BITC inhibited macrophage migration as well as lipid droplet accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. These results suggest that suppression of lipid accumulation and macrophage infiltration in tumor tissues may be one of the mechanisms by which BITC suppresses tumor progression in HFD-fed mice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 500 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Jesse

    2000-03-01

    OAK-B135 An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 500 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical progress report Note: This report was submitted electronically even though Part II A indicates by ''PAPER''.

  19. Characterization of the expression of the pro-metastatic Mena(INV) isoform during breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Oudin, Madeleine J; Hughes, Shannon K; Rohani, Nazanin; Moufarrej, Mira N; Jones, Joan G; Condeelis, John S; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2016-03-01

    Several functionally distinct isoforms of the actin regulatory Mena are produced by alternative splicing during tumor progression. Forced expression of the Mena(INV) isoform drives invasion, intravasation and metastasis. However, the abundance and distribution of endogenously expressed Mena(INV) within primary tumors during progression remain unknown, as most studies to date have only assessed relative mRNA levels from dissociated tumor samples. We have developed a Mena(INV) isoform-specific monoclonal antibody and used it to examine Mena(INV) expression patterns in mouse mammary and human breast tumors. Mena(INV) expression increases during tumor progression and to examine the relationship between Mena(INV) expression and markers for epithelial or mesenchymal status, stemness, stromal cell types and hypoxic regions. Further, while Mena(INV) robustly expressed in vascularized areas of the tumor, it is not confined to cells adjacent to blood vessels. Altogether, these data demonstrate the specificity and utility of the anti-Mena(INV)-isoform specific antibody, and provide the first description of endogenous Mena(INV) protein expression in mouse and human tumors.

  20. High milk consumption does not affect prostate tumor progression in two mouse models of benign and neoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Bernichtein, Sophie; Pigat, Natascha; Capiod, Thierry; Boutillon, Florence; Verkarre, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Viltard, Mélanie; Méjean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Friedlander, Gérard; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that have investigated whether dairy (mainly milk) diets are associated with prostate cancer risk have led to controversial conclusions. In addition, no existing study clearly evaluated the effects of dairy/milk diets on prostate tumor progression, which is clinically highly relevant in view of the millions of men presenting with prostate pathologies worldwide, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). We report here a unique interventional animal study to address this issue. We used two mouse models of fully penetrant genetically-induced prostate tumorigenesis that were investigated at the stages of benign hyperplasia (probasin-Prl mice, Pb-Prl) or pre-cancerous PIN lesions (KIMAP mice). Mice were fed high milk diets (skim or whole) for 15 to 27 weeks of time depending on the kinetics of prostate tumor development in each model. Prostate tumor progression was assessed by tissue histopathology examination, epithelial proliferation, stromal inflammation and fibrosis, tumor invasiveness potency and expression of various tumor markers relevant for each model (c-Fes, Gprc6a, activated Stat5 and p63). Our results show that high milk consumption (either skim or whole) did not promote progression of existing prostate tumors when assessed at early stages of tumorigenesis (hyperplasia and neoplasia). For some parameters, and depending on milk type, milk regimen could even exhibit slight protective effects towards prostate tumor progression by decreasing the expression of tumor-related markers like Ki-67 and Gprc6a. In conclusion, our study suggests that regular milk consumption should not be considered detrimental for patients presenting with early-stage prostate tumors.

  1. High Milk Consumption Does Not Affect Prostate Tumor Progression in Two Mouse Models of Benign and Neoplastic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Boutillon, Florence; Verkarre, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Viltard, Mélanie; Méjean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Friedlander, Gérard; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that have investigated whether dairy (mainly milk) diets are associated with prostate cancer risk have led to controversial conclusions. In addition, no existing study clearly evaluated the effects of dairy/milk diets on prostate tumor progression, which is clinically highly relevant in view of the millions of men presenting with prostate pathologies worldwide, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). We report here a unique interventional animal study to address this issue. We used two mouse models of fully penetrant genetically-induced prostate tumorigenesis that were investigated at the stages of benign hyperplasia (probasin-Prl mice, Pb-Prl) or pre-cancerous PIN lesions (KIMAP mice). Mice were fed high milk diets (skim or whole) for 15 to 27