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Sample records for accelerating charged particles

  1. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  4. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  5. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  6. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  7. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  8. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  9. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  10. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  11. General stationary charged black holes as charged particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Wu, Shao-Feng; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Jiang, Ying

    2011-08-01

    We study the possibility of getting infinite energy in the center-of-mass frame of colliding charged particles in a general stationary charged black hole. For black holes with twofold degenerate horizon, it is found that arbitrary high center-of-mass energy can be attained, provided that one of the particle has critical angular momentum or critical charge and the remained parameters of particles and black holes satisfy certain restriction. For black holes with multiple-fold degenerate event horizons, the restriction is released. For nondegenerate black holes, the ultrahigh center-of-mass is possible to be reached by invoking the multiple scattering mechanism. We obtain a condition for the existence of innermost stable circular orbit with critical angular momentum or charge on any-fold degenerate horizons, which is essential to get ultrahigh center-of-mass energy without fine-tuning problem. We also discuss the proper time spending by the particle to reach the horizon and the duality between frame-dragging effect and electromagnetic interaction. Some of these general results are applied to braneworld small black holes.

  12. Acceleration of energetic charged particles: Shocks, reconnection or turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    Acceleration of energetic charged charged particles, most-often with power-law energy spectra occurs everywhere is space where particle-particle collision mean free paths are significantly larger than their gyro-radii. Shocks, reconnection events and turbulence have variously been proposed as acceleration mechanisms, and each must currently be considered a viable mechanism. Shocks have the advantage that they produce naturally power-law spectra in the observed range which are not very sensitive to the parameters. They are usually also fast accelerators. I first discuss the constraints which observations place on the acceleration mechanisms and show that there are both temporal and spatial constraints. Stochastic acceleration tends to be slow, so the rate of acceleration is important. In the inner heliosphere, this rate must exceed the rate of adiabatic cooling ~ 2Vw/r, where Vw is the radial solar-wind velocity. Acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays (ACR) in the heliosheath must occur on a time scale of on year to avoid producing too many multiply charged ACR. It is shown that here, stochastic acceleration has difficulties in the inner heliosheath. Reconnection events are essentially incompressible, so the divergence of the flow velocity is nearly zero, and the Parker equation would give little acceleration. Acceleration at reconnection therefore must go beyond the Parker equation - either by invoking large pitch-angle anisotropies or by extending the equation to higher order in the flow speed relative to the particle speed. An approach to using an extension of Parker's equation is discussed. Diffusive shock acceleration at the heliospheric termination shock is also discussed. It is suggested that inclusion of upstream turbulence and shock geometry provides reasonable solutions to the perceived problems with this mechanism. Finally, observation evidence is presented which suggests, strongly, that the acceleration of the ACR occurs in the inner heliosphere, not far

  13. Stochastic acceleration of charged particle in nonlinear wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kaifen

    2003-04-01

    Possibility of stochastic acceleration of charged particle by nonlinear waves is investigated. Spatially regular (SR) and spatiotemporal chaotic (STC) wave solutions evolving from saddle steady wave are tested as the fields. In the non-steady SR field the particle is finally trapped by the wave and averagely gains its group velocity, while in the STC field the particle motion displays trapped-free phases with its averaged velocity larger or smaller than the group velocity depending on the charge sign. A simplified model is established to investigate the acceleration mechanism. By analogy with motor protein, it is found that the virtual pattern of saddle steady wave plays a role of asymmetric potential, which and the nonlinear varying perturbation wave are the two sufficient ingredients for the acceleration in our case.

  14. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  15. Harmonic Ratcheting for Ferrite Tuned RF Acceleration of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Brennan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    One of the most persistent difficulties in the design of RF cavities for acceleration of charged particles is the rapid and efficient acceleration of particles over a large range of frequencies. From medical synchrotrons to accelerator driven systems, there is a strong need for fast acceleration of protons and light ions over hundreds of MeV. Conventionally, this is a costly undertaking, requiring specially designed ferrite loaded cavities to be tuned over a large range of frequencies. Ferromagnetic materials allow for the precise adjustment of cavity resonant frequency, but rapid changes in the frequency as well as operation outside material specific frequency ranges result in significant Q-loss to the cavity. This leads to a considerable increase in power required and is thus undesirable for regular operation. We introduce an acceleration scheme known as harmonic ratcheting which can be used to reduce the cavity frequency range needed for accelerating an ion beam in a synchrotron. In particular, this scheme addresses the need for high rep. rate machines for applications such as radiation therapy in which low beam intensity is needed. We demonstrate with simulations the type of ramps achievable using this technique and consider its advantages over h=1 acceleration schemes.

  16. Accelerators for charged particle therapy: PAMELA and related issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease that will affect one in three people at some point in their life; radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cancer treatment, and contributes about 40% to the successful treatment of cancer. Charged Particle Therapy uses protons and other light ions to deliver the lethal dose to the tumor while being relatively sparing of healthy tissue and, because of the finite range of the particles, is able to avoid giving any dose to vital organs. While there are adequate technologies currently available to deliver the required energies and fluxes, the two main technologies (cyclotrons and synchrotrons) have limitations. PAMELA (the Particle Accelerator for MEdicaLApplications) uses the newly-developed non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerator concepts to deliver therapeutically relevant beams. The status of the development of the PAMELA conceptual design is discussed.

  17. Stable charged-particle acceleration and focusing in a laser accelerator using spatial harmonics.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, B; Valloni, A; Putterman, S; Rosenzweig, J B

    2012-10-19

    Regarding the laser-driven acceleration of charged particles in photonic systems, a central unmet challenge is the achievement of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal stability at nonultrarelativistic energies. At such energies, Earnshaw's theorem [S. Earnshaw, Trans. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 7, 97 (1842)] indicates that a synchronous accelerating wave gives a defocusing effect. We present a scheme in which particles are accelerated by interaction with a resonant spatial harmonic and are focused by strong ponderomotive interaction with nonresonant spatial harmonics. We show that this scheme exhibits net transverse focusing and longitudinal stability, and we discuss its use in a compact laser accelerator.

  18. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  19. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  20. On the acceleration of charged particles at relativistic shock fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, J. G.; Schneider, P.

    1987-01-01

    The diffusive acceleration of highly relativistic particles at a shock is reconsidered. Using the same physical assumptions as Blandford and Ostriker (1978), but dropping the restriction to nonrelativistic shock velocities, the authors find approximate solutions of the particle kinetic equation by generalizing the diffusion approximation to higher order terms in the anisotropy of the particle distribution. The general solution of the transport equation on either side of the shock is constructed, which involves the solution of an eigenvalue problem. By matching the two solutions at the shock, the spectral index of the resulting power law is found by taking into account a sufficiently large number of eigenfunctions. Low-order truncation corresponds to the standard diffusion approximation and to a somewhat more general method described by Peacock (1981). In addition to the energy spectrum, the method yields the angular distribution of the particles and its spatial dependence.

  1. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J.

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  2. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  3. Nonresonant Charged-Particle Acceleration by Electrostatic Waves Propagating across Fluctuating Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Vasiliev, A A; Zelenyi, L M

    2015-10-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the effect of nonresonant charged-particle acceleration by an electrostatic wave propagating across the background magnetic field. We show that in the absence of resonance (i.e., when particle velocities are much smaller than the wave phase velocity) particles can be accelerated by electrostatic waves provided that the adiabaticity of particle motion is destroyed by magnetic field fluctuations. Thus, in a system with stochastic particle dynamics the electrostatic wave should be damped even in the absence of Landau resonance. The proposed mechanism is responsible for the acceleration of particles that cannot be accelerated via resonant wave-particle interactions. Simplicity of this straightforward acceleration scenario indicates a wide range of possible applications. PMID:26550729

  4. Dust particle injector for hypervelocity accelerators provides high charge-to-mass ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, O. E.

    1966-01-01

    Injector imparts a high charge-to-mass ratio to microparticles and injects them into an electrostatic accelerator so that the particles are accelerated to meteoric speeds. It employs relatively large masses in the anode and cathode structures with a relatively wide separation, thus permitting a large increase in the allowable injection voltages.

  5. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  6. Charged-particle acceleration through decreasing refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Chen, Zhaoyang; Liu, Pu-Kun; Yu, Ming Young

    2015-02-01

    We propose a mechanism for electron acceleration in which circularly polarized electromagnetic waves (CPEMW) propagate along a uniform magnetic field in a medium with a tapered refractive index. Results show that with a decreasing refractive index and a moderate CPEMW electric field, e.g., 1.20 × 108 V/m, the relativistic factor of an electron can go above 14 after it travels 10 cm in the direction of CPEMW propagation. Without tapering of the refractive index, the maximum value of the relativistic factor is less than 2.92 under the same wave and guiding magnetic field conditions. Similar acceleration efficiency is found for electrons with different initial velocities.

  7. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  8. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  9. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas.more » At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.« less

  10. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  11. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, A. O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity, the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  12. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  13. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M; Vainchtein, D L

    2010-12-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Adiabatic description of capture into resonance and surfatron acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M; Vainchtein, D L

    2010-12-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the surfatron acceleration of nonrelativistic charged particles by electromagnetic waves. The acceleration is caused by capture of particles into resonance with one of the waves. We investigate capture for systems with one or two waves and provide conditions under which the obtained results can be applied to systems with more than two waves. In the case of a single wave, the once captured particles never leave the resonance and their velocity grows linearly with time. However, if there are two waves in the system, the upper bound of the energy gain may exist and we find the analytical value of that bound. We discuss several generalizations including the relativistic limit, different wave amplitudes, and a wide range of the waves' wavenumbers. The obtained results are used for qualitative description of some phenomena observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. PMID:21198098

  15. Development of an RF Conditioning System for Charged-Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Howlader, Mostofa; Shajedul Hasan, Dr. S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Charged-particle accelerators use various vacuum windows on their accelerating radio-frequency (RF) cavities to throughput very high RF power. Before being placed on the cavities, the windows should be cleaned, baked, and fully RF conditioned to prevent a poor vacuum from outgassing, as well as other forms of contamination. An example is the coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC) with an annular alumina ceramic window for each of the 81 superconducting RF cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator. The FPCs needed to be tested up to 650-kW peak in a traveling wave and 2.6 MW with standing wave peaks in 1.3 and 60 pulses/s at 805 MHz. In this paper, an Experimental-Physics-and-Industrial-Control-System-based RF conditioning system for the SNS RF test facility is presented. This paper summarizes the hardware and software design strategies, provides the results obtained, and describes the future research scope.

  16. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles in stellar envelopes of magnetic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2007-02-26

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Tc, Pm and 84 {<=} Z {<=} 99 elements at the surface of the chemically-peculiar magnetic star HD 101065, also known as Przybylski's star. The peculiar 35 < Z < 82 abundance pattern of HD 101065 has been so far explained by diffusion processes in the stellar envelope . However, such processes cannot be called for to explain the origin of short-lived radio-elements. The large magnetic field observed in Ap stars can be at the origin of a significant acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the irradiation process corresponding to the interaction of the stellar material with energetic particles can by itself only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of the chemically peculiar star HD 101065, as well as other chemically peculiar star. Due to the unknown characteristics of the accelerated particles, a purely parametric approach is followed, taken as free parameters the proton and {alpha}-particle flux amplitude and energy distribution as well as the time of irradiation. The specific simulations considered here can explain many different observational aspects. In particular, it is shown that a significant production of Z > 30 heavy elements can be achieved. The most attractive feature of the irradiation process is the significant production of Tc and Pm, as well as actinides and sub-actinides.

  17. Pondermotive acceleration of charged particles along the relativistic jets of an accreting blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisuzaki, T.; Tajima, T.

    2014-05-01

    Accreting blackholes such as miniquasars and active galactic nuclei can contribute to the highest energy components of intra- (˜1015 eV) galactic and extra-galactic components (˜1020 eV) of cosmic rays. Alfven wave pulses which are excited in the accretion disk around blackholes propagate in relativistic jets. Because of their highly non-linear nature of the waves, charged particles (protons, ions, and electrons) can be accelerated to high energies in relativistic jets in accreting blackhole systems, the central engine of miniquasars and active galactic nuclei.

  18. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  19. Theory of Generation of Alfvenic Non-Propagating Electromagnetic Plasma Structures and Acceleration of Charged Particles in Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In Earth's auroral acceleration regions, the nonlinear interaction of incident and reflected Alfven wave packets can collectively create non-propagating electromagnetic plasma structures, such as the Transverse Alfvenic Double Layer (TA-DL) and Charge Hole (TA-CH). These structures, such as TA-DL, encompass localized strong electrostatic electric fields, nested in low density cavities and surrounded by a local dynamo. Such structures constitute powerful high energy particle accelerators causing auroral particle acceleration and creating both Alfvenic and quasi-static discrete auroras. Similar electromagnetic plasma structures should also be generated by Alfvenic interaction in other inhomogenous cosmic plasma regions, and would constitute effective high energy particle accelerators.

  20. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  1. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  2. Production of .sup.64 Cu and other radionuclides using a charged-particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Michael J.; McCarthy, Deborah W.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclides are produced according to the present invention at commercially significant yields and at specific activities which are suitable for use in radiodiagnostic agents such as PET imaging agents and radiotherapeutic agents and/or compositions. In the method and system of the present invention, a solid target having an isotopically enriched target layer electroplated on an inert substrate is positioned in a specially designed target holder and irradiated with a charged-particle beam. The beam is preferably generated using an accelerator such as a biomedical cyclotron at energies ranging from about 5 MeV to about 25 MeV. The target is preferably directly irradiated, without an intervening attenuating foil, and with the charged particle beam impinging an area which substantially matches the target area. The irradiated target is remotely and automatically transferred from the target holder, preferably without transferring any target holder subassemblies, to a conveyance system which is preferably a pneumatic or hydraulic conveyance system, and then further transferred to an automated separation system. The system is effective for processing a single target or a plurality of targets. After separation, the unreacted target material can be recycled for preparation of other targets. In a preferred application of the invention, a biomedical cyclotron has been used to produce over 500 mCi of .sup.64 Cu having a specific activity of over 300 mCi/.mu.g Cu according to the reaction .sup.64 Ni(p,n).sup.64 Cu. These results indicate that accelerator-produced .sup.64 Cu is suitable for radiopharmaceutical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  3. A charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field accelerated by a time-periodic Aharonov-Bohm flux

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvoda, T.; Stovicek, P.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a nonrelativistic quantum charged particle moving on a plane under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and driven by a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. We observe an acceleration effect in the case when the Aharonov-Bohm flux depends on time as a sinusoidal function whose frequency is in resonance with the cyclotron frequency. In particular, the energy of the particle increases linearly for large times. An explicit formula for the acceleration rate is derived with the aid of the quantum averaging method, and then it is checked against a numerical solution and a very good agreement is found. - Highlights: > A nonrelativistic quantum charged particle on a plane. > A homogeneous magnetic field and a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. > The quantum averaging method applied to a time-dependent system. > A resonance of the AB flux with the cyclotron frequency. > An acceleration with linearly increasing energy; a formula for the acceleration rate.

  4. The impact of interplanetary transport on the charge spectra of heavy ions accelerated in solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dröge, W.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Ostryakov, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of interplanetary propagation on the energy dependence of the iron mean ionic charge of solar cosmic rays is investigated. The diffusion convection transport equation is solved numerically making use of a Monte-Carlo approach. The interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration which becomes stronger as the particles’ scattering mean free path decreases. Taking the above effect into account, we compare predictions of our model of charge-consistent stochastic acceleration with recent ACE observations. A detailed analysis of two particle events shows that our model can give a consistent explanation of the observed iron charge and energy spectra, and allows to put constrains on the temperature, density, and the acceleration and escape time scales in the acceleration region.

  5. A new magnetic pumping accelerator of charged particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, J.-L.

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes an acceleration mechanism to explain the observations of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. In the inner magnetosphere particles are convected towards and away from the Io plasma torus by the centrifugally driven interchange mode or by the longitudinal asymmetry of the magnetosphere and the Io plasma torus. They experience a varying (space-dependent in Jupiter's frame of reference) magnetic field and are subject to pitch-angle scattering by wave-particle interactions. Thus, an e-fold magnetic pumping acceleration is expected in the system. The calculations show that the accelerator can generate up to one MeV energy particles in about 10-15 times the characteristic convection time.

  6. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  7. Developments in accelerators and instrumentation relevant to imaging with charged particles and positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    In past years particle accelerators have become increasingly important tools for the advancement of medical science. From the pace of advancing technology and current directions in medical research, it is clear that this relationship between accelerators and medicine will only grow stronger in future years. In view of this importance, this relationship is investigated in some detail, with an eye not so much towards the medical uses of the beams produced, but more towards the technology associated with these accelerators and the criteria which make for successful incorporation of these machines into the clinical environment. In order to lay the necessary groundwork, the different kinds of accelerators found in medical use today are reviewed briefly discussing salient points of each.

  8. Acceleration and Compression of Charged Particle Bunches Using Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N. J. Fisch; A. Pukhov

    2000-10-17

    The nonlinear interaction between counter-propagating laser beams in a plasma results in the generation of large (enhanced) plasma wakes. The two beams need to be slightly detuned in frequency, and one of them has to be ultra-short (shorter than a plasma period). Thus produced wakes have a phase velocity close to the speed of light and can be used for acceleration and compression of charged bunches. The physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced wake generation is qualitatively described and compared with the conventional laser wakefield mechanism. The authors also demonstrate that, depending on the sign of the frequency difference between the lasers, the enhanced wake can be used as a ``snow-plow'' to accelerate and compress either positively or negatively charged bunches. This ability can be utilized in an electron-positron injector.

  9. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  10. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1982-09-21

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  11. Acceleration and Transport Modeling of Solar Energetic Particle Charge States for the Event of 1998 September 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Klecker, B.; Mason, G. M.

    2006-07-01

    The 1998 September 9 solar particle event was a 3He-rich solar particle event that showed a strong increase of Fe ionization states in the energy range below 1 MeV nucleon-1. We have investigated this event by fitting Wind and ACE observations using a model of acceleration and stripping near the Sun, followed by particle transport in the interplanetary medium taking into account particle focusing, pitch-angle scattering, adiabatic deceleration, and convection. The simulation provides a reconstruction of the injection function of the energetic particles released from the Sun and their time, energy, and charge dependence. We find that electrons and Fe ions are injected almost impulsively, whereas the injection of protons takes place on a much longer timescale or even consists of two distinct injection processes. We are able to obtain good overall fits to the observations. This suggests that our model can be used to obtain information about the conditions in the acceleration region such as density, temperature, and the timescales of the acceleration process, if sufficiently accurate modeling of the particle transport in the solar wind is possible.

  12. Particle-Charge Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

  13. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  14. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  15. Self-interaction in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics: Can the observable mass of a charged particle depend on its acceleration?

    SciTech Connect

    Zayats, Alexei E.

    2014-03-15

    In this paper we obtain the expression for the self-force in the model with the Lagrangian containing additional terms, quadratic in Maxwell tensor derivatives (so-called Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics). Features of this force are analyzed for various limiting cases. When a charged particle moves along straight line with a uniform acceleration, an explicit formula is found. In the framework of the considered model, an observable renormalized particle mass is shown to depend on its acceleration. This dependence allows, in principle, to extract experimentally a value of the particle bare mass. -- Highlights: •An expression for the self-force in the Bopp–Podolsky electrodynamics is given. •For a uniformly accelerated charged particle an explicit formula for the self-force is obtained. •Dependence between the observable mass of a charged particle and its acceleration is found.

  16. [Experimental studies of the relative biological effectiveness of accelerated charged particles varying in energy].

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, B S; Petrov, V M; Smirnova, O A; Vorozhtsova, S V; Abrosimova, A N

    2006-01-01

    Experimental results and literary data were analyzed for the relative biological effectiveness of heavy charged particles in a broad range of energy and LET to cells of humans and other mammals in culture, whole body of laboratory animals, microorganisms, bacteriophages, and plants. Analyzed were data obtained with the use of a diversity of tests of acute and delayed lesions induced by ionizing radiation, cancers and cataracts, specifically. Non-parametric methods are applied in parallel to the classic method of calculating the coefficients of relative biological effectiveness by correlating the equal-effective doses of the standard and a given radiation. Consideration is given to factors that may modify RBE values estimated for different types of radiation. PMID:17193971

  17. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  18. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  19. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  20. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  1. Self-interaction in the Bopp-Podolsky electrodynamics: Can the observable mass of a charged particle depend on its acceleration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayats, Alexei E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we obtain the expression for the self-force in the model with the Lagrangian containing additional terms, quadratic in Maxwell tensor derivatives (so-called Bopp-Podolsky electrodynamics). Features of this force are analyzed for various limiting cases. When a charged particle moves along straight line with a uniform acceleration, an explicit formula is found. In the framework of the considered model, an observable renormalized particle mass is shown to depend on its acceleration. This dependence allows, in principle, to extract experimentally a value of the particle bare mass.

  2. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  3. Charged particle radiography.

    PubMed

    Morris, C L; King, N S P; Kwiatkowski, K; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Saunders, A

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography. PMID:23481477

  4. Charged particle radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Saunders, A.

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography.

  5. Search for fractionally charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Zweig, G.

    1982-01-01

    Quarks, the constituents of hadrons and fermion fields of quantum chromodynamics, have fractional charges -1/3e and 2/3e. All charges are integral multiples of 1/3e and not e, as was previously believed. Therefore it is natural to ask if isolated particles of fractional charge exist, either as an intrinsic part of matter, or as particles that can be produced at high energy accelerators. This question can only be answered by experiment, and remains interesting even if quantum chromodynamics turns out to be an absolutely confining theory of quarks. For example, small deviations from the standard version of quantum chromodynamics, or the incorporation of quantum chromodynamics into a more comprehensive theory, could require the existence of free fractionally charged particles.

  6. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  7. Semiclassical geons at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2014-02-01

    We point out that in certain four-dimensional extensions of general relativity constructed within the Palatini formalism stable self-gravitating objects with a discrete mass and charge spectrum may exist. The incorporation of nonlinearities in the electromagnetic field may effectively reduce their mass spectrum by many orders of magnitude. As a consequence, these objects could be within (or near) the reach of current particle accelerators. We provide an exactly solvable model to support this idea.

  8. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Caporaso, George J.; Briggs, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  9. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  10. Introduction to Particle Acceleration in the Cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Horwitz, J. L.; Perez, J.; Quenby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated charged particles have been used on Earth since 1930 to explore the very essence of matter, for industrial applications, and for medical treatments. Throughout the universe nature employs a dizzying array of acceleration processes to produce particles spanning twenty orders of magnitude in energy range, while shaping our cosmic environment. Here, we introduce and review the basic physical processes causing particle acceleration, in astrophysical plasmas from geospace to the outer reaches of the cosmos. These processes are chiefly divided into four categories: adiabatic and other forms of non-stochastic acceleration, magnetic energy storage and stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, and plasma wave and turbulent acceleration. The purpose of this introduction is to set the stage and context for the individual papers comprising this monograph.

  11. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  12. ACCELERATION OF SMALL ASTROPHYSICAL GRAINS DUE TO CHARGE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Lazarian, A.; Hoang, Thiem; Tsytovich, V. N.; De Angelis, U.

    2010-11-01

    We discuss a novel mechanism of dust acceleration which may dominate for particles smaller than {approx}0.1 {mu}m. The acceleration is caused by their direct electrostatic interactions arising from fluctuations of grain charges. The energy sources for the acceleration are the irreversible plasma processes occurring on the grain surfaces. We show that this mechanism of charge-fluctuation-induced acceleration likely affects the rate of grain coagulation and shattering of the population of small grains.

  13. Space experiments with particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  14. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  15. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating. PMID:25215682

  16. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  17. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  18. A novel adaptive time stepping variant of the Boris–Buneman integrator for the simulation of particle accelerators with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Toggweiler, Matthias; Adelmann, Andreas; Arbenz, Peter; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-09-15

    We show that adaptive time stepping in particle accelerator simulation is an enhancement for certain problems. The new algorithm has been implemented in the OPAL (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) framework. The idea is to adjust the frequency of costly self-field calculations, which are needed to model Coulomb interaction (space charge) effects. In analogy to a Kepler orbit simulation that requires a higher time step resolution at the close encounter, we propose to choose the time step based on the magnitude of the space charge forces. Inspired by geometric integration techniques, our algorithm chooses the time step proportional to a function of the current phase space state instead of calculating a local error estimate like a conventional adaptive procedure. Building on recent work, a more profound argument is given on how exactly the time step should be chosen. An intermediate algorithm, initially built to allow a clearer analysis by introducing separate time steps for external field and self-field integration, turned out to be useful by its own, for a large class of problems.

  19. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  20. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  1. Double layers acting as particles accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Lozneanu, E.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that self-consistent stable and unstable double layers generated in plasma after a self-organisation process are able to accelerate charged particles. The implication of cosmic double layers (Dls) in the acceleration of electrical charged particles long been advocated by Alfven and his Stockholm school is today disputed by argument that static electric fields associated with Dls are conservative and consequently the line integral of the electric field outside the DL balances the line integral inside it. Related with this dispute we will evidence some, so far not considered, facts which are in our opinion arguments that aurora Dls are able to energize particles. For justifying this assertion we start from recent experimental results concerning the phenomenology of self-consistent Dls whose generation involve beside ionisations the neutrals excitations which are at tile origin of the light phenomena as those observed in auroras.

  2. Fast ion mass spectrometry and charged particle spectrography investigations of transverse ion acceleration and beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Marshall, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion acceleration transverse to the magnetic field in the topside ionosphere was investigated. Transverse acceleration is believed to be responsible for the upward-moving conical ion distributions commonly observed along auroral field lines at altitudes from several hundred to several thousand kilometers. Of primary concern in this investigation is the extent of these conic events in space and time. Theoretical predictions indicate very rapid initial heating rates, depending on the ion species. These same theories predict that the events will occur within a narrow vertical region of only a few hundred kilometers. Thus an instrument with very high spatial and temporal resolution was required; further, since different heating rates were predicted for different ions, it was necessary to obtain composition as well as velocity space distributions. The fast ion mass spectrometer (FIMS) was designed to meet these criteria. This instrument and its operation is discussed.

  3. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  5. Fermi acceleration of auroral particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of a number of nighttime acceleration mechanisms proposed in the literature for the role of producing the keV nighttime auroral-particle fluxes. Parallel electric fields are rejected for several reasons, but particularly because of the observed simultaneous precipitation of electrons and protons. Acceleration in the neutral sheet is inadequate for producing the particle energies, the observed field-aligned pitch-angle distribution at high latitudes, and the spectral hardening toward lower latitudes. Neutral point mechanisms, although often suggested in principle, have never been demonstrated satisfactorily in theory or in practice. Pitch-angle scattering from a trapped population produced by transverse adiabatic compression is also incapable of producing the field-aligned distribution. It is therefore suggested that longitudinal or Fermi acceleration, which results from the known magnetospheric convection, is the main nighttime auroral acceleration mechanism. The argument is supported by data obtained with the soft-particle spectrometer on Isis 1.

  6. Self-force on an accelerated particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Thomas M.; Friedman, John L.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the singular field of an accelerated point particle (scalar charge, electric charge or small gravitating mass) moving on an accelerated (nongeodesic) trajectory in a generic background spacetime. Using a mode-sum regularization scheme, we obtain explicit expressions for the self-force regularization parameters. We use a Lorentz gauge for the electromangetic and gravitational cases. This work extends the work of Barack and Ori [1] who demonstrated that the regularization parameters for a point particle in geodesic motion in a Schwarzschild spacetime can be described solely by the leading and subleading terms in the mode-sum (commonly known as the A and B terms) and that all terms of higher order in ℓ vanish upon summation (later they showed the same behavior for geodesic motion in Kerr [2], [3]). We demonstrate that these properties are universal to point particles moving through any smooth spacetime along arbitrary (accelerated) trajectories. Our renormalization scheme is based on, but not identical to, the Quinn-Wald axioms. As we develop our approach, we review and extend work showing that that different definitions of the singular field used in the literature are equivalent to our approach. Because our approach does not assume geodesic motion of the perturbing particle, we are able use our mode-sum formalism to explicitly recover a well-known result: The self-force on static scalar charges near a Schwarzschild black hole vanishes.

  7. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  8. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  9. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  10. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  11. Particle acceleration by combined diffusive shock acceleration and downstream multiple magnetic island acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    As a consequence of the evolutionary conditions [28; 29], shock waves can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence. Simulations [32-34] and observations [30; 31] support the idea that downstream magnetic islands (also called plasmoids or flux ropes) result from the interaction of shocks with upstream turbulence. Zank et al. [18] speculated that a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream reconnection-related effects associated with the dynamical evolution of a “sea of magnetic islands” would result in the energization of charged particles. Here, we utilize the transport theory [18; 19] for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets to investigate a combined DSA and downstream multiple magnetic island charged particle acceleration mechanism. We consider separately the effects of the anti-reconnection electric field that is a consequence of magnetic island merging [17], and magnetic island contraction [14]. For the merging plasmoid reconnection- induced electric field only, we find i) that the particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory, and ii) that the solution is constant downstream of the shock. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, we find that i) the accelerated particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory; ii) for a given energy, the particle intensity peaks downstream of the shock, and the peak location occurs further downstream of the shock with increasing particle energy, and iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x, c/c0)/f(0, c/c0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA theory, but increases with increasing particle energy. These predictions can be tested against observations of electrons and ions accelerated at interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric

  12. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  13. Visualization of charged particle traversals in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.

    1997-12-31

    This research addresses the early events that occur in the cell, and particularly in the cell nucleus, after passage of a charged particle. The authors present an assay system which locates the path of a charged particle through the cell nucleus, and speculate that this will be a valuable tool to define a start point for cell signaling of DNA repair processes, as well as signaling of cell-cycle checkpoint proteins. This study of the biological effects of low doses of high LET particles stems from the need to understand molecular mechanisms of long term health effects originating from the heavy particle component of galactic cosmic rays, a major concern in extended space missions. In the deep-space environment each target cell would be traversed only once a month, on average, by a heavy charged particle (1); therefore it was important to use very low particle fluences for subsequent analysis and understanding of resulting measurements. The Single-Cell/Single-particle Irradiator at PNNL was used to deliver particles from an electrostatic accelerator, and thus eliminate most of the experimental variability in the exposure of cells to high LET radiation. The number of tracks through each cell can be specified, rather than the random number obtained with conventional irradiation. Irradiation can be limited to a specified portion of the cell, and the variation in stopping power of the particles as they enter the cell can be minimized.

  14. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  16. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  17. Naked singularities as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate here the particle acceleration by naked singularities to arbitrarily high center of mass energies. Recently it has been suggested that black holes could be used as particle accelerators to probe the Planck scale physics. We show that the naked singularities serve the same purpose and probably would do better than their black hole counterparts. We focus on the scenario of a self-similar gravitational collapse starting from a regular initial data, leading to the formation of a globally naked singularity. It is seen that when particles moving along timelike geodesics interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center of mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to Planck scale physics.

  18. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  19. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, Steve L.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chen, Fang C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  20. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  1. Microwaves and particle accelerators: a fundamental link

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    2011-07-01

    John Cockcroft's splitting of the atom and Ernest Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron in the first half of the twentieth century ushered in the grand era of ever higher energy particle accelerators to probe deeper into matter. It also forged a link, bonding scientific discovery with technological innovation that continues today in the twenty first century. The development of radar and high power vacuum electronics, especially microwave power tubes like the magnetrons and the klystrons in the pre-second world war era, was instrumental in the rapid development of circular and linear charged particle accelerators in the second half of the twentieth century. We had harnessed the powerful microwave radio-frequency sources from few tens of MHz to up to 90 GHz spanning L-band to W-band frequencies. Simultaneously in the second half of the twentieth century, lasers began to offer very first opportunities of controlling charged particles at smaller resolutions on the scale of wavelengths of visible light. We also witnessed in this period the emergence of the photon and neutron sciences driven by accelerators built-by-design producing tailored and ultra-bright pulses of bright photons and neutrons to probe structure and function of matter from aggregate to individual molecular and atomic scales in unexplored territories in material and life sciences. As we enter the twenty first century, the race for ever higher energies, brightness and luminosity to probe atto-metric and atto-second domains of the ultra-small structures and ultra-fast processes continues. These developments depend crucially on yet further advancements in the production and control of high power and high frequency microwaves and light sources, often intricately coupled in their operation to the high energy beams themselves. We give a glimpse of the recent developments and innovations in the electromagnetic production and control of charged particle beams in the service of science and society. (author)

  2. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  3. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    problem of ion and electron energization in solar flares, and is capable of accounting for a wide range of both neutral and charged particle emissions. It is also a component in diffusive shock acceleration, since pitch-angle scattering (which is necessary for multiple shock crossings) is accompanied by diffusion in momentum space, which in turn yields a net systematic energy gain; however, stochastic energization will dominate the first-order shock process only in certain parameter regimes. Although stochastic acceleration has been applied to particle energization in the lobes of radio galaxies, its application to the central regions of AGNs has only recently been considered, but not in detail. We proposed to systematically investigate the plasma processes responsible for stochastic particle acceleration in black hole magnetospheres along with the energy-loss processes which impede particle energization. To this end we calculated acceleration rates and escape time scales for protons and electrons resonating with Alfven waves, and for electrons resonating with whistlers. Assuming either a Kolmogorov or Kraichnan wave spectrum, accretion at the Eddington limit, magnetic field strengths near equipartition, and turbulence energy densities approx. 10% of the total magnetic field energy density, we find that Alfven waves accelerate protons to Lorentz factors approx, equals 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) before they escape from the system. Acceleration of electrons by fast mode and whistler waves can produce a nonthermal population of relativistic electrons whose maximum energy is determined by a competition with radiation losses.

  4. Particle accelerators test cosmological theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.; Steigman, G.

    1988-06-01

    Over the past decade two subfields of science, cosmology and elementary-particle physics, have become married in a symbiotic relationship that has produced a number of exciting offspring. These offspring are beginning to yield insights on the creation of spacetime and matter at epochs as early as 10 to the minus 43 to 10 to the minus 35 second after the birth of the universe in the primordial explosion known as the big bang. Important clues to the nature of the big bang itself may even come from a theory currently under development, known as the ultimate theory of everything (T.E.O.). A T.E.O. would describe all the interactions among the fundamental particles in a single bold stroke. Now that cosmology ahs begun to make predictions about elementary-particle physics, it has become conceivable that those cosmological predictions could be checked with carefully controlled accelerator experiments. It has taken more than 10 years for accelerators to reach the point where they can do the appropriate experiments, but the experiments are now in fact in progress. The preliminary results confirm the predictions of cosmology. The cosmological prediction the authors have been concerned with pertains to setting limits on the number of fundamental particles of matter. It appears that there are 12 fundamental particles, as well as their corresponding antiparticles. Six of the fundamental particles are quarks. The other six are leptons. The 12 particles are grouped in three families, each family consisting of four members. Cosmology suggests there must be a finite number of families and, further limits the possible range of to small values: only three or at most four families exist. 7 figs.

  5. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  6. Electrodynamics of massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Kurt

    2015-02-15

    We derive the classical dynamics of massless charged particles in a rigorous way from first principles. Since due to ultraviolet divergences this dynamics does not follow from an action principle, we rely on (a) Maxwell’s equations, (b) Lorentz- and reparameterization-invariance, and (c) local conservation of energy and momentum. Despite the presence of pronounced singularities of the electromagnetic field along Dirac-like strings, we give a constructive proof of the existence of a unique distribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its conservation requires the particles to obey standard Lorentz equations and they experience, hence, no radiation reaction. Correspondingly, the dynamics of interacting classical massless charged particles can be consistently defined, although they do not emit bremsstrahlung end experience no self-interaction.

  7. Energization of charged particles in the Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Gómez, E.; Durand-Manterola, H.; Pérez de Tejada, H.

    The acceleration of charged particles to suprathermal energies appears to occur in every diffuse plasma of astrophysical interest Mechanisms like the direct electrostatic acceleration the stochastic acceleration the diffusive shock acceleration the shock drift acceleration the resonant acceleration by MHD waves the resonant acceleration by Alfven and Langmuir waves the runaway acceleration the acceleration by potential double layers and the acceleration during magnetic reconnection are observed in a wide variety of astrophysical sites ranging from the terrestrial aurorae to the most distant quasars The simplest type of acceleration is the systematic acceleration in an electrostatic field parallel to the magnetic field Consequently one is lead to the concept of stochastic acceleration or second order Fermi acceleration The main idea is that the electric field is random in some sense and that although particles both gain and lose energy in elementary interactions they gain energy on average The essential requirements of a stochastic acceleration mechanism are 1 elementary interactions which cause the energy of the particles to change due to the betatron effect reflection of moving magnetic inhomogeneities or transit damping 2 effective scattering attributed to wave-particle interactions and 3 a random process statistical treatment usually based either on a Fokker-Planck approach or on a quasilinear approach implying that stochastic acceleration may be regarded as a diffusion in momentum space We propose a different

  8. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  9. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  10. Final Report: Measurements of Core Conditions, Implosion Symmetry, and Anomaloes Acceleration Mechanisms on Omega through Charged Particle Spectroscopy, November 1, 1997 - December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R.; Li, C.K.

    1999-10-19

    This work concerns the first spectroscopic measurements of energetic charged particles on Omega. Individual line profiles include D-3He protons (14.7 MeV) and alphas (3.6 MeV), D-T alphas (3.5 MeV), D-D protons (3.0 MeV), and D-D tutons (1.0 MeV)

  11. Self-modulation of a long externally injected relativistic charged-particle beam in a laser wake field acceleration scheme. A preliminary quantum-like investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Renato; Jovanović, Dusan; Tanjia, Fatema; De Nicola, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Recent investigations indicate that sufficiently long beams of charged particles, travelling in a plasma, experience the phenomenon of self-modulation. The self-modulation is driven by the plasma wake field excitation due to the beam itself, and it may become unstable under certain conditions. A preliminary theoretical investigation of the self-modulation of a relativistic charged-particle beam in overdense plasma in the presence of a preformed plasma wave is carried out, within the quantum-like description of charged particle beams provided by the Thermal Wave Model. A simple physical model for the self-modulation is put forward, described by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation coupled with the Poisson-like equation for the plasma wake potential (so-called Fedele-Shukla equations). The physical mechanism is based on the interplay of three concomitant effects, the radial thermal dispersion (associated with the emittance ε), the radial ponderomotive effects of a preexisting plasma wave (which provides the guidance for the beam), and the self-interaction of the plasma wake field generated by the beam itself.

  12. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klecker, Berndt; Cliver, Ed; Kahler, Steve; Cane, Hilary

    Particle acceleration in solar flares was the topic of a workshop held at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia, January 24-26, 1990. The workshop was held in conjunction with the 21st International Cosmic Ray Conference in Adelaide, South Australia, January 6-19, 1990. Forty-six scientists participated in the workshop, which was organized by Hilary Cane and John Humble of the University of Tasmania; Marc Duldig, Australian Antarctic Division, University of Tasmania; Ed Cliver, Geophysics Laboratory, U.S. Air Force Systems Command; and Steve Kahler, Boston College, Mass.

  13. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  14. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

  15. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Hesse, M.; Schindler, K.

    1997-08-01

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  16. CHARGED PARTICLE MULTIPLICITIES AT BRAHMS.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE, R., FOR THE BRAHMS COLLABORATION

    2001-07-30

    This report presents the measurement of charged particle multiplicity densities dN/d{eta} in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions as function of {eta} and the centrality of the collisions. This distributions were extracted from data collected by the BRAHMS collaboration during the first RHK run with gold ions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130A {center_dot} GeV. The analysis method is described and, results are compared to some model predictions.

  17. Scalar fields and particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon discovered in 2009 by Bañados, Silk and West where particle collisions can achieve arbitrary high center-of-mass (c.m.) energies close to the event horizon of an extreme Kerr black hole, has generated a lot of interest. Although rotation seemed to be an essential requirement, it was later shown that arbitrary high energies can also be achieved for collisions between radially moving particles near the horizon of the electrically charged extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Recently Patil and Joshi claimed that instead of spinning up the black hole one can also crank up the c.m. energy of particle collisions by "charging up" a static black hole with a massless scalar field. In this regard they showed that infinite energies can be attained in the vicinity of the naked singularity of the Janis-Newman-Wincour (JNW) spacetime, which contains a massless scalar field that also becomes infinite at the position of the curvature singularity. In this study we show that Patil and Joshi's claim does not apply for other static black hole systems endowed with a massless scalar field. In particular we consider the well-known Bekenstein black hole and the recently discovered Martínez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole, and show that the expression of the c.m. energy for particle collisions near the event horizons of these black holes is no different than the corresponding case with vanishing scalar field represented by the Schwarzschild solution. Moreover by studying the motion of scalar test charges that interact with the background scalar field in these black hole spacetimes we show that the resulting c.m. energies are even smaller than in the case of free particles. This shows that the infinite energies obtained by Patil and Joshi may not be due to the fact that the black hole contains a massless scalar field, but may be instead related to the geometry of the naked singularity in the JNW spacetime. An analogous case of infinite c.m. energy in the vicinity of a naked

  18. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  19. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  20. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  1. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Kenneth W.; Delayen, Jean R.

    1995-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium.

  2. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  3. Automation of particle accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a 'mouseable' representation of a typical beamline. This responds actively to changes input from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beamline itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operator. We have incorporated the Fortran beam optics code TRANSPORT for simulation of the beam. The paper describes the experience gained in this process and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in real-time, on an operating beamline. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  5. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  6. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  7. Relativistic particle acceleration in plerions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, Jonathan; Tavani, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent research on the structure and particle acceleration properties of relativistic shock waves in which the magnetic field is transverse to the flow direction in the upstream medium, and whose composition is either pure electrons and positrons or primarily electrons and positrons with an admixture of heavy ions. Particle-in-cell simulation techniques as well as analytic theory have been used to show that such shocks in pure pair plasmas are fully thermalized -- the downstream particle spectra are relativistic Maxwellians at the temperature expected from the jump conditions. On the other hand, shocks containing heavy ions which are a minority constituent by number but which carry most of the energy density in the upstream medium do put approximately 20% of the flow energy into a nonthermal population of pairs downstream, whose distribution in energy space is N(E) varies as E(exp -2), where N(E)dE is the number of particles with energy between E and E+dE. The mechanism of thermalization and particle acceleration is found to be synchrotron maser activity in the shock front, stimulated by the quasi-coherent gyration of the whole particle population as the plasma flowing into the shock reflects from the magnetic field in the shock front. The synchrotron maser modes radiated by the heavy ions are absorbed by the pairs at their (relativistic) cyclotron frequencies, allowing the maximum energy achievable by the pairs to be gamma(sub +/-)m(sub +/-)c squared = m(sub i)c squared gamma(sub 1)/Z(sub i), where gamma(sub 1) is the Lorentz factor of the upstream flow and Z(sub i) is the atomic number of the ions. The shock's spatial structure is shown to contain a series of 'overshoots' in the magnetic field, regions where the gyrating heavy ions compress the magnetic field to levels in excess of the eventual downstream value. This shock model is applied to an interpretation of the structure of the inner regions of the Crab Nebula, in particular to the 'wisps

  8. Relativistic Shocks: Particle Acceleration and Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, L.; Keshet, U.; Lemoine, M.

    2015-10-01

    We review the physics of relativistic shocks, which are often invoked as the sources of non-thermal particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, and as possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. We focus on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation, and describe the recent progress in the field driven by theory advances and by the rapid development of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In weakly magnetized or quasi parallel-shocks (i.e. where the magnetic field is nearly aligned with the flow), particle acceleration is efficient. The accelerated particles stream ahead of the shock, where they generate strong magnetic waves which in turn scatter the particles back and forth across the shock, mediating their acceleration. In contrast, in strongly magnetized quasi-perpendicular shocks, the efficiencies of both particle acceleration and magnetic field generation are suppressed. Particle acceleration, when efficient, modifies the turbulence around the shock on a long time scale, and the accelerated particles have a characteristic energy spectral index of s_{γ}˜eq2.2 in the ultra-relativistic limit. We discuss how this novel understanding of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic shocks can be applied to high-energy astrophysical phenomena, with an emphasis on PWNe and GRB afterglows.

  9. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  10. Particle acceleration and reconnection in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2016-03-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized quasi-2D small-scale magnetic island reconnection processes. An advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution describes particle transport and energization in a region of interacting magnetic islands [1; 2]. The dominant charged particle energization processes are 1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging, and 2) magnetic island contraction. The acceleration of charged particles in a "sea of magnetic islands" in a super-Alfvénic flow, and the energization of particles by combined diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic island reconnection processes are discussed.

  11. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Ushirokawa, A.; Kudo, I.; Ejiri, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Plans for SEPAC, an instrument array to be used on Spacelab 1 to study vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interaction in space, beam-atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and the electromagnetic-field configuration of the magnetosphere, are presented. The hardware, consisting of electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma arcjet, neutral-gas plume generator, power supply, diagnostic package (photometer, plasma probes, particle analyzers, and plasma-wave package), TV monitor, and control and data-management unit, is described. The individual SEPAC experiments, the typical operational sequence, and the general outline of the SEPAC follow-on mission are discussed. Some of the experiments are to be joint ventures with AEPI (INS 003) and will be monitored by low-light-level TV.

  12. Particle acceleration on Galactic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, W. I.

    The history of and current ideas concerning the origin of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and in extragalactic sources are surveyed. The observed properties of Galactic cosmic rays and shock acceleration are discussed. It is argued that shock acceleration in various guises is an essential and conceptually the most economical acceleration mechanism.

  13. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  14. Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

  15. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  16. Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.; Subramanian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Trans-relativistic particle acceleration due to Fermi interactions between charged particles and MHD waves helps to power the observed high-energy emission in AGN transients and solar flares. The trans-relativistic acceleration process is challenging to treat analytically due to the complicated momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient. For this reason, most existing analytical treatments of particle acceleration assume that the injected seed particles are already relativistic, and therefore they are not suited to study trans-relativistic acceleration. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem describing the acceleration of seed particles due to hard-sphere collisions with MHD waves. The new results include the exact solution for the steady-state Green's function resulting from the continual injection of monoenergetic seed particles with an arbitrary energy. We also introduce an approximate treatment of the trans-relativistic acceleration process based on a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The main advantage of the hybrid approximation is that it allows the extension of the physical model to include (i) the effects of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses and (ii) time dependence. The new analytical results can be used to model the trans-relativistic acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed. We highlight (i) relativistic ion acceleration in black hole accretion coronae, and (ii) the production of gyrosynchrotron microwave emission due to relativistic electron

  17. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  18. Stochastic particle acceleration in multiple magnetic islands during reconnection.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-03-30

    A nonthermal particle acceleration mechanism involving the interaction of a charged particle with multiple magnetic islands is proposed. The original Fermi acceleration model, which assumes randomly distributed magnetic clouds moving at random velocity V(c) in the interstellar medium, is known to be of second-order acceleration of O(V(c)/c)(2) owing to the combination of head-on and head-tail collisions. In this Letter, we reconsider the original Fermi model by introducing multiple magnetic islands during reconnection instead of magnetic clouds. We discuss that the energetic particles have a tendency to be distributed outside the magnetic islands, and they mainly interact with reconnection outflow jets. As a result, the acceleration efficiency becomes first order of O(V(A)/c), where V(A) and c are the Alfvén velocity and the speed of light, respectively.

  19. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  20. Particle Acceleration via Reconnection Processes in the Supersonic Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index α = -(3 + MA )/2, where MA is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index -3(1 + τ c /(8τdiff)), where τ c /τdiff is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio τdiff/τ c . Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c -5 (c particle speed) spectra observed by Fisk & Gloeckler and Mewaldt et

  1. Acceleration of reaction in charged microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Banerjee, Shibdas; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2015-11-01

    Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have studied the synthesis of isoquinoline in a charged electrospray droplet and the complexation between cytochrome c and maltose in a fused droplet to investigate the feasibility of droplets to drive reactions (both covalent and noncovalent interactions) at a faster rate than that observed in conventional bulk solution. In both the cases we found marked acceleration of reaction, by a factor of a million or more in the former and a factor of a thousand or more in the latter. We believe that carrying out reactions in microdroplets (about 1-15 μm in diameter corresponding to 0·5 pl - 2 nl) is a general method for increasing reaction rates. The mechanism is not presently established but droplet evaporation and droplet confinement of reagents appear to be two important factors among others. In the case of fused water droplets, evaporation has been shown to be almost negligible during the flight time from where droplet fusion occurs and the droplets enter the heated capillary inlet of the mass spectrometer. This suggests that (1) evaporation is not responsible for the acceleration process in aqueous droplet fusion and (2) the droplet-air interface may play a significant role in accelerating the reaction. We argue that this 'microdroplet chemistry' could be a remarkable alternative to accelerate slow and difficult reactions, and in conjunction with mass spectrometry, it may provide a new arena to study chemical and biochemical reactions in a confined environment.

  2. Acceleration of reaction in charged microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Banerjee, Shibdas; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2015-11-01

    Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have studied the synthesis of isoquinoline in a charged electrospray droplet and the complexation between cytochrome c and maltose in a fused droplet to investigate the feasibility of droplets to drive reactions (both covalent and noncovalent interactions) at a faster rate than that observed in conventional bulk solution. In both the cases we found marked acceleration of reaction, by a factor of a million or more in the former and a factor of a thousand or more in the latter. We believe that carrying out reactions in microdroplets (about 1-15 μm in diameter corresponding to 0·5 pl - 2 nl) is a general method for increasing reaction rates. The mechanism is not presently established but droplet evaporation and droplet confinement of reagents appear to be two important factors among others. In the case of fused water droplets, evaporation has been shown to be almost negligible during the flight time from where droplet fusion occurs and the droplets enter the heated capillary inlet of the mass spectrometer. This suggests that (1) evaporation is not responsible for the acceleration process in aqueous droplet fusion and (2) the droplet-air interface may play a significant role in accelerating the reaction. We argue that this 'microdroplet chemistry' could be a remarkable alternative to accelerate slow and difficult reactions, and in conjunction with mass spectrometry, it may provide a new arena to study chemical and biochemical reactions in a confined environment. PMID:26537403

  3. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  4. Generalized power-spectrum Larmor formula for an extended charged particle embedded in a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Khodja, Mohamed R.

    2006-09-01

    The nonrelativistic Larmor radiation formula, giving the power radiated by an accelerated charged point particle, is generalized for a spatially extended particle in the context of the classical charged harmonic oscillator. The particle is modeled as a spherically symmetric rigid charge distribution that possesses both translational and spinning degrees of freedom. The power spectrum obtained exhibits a structure that depends on the form factor of the particle, but reduces, in the limit of an infinitesimally small particle and for the charge distributions considered, to Larmor’s familiar result. It is found that for finite-duration small-enough accelerations as well as perpetual uniform accelerations the power spectrum of the spatially extended particle reduces to that of a point particle. It is also found that when the acceleration is violent or the size parameter of the particle is very large compared to the wavelength of the emitted radiation the power spectrum is highly suppressed. Possible applications are discussed.

  5. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-01

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  6. Charge injection into small semiconductor particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, D.; Luangdilok, C.; Cook, A.R.; Meisel, D.

    1995-06-01

    We report on the effect of the injection of electrons into small CdS particles on their spectroscopy. Solvated electrons were generated pulse radiolytically and their reaction with the particles was monitored. As a result of the excess charge, the absorption by the particle in the exciton region is bleached. The bleaching tacks the shift in band edge as the particle size decreases. However, excess electrons in larger particles are more efficient tan in small particles. It is concluded that the effort originates in the electric field effect generated by the excess charge.

  7. Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC): Description of instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Baker, B. B.; Burch, J. L.; Gibson, W. C.; Black, R. K.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Bounds, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    SEPAC (Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators) flew on Spacelab 1 (SL 1) in November and December 1983. SEPAC is a joint U.S.-Japan investigation of the interaction of electron, plasma, and neutral beams with the ionosphere, atmosphere and magnetosphere. It is scheduled to fly again on Atlas 1 in August 1990. On SL 1, SEPAC used an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, and neutral gas source as active elements and an array of diagnostics to investigate the interactions. For Atlas 1, the plasma accelerator will be replaced by a plasma contactor and charge collection devices to improve vehicle charging meutralization. This paper describes the SEPAC instrumentation in detail for the SL 1 and Atlas 1 flights and includes a bibliography of SEPAC papers.

  8. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  9. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  10. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  11. Characterization and separation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation into the removal of electrically charged particles by using an electric field was carried out in both liquid and gaseous media. The systems studied in liquid media were clay particles suspended in synthetic fuels such as tar sand extracts and shale oils, whereas in gaseous media, the electrostatic removal of pyrites from coal was the objective. For proper design of separation equipment the charge of the particles was characterized as a function of the system variables. For the systems studied in the liquid media, the charge of the particles arises due to the adsorption of asphaltenes present in the synthetic fuel. The magnitude of the charge is strongly dependent on the amount of adsorbed asphaltenes. Small quantities of water have a drastic effect on the charge of the particles. As a result of the particle charge, a crossflow electrofilter can be used to completely remove these particles from the synthetic fuels. In gaseous media, the particles get charged by triboelectrification. The charge of pyrites and coal was measured in a continuous recirculating pneumatic conveyor using a ball probe as well as a Faraday cage. The charge of both coal and pyrites depends on the solid velocity, humidity, particle size, solids concentration, and surface oxidation. In most cases there is a sufficient charge difference between coal and pyrites to provide a driving force for electrostatic separation. Based on the charge difference a novel electrostatic separator was constructed. An improvement in the separator was made using a hydrodynamic model for two phase flow. Good agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental results were obtained.

  12. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  13. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The SEPAC instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam-particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  14. Diagnosing particle acceleration in relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.; Liang, Edison P.; Summerlin, Errol J.; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian A.; Roustazadeh, Parisa

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy emission from blazars and other relativistic jet sources indicates that electrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic (GeV - TeV) energies in these systems. This paper summarizes recent results from numerical studies of two fundamentally different particle acceleration mechanisms potentially at work in relativistic jets: Magnetic-field generation and relativistic particle acceleration in relativistic shear layers, which are likely to be present in relativistic jets, is studied via Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Diffusive shock acceleration at relativistic shocks is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting magnetic-field configurations and thermal + non-thermal particle distributions are then used to predict multi-wavelength radiative (synchrotron + Compton) signatures of both acceleration scenarios. In particular, we address how anisotropic shear-layer acceleration may be able to circumvent the well-known Lorentz-factor crisis, and how the self-consistent evaluation of thermal + non-thermal particle populations in diffusive shock acceleration simulations provides tests of the bulk Comptonization model for the Big Blue Bump observed in the SEDs of several blazars.

  15. Particle acceleration by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given of the analysis of new observations of energetic particles and energetic secondary emissions obtained over the solar maxium (approx. 1980) by the Solar Maximum mission, Hinotori, the international Sun-Earth Explorer, Helios, Explorer satellites, and Voyager spacecraft. Solar energetic particle events observed in space, He(3)- rich events, solar gamma rays and neutrons, and solar neutrinos are discussed.

  16. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  17. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  18. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  19. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  20. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  1. Space experiments with particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Garriott, O. K.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Electron and plasma beams and neutral gas plumes were injected into the space environment by instruuments on Spacelab 1, and various diagnostic measurements including television camera observations were performed. The results yield information on vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interactions, and ionization enhancement by neutral beam injection.

  2. Lasers and new methods of particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    There has been a great progress in development of high power laser technology. Harnessing their potential for particle accelerators is a challenge and of great interest for development of future high energy colliders. The author discusses some of the advances and new methods of acceleration including plasma-based accelerators. The exponential increase in sophistication and power of all aspects of accelerator development and operation that has been demonstrated has been remarkable. This success has been driven by the inherent interest to gain new and deeper understanding of the universe around us. With the limitations of the conventional technology it may not be possible to meet the requirements of the future accelerators with demands for higher and higher energies and luminosities. It is believed that using the existing technology one can build a linear collider with about 1 TeV center of mass energy. However, it would be very difficult (or impossible) to build linear colliders with energies much above one or two TeV without a new method of acceleration. Laser driven high gradient accelerators are becoming more realistic and is expected to provide an alternative, (more compact, and more economical), to conventional accelerators in the future. The author discusses some of the new methods of particle acceleration, including laser and particle beam driven plasma based accelerators, near and far field accelerators. He also discusses the enhanced IFEL (Inverse Free Electron Laser) and NAIBEA (Nonlinear Amplification of Inverse-Beamstrahlung Electron Acceleration) schemes, laser driven photo-injector and the high energy physics requirements.

  3. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G.; Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Kunold, A.; Roa-Neri, J.A.E.

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  4. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  5. Applications of particle accelerators in medicine.

    PubMed

    Silari, Marco

    2011-07-01

    There are nearly 20,000 particle accelerators in operation worldwide, about half of them employed for biomedical uses. This paper focuses on some recent advances in the two main medical domains where accelerators find their use, radionuclide production and radiation therapy. The paper first discusses the use of high-energy electron and proton accelerators for the potential, future production of (99)Mo, which is presently provided by fission reactors. Next, it reviews the rationale for the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy, discussing the requirements imposed on accelerator technology and looking at some recent developments.

  6. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils.

  7. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  8. Electrostatic plasma lens for focusing negatively charged particle beams.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, A A; Dobrovolskiy, A M; Dunets, S M; Litovko, I V; Gushenets, V I; Oks, E M

    2012-02-01

    We describe the current status of ongoing research and development of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating intense negatively charged particle beams, electrons, and negative ions. The physical principle of this kind of plasma lens is based on magnetic isolation electrons providing creation of a dynamical positive space charge cloud in shortly restricted volume propagating beam. Here, the new results of experimental investigations and computer simulations of wide-aperture, intense electron beam focusing by plasma lens with positive space charge cloud produced due to the cylindrical anode layer accelerator creating a positive ion stream towards an axis system is presented.

  9. Charged particle dynamics in turbulent current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Vainchtein, D. L.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    We study dynamics of charged particle in current sheets with magnetic fluctuations. We use the adiabatic theory to describe the nonperturbed charged particle motion and show that magnetic field fluctuations destroy the adiabatic invariant. We demonstrate that the evolution of particle adiabatic invariant's distribution is described by a diffusion equation and derive analytical estimates of the rate of adiabatic invariant's diffusion. This rate is proportional to power density of magnetic field fluctuations. We compare analytical estimates with numerical simulations. We show that adiabatic invariant diffusion results in transient particles trapping in the current sheet. For magnetic field fluctuation amplitude a few times larger than a normal magnetic field component, more than 50% of transient particles become trapped. We discuss the possible consequences of destruction of adiabaticity of the charged particle motion on the state of the current sheets.

  10. Charged particles constrained to a curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Frauendiener, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We study the motion of charged particles constrained to arbitrary two-dimensional curved surfaces but interacting in three-dimensional space via the Coulomb potential. To speed up the interaction calculations, we use the parallel compute capability of the Compute Unified Device Architecture of today's graphics boards. The particles and the curved surfaces are shown using the Open Graphics Library. This paper is intended to give graduate students, who have basic experiences with electrostatics and the Lagrangian formalism, a deeper understanding of charged particle interactions and a short introduction of how to handle a many particle system using parallel computing on a single home computer.

  11. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  12. CUSP Energetic Particles: Confinement, Acceleration and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    The cusp energetic particle (CEP) event is a new magnetospheric phenomenon. The events were detected in the dayside cusp for hours, in which the measured helium ions had energies up to 8 MeV. All of these events were associated with a dramatic decrease and large fluctuations in the local magnetic field strength. During January 1999 - December 1999 covered by this report, I have studied the CEP events by analyzing the POLAR, GEOTAIL, and WIND particle and magnetic field data measured during the geomagnetic quiet periods in 1996 and one geomagnetic storm period in 1998. The simultaneous observations indicated that the ion fluxes in the CEP events were higher than that in both the upstream and the downstream from the bow shock. The pitch angle distribution of the helium ions in the CEP events was found to peak around 90 deg. It was found that the mirror parameter, defined as the ratio of the square root of the integration of the parallel turbulent power spectral component over the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges to the mean field in the cusp, is correlated with the intensity of the cusp MeV helium flux, which is a measure of the influence of mirroring interactions and an indication of local effect. It was also found that the turbulent power of the local magnetic field in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) ranges is correlated with the intensity of the cusp energetic helium ions. Such ULF ranges correspond to periods of about 0.33-500 seconds that cover the gyroperiods, the bounce periods, and the drift periods of the tens keV to MeV charged particles when they are temporarily confined in the high-altitude dayside cusp. These observations represent a discovery that the high-altitude dayside cusp is a new acceleration and dynamic trapping region of the magnetosphere. The cusp geometry is connected via gradient and curvature drift of these energized ions to the equatorial plasma sheet as close as the geostationary orbit at local midnight. It implies that the dayside cusp is

  13. Observation of particle acceleration in laboratory magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Nogami, T.; Sato, N.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Mushiake, T.

    2015-11-15

    The self-organization of magnetospheric plasma is brought about by inward diffusion of magnetized particles. Not only creating a density gradient toward the center of a dipole magnetic field, the inward diffusion also accelerates particles and provides a planetary radiation belt with high energy particles. Here, we report the first experimental observation of a “laboratory radiation belt” created in the ring trap 1 device. By spectroscopic measurement, we found an appreciable anisotropy in the ion temperature, proving the betatron acceleration mechanism which heats particles in the perpendicular direction with respect to the magnetic field when particles move inward. The energy balance model, including the heating mechanism, explains the observed ion temperature profile.

  14. Charged particle periodicity in the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the first definitive evidence for charged particle modulations near the magnetic rotation period at Saturn. This periodicity is apparent in the ratios (and spectra) of low energy charged particles in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Most of the data presented were taken during the Voyager 2 outbound portion of the Saturn encounter. During this time the spacecraft was at high latitudes (approximately 30 deg) in the southern hemisphere of the Saturnian magnetosphere. The probe's trajectory was approximately along the dawn meridian at an essentially constant local time. The observation that the charged particle modulation is consistent with the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) period provides a basic input for the resolution of a puzzle which has existed ever since the discovery of the SKR modulation. The charged particle periodicity identified suggests that a basic asymmetry must exist in the Saturnian magnetosphere.

  15. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  16. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  17. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  18. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  19. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  20. Anomalous/Fractional Diffusion in Particle Acceleration Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    This talk is aimed at reviewing a certain number of theoretical aspects concerning the relation between stochastic acceleration and anomalous/fractional transport of particles. As a matter of fact, anomalous velocity-space diffusion is required within any stochastic acceleration scenario to explain the formation of the ubiquitous power-law tail of non-thermal particles, as observed e.g. in the accelerated distribution of electrons during solar flares. I will establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving turbulence in magnetized plasmas. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the spatial transport (possibly fractional) of charged particles in the acceleration region. I will also discuss recent attempts to obtain spatially non-local and fractional diffusion equations directly from first principles, starting either from the Fokker-Planck equation in the large mean free-path regime or the Boltzmann equation involving velocity-space relaxation toward the kappa distribution instead of the standard Maxwellian distribution.

  1. Solar Particle Acceleration Radiation and Kinetics (SPARK). A mission to understand the nature of particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Sarah A.; Williams, David R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kontar, Eduard P.; Smith, David M.; Lagg, Andreas; Krucker, Sam; Hurford, Gordon J.; Vilmer, Nicole; MacKinnon, Alexander L.; Zharkova, Valentina V.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, Iain G.; Browning, Philippa K.; Innes, Davina E.; Trottet, Gerard; Foullon, Clare; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Green, Lucie M.; Lamoureux, Herve; Forsyth, Colin; Walton, David M.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Gandorfer, Achim; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin; Limousin, Olivier; Verwichte, Erwin; Dalla, Silvia; Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henri; Neukirch, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Energetic particles are critical components of plasma populations found throughout the universe. In many cases particles are accelerated to relativistic energies and represent a substantial fraction of the total energy of the system, thus requiring extremely efficient acceleration processes. The production of accelerated particles also appears coupled to magnetic field evolution in astrophysical plasmas through the turbulent magnetic fields produced by diffusive shock acceleration. Particle acceleration is thus a key component in helping to understand the origin and evolution of magnetic structures in, e.g. galaxies. The proximity of the Sun and the range of high-resolution diagnostics available within the solar atmosphere offers unique opportunities to study the processes involved in particle acceleration through the use of a combination of remote sensing observations of the radiative signatures of accelerated particles, and of their plasma and magnetic environment. The SPARK concept targets the broad range of energy, spatial and temporal scales over which particle acceleration occurs in the solar atmosphere, in order to determine how and where energetic particles are accelerated. SPARK combines highly complementary imaging and spectroscopic observations of radiation from energetic electrons, protons and ions set in their plasma and magnetic context. The payload comprises focusing-optics X-ray imaging covering the range from 1 to 60 keV; indirect HXR imaging and spectroscopy from 5 to 200 keV, γ-ray spectroscopic imaging with high-resolution LaBr3 scintillators, and photometry and source localisation at far-infrared wavelengths. The plasma environment of the regions of acceleration and interaction will be probed using soft X-ray imaging of the corona and vector magnetography of the photosphere and chromosphere. SPARK is designed for solar research. However, in addition it will be able to provide exciting new insights into the origin of particle acceleration in

  2. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  3. Non-accelerator particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Applications of large-scale computation to particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1991-05-01

    The rapid growth in the power of large-scale computers has had a revolutionary effect on the study of charged-particle accelerators that is similar to the impact of smaller computers on everyday life. Before an accelerator is built, it is now the absolute rule to simulate every component and subsystem by computer to establish modes of operation and tolerances. We will bypass the important and fruitful areas of control and operation, and consider only application to design and diagnostic interpretation. Applications of computers can be divided into separate categories including: component design, system design, stability studies, cost optimization, and operating condition simulation. For the purposes of this report, we will choose a few examples from the above categories to illustrate the methods used, and discuss the significance of the work to the project. We also briefly discuss the accelerator project itself. The examples that will be discussed are: The design of accelerator structures for electron-positron linear colliders and circular colliding beam systems, simulation of the wake fields from multibunch electron beams for linear colliders. Particle-in-cell simulation of space-charge dominated beams for an experimental linear induction accelerator for Heavy Ion Fusion.

  5. The charged particle radiation environment for AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be subjected to several sources of charged particle radiation during its 15-year orbital lifetime: geomagnetically-trapped electrons and protons, galactic cosmic ray particles, and solar flare events. These radiation levels are presented for the AXAF orbit for use in the design of the observatory's science instruments.

  6. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  7. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Gaume, R.; Wisdom, J.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    Laser driven particle accelerators require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise electron-beam guiding so fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such next generation machines. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003[1] but with a variety of complications on the laser side. However, fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss the advantages such as the range of materials available and ways to implement them followed by some different test examples we been considered. One important goal is an integrated system that avoids having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  8. Origin and acceleration of suprathermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir I.; Dayeh, Maher A.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2016-03-01

    Observations over the last decade have shown that suprathermal ions with energies above that of the core or bulk solar wind protons (i.e., ~1-2 keV/nucleon) are an important constituent of the overall seed population that is accelerated in solar and interplanetary events. Despite the recent recognition of their importance, the origin of these populations and the method of their acceleration remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the fact that these particles exist in the so-called tail regions of the corresponding solar wind distributions where high temporal and sensitivity measurements are sparse. Moreover, observations comprising long-term averages (between hours to more than a day) show conflicting results. For instance, below ~40 keV/nucleon the ion differential intensities in the solar wind frame appear to exhibit a near-constant power-law spectral slope of ~1.5, perhaps indicating a universal acceleration mechanism. In contrast, at energies greater than ~40 keV/nucleon, the ion composition changes with solar activity, and the energy spectra are significantly steeper, perhaps indicating that the suprathermal pool of material also comprises lower-energy particle populations accelerated in corotating interaction regions, interplanetary shocks, and solar energetic particle events. This paper discusses key observations of suprathermal ions and electrons in terms of state-of-the-art theories and models that have been put forward to account for their origin and acceleration.

  9. Particle acceleration via reconnection processes in the supersonic solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Khabarova, O.

    2014-12-10

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We derive a gyrophase-averaged transport equation for particles experiencing pitch-angle scattering and energization in a super-Alfvénic flowing plasma experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events. A simpler advection-diffusion transport equation for a nearly isotropic particle distribution is derived. The dominant charged particle energization processes are (1) the electric field induced by quasi-2D magnetic island merging and (2) magnetic island contraction. The magnetic island topology ensures that charged particles are trapped in regions where they experience repeated interactions with the induced electric field or contracting magnetic islands. Steady-state solutions of the isotropic transport equation with only the induced electric field and a fixed source yield a power-law spectrum for the accelerated particles with index α = –(3 + M{sub A} )/2, where M{sub A} is the Alfvén Mach number. Considering only magnetic island contraction yields power-law-like solutions with index –3(1 + τ {sub c}/(8τ{sub diff})), where τ {sub c}/τ{sub diff} is the ratio of timescales between magnetic island contraction and charged particle diffusion. The general solution is a power-law-like solution with an index that depends on the Alfvén Mach number and the timescale ratio τ{sub diff}/τ {sub c}. Observed power-law distributions of energetic particles observed in the quiet supersonic solar wind at 1 AU may be a consequence of particle acceleration associated with dissipative small-scale reconnection processes in a turbulent plasma, including the widely reported c {sup –5} (c particle

  10. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Sessler

    2008-04-04

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  11. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Sessler

    2016-07-12

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  12. EIDOSCOPE: particle acceleration at plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaivads, A.; Andersson, G.; Bale, S. D.; Cully, C. M.; De Keyser, J.; Fujimoto, M.; Grahn, S.; Haaland, S.; Ji, H.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lazarian, A.; Lavraud, B.; Mann, I. R.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Narita, Y.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schwartz, S. J.; Shinohara, I.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the mission concept of how ESA can make a major contribution to the Japanese Canadian multi-spacecraft mission SCOPE by adding one cost-effective spacecraft EIDO (Electron and Ion Dynamics Observatory), which has a comprehensive and optimized plasma payload to address the physics of particle acceleration. The combined mission EIDOSCOPE will distinguish amongst and quantify the governing processes of particle acceleration at several important plasma boundaries and their associated boundary layers: collisionless shocks, plasma jet fronts, thin current sheets and turbulent boundary layers. Particle acceleration and associated cross-scale coupling is one of the key outstanding topics to be addressed in the Plasma Universe. The very important science questions that only the combined EIDOSCOPE mission will be able to tackle are: 1) Quantitatively, what are the processes and efficiencies with which both electrons and ions are selectively injected and subsequently accelerated by collisionless shocks? 2) How does small-scale electron and ion acceleration at jet fronts due to kinetic processes couple simultaneously to large scale acceleration due to fluid (MHD) mechanisms? 3) How does multi-scale coupling govern acceleration mechanisms at electron, ion and fluid scales in thin current sheets? 4) How do particle acceleration processes inside turbulent boundary layers depend on turbulence properties at ion/electron scales? EIDO particle instruments are capable of resolving full 3D particle distribution functions in both thermal and suprathermal regimes and at high enough temporal resolution to resolve the relevant scales even in very dynamic plasma processes. The EIDO spin axis is designed to be sun-pointing, allowing EIDO to carry out the most sensitive electric field measurements ever accomplished in the outer magnetosphere. Combined with a nearby SCOPE Far Daughter satellite, EIDO will form a second pair (in addition to SCOPE Mother-Near Daughter) of closely

  13. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  14. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  15. BDO-RFQ Program Complex of Modelling and Optimization of Charged Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.; Antropov, I. V.; Kozynchenko, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article is dedicated to BDO Code program complex used for modelling and optimization of charged particle dynamics with consideration of interaction in RFQ accelerating structures. The structure of the program complex and its functionality are described; mathematical models of charged particle dynamics, interaction models and methods of optimization are given.

  16. Why do particle clouds generate electric charges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, T.; Herrmann, H. J.; Shinbrot, T.

    2010-05-01

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  17. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. On charging of snow particles in blizzard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shio, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The causes of the charge polarity on the blizzard, which consisted of fractured snow crystals and ice particles, were investigated. As a result, the charging phenomena showed that the characteristics of the blizzard are as follows: (1) In the case of the blizzard with snowfall, the fractured snow particles drifting near the surface of snow field (lower area: height 0.3 m) had positive charge, while those drifting at higher area (height 2 m) from the surface of snow field had negative charge. However, during the series of blizzards two kinds of particles positively and negatively charged were collected in equal amounts in a Faraday Cage. It may be considered that snow crystals with electrically neutral properties were separated into two kinds of snow flakes (charged positively and negatively) by destruction of the snow crystals. (2) In the case of the blizzard which consisted of irregularly formed ice drops (generated by peeling off the hardened snow field), the charge polarity of these ice drops salting over the snow field was particularly controlled by the crystallographic characteristics of the surface of the snow field hardened by the powerful wind pressure.

  19. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  20. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  1. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  2. Medium energy charged particle data for evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, S.

    1989-01-01

    Medium energy charged particles incident on targets can cause a variety of nuclear reactions. Charged particle transport calculations require access to a large body of cross-section data which results in interest in an evaluated charge particle data library. Developing an evaluated data library can involve several steps. An index to the literature on measurements and theory is useful to locate information relevant to data evaluation. A computerized compilation of measurements facilitates the intercomparison of different experiments and the determination of how well data are known. Nuclear models, based on theory or phenonological evidence, are compared with experiment and where validated, are used to fill in regions where experimental data are not available. Finally, the selected data is placed into computer readable formats for use in transport calculations. 16 refs.

  3. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  4. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  5. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  6. General description of electromagnetic radiation processes based on instantaneous charge acceleration in ''endpoints''

    SciTech Connect

    James, Clancy W.; Falcke, Heino; Huege, Tim; Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-11-15

    We present a methodology for calculating the electromagnetic radiation from accelerated charged particles. Our formulation - the 'endpoint formulation' - combines numerous results developed in the literature in relation to radiation arising from particle acceleration using a complete, and completely general, treatment. We do this by describing particle motion via a series of discrete, instantaneous acceleration events, or 'endpoints', with each such event being treated as a source of emission. This method implicitly allows for particle creation and destruction, and is suited to direct numerical implementation in either the time or frequency domains. In this paper we demonstrate the complete generality of our method for calculating the radiated field from charged particle acceleration, and show how it reduces to the classical named radiation processes such as synchrotron, Tamm's description of Vavilov-Cherenkov, and transition radiation under appropriate limits. Using this formulation, we are immediately able to answer outstanding questions regarding the phenomenology of radio emission from ultra-high-energy particle interactions in both the earth's atmosphere and the moon. In particular, our formulation makes it apparent that the dominant emission component of the Askaryan effect (coherent radio-wave radiation from high-energy particle cascades in dense media) comes from coherent 'bremsstrahlung' from particle acceleration, rather than coherent Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation.

  7. Charged Particle lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Research development in the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is reported. The CPLEE is ion-electron spectrometer placed on the lunar surface for the purpose of measuring charged particle fluxes impacting the moon from a variety of regions and to study the interactions between space plasmas and the lunar surface. The principal accomplishments reported include: (1) furnishing design specifications for construction of the CPLEE instruments; (2) development of an advanced computer-controlled facility for automated instrument calibration; (3) active participation in the deployment and past-deployment operational phases with regard to data verification and operational mode selection; and (4) publication of research papers, including a study of lunar photoelectrons, a study of plasmas resulting from man-made lunar impart events, a study of magnetotail and magnetosheath particle populations, and a study of solar-flare interplanetary particles.

  8. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  9. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-01

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 82, 104049 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevD.82.104049] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  10. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-15

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. D 82, 104049 (2010).] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  11. The Effect of Single Particle Charge Limits on Particle Charge Distributions in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Le Picard, Romain

    2013-09-01

    There is a limit to the number of electrons that can coexist on a dust particle in a plasma. This limit depends on the particle's surface potential, electron affinity and the inter-electron Coulomb repulsion. We conducted numerical simulations that examine the effect of charge limits on steady-state particle charge distributions, as well as on the time required to reach steady state. Attachment of electrons to a cloud of nanoparticles can severely deplete the electron density and increase the ion density, causing the electron-to-ion density ratio to be much less than unity. At sufficiently high values of the density ratio, e.g. above about 0.1 for 80-nm-diameter Si particles, the charge limit strongly constrains particle charge. At lower values of the density ratio, e.g. around 0.01, particles are much less negatively charged even in the absence of a charge limit, and therefore the limit makes only a small difference. However, in this regime the charge distribution still deviates from the Gaussian form predicted by previous work that neglects charge limits. For the case of Maxwellian electron velocity distributions, we find that whether or not particle charge distributions are significantly affected by charge limits depends on the dimensionless asymmetry charging factor p and on particle size. The factor p in turn depends on the ratios of electron-to-ion density, temperature and mass. Partially supported by the US NSF (grant CHE-1124752), US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (grant DE-SC0001939), and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  12. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  13. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  14. Particle Acceleration At Small-Scale Flux Ropes In The Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, G.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux roped. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands". We describe briefly some observations, selected simulations, and then introduce a transport approach for describing particle acceleration at small-scale flux ropes. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations.

  15. Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, Mirjam E; Christova, Christina G; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Royall, C Patrick; Campbell, Andrew I; Imhof, Arnout; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2005-09-01

    Colloidal suspensions are widely used to study processes such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. This is because they display the same phase behaviour as atoms or molecules, with the nano- to micrometre size of the colloidal particles making it possible to observe them directly in real space. Another attractive feature is that different types of colloidal interactions, such as long-range repulsive, short-range attractive, hard-sphere-like and dipolar, can be realized and give rise to equilibrium phases. However, spherically symmetric, long-range attractions (that is, ionic interactions) have so far always resulted in irreversible colloidal aggregation. Here we show that the electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged particles can be tuned such that large ionic colloidal crystals form readily, with our theory and simulations confirming the stability of these structures. We find that in contrast to atomic systems, the stoichiometry of our colloidal crystals is not dictated by charge neutrality; this allows us to obtain a remarkable diversity of new binary structures. An external electric field melts the crystals, confirming that the constituent particles are indeed oppositely charged. Colloidal model systems can thus be used to study the phase behaviour of ionic species. We also expect that our approach to controlling opposite-charge interactions will facilitate the production of binary crystals of micrometre-sized particles, which could find use as advanced materials for photonic applications.

  16. Highly efficient charged particle veto detector CUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacz, M.; Nyberg, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Dworski, J.; Górska, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Kapusta, M.; Kownacki, J.; Kulczycka, E.; Lagergren, K.; Moszyński, M.; Pieńkowski, L.; Stolarz, A.; Wolski, D.; Ziębliński, M.

    2005-09-01

    A novel, highly efficient, plastic scintillator detector has been constructed. The primary application of the detector is to act as a veto device in heavy-ion-induced fusion-evaporation reactions, in which the structure of proton-rich nuclides is investigated by γ-ray spectroscopy methods. The detector rejects events in which light charged particles, like protons and α particles, are emitted in the evaporation process, facilitating selection of reaction channels associated with emission of only neutrons. The detector was used in a EUROBALL experiment, with achieved efficiencies of 80% and 63% for protons and α particles, respectively. The design of the detector, its performance and limitations are discussed.

  17. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurli, Francesco; Lechner, Kurt

    2014-10-15

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard–Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string. - Highlights: • First exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for massless charges in arbitrary motion. • Explicit expressions of electromagnetic fields and potentials. • Derivations are rigorous and based on distribution theory. • The form of the field depends heavily on whether the motion is bounded or unbounded. • The electromagnetic field contains unexpected Dirac-delta-function contributions.

  18. Stochastic particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droege, W.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that particles during the second phase of solar flares are accelerated by stochastic resonant scattering off hydromagnetic waves and first order Fermi acceleration in shock waves generated in the impulsive phase of the flare. Solutions allow arbitrary power law momentum dependences of the momentum diffusion coefficient as well as the momentum diffusion coefficient as well as the momentum loss time. The acceleration time scale to a characteristic energy approximately 100 keV for protons can be as short as 5s. The resulting electron spectra show a characteristic double power law with a transition around 200 keV and are correlated to the proton spectra evaluated under equal boundary conditions, indicating that electrons and protons are accelerated by the same mechanism. The correlation between the different spectral indices in the electron double power law and between electron and proton spectra are governed by the ratio of first to second order acceleration and therefore allow a determination of the Alfven Mach number of the shock wave.

  19. Particle Access and Charging Environments in the Lunar Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda; Minow, Joseph; Singh, Nagendra; Araveti, Venkata S.; Venkiteswaran, Karthik

    2010-01-01

    A plasma wake a region of low density, high temperature plasma forms on the far side of the Moon when solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail plasma flows past the Moon [Manka, 1973; Ogilvie et al., 1996; Farrell et al., 1998; Halekas et al., 2005]. Ion populations in these flows typically have much smaller thermal velocity than bulk speed and are therefore excluded from the plasma wake while the large thermal electron velocity allows the lighter negatively charged particles to stream ahead of the ions into the wake. Charge separation due to electrons streaming ahead of the ions into the wake from the wake boundary establishes an ambipolar electric field which impedes the motion of electron flow and accelerates ions into the wake [Ogilvie et al., 1996; Farrell et al., 1997]. We have conducted a theoretical study of acceleration (and deceleration) of charged particles in lunar plasma environments, which investigated the mechanisms responsible for allowing solar wind entry into the lunar wake, and for producing energetic particle distributions observed within the lunar wake. To this end, the investigation utilized a macroscale 3D hybrid particle-in-cell numerical model of the interaction of the Moon with external plasma environments to compute electric fields in the lunar environment for a variety of external plasma conditions and interplanetary magnetic field orientations. Ion dynamics were attained from the hybrid code while electron dynamics were determined by considering electron test particle trajectories through the fields established in the hybrid code. Results from the code will be presented to evaluate charging environments within the lunar wake.

  20. Proceedings of the 1987 IEEE particle accelerator conference: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, E.R.; Taylor, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains papers from the IEEE particle accelerator conference. This second volume of three covers the following main topics: Instrumentation and control, accelerators for medium energies and nuclear physics, high current accelerators, and beam dynamics. (LSP)

  1. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis

    2010-09-10

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  2. Channeled particle acceleration by plasma waves in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Noble, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal is presented. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible. Particle dechanneling due to electron multiple scattering can be eliminated with a sufficiently high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed.

  3. Particle transport through hydrogels is charge asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2015-02-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks.

  4. Particle Transport through Hydrogels Is Charge Asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R.; DeRouchey, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks. PMID:25650921

  5. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  6. Properties of acceleration sites in active regions as derived from heavy ion charge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Y.; Dröge, W.; Klecker, B.; Möbius, E.; Popecki, M.; Mason, G.; Krucker, S.

    Charge states of heavy ions in solar energetic particle SEP events are determined by both the plasma conditions in the acceleration region and propagation effects The steep increase of the ionic charge of heavy ions as observed in all 3He- and Fe-rich SEP events suggests that stripping in a dense environment in the low corona is important in all these events The observed charge states and energy spectra of iron ions are used to infer the plasma conditions in the acceleration region by modelling the observations with a combined acceleration and propagation model that includes charge stripping acceleration coulomb losses and recombination in the corona and interplanetary propagation The interplanetary propagation includes anisotropic pitch-angle scattering on magnetic irregularities as well as magnetic focusing convection and adiabatic deceleration in the expanding solar wind To accurately derive the value of the scattering mean free path of particles the intensity profiles and anisotropy data from ACE and Wind spacecraft were used The comparison of the deduced parameters of the acceleration region with coronal density profiles shows that the acceleration of these ions takes place in closed magnetic structures in the low corona

  7. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  8. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  9. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  10. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  11. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  12. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  13. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  14. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  15. Charged particles in curved space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, K.; Jalili, O.

    2016-03-01

    Considering the dynamics of geometry and the matter fields, dynamical equations of geometry and the matter fields are re-derived. The solutions of these equations are studied. We focus on a charged particle and explain the axiomatic approach to drive the electromagnetic self-force on its motion, then the energy conservation is considered. A new mathematical concept, which is introduced in axiomatic approach in general, is discussed.

  16. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  17. Test particle acceleration in a magnetotail reconnection configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Sachsenweger, D.; Scholer, M.; Mobius, E. )

    1989-09-01

    AMPTE/IRM measurements during a period of strong magnetic activity on April 8, 1985 exhibit a significant hardening of the energy spectra of all detected ion species (H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, He{sup +}, O{sup +}) following substorm expansion. In order to explain these observations in the framework of the substorm neutral line model, single-particle trajectories of various ions (H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, O{sup +}) are followed numerically in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields obtained from a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail reconnection. Current sheet acceleration of a suitable plasma sheet ion distribution can explain the observed ordering of the flux increase of the various species in energy per charge. Starting from a cold lobe population, however, current sheet acceleration cannot account for the differential ion intensities observed after substorm expansion. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  18. ULF Waves and Diffusive Radial Transport of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ashar Fawad

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain highly energetic particles which interact with a variety of plasma and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Waves in the ultra low-frequency (ULF) range play an important role in the loss and acceleration of energetic particles. Considering the geometry of the geomagnetic field, charged particles trapped in the inner magnetosphere undergo three distinct types of periodic motions; an adiabatic invariant is associated with each type of motion. The evolution of the phase space density of charged particles in the magnetosphere in the coordinate space of the three adiabatic invariants is modeled by the Fokker-Planck equation. If we assume that the first two adiabatic invariants are conserved while the third invariant is violated, then the general Fokker-Planck equation reduces to a radial diffusion equation with the radial diffusion coefficient quantifying the rate of the radial diffusion of charged particles, including contributions from perturbations in both the magnetic and the electric fields. This thesis investigates two unanswered questions about ULF wave-driven radial transport of charged particles. First, how important are the ULF fluctuations in the magnetic field compared with the ULF fluctuations in the electric field in driving the radial diffusion of charged particles in the Earth's inner magnetosphere? It has generally been accepted that magnetic field perturbations dominate over electric field perturbations, but several recently published studies suggest otherwise. Second, what is the distribution of ULF wave power in azimuth, and how does ULF wave power depend upon radial distance and the level of geomagnetic activity? Analytic treatments of the diffusion coefficients generally assume uniform distribution of power in azimuth, but in situ measurements suggest that this may not be the case. We used the magnetic field data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and the electric and the magnetic

  19. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  20. Particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptitsyna, K.; Neronov, A.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We consider particle acceleration in the vacuum gaps in magnetospheres of black holes powered by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism and embedded in the radiatively-inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) environment. In this situation, the gap height is limited by the onset of gamma-gamma pair production on the infrared photons originating in the RIAF. Methods: We numerically calculated the acceleration and propagation of charged particles by taking the detailed structure of the electric and magnetic fields in the gap and in the entire black hole magnetosphere into account, as well as the radiative energy losses and interactions of γ-rays produced by the propagated charged particles with the background radiation field of the RIAF. Results: We show that the presence of the vacuum gap has clear observational signatures. The spectra of emission from gaps embedded in a relatively high-luminosity RIAF are dominated by the inverse Compton emission with a sharp, super-exponential cut-off in the very-high-energy gamma-ray band. The cut-off energy is determined by the properties of the RIAF and is largely independent of the structure of magnetosphere and geometry of the gap. The spectra of the gap residing in low-luminosity RIAFs are dominated by synchrotron or curvature emission with the spectra extending into 1-100 GeV energy range. We also consider the effect of possible acceleration of protons in the gap and find that proton energies could reach the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) range only in extremely low-luminosity RIAFs.

  1. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific emphasis of this contract has been on the physics of beam ionosphere interactions, in particular, what are the plasma wave levels stimulated by the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) electron beam as it is ejected from the Electron Beam Accelerator (EBA) and passes into and through the ionosphere. There were two different phenomena expected. The first was generation of plasma waves by the interaction of the DC component of the beam with the plasma of the ionosphere, by wave particle interactions. The second was the generation of waves at the pulsing frequency of the beam (AC component). This is referred to as using the beam as a virtual antenna, because the beam of electrons is a coherent electrical current confined to move along the earth's magnetic field. As in a physical antenna, a conductor at a radio or TV station, the beam virtual antenna radiates electromagnetic waves at the frequency of the current variations. These two phenomena were investigated during the period of this contract.

  2. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1959-08-01

    An analog system for determining the motion of charged particles in three dimensional electrical fields is described. A model electrode structure is formed and potentials are applied to the electrodes to provide an analog of the field which is to be studied. To simulate charged particles within the model, conducting spheres are placed at points from which particle motion is to be traced. To free the spheres from gravitational attraction in order that they will be electrostatically accelerated through the model, the apparatus is suspended and dropped. During the pericd that the model is dropping the spheres move through the electrcde structure with a motion corresponding to that of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data which frequently can otherwise be obtained only with a digital computer.

  3. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  4. Ball Rolling on a Turntable: Analog for Charged Particle Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes how a ball's motion duplicates that of a charged particle moving through a magnetic field and thereby allows students to visualize directly many aspects of charged particle dynamics otherwise not accessible to them. (Author/JN)

  5. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  6. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  7. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2003-07-01

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field with regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case, not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e., can be cancelled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of a homogeneous external field, the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  8. Ionic charge state measurements during He(+)-rich solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ionic charge state measurements of carbon, oxygen, and iron in He(+)-rich energetic particle events are presented. The data have been obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The ionic charge states cannot be explained in terms of a model in which the coronal temperature determines a charge equilibrium which is subsequently frozen-in nor in terms of charge exchange during transition through coronal matter after acceleration. It is concluded that the acceleration and probably also the injection process is biased against particles with high mass-to-charge ratios. The plasma injected into the acceleration process must consist of material of cold (not greater than 8.5 x 10 to the 4th K) as well as hot (2.5 x 10 to the 6th K) origin. The cold material must be more abundant than the hot material.

  9. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzurli, Francesco; Lechner, Kurt

    2014-10-01

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard-Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string.

  10. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  11. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.; Holzer, T. E. (Editor); Mihalas, D. (Editor); Sturrock, P. A. (Editor); Ulrich, R. K. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theories of particle acceleration in solar flares are reviewed. The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are gamma rays, X-rays and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere and energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The implication of these observations are discussed. Stochastic and shock acceleration as well as acceleration in direct electric fields are considered. Interplanetary particle propagation is discussed and an overview of the highlights of both current and promising future research is presented.

  12. Charged-particle telescope experiment on Clementine.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S; Blake, J B; Adams, J H

    1995-01-01

    The charged-particle telescope (CPT) onboard the Clementine spacecraft measured the fluxes of energetic protons emitted in solar energetic particle events. Protons in the energy range from 10 to 80 MeV were of greatest interest for radiation effects such as total dose and single event upsets. Energetic electrons were also of interest for spacecraft charging and their contribution to total dose. The lower-energy CPT electron channels (25-500 keV) were mainly of geophysical interest. While orbiting the moon, the CPT observed the wake created by the moon when it blocked the flow of energetic particles in the magnetotail region. The CPT provided opportunities to observe energetic electron bursts during magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. CPT data are particularly useful in multispacecraft studies of interplanetary disturbances and their interaction with the magnetosphere. The proton channels on the CPT provided data on solar energetic protons and storm-time protons associated with the passage of an interplanetary shock at 0903 UT on Feb. 21, 1994. Results are compared with those from GOES-7, SAMPEX, and GEOTAIL.

  13. Charged particle optics without detailed field maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, David C.

    1993-12-01

    For the initial design of a beam line or charged particle optical system, it is both useful and convenient to be able to describe the components in terms of a small number of parameters. These parameters are used in a calculation of a transfer map which represents the effect of the beam line on a particle trajectory. The transfer map is often expressed as some kind of series expansion. A calculation to first order requires the smallest number of descriptive parameters. Extension of the calculation to higher orders requires a greater number of parameters. From our mathematical backgrounds we have come to have certain expectations as to the characteristics of a series expansion. These expectations may not always be commensurate with the physics of charged particle beam lines. The reconciliation of these expectations will be discussed. The example used will be the program TRANSPORT and its extension to third order. The third-order expansion may represent the inherent limit of the series representation without numerical integration. We shall explain why we may have reached that limit.

  14. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  15. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Farengo, R.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, "cold" neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  16. Energetic charged particle beams for disablement of mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1995-03-27

    LLNL has an ongoing program of weapons disablement using energetic charged particle beams; this program combines theoretical and experimental expertise in accelerators, high-energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics and hydrodynamics to simulate/measure effects of electron and proton beams on weapons. This paper reviews work by LLNL, LANL and NSWC on detonating sensitive and insensitive high explosives and land mines using high-current electron beams. Computer simulations are given. 20--160 MeV electron beams incident on wet/dry soils are being studied, along with electron beam propagation in air. Compact high current, high energy accelerators are being developed for mine clearing. Countermine missions of interest are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Neutral and inertial particle acceleration in strained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min; Gylfason, Armann; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence influences the transport and mixing of particles. We study the dynamics of particles in turbulent flows undergoing asymmetrically expanding straining by means of direct numerical simulations. We investigate the accelerations of tracer and inertial particles. We find a good agreement between tracer acceleration variance and the prediction of rapid distortion theory. Furthermore we study how particle acceleration probability density functions depend on the strain rate, the Stokes number, and the Reynolds number. Accelerations variances of inertial particles are discussed in the context of the formal solution of the equation of particle motion, and we show that in strong straining the acceleration variance of particles with small Stokes numbers can exceed that of tracer particles.

  18. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL PARTICLES UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Zhang, M. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2013-02-10

    The acceleration of suprathermal charged particles in the heliosphere under pressure balance conditions including for the first time the radial spatial particle diffusion and convection in the solar wind is investigated. The physical conditions are derived for which the stationary phase space distribution of suprathermal particles approaches the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5}, which is often seen in spacecraft observations. For separable source distributions in momentum and position we analytically solve the stationary particle transport equation for a radially constant solar wind speed V {sub 0} and a momentum-independent radial spatial diffusion coefficient. The resulting stationary solution at any position within the finite heliosphere is the superposition of an infinite sum of power laws in momentum below and above the (assumed mono-momentum) injection momentum p{sub I} . The smallest spatial eigenvalue determines the flattest power law, to which the full stationary solution approaches at large and small enough momenta. Only for the case of a reflecting inner and a free-escape outer spatial boundary, does one small eigenvalue exist, yielding the power-law distribution f{proportional_to}p {sup -5} at sufficiently large momentum values. The other three spatial boundary conditions imply steeper momentum spectra. Momentum spectra and radial profiles of suprathermal particles are calculated by adopting a uniform outer ring spatial source distribution.

  19. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  20. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  1. Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, N.; Garrett, H. B.

    1983-09-01

    In situ data from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, supplemented by earth-based observations and theoretical considerations, are used as the basis for the present quantitative, compact model of the 1 eV-several MeV charged particle distribution in the Jovian magnetosphere. The thermal plasma parameters of convection speed, number density, and characteristic energy, are specified as functions of position for electrons and for the ion species H(+), O(+), O(2+), S(+), S(2+), S(3+), and Na(+). Major features of the magnetic field, thermal plasma, and trapped particle distributions, are modeled and results for each plasma region are compared with observed spectra. Comparisons show that the model represents the data to within a factor of 2 + or - 1, except where time variations are significant. Practical applications of the model to spacecraft near Jupiter are given.

  2. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  3. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  4. Critical escape velocity for a charged particle in Ernst spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qihong; Chen, Juhua; Wang, Yongjiu

    2015-05-01

    Motion of a charged particle in Ernst spacetime is discussed. We study the conditions that a charged particle, originally revolving around this black hole in the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), will escape to infinity after being kicked by another particle or photon. The motion of the kicked particle is chaotic. The critical escape energy and velocity of the charged particle are obtained in the present paper. Comparing to the Schwarzschild case, the kicked charged particle without the radial velocity needs more energy to escape in Ernst case for l > 0 and less energy to escape for l < 0.

  5. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  6. DIFFUSIVE ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES AT OBLIQUE, RELATIVISTIC, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Summerlin, Errol J.; Baring, Matthew G. E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2012-01-20

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at relativistic shocks is expected to be an important acceleration mechanism in a variety of astrophysical objects including extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. These sources remain good candidate sites for the generation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. In this paper, key predictions of DSA at relativistic shocks that are germane to the production of relativistic electrons and ions are outlined. The technique employed to identify these characteristics is a Monte Carlo simulation of such diffusive acceleration in test-particle, relativistic, oblique, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks. Using a compact prescription for diffusion of charges in MHD turbulence, this approach generates particle angular and momentum distributions at any position upstream or downstream of the shock. Simulation output is presented for both small angle and large angle scattering scenarios, and a variety of shock obliquities including superluminal regimes when the de Hoffmann-Teller frame does not exist. The distribution function power-law indices compare favorably with results from other techniques. They are found to depend sensitively on the mean magnetic field orientation in the shock, and the nature of MHD turbulence that propagates along fields in shock environs. An interesting regime of flat-spectrum generation is addressed; we provide evidence for it being due to shock drift acceleration, a phenomenon well known in heliospheric shock studies. The impact of these theoretical results on blazar science is outlined. Specifically, Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray observations of these relativistic jet sources are providing significant constraints on important environmental quantities for relativistic shocks, namely, the field obliquity, the frequency of scattering, and the level of field turbulence.

  7. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  8. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  9. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  10. Current Fragmentation and Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Vlahos, L.; Baumann, G.; Drake, J. F.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    Particle acceleration in solar flares remains an outstanding problem in plasma physics and space science. While the observed particle energies and timescales can perhaps be understood in terms of acceleration at a simple current sheet or turbulence site, the vast number of accelerated particles, and the fraction of flare energy in them, defies any simple explanation. The nature of energy storage and dissipation in the global coronal magnetic field is essential for understanding flare acceleration. Scenarios where the coronal field is stressed by complex photospheric motions lead to the formation of multiple current sheets, rather than the single monolithic current sheet proposed by some. The currents sheets in turn can fragment into multiple, smaller dissipation sites. MHD, kinetic and cellular automata models are used to demonstrate this feature. Particle acceleration in this environment thus involves interaction with many distributed accelerators. A series of examples demonstrate how acceleration works in such an environment. As required, acceleration is fast, and relativistic energies are readily attained. It is also shown that accelerated particles do indeed interact with multiple acceleration sites. Test particle models also demonstrate that a large number of particles can be accelerated, with a significant fraction of the flare energy associated with them. However, in the absence of feedback, and with limited numerical resolution, these results need to be viewed with caution. Particle in cell models can incorporate feedback and in one scenario suggest that acceleration can be limited by the energetic particles reaching the condition for firehose marginal stability. Contemporary issues such as footpoint particle acceleration are also discussed. It is also noted that the idea of a "standard flare model" is ill-conceived when the entire distribution of flare energies is considered.

  11. ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES ASSOCIATED WITH STRONG INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2012-12-10

    We analyze observations of energetic charged particles associated with many strong interplanetary shocks seen by Advanced Composition Explorer. We focus primarily on 47-187 keV suprathermal protons and restrict our analysis to strong interplanetary shocks (Alfven Mach number >3 and the shock density compression >2.5). Eighteen shocks meeting this criterion from 1998 to 2003 were analyzed. All 18 had enhancements of the 47-65 keV proton intensity above the intensity seen one day before the shock. In 17 events, the particle intensity either rose to a quasi-plateau or peaked within 10 minutes of the shock. Most had intensities at the shock exceeding 100 times more than that seen the day before the shock arrived. The time-intensity profiles of the energetic proton events in many cases reveal a rise before the shock passage reaching a quasi-plateau or local peak at the shock, followed by a gradual decline. This suggests that the shock itself is the source of energetic particles. Energy spectra behind the shock were fit to an assumed power law over the interval from 46 to 187 keV, and the resulting spectral index was compared to the plasma density jump across each shock. Most events agree with the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory to within the observational uncertainties. We also analyzed a few selected events to determine the particle spatial diffusion coefficients and acceleration timescales. We find that the time to accelerate protons to {approx}50 keV is of the order of an hour.

  12. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  13. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances. PMID:23789432

  14. Charged particle therapy--optimization, challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Jay S; Durante, Marco

    2013-07-01

    The use of charged particle therapy to control tumours non-invasively offers advantages over conventional radiotherapy. Protons and heavy ions deposit energy far more selectively than X-rays, allowing a higher local control of the tumour, a lower probability of damage to healthy tissue, low risk of complications and the chance for a rapid recovery after therapy. Charged particles are also useful for treating tumours located in areas that surround tissues that are radiosensitive and in anatomical sites where surgical access is limited. Current trial outcomes indicate that accelerated ions can potentially replace surgery for radical cancer treatments, which might be beneficial as the success of surgical cancer treatments are largely dependent on the expertise and experience of the surgeon and the location of the tumour. However, to date, only a small number of controlled randomized clinical trials have made comparisons between particle therapy and X-rays. Therefore, although the potential advantages are clear and supported by data, the cost:benefit ratio remains controversial. Research in medical physics and radiobiology is focusing on reducing the costs and increasing the benefits of this treatment.

  15. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  16. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  17. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied| about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  18. Search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, V.

    1999-10-29

    The authors have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup {minus}22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  19. High-energy particle acceleration in the shell of a supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F A; Akhperjanian, A G; Aye, K-M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Bolz, O; Boisson, C; Borgmeier, C; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Gordo, J Bussons; Chadwick, P M; Chitnis, V R; Chounet, L-M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'C; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Guy, J; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemoine, M; Lemière, A; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, M; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pohl, M; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rivoal, M; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J-P; Théoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Der Walt, D J; Vasileiadis, G; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2004-11-01

    A significant fraction of the energy density of the interstellar medium is in the form of high-energy charged particles (cosmic rays). The origin of these particles remains uncertain. Although it is generally accepted that the only sources capable of supplying the energy required to accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova explosions, and even though the mechanism of particle acceleration in expanding supernova remnant (SNR) shocks is thought to be well understood theoretically, unequivocal evidence for the production of high-energy particles in supernova shells has proven remarkably hard to find. Here we report on observations of the SNR RX J1713.7 - 3946 (G347.3 - 0.5), which was discovered by ROSAT in the X-ray spectrum and later claimed as a source of high-energy gamma-rays of TeV energies (1 TeV = 10(12) eV). We present a TeV gamma-ray image of the SNR: the spatially resolved remnant has a shell morphology similar to that seen in X-rays, which demonstrates that very-high-energy particles are accelerated there. The energy spectrum indicates efficient acceleration of charged particles to energies beyond 100 TeV, consistent with current ideas of particle acceleration in young SNR shocks.

  20. The Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Particles Required to Seed Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J.; Laming, J. M.; Tylka, A.; Ko, Y.; Rakowski, C.; Ng, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    An extensive body of evidence identifies shocks driven by very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) starting within a few solar radii of the Sun as the primary particle accelerators in large, gradual solar energetic particles (SEP) events. These large SEP events are major radiation hazards for astronauts and for space borne instrumentation, making a reliable SEP predictive capability a high priority for Heliophysics research. Diverse lines of evidence indicate that the rapid production of large intensities of high-energy particles is greatly enhanced when the pre-event environment has been primed with a population of suprathermal ions having energies well above the typical thermal particle energy, usually in the range from a few to tens of keV in the solar corona. However, at present we have no direct evidence that suprathermal ions actually exist in the corona in numbers sufficient to serve as "seed particles" for diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). We will review the evidence indicating seed particles are required to produce energetic SEPs on the observed time scales. One technique with the potential for directly observing these seed particles is the use of high-throughput UV spectroscopy to quantify broadening of the Ly-α line resulting from charge exchange between suprathermal protons and neutral atoms in the corona. Attempts to use this technique with SOHO UVCS have not produced clear evidence for the detection of coronal suprathermals. We will present revised spectroscopic computations of the influence of seed particles on the Ly-α line spectrum and describe the instrumental requirements for observing this line broadening.

  1. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  2. Initial observations of low energy charged particles near the earth's bow shock on ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Initial measurements from the ULECA sensor of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE 1 are reported. ULECA is an electrostatic deflection - total energy sensor consisting of a collimator, a deflection analyzer, and an array of solid-state detectors. The position of a given detector, which determines the energy per charge of an incident particle, together with the measured energy, determines the particle's charge state. It is found that a rich variety of phenomena are operative in the transthermal energy regime (about 10 keV/Q to 100 keV/Q) covered by ULECA. Specifically, observations are presented of locally accelerated protons, alpha particles, and heavier ions in the magnetosheath and upstream of earth's bow shock. Preliminary analysis indicates that the behavior of these locally accelerated particles is most similar at the same energy per charge.

  3. Charge states of Mg and Si from stochastic acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.; Wannawichian, S.; Ruffolo, D.; Ostryakov, V. M.

    2002-07-01

    We consider the acceleration of heavy ions in impulsive solar flares. In particular, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations of stochastic acceleration by Alfvén wave turbulence, and compare new results for magnesium and silicon ions with previous results for iron. The model takes into account stripping due to collisions with ambient electrons and heavy particles (protons and He +2) which becomes increasingly important for more energetic ions, as well as radiative and dielectronic recombination due to collisions with electrons. Spatial diffusion and Coulomb losses are also taken into account. For comparison, we also calculate equilibrium mean charges. We examine the effects of plasma parameters on the calculated energy-dependent charge state distributions of these elements, which can be compared with results from space-borne instruments in order to put constraints on the physical environment of the acceleration region.

  4. Modulation of terrestrial ion escape flux composition /by low-altitude acceleration and charge exchange chemistry/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations of highly variable hot plasma composition in the magnetosphere, control of the ionospheric escape flux composition by low-altitude particle dynamics and ion chemistry has been investigated for an e(-), H(+), O(+) ionosphere. It is found that the fraction of the steady state escape flux which is O(+) can be controlled very sensitively by the occurrence of parallel or transverse ion acceleration at altitudes below the altitude where the neutral oxygen density falls rapidly below the neutral hydrogen density and the ionospheric source of O(+) tends to be rapidly converted by charge exchange to H(+). The acceleration is required both to overcome the gravitational confinement of O(+) and to violate charge exchange equilibrium so that the neutral hydrogen atmosphere appears 'optically' thin to escaping O(+). Constraints are placed on the acceleration processes, and it is shown that O(+) escape is facilitated by observed ionospheric responses to magnetic activity.

  5. Solar gamma-ray lines as probes of accelerated particle directionalities in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Crannell, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Anisotropies of charged particles accelerated in solar flares were studied by observing Doppler shifts of selected gamma-ray lines. The spectral shape was calculated of the 6.1-MeV line of O-16. If the accelerated particles are isotropic, the line remains centered at e sub 0 = 6129.4 keV, and its width (FWHM) is about 100 keV. For particle anisotropies that may be produced in solar flares, the line is shifted to lower energies by about 30 to 40 keV.

  6. Spectrometry of charged particles from inertial-confinement-fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Hicks, D. G.; Kurebayashi, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Schwartz, B.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Roberts, S.; Soures, J. M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Knauer, J. P.; Sorce, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Phillips, T. W.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Padalino, S.

    2003-02-01

    High-resolution spectrometry of charged particles from inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) experiments has become an important method of studying plasma conditions in laser-compressed capsules. In experiments at the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], utilizing capsules with D2, D3He, DT, or DTH fuel in a shell of plastic, glass, or D2 ice, we now routinely make spectral measurements of primary fusion products (p, D, T, 3He, α), secondary fusion products (p), "knock-on" particles (p, D, T) elastically scattered by primary neutrons, and ions from the shell. Use is made of several types of spectrometers that rely on detection and identification of particles with CR-39 nuclear track detectors in conjunction with magnets and/or special ranging filters. CR-39 is especially useful because of its insensitivity to electromagnetic noise and its ability to distinguish the types and energies of individual particles, as illustrated here by detailed calibrations of its response to 0.1-13.8 MeV protons from a Van de Graaff accelerator and to p, D, T, and α from ICF experiments at OMEGA. A description of the spectrometers is accompanied by illustrations of their operating principles using data from OMEGA. Sample results and discussions illustrate the relationship of secondary-proton and knock-on spectra to capsule fuel and shell areal densities and radial compression ratios; the relationship of different primary fusion products to each other and to ion temperatures; the relationship of deviations from spherical symmetry in particle yields and energies to capsule structure; the acceleration of fusion products and the spectra of ions from the shell due to external fields; and other important physical characteristics of the laser-compressed capsules.

  7. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  8. Multiwavelength studies of Galactic TeV particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-07-01

    Our Milky Way galaxy is host to a variety of astrophysical objects capable of accelerating particles to TeV energies, including supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. I will review recent multiwavelength results on Galactic TeV sources and discuss the implications for particle acceleration and diffusion in these systems.

  9. Proceedings of the 1987 IEEE particle accelerator conference: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, E.R.; Taylor, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers from the IEEE conference on particle accelerators. The general areas covered in this first of three volumes are: high energy accelerators; colliders; novel methods; free electron lasers; low energy accelerators; ion sources; synchrotron light source; radiation sources; instrumentation and control. Individual papers are separately indexed.

  10. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  11. Test-particle acceleration in a hierarchical three-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Dalena, S.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.; Greco, A.

    2014-03-10

    The acceleration of charged particles is relevant to the solar corona over a broad range of scales and energies. High-energy particles are usually detected in concomitance with large energy release events like solar eruptions and flares. Nevertheless, acceleration can occur at smaller scales, characterized by dynamical activity near current sheets. To gain insight into the complex scenario of coronal charged particle acceleration, we investigate the properties of acceleration with a test-particle approach using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. These are obtained from direct solutions of the reduced MHD equations, well suited for a plasma embedded in a strong axial magnetic field, relevant to the inner heliosphere. A multi-box, multiscale technique is used to solve the equations of motion for protons. This method allows us to resolve an extended range of scales present in the system, namely, from the ion inertial scale of the order of a meter up to macroscopic scales of the order of 10 km (1/100th of the outer scale of the system). This new technique is useful to identify the mechanisms that, acting at different scales, are responsible for acceleration to high energies of a small fraction of the particles in the coronal plasma. We report results that describe acceleration at different stages over a broad range of time, length, and energy scales.

  12. Particle Acceleration At Shock Waves and Downstream Small-Scale Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, Gary; Hunana, Peter; Mostafavi, Parisa; le Roux, Jakobus; Webb, Gary; Khabarova, Olga; Li, Gang; Cummungs, Alan; Stone, Edward; Decker, Robert

    2016-04-01

    An emerging paradigm for the dissipation of magnetic turbulence in the supersonic solar wind is via localized small-scale reconnection processes, essentially between quasi-2D interacting magnetic islands or flux ropes. Charged particles trapped in merging magnetic islands can be accelerated by the electric field generated by magnetic island merging and the contraction of magnetic islands. We discuss the basic physics of particle acceleration by single magnetic islands and describe how to incorporate these ideas in a distributed "sea of magnetic islands" by developing a transport formalism. We discuss particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind and extend these ideas to particle acceleration at shock waves. Shock waves generate naturally vortical turbulence and particle acceleration at shocks is likely therefore to be a combination of classical diffusive shock acceleration and acceleration by downstream magnetic islands or flux ropes. These models are appropriate to the acceleration of both electrons and ions. We describe model predictions and supporting observations made at the heliospheric termination shock.

  13. PARTICLE ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN A COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-08-20

    Particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk was investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We discuss the important role that magnetic reconnection plays not only on the saturation of MRI but also on the relativistic particle generation. The plasma pressure anisotropy of p > p{sub ||} induced by the action of MRI dynamo leads to rapid growth in magnetic reconnection, resulting in the fast generation of nonthermal particles with a hard power-law spectrum. This efficient particle acceleration mechanism involved in a collisionless accretion disk may be a possible model to explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  14. Earth's Most Powerful Natural Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Thunderstorms launch antimatter, gamma rays, and highly energetic electrons and neutrons to the edge of space. This witches' brew of radiation is generated at the edge of the stratopause, by the strong electric fields associated with lightning discharges. In less than a quarter millisecond, an explosive feedback process takes an initial seed population of electrons, perhaps produced by cosmic rays from dying stars, and amplifies them a billion billion-fold in the rarefied air over high altitude thunderheads. The electrons generate gamma radiation as they travel through the stratosphere and lower mesosphere, momentarily brighter and of harder spectrum than cosmic gamma ray bursts. These electrons ultimately are absorbed by the atmosphere, but the gamma rays continue on, into the upper reaches of the atmosphere, where they in turn generate a new population of electrons, positrons, and energetic neutrons. These secondary electrons and positrons move along the magnetic field, and can reach near-earth space, streaming through the inner radiation belts, and possibly contributing to the trapped populations there. First postulated by Wilson in 1925, and serendipitously discovered by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in 1994 [Fishman et al.], these events, known as "Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes" (TGFs), represent the most intense episodes of particle acceleration on or near the Earth, resulting in electrons with energies up to 100 MeV. Recent observations by the RHESSI [Smith et al., 2004], Fermi [Briggs et al., 2010], and AGILE [Tavani et al., 2011] satellites, and theoretical and computational modeling, have suggested that the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism [Gurevich, 1992], and important modifications, such as the relativistic feedback discharge (RFD) model [Dwyer 2012] can best explain the observations at present. In these models, strong thunderstorm electric fields drive seed electrons, generated from cosmic ray interactions, into a runaway

  15. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  16. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  17. Beams of protons and alpha particles greater than approximately 30 keV/charge from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two beamlike particle events (30 keV/charge to 160 keV/charge) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland ultralow energy and charge analyzer on ISEE 1. These beams consist of protons as well as of alpha particles, and the spectra are generally steep and are decreasing with increasing energy. During one event the spectra of both protons and alpha particles have a maximum at approximately 65 keV/charge. During these events, the interplanetary magnetic field through the satellite position was almost tangent to the bow shock, and application of the theory of acceleration predicts acceleration of a solar wind particle up to 60 keV/nucleon in a single reflection. The observation of reflected protons as well as alpha particles has implications for the physical reflection process usually not discussed in acceleration theories.

  18. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  19. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  20. Determination of colloidal particle surface charge from dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Marko; Nuansri, Rittirong; Mazza, Jacob; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Electrophoresis (EP) is used to determine colloidal particle surface charge. However, when the Debye length is comparable to or larger than the particle size, electrophoresis cannot be reliably used to determine the surface charge due to counter ion retardation flow. Alexander et al. developed a theory relating colloidal osmotic pressure and particle surface charge. We use dielectrophoresis (DEP) to obtain a potential landscape based on the number density distribution of the particles in a non-uniform AC electric field. We determine the osmotic pressure from the DEP force and density profiles using Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation. Surface charge obtained by DEP (thermodynamics) will be compared to that obtained by EP (electrokinetics).

  1. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  2. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  3. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  4. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented.

  5. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  6. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  7. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common “bead-on-the-wire” approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their “falling” on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  8. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  9. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  10. Particle Acceleration at Low Coronal Compression Regions and Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Lee, M. A.; Gorby, M.; Lugaz, N.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M.; Török, T.; Downs, C.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.; Mikić, Z.; Riley, P.; Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Kozarev, K.

    2015-09-01

    We present a study on particle acceleration in the low corona associated with the expansion and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Because CME expansion regions low in the corona are effective accelerators over a finite spatial region, we show that there is a rigidity regime where particles effectively diffuse away and escape from the acceleration sites using analytic solutions to the Parker transport equation. This leads to the formation of broken power-law distributions. Based on our analytic solutions, we find a natural ordering of the break energy and second power-law slope (above the break energy) as a function of the scattering characteristics. These relations provide testable predictions for the particle acceleration from low in the corona. Our initial analysis of solar energetic particle observations suggests a range of shock compression ratios and rigidity dependencies that give rise to the solar energetic particle (SEP) events studied. The wide range of characteristics inferred suggests competing mechanisms at work in SEP acceleration. Thus, CME expansion and acceleration in the low corona may naturally give rise to rapid particle acceleration and broken power-law distributions in large SEP events.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT LOW CORONAL COMPRESSION REGIONS AND SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Lee, M. A.; Gorby, M; Lugaz, N.; Spence, H. E.; Desai, M.; Török, T.; Downs, C.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.; Mikić, Z.; Riley, P.; Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Kozarev, K.

    2015-09-10

    We present a study on particle acceleration in the low corona associated with the expansion and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Because CME expansion regions low in the corona are effective accelerators over a finite spatial region, we show that there is a rigidity regime where particles effectively diffuse away and escape from the acceleration sites using analytic solutions to the Parker transport equation. This leads to the formation of broken power-law distributions. Based on our analytic solutions, we find a natural ordering of the break energy and second power-law slope (above the break energy) as a function of the scattering characteristics. These relations provide testable predictions for the particle acceleration from low in the corona. Our initial analysis of solar energetic particle observations suggests a range of shock compression ratios and rigidity dependencies that give rise to the solar energetic particle (SEP) events studied. The wide range of characteristics inferred suggests competing mechanisms at work in SEP acceleration. Thus, CME expansion and acceleration in the low corona may naturally give rise to rapid particle acceleration and broken power-law distributions in large SEP events.

  12. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  13. Test particle acceleration in a numerical MHD experiment of an anemone jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, K. J.; Galsgaard, K.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: To use a 3D numerical MHD experiment representing magnetic flux emerging into an open field region as a background field for tracing charged particles. The interaction between the two flux systems generates a localised current sheet where MHD reconnection takes place. We investigate how efficiently the reconnection region accelerates charged particles and what kind of energy distribution they acquire. Methods: The particle tracing is done numerically using the Guiding Center Approximation on individual data sets from the numerical MHD experiment. Results: We derive particle and implied photon distribution functions having power law forms, and look at the impact patterns of particles hitting the photosphere. We find that particles reach energies far in excess of those seen in observations of solar flares. However the structure of the impact region in the photosphere gives a good representation of the topological structure of the magnetic field. Three movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in Reservoirs throughout the Heliosphere: 1. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-09-01

    “Reservoirs” of energetic charged particles are regions where the particle population is quasi-trapped in large-scale (relative to the gyroradii) magnetic field structures. Reservoirs are found throughout the heliosphere: the huge heliosheath (90charged particles within these reservoirs is produced by the interaction when the particle magnetic drifts have a component along the large-scale electric fields produced by plasma convection. The appropriate description of this transport is “weak scattering”, in which the particle's first adiabatic invariant (magnetic moment) is approximately conserved while the particle itself moves rather freely along magnetic field lines. Considerable insight into the observed properties of energization processes can be gained from a remarkably simple equation that describes the particle's fractional time-rate-of-change of momentum (dlnp/dt) which depends only upon its pitch angle, the divergence of the plasma velocity (V⊥) transverse to the magnetic field), and the inner product of (V⊥) with the curvature vector of the field lines. The possibilities encompassed in this simple (but general) equation are quite rich, so we restrict our application of it in this paper to the compressive acceleration of SEPs within CMEs.

  15. Ferroelectric Devices Emit Charged Particles and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Felsteiner, Joshua; Karsik, Yakov

    2005-01-01

    Devices called solid-state ferroelectric- based sources (SSFBSs) are under development as sources of electrons, ions, ultraviolet light, and x-rays for diverse applications in characterization and processing of materials. Whereas heretofore it has been necessary to use a different device to generate each of the aforementioned species of charged particles or radiation, a single SSFBS can be configured and operated to selectively generate any of the species as needed using a single source. Relative to comparable prior sources based, variously, on field emission, thermionic emission, and gaseous discharge plasmas, SSFBSs demand less power, and are compact and lightweight. An SSFBS exploits the unique physical characteristics of a ferroelectric material in the presence of a high-frequency pulsed electric field. The basic building block of an SSFBS is a ferroelectric cathode -- a ferroelectric wafer with a solid electrode covering its rear face and a grid electrode on its front face (see figure). The application of a voltage pulse -- typically having amplitude of several kilovolts and duration of several nanoseconds -- causes dense surface plasma to form near the grid wires on the front surface.

  16. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  17. Suppression of Fermi acceleration in composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Kellen Manoela; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2016-09-01

    We study the motion of a composite particle in a one-dimensional billiard with a moving wall. The particle is modeled by two point masses coupled by a harmonic spring. We show that the energy gained by the composite particle is greatly reduced with respect to a single point particle. We show that the amount of energy transferred to the system at each collision with the walls is independent of the spring constant. However, the presence of the spring is responsible for the energy suppression because it diminishes the number of collisions by storing part of the system's energy and reducing the velocity of the particle's center of mass.

  18. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  19. Acceleration of solid particles by gaseous detonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilenko, T.P.; Grigoriev, V.V.; Zhdan, S.A.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Boiko, V.M.; Papyrin, A.N.

    1986-11-01

    This investigation is concerned with a theoretical and experimental study of acceleration dynamics of spherically inert solid particles (100 ..mu..m nominal diameter) in flows of gaseous detonation products. The experiments were conducted in a detonation channel 1.5 m long with a 20 x 20 mm/sup 2/ cross section and one open end. Particle motion was observed with the method of multiexposure photographic recording and a laser stroboscopic light source. The character of velocity variation of individual particles inside and outside of the channel was investigated for different initial positions of particles. Under certain conditions the accelerated particles are destroyed. A mathematical model based on two-phase multivelocity continuum mechanics has been formulated to describe the detonation wave propagation, outflow of detonation products from the channel, and interaction between particles and a nonstationary flow of detonation products. The model includes chemical equilibrium of detonation products, particle acceleration, heat exchange between phases and channel walls, particle melting, and fragmentation of droplets if the Weber number exceeds some critical value. Particle destruction has been correlated with the initial position, diameter, and physical properties of particles. Comparison of computer and experimental results shows that the model satisfactorily describes acceleration, heating, and fragmentation of particles.

  20. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  1. Determination of Dusty Particle Charge Taking into Account Ion Drag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Orazbayev, S. A.; Petrov, O. F.; Antipov, S. N.

    2008-09-07

    This work is devoted to the experimental estimation of charge of dust particle that levitates in the stratum of dc glow discharge. Particle charge is determined on the basis of the balance between ion drag force, gravitational and electric forces. Electric force is obtained from the axial distribution of the light intensity of strata.

  2. Preformed transient gas channels for laser wakefield particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.

    1994-11-01

    Acceleration of electrons by laser-driven plasma wake fields is limited by the range over which a laser pulse can maintain its intensity. This distance is typically given by the Rayleigh range for the focused laser beam, usually on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm. For practical particle acceleration, interaction distances on the order of centimeters are required. Therefore, some means of guiding high intensity laser pulses is necessary. Light intensities on the order of a few times 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} are required for laser wakefield acceleration schemes using near IR radiation. Gas densities on the order of or greater than 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} are also needed. Laser-atom interaction studies in this density and intensity regime are generally limited by the concomitant problems in beam propagation introduced by the creation of a plasma. In addition to the interaction distance limit imposed by the Rayleigh range, defocusing of the high intensity laser pulse further limits the peak intensity which can be achieved. To solve the problem of beam propagation limitations in laser-plasma wakefield experiments, two potential methods for creating transient propagation channels in gaseous targets are investigated. The first involves creation of a charge-neutral channel in a gas by an initial laser pulse, which then is ionized by a second, ultrashort, high-intensity pulse to create a waveguide. The second method involves the ionization of a gas column by an ultrashort pulse; a transient waveguide is formed by the subsequent expansion of the heated plasma into the neutral gas.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERLUMINAL STRONG WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them using numerical methods in the context of the termination shocks of pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the orbit of electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of a primary SLS and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave for electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared with the oscillation of the wave, which is “phase-locked,” and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in pre-shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. However, when the amplitude of the secondary waves is not extremely weaker than that of the primary wave, the typical frequency can be estimated from synchro-Compton theory using the secondary waves. The primary wave does not contribute to the radiation because the SLSW accelerates electrons almost linearly. This radiation can be observed as a radio knot at the upstream of the termination shocks of the pulsar wind nebulae without counterparts in higher frequency ranges.

  4. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  5. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  6. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  7. Charge-exchange erosion studies of accelerator grids in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A particle simulation model is developed to study the charge-exchange grid erosion in ion thrusters for both ground-based and space-based operations. Because the neutral gas downstream from the accelerator grid is different for space and ground operation conditions, the charge-exchange erosion processes are also different. Based on an assumption of now electric potential hill downstream from the ion thruster, the calculations show that the accelerator grid erosion rate for space-based operating conditions should be significantly less than experimentally observed erosion rates from the ground-based tests conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). To resolve this erosion issue completely, we believe that it is necessary to accurately measure the entire electric potential field downstream from the thruster.

  8. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  9. Energy-Dependent Ionization States of Shock-Accelerated Particles in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ng, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the range of possible energy dependence of the ionization states of ions that are shock-accelerated from the ambient plasma of the solar corona. If acceleration begins in a region of moderate density, sufficiently low in the corona, ions above about 0.1 MeV/amu approach an equilibrium charge state that depends primarily upon their speed and only weakly on the plasma temperature. We suggest that the large variations of the charge states with energy for ions such as Si and Fe observed in the 1997 November 6 event are consistent with stripping in moderately dense coronal. plasma during shock acceleration. In the large solar-particle events studied previously, acceleration occurs sufficiently high in the corona that even Fe ions up to 600 MeV/amu are not stripped of electrons.

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Arzner, K.; Benz, A. O.; Browning, P.; Dauphin, C.; Emslie, A. G.; Fletcher, L.; Kontar, E. P.; Mann, G.; Onofri, M.; Petrosian, V.; Turkmani, R.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2011-09-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared. While these studies show considerable promise in accounting for the various observational manifestations of solar flares, they are limited by a number of factors, mostly relating to available computational power. Not the least of these issues is the need to explicitly incorporate the electrodynamic feedback of the accelerated particles themselves on the environment in which they are accelerated. A brief prognosis for future advancement is offered.

  11. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Sessler, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  12. Particle acceleration at shocks in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard

    This dissertation describes a study of particle acceleration at shocks via the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Results for particle acceleration at both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks are presented to address the question of whether there are sufficient particles in the solar wind thermal core, modeled as either a Maxwellian or kappa- distribution, to account for the observed accelerated spectrum. Results of accelerating the theoretical upstream distribution are compared to energetic observations at 1 AU. It is shown that the particle distribution in the solar wind thermal core is sufficient to explain the accelerated particle spectrum downstream of the shock, although the shape of the downstream distribution in some cases does not follow completely the theory of diffusive shock acceleration, indicating possible additional processes at work in the shock for these cases. Results show good to excellent agreement between the theoretical and observed spectral index for one third to one half of both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks studied herein. Coronal mass ejections occurring during periods of high solar activity surrounding solar maximum can produce shocks in excess of 3-8 shocks per day. During solar minimum, diffusive shock acceleration at shocks can generally be understood on the basis of single independent shocks and no other shock necessarily influences the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this sense, diffusive shock acceleration during solar minimum may be regarded as Markovian. By contrast, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at periods of high solar activity (e.g. solar maximum) see frequent, closely spaced shocks that include the effects of particle acceleration at preceding and following shocks. Therefore, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at solar maximum cannot be modeled on the basis of diffusive shock acceleration as a single, independent shock and the process is essentially non-Markovian. A

  13. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  14. Charge-state enhancement for radioactive beam post-acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.; Dooling, J.

    1995-08-01

    A critical question for an ISOL-type radioactive-beam facility, such as that being discussed by the North American Isospin Laboratory Committee, is the efficiency and q/m of the ion source for the radioactive species. ISOLDE at CERN demonstrated that high efficiency is obtained for a wide variety of species in the 1{sup +} charge state. These ion sources also generally have excellent transverse emittances and low energy spreads. One possibility is to use this proven technology plus an ionizer stage to increase the output of such sources to 2, 3, or 4{sup +} with high efficiency. We are currently investigating technical options for such charge-state enhancement. There is a proposal by a Heidelberg/ISOLDE collaboration to build a {open_quotes}charge-state breeder{close_quotes} as part of an experiment called REX-ISOLDE. This concept would deliver batches of radioactive ions with low duty cycle, optimized for relatively low-intensity secondary beams, on the order of 10{sup 6}/sec. We are independently doing simulations of an alternative approach, called the Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier (EBQA), which would yield DC beams with improved transverse emittance and would not have the intensity limitation of the batch transfer process. The cost and efficiency of the EBQA will have to be compared with those of a normally-conducting CW RFQ followed by ion stripping, as alternatives for the first stage of a secondary ion accelerator.

  15. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  16. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Charman, A. E.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, L. T.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms- of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10-21e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  17. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10(-21)e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  18. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10(-21)e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement. PMID:26791725

  19. Helium measurements simulating alpha-particle diagnostics by the pellet charge exchange in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Veschev, E.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; ,

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of α particle, which is produced by the nuclear reaction in ITER or fusion reactor. The pellet charge exchange measurement (PCX) is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of α particle energy spectra in plasma. In Large Helical Device (LHD), it is possible to confine the high energetic particle (helium) accelerated by using the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICH). Therefore it is possible to perform the simulation experiment of α particle diagnostic in LHD.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Katsuaki

    2008-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are possible sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHE-CRs). To test the GRB origin of UHECRs, it is essential to search for characteristic, proton-induced signatures of secondary radiation. In this paper we present our recent results of Monte Carlo simulations that model the broadband prompt emission of GRBs including various processes associated with electrons and protons accelerated to high energies. The most notable effect of accelerated protons on the high-energy spectra is the synchrotron emission from secondary electron-positron pairs injected by photomeson interactions. Secondary photons tend to make the spectra flat, so a spectral flattening in the GeV-TeV bands may serve as a signature of UHECR acceleration. In some cases, the proton-induced photons overwhelm the photon field, resulting in a spectral peak due to inverse Compton emission from secondary pairs located around 10{sup 7} eV. We can expect to detect synchrotron photons from protons or muons. Observations with GLAST or with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes can provide useful estimates of the bulk Lorents factor and can constrain the proton acceleration efficiency.

  1. Particle Acceleration and Associated Emission from Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Five talks consist of a research program consisting of numerical simulations and theoretical development designed to provide an understanding of the emission from accelerated particles in relativistic shocks. The goal of this lecture is to discuss the particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and radiation along with the microphysics of the shock process in a self-consistent manner. The discussion involves the collisionless shocks that produce emission from gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows, and producing emission from supernova remnants and AGN relativistic jets. Recent particle-in-cell simulation studies have shown that the Weibel (mixed mode two-stream filamentation) instability is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic collisionless shocks. 3-D RPIC code parallelized with MPI has been used to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields. In this lecture we will present brief tutorials of RPIC simulations and RMHD simulations, a brief summary of recent RPIC simulations, mechanisms of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks, and calculation of synchrotron radiation by tracing particles. We will discuss on emission from the collisionless shocks, which will be calculated during the simulation by tracing particle acceleration self-consistently in the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated in the shocks. In particular, we will discuss the differences between standard synchrotron radiation and the jitter radiation that arises in turbulent magnetic fields.

  2. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  3. Physical Interpretation of the Schott Energy of An Accelerating Point Charge and the Question of Whether a Uniformly Accelerating Charge Radiates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A core topic in graduate courses in electrodynamics is the description of radiation from an accelerated charge and the associated radiation reaction. However, contemporary papers still express a diversity of views on the question of whether or not a uniformly accelerating charge radiates suggesting that a complete "physical" understanding of the…

  4. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  5. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  6. Generation of the cosmic rays flux variations due to surfatron acceleration of charges by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Loznikov, Vladimir; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of experimental data on the spectra of cosmic rays (CR) has shown their variability on time scales of a few years, in particular, CR variations observed in E / Z range from TeV to 10000 TeV, where E is the energy of the particle, Z is its charge number. Consequently, the source of these variations must be located at a distance of no more than 1 parsec from the sun in the closest local interstellar clouds. As a mechanism of such variations appearance it is considered the surfatron acceleration of CR particles by electromagnetic wave in a relatively quiet space plasma. On the basis of developed model the numerical calculations were performed for particle capture dynamics (electrons, protons, helium and iron nuclei) in the wave effective potential well with a following growth their energy by 3-6 orders of magnitude. Optimal conditions for the implementation of charged particles surfatron acceleration in space plasma, the rate of trapped particles energy growth, the dynamics of wave phase on the captured particle trajectory, a temporal dynamics of components for charge impulse momentum and speed were studied. It is indicated that the capture of a small fraction of particles by wave for energies about TeV and less followed by their surfatron acceleration to an energy of about 10000 TeV will lead to a significant increase in the CR flux at such high energies. Thus CL flow variations are conditioned by changes in the space weather parameters

  7. Solid-particle jet formation under shock-wave acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2013-12-01

    When solid particles are impulsively dispersed by a shock wave, they develop a spatial distribution which takes the form of particle jets whose selection mechanism is still unidentified. The aim of the present experimental work is to study particle dispersal with fingering effects in an original quasi-two-dimensional experiment facility in order to accurately extract information. Shock and blast waves are generated in the carrier gas at the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell and impulsively accelerated. With the present experimental setup, the particle jet formation is clearly observed. From fast flow visualizations, we notice, in all instances, that the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. This point has not been observed in three-dimensional experiments. We highlight that the number of jets is unsteady and decreases with time. For a fixed configuration, considering the very early times following the initial acceleration, the jet size selection is independent of the particle diameter. Moreover, the influence of the initial overpressure and the material density on the particle jet formation have been studied. It is shown that the wave number of particle jets increases with the overpressure and with the decrease of the material density. The normalized number of jets as a function of the initial ring acceleration shows a power law valid for all studied configurations involving various initial pressure ratios, particle sizes, and particle materials. PMID:24483561

  8. Solid-particle jet formation under shock-wave acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2013-12-01

    When solid particles are impulsively dispersed by a shock wave, they develop a spatial distribution which takes the form of particle jets whose selection mechanism is still unidentified. The aim of the present experimental work is to study particle dispersal with fingering effects in an original quasi-two-dimensional experiment facility in order to accurately extract information. Shock and blast waves are generated in the carrier gas at the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell and impulsively accelerated. With the present experimental setup, the particle jet formation is clearly observed. From fast flow visualizations, we notice, in all instances, that the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. This point has not been observed in three-dimensional experiments. We highlight that the number of jets is unsteady and decreases with time. For a fixed configuration, considering the very early times following the initial acceleration, the jet size selection is independent of the particle diameter. Moreover, the influence of the initial overpressure and the material density on the particle jet formation have been studied. It is shown that the wave number of particle jets increases with the overpressure and with the decrease of the material density. The normalized number of jets as a function of the initial ring acceleration shows a power law valid for all studied configurations involving various initial pressure ratios, particle sizes, and particle materials.

  9. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  10. Double layer -- a particle accelerator in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong

    2015-07-16

    Slides present the material under the following topics: Introduction (What is a double layer (DL)? Why is it important? Key unsolved problems); Theory -- time-independent solutions of 1D Vlasov--Poisson system; Particle-in-cell simulations (Current-driven DLs); and Electron acceleration by DL (Betatron acceleration). Key problems include the generation mechanism, stability, and electron acceleration. In summary, recent observations by Van Allen Probes show large number of DLs in the outer radiation belt, associated with enhanced flux of relativistic electrons. Simulations show that ion acoustic double layers can be generated by field-aligned currents. Thermal electrons can gain energy via betatron acceleration in a dipole magnetic field.

  11. Quantum interface to charged particles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A superconducting qubit device suitable for interacting with a flying electron has recently been proposed [Okamoto and Nagatani, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 062604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4865244]. Either a clockwise or counterclockwise directed loop of half magnetic flux quantum encodes a qubit, which naturally interacts with any single charged particle with arbitrary kinetic energy. Here, the device's properties, sources of errors, and possible applications are studied in detail. In particular, applications include detection of a charged particle essentially without applying a classical force to it. Furthermore, quantum states can be transferred between an array of the proposed devices and the charged particle.

  12. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  13. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS CONTAINING LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC-FIELD VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J. E-mail: jokipii@lpl.arizona.ed

    2010-12-10

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field have been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar planar-shock results can be significantly altered as a consequence of large-scale, meandering magnetic lines of force. Because the perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub perpendicular} is generally much smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub ||}, the energetic charged particles are trapped and preferentially accelerated along the shock front in the regions where the connection points of magnetic field lines intersecting the shock surface converge, and thus create the 'hot spots' of the accelerated particles. For the regions where the connection points separate from each other, the acceleration to high energies will be suppressed. Further, the particles diffuse away from the 'hot spot' regions and modify the spectra of downstream particle distribution. These features are qualitatively similar to the recent Voyager observations in the Heliosheath. These results are potentially important for particle acceleration at shocks propagating in turbulent magnetized plasmas as well as those which contain large-scale nonplanar structures. Examples include anomalous cosmic rays accelerated by the solar wind termination shock, energetic particles observed in propagating heliospheric shocks, galactic cosmic rays accelerated by supernova blast waves, etc.

  14. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric, magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential drop in the polar cap region of a rotating, magnetized neutron star is found assuming that the magnetic field is dipolar, with the field aligned (or anti-aligned) with the rotation axis. The curvature of the field lines is of critical importance. Charge flow is assumed to be along magnetic field lines. The electric field has a maximum at radius 1.5 R and the magnitude and functional form of the current is determined.

  15. Particle accelerators inside spinning black holes.

    PubMed

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-05-28

    On the basis of the Kerr metric as a model for a spinning black hole accreting test particles from rest at infinity, I show that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is generically divergent at the inner horizon. This shows not only that classical black holes are internally unstable, but also that Planck-scale physics is a characteristic feature within black holes at scales much larger that the Planck length. The novel feature of the divergence discussed here is that the phenomenon is present only for black holes with rotation, and in this sense it is distinct from the well-known Cauchy horizon instability.

  16. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  17. Charging of multiple interacting particles by contact electrification.

    PubMed

    Soh, Siowling; Liu, Helena; Cademartiri, Rebecca; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Whitesides, George M

    2014-09-24

    Many processes involve the movement of a disordered collection of small particles (e.g., powders, grain, dust, and granular foods). These particles move chaotically, interact randomly among themselves, and gain electrical charge by contact electrification. Understanding the mechanisms of contact electrification of multiple interacting particles has been challenging, in part due to the complex movement and interactions of the particles. To examine the processes contributing to contact electrification at the level of single particles, a system was constructed in which an array of millimeter-sized polymeric beads of different materials were agitated on a dish. The dish was filled almost completely with beads, such that beads did not exchange positions. At the same time, during agitation, there was sufficient space for collisions with neighboring beads. The charge of the beads was measured individually after agitation. Results of systematic variations in the organization and composition of the interacting beads showed that three mechanisms determined the steady-state charge of the beads: (i) contact electrification (charging of beads of different materials), (ii) contact de-electrification (discharging of beads of the same charge polarity to the atmosphere), and (iii) a long-range influence across beads not in contact with one another (occurring, plausibly, by diffusion of charge from a bead with a higher charge to a bead with a lower charge of the same polarity).

  18. Effect of charge asymmetry and charge screening on structure of superlattices formed by oppositely charged colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavaskar, Ganeshprasad; Sharma, Siddharth; Punnathanam, Sudeep N.

    2012-04-01

    Colloidal suspensions made up of oppositely charged particles have been shown to self-assemble into substitutionally ordered superlattices. For a given colloidal suspension, the structure of the superlattice formed from self-assembly depends on its composition, charges on the particles, and charge screening. In this study we have computed the pressure-composition phase diagrams of colloidal suspensions made up of binary mixtures of equal sized and oppositely charged particles interacting via hard core Yukawa potential for varying values of charge screening and charge asymmetry. The systems are studied under conditions where the thermal energy is equal or greater in magnitude to the contact energy of the particles and the Debye screening length is smaller than the size of the particles. Our studies show that charge asymmetry has a significant effect on the ability of colloidal suspensions to form substitutionally ordered superlattices. Slight deviations of the charges from the stoichiometric ratio are found to drastically reduce the thermodynamic stability of substitutionally ordered superlattices. These studies also show that for equal-sized particles, there is an optimum amount of charge screening that favors the formation of substitutionally ordered superlattices.

  19. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  20. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 {mu}m with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3x10{sup -21} particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9x10{sup -23} particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  1. Search for fractional-charge particles in meteoritic material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter C; Lee, Eric R; Lee, Irwin T; Perl, Martin L; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 microm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3 x 10(-21) particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9 x 10(-23) particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  2. Mechanisms of Particle Charging by Surfactants in Nonpolar Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Alas, Guillermo; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2015-11-10

    Electric charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar solvents plays a crucial role for many industrial applications and products, including rubbers, engine oils, toners, or electronic displays. Although disfavored by the low solvent permittivity, particle charging can be induced by added surfactants, even nonionic ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood, and neither the magnitude nor the sign of charge can generally be predicted from the particle and surfactant properties. The conclusiveness of scientific studies has been limited partly by a traditional focus on few surfactant types with many differences in their chemical structure and often poorly defined composition. Here we investigate the surface charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles dispersed in hexane-based solutions of three purified polyisobutylene succinimide polyamine surfactants with "subtle" structural variations. We precisely vary the surfactant chemistry by replacing only a single electronegative atom located at a fixed position within the polar headgroup. Electrophoresis reveals that these small differences between the surfactants lead to qualitatively different particle charging. In the respective particle-free surfactant solutions we also find potentially telling differences in the size of the surfactant aggregates (inverse micelles), the residual water content, and the electric solution conductivity as well as indications for a significant size difference between oppositely charged inverse micelles of the most hygroscopic surfactant. An analysis that accounts for the acid/base properties of all constituents suggests that the observed particle charging is better described by asymmetric adsorption of charged inverse micelles from the liquid bulk than by charge creation at the particle surface. Intramicellar acid-base interaction and intermicellar surfactant exchange help rationalize the formation of micellar ions pairs with size asymmetry. PMID:26484617

  3. Particle Acceleration at Reconnecting 3D Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M.; Dalla, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hard X-ray observations from the RHESSI spacecraft indicate that a significant fraction of solar flare energy release is in non-thermal energetic particles. A plausible acceleration mechanism for these are the strong electric fields associated with reconnection, a process that can be particularly efficient when particles become unmagnetised near to null points. This mechanism has been well studied in 2D, at X-points within reconnecting current sheets; however, 3D reconnection models show significant qualitative differences and it is not known whether these new models are efficient for particle acceleration. We place test particles in analytic model fields (eg. Craig and Fabling 1996) and numerical solutions to the the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations near reconnecting 3D nulls. We compare the behaviour of these test particles with previous results for test particle acceleration in ideal MHD models (Dalla and Browning 2005). We find that the fan model is very efficient due to an increasing "guide field" that stabilises particles against ejection from the current sheet. However, the spine model, which was the most promising in the ideal case, gives weak acceleration as the reconnection electric field is localised to a narrow cylinder about the spine axis.

  4. Stochastic Acceleration of Dust Particles in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Marmolino, C.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-10-15

    Stochastic heating of dust particles resulting from dust charge fluctuations is considered in the conditions of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) in tokamak plasmas. It is shown that kinetic energies corresponding to velocities of {approx_equal}Km/s can be reached in times of order {approx_equal}1 ms by micron-size dust particles interacting with a background of stochastically heated nano-size dust particles.

  5. Nonequatorial charged particle confinement around Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preti, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the nonequatorial charged particle dynamics around a rotating black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field, the latter being given by Wald’s exact analytical solution to the Maxwell’s equations in the Kerr background. At variance with the corresponding Schwarzschild case, the behavior of the particle becomes here markedly charge-sign dependent, and the more so the more the Kerr parameter increases. The interplay between the rotating black hole and the magnetic field is shown to provide a mechanism both for selective charge ejection in axially collimated jetlike trajectories, and for selective charge confinement into nonequatorial bound orbits around the hole; the possibility of such a confinement allows the fate of an accreting particle to not necessarily be doomed: infall into the hole can be prevented, and the neutrality of the Kerr source could therefore be preserved, while the charge is safely parked into bound cross-equatorial orbits all around it.

  6. Nonequatorial charged particle confinement around Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Preti, Giovanni

    2010-01-15

    We analyze the nonequatorial charged particle dynamics around a rotating black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field, the latter being given by Wald's exact analytical solution to the Maxwell's equations in the Kerr background. At variance with the corresponding Schwarzschild case, the behavior of the particle becomes here markedly charge-sign dependent, and the more so the more the Kerr parameter increases. The interplay between the rotating black hole and the magnetic field is shown to provide a mechanism both for selective charge ejection in axially collimated jetlike trajectories, and for selective charge confinement into nonequatorial bound orbits around the hole; the possibility of such a confinement allows the fate of an accreting particle to not necessarily be doomed: infall into the hole can be prevented, and the neutrality of the Kerr source could therefore be preserved, while the charge is safely parked into bound cross-equatorial orbits all around it.

  7. Dynamics of Charged Dust Particle near Conducting Wall in TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    A substantial amount of dust has been observed to be present near the first walls of fusion devices. The impact of dust on plasma parameters in current and future fusion devices is not clear and may cause a significant safety threat. It is therefore important to understand the dynamics of dust particles after formation. A surface charge is induced on the wall of a conducting material in the presence of a charged particle. The charged particle is then attracted to the wall by this induced charge causing the charge in the wall to redistribute and thus increasing the force of attraction further. In this work we study the dynamics of this attraction and the dissipation of electromagnetic energy via joule heating within the conducting wall.

  8. On the Thermal Property of Arbitrarily Accelerating Charged Black Hole with a New Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenfeng, Niu; Wenbiao, Liu

    2006-07-01

    After a new tortoise coordinate transformation is adopted, the entropy and non-thermal radiation of an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole are discussed as an example of non-stationary black holes. The same cut-off relation is chosen as static case, which is independent of space-time, and then the entropy of the non-stationary black hole is also proportional to the area of its event horizon. Meanwhile, the crossing of the particle energy levels near the event horizon is studied, the representative of the maximum value of the crossing energy levels is the same as the usual tortoise coordinate transformation.

  9. PARALLEL 3-D SPACE CHARGE CALCULATIONS IN THE UNIFIED ACCELERATOR LIBRARY.

    SciTech Connect

    D'IMPERIO, N.L.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MALITSKY, N.

    2006-06-26

    The paper presents the integration of the SIMBAD space charge module in the UAL framework. SIMBAD is a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code. Its 3-D Parallel approach features an optimized load balancing scheme based on a genetic algorithm. The UAL framework enhances the SIMBAD standalone version with the interactive ROOT-based analysis environment and an open catalog of accelerator algorithms. The composite package addresses complex high intensity beam dynamics and has been developed as part of the FAIR SIS 100 project.

  10. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  11. Particle Acceleration at the Sun and in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic particles are accelerated in rich profusion at sites throughout the heliosphere. They come from solar flares in the low corona, from shock waves driven outward by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), from planetary magnetospheres and bow shocks. They come from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) produced by high-speed streams in the solar wind, and from the heliospheric termination shock at the outer edge of the heliospheric cavity. We sample all these populations near Earth, but can distinguish them readily by their element and isotope abundances, ionization states, energy spectra, angular distributions and time behavior. Remote spacecraft have probed the spatial distributions of the particles and examined new sources in situ. Most acceleration sources can be "seen" only by direct observation of the particles; few photons are produced at these sites. Wave-particle interactions are an essential feature in acceleration sources and, for shock acceleration, new evidence of energetic-proton-generated waves has come from abundance variations and from local cross-field scattering. Element abundances often tell us the physics the source plasma itself, prior to acceleration. By comparing different populations, we learn more about the sources, and about the physics of acceleration and transport, than we can possibly learn from one source alone.

  12. Regular and chaotic aspects of charged particle motion in a magnetotail-like field with a neutral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savenkov, Boris V.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Buechner, Jorg

    1991-01-01

    The motion of charged particles is studied numerically and analytically using a test particle approach. Acceleration near the X-type neutral line is described in terms of adiabatic invariants and separatrix crossings. The relation between regular and chaotic properties of the process is discussed for a realistic source in the plasma mantle.

  13. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael K.; Fryberger, David

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  14. An improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The SLAC Quark Search Group has demonstrated successful operation of a low cost, high mass throughput Millikan apparatus designed to search for fractionally charged particles. About six million silicone oil drops were measured with no evidence of fractional charges. A second experiment is under construction with 100 times greater throughput which will utilize optimized search fluids.

  15. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2011-10-15

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  16. Observation of high iron charge states at low energies in solar energetic particle events

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z.; Möbius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Connell, J. J.; Popecki, M. A.; Klecker, B.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Mason, G. M.

    2014-04-10

    The ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide direct information about the source plasma, the acceleration environment, and their transport. Recent studies report that both gradual and impulsive SEP events show mean iron charge states (Q {sub Fe}) ∼ 10-14 at low energies E ≤ 0.1 MeV nuc{sup –1}, consistent with their origin from typical corona material at temperatures 1-2 MK. Observed increases of (Q {sub Fe}) up to 20 at energies 0.1-0.5 MeV nuc{sup –1} in impulsive SEPs are attributed to stripping during acceleration. However, Q {sub Fe} > 16 is occasionally found in the solar wind, particularly coming from active regions, in contrast to the exclusively reported (Q {sub Fe}) ≤ 14 for low energy SEPs. Here we report results from a survey of all 89 SEP events observed with Advanced Composition Explorer Solar Energetic Particle Ionic Charge Analyzer (SEPICA) in 1998-2000 for iron charge states augmented at low energy with Solar and Heliospheric Observatory CELIAS suprathermal time-of-flight (STOF). Nine SEP events with (Q {sub Fe}) ≥ 14 throughout the entire SEPICA and STOF energy range have been identified. Four of the nine events are impulsive events identified through velocity dispersion that are consistent with source temperatures ≥2 MK up to ∼4 MK. The other five events show evidence of interplanetary acceleration. Four of them involve re-acceleration of impulsive material, whose original energy dependent charge states appear re-distributed to varying extent bringing higher charge states to lower energy. One event, which shows flat but elevated (Q {sub Fe}) ∼ 14.2 over the entire energy range, can be associated with interplanetary acceleration of high temperature material. This event may exemplify a rare situation when a second shock plows through high temperature coronal mass ejection material.

  17. Observation of High Iron Charge States at Low Energies in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Möbius, E.; Klecker, B.; Bochsler, P.; Connell, J. J.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Mason, G. M.; Popecki, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide direct information about the source plasma, the acceleration environment, and their transport. Recent studies report that both gradual and impulsive SEP events show mean iron charge states langQ Ferang ~ 10-14 at low energies E <= 0.1 MeV nuc-1, consistent with their origin from typical corona material at temperatures 1-2 MK. Observed increases of langQ Ferang up to 20 at energies 0.1-0.5 MeV nuc-1 in impulsive SEPs are attributed to stripping during acceleration. However, Q Fe > 16 is occasionally found in the solar wind, particularly coming from active regions, in contrast to the exclusively reported langQ Ferang <= 14 for low energy SEPs. Here we report results from a survey of all 89 SEP events observed with Advanced Composition Explorer Solar Energetic Particle Ionic Charge Analyzer (SEPICA) in 1998-2000 for iron charge states augmented at low energy with Solar and Heliospheric Observatory CELIAS suprathermal time-of-flight (STOF). Nine SEP events with langQ Ferang >= 14 throughout the entire SEPICA and STOF energy range have been identified. Four of the nine events are impulsive events identified through velocity dispersion that are consistent with source temperatures >=2 MK up to ~4 MK. The other five events show evidence of interplanetary acceleration. Four of them involve re-acceleration of impulsive material, whose original energy dependent charge states appear re-distributed to varying extent bringing higher charge states to lower energy. One event, which shows flat but elevated langQ Ferang ~ 14.2 over the entire energy range, can be associated with interplanetary acceleration of high temperature material. This event may exemplify a rare situation when a second shock plows through high temperature coronal mass ejection material.

  18. Optical characterization of electrically charged particles using discrete dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kundracik, František; Videen, Gorden

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of the electric potential on the absorption and scattering of light by small particles has emerged as an interesting research topic, as the unexpected amplified optical signatures of a system of electrically charged particles were satisfactory predicted recently for homogeneous, uniformly charged spheres. However, natural particles are rarely of spherical shape. A comprehensive understanding of how arbitrarily shaped, charged particles interact with electromagnetic radiation has been missing. The approach we present here attempts to fill this gap by introducing a numerical formulation of the electromagnetic scattering problem for these particles. The first results from the intercomparison of numerical and analytical solutions for a pseudosphere show that the resonance features found are largely consistent, except for the magnitude and width of the peak amplitude, which may be due to inherent differences in the approaches used.

  19. Schwarzschild black hole as particle accelerator of spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that in the Schwarzschild background there exists a direct counterpart of the Bañados-Silk-West effect for spinning particles. This means that if two particles collide near the black-hole horizon, their energy in the centre-of-mass frame can grow unbounded. In doing so, the crucial role is played by the so-called near-critical trajectories when the particle parameters are almost fine-tuned. A direct scenario of the collision under discussion is possible with restriction on the energy-to-mass ratio E/m<\\frac{1}{2\\sqrt{3}} only. However, if one takes into account multiple scattering, this becomes possible for E≥ m as well.

  20. Particle acceleration during interactions between transient ion foreshock phenomena and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Drew; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Wilson, Lynn; Hietala, Heli; Omidi, Nick; Masters, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Foreshocks are regions upstream of supercritical astrophysical shock waves that are in communication with the shock via suprathermal charged particles that have been energized and reflected by the shock and are counter-streaming into the incident plasma. These regions form upstream of the quasi-parallel region of the shock, in which the angle between the magnetic field in the incident plasma and the shock normal direction is less than ~40 deg. The relative drift between the reflected suprathermal particles and the incident bulk flow is a source of free energy, which is capable of producing a variety of kinetic plasma instabilities and enhanced wave activity. Simulations and observations of Earth's and other planetary foreshocks have shown that large-scale transient phenomena can also develop due to nonlinear processes and interactions between foreshock particles and discontinuities in the incident solar wind. Several of these transient ion foreshock phenomena (TIFP), such as short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMS), hot flow anomalies (HFAs), and foreshock bubbles (FBs), can result in the development of nonlinear wave activity and additional shocks upstream of the main bow shock. We present in situ observations, made by NASA's THEMIS mission, of ion and electron distributions from within and without SLAMS, HFAs, and FBs, examining the particle heating and acceleration taking place within those TIFP. The observations are compared to theoretical expectations for shock-drift acceleration, Fermi acceleration, and energy diffusion via wave-particle interactions. Our preliminary results show that SLAMS, HFAs, and FBs can be ideal particle accelerators. Finally, we develop an understanding for the upper energy limits for ion and electron acceleration in each of these TIFP at Earth's bow shock and use this to investigate how TIFP may accelerate particles at other astrophysical shocks, such as planetary and astrospherical bow shocks, shocks in stellar winds, and

  1. Method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam

    DOEpatents

    Hannon, Fay

    2016-08-02

    A method for maximizing the brightness of the bunches in a particle injector by converting a highly space-charged beam to a relativistic and emittance-dominated beam. The method includes 1) determining the bunch charge and the initial kinetic energy of the highly space-charge dominated input beam; 2) applying the bunch charge and initial kinetic energy properties of the highly space-charge dominated input beam to determine the number of accelerator cavities required to accelerate the bunches to relativistic speed; 3) providing the required number of accelerator cavities; and 4) setting the gradient of the radio frequency (RF) cavities; and 5) operating the phase of the accelerator cavities between -90 and zero degrees of the sinusoid of phase to simultaneously accelerate and bunch the charged particles to maximize brightness, and until the beam is relativistic and emittance-dominated.

  2. Charged particle trajectories in the field of a charge near a Schwarzschild blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonar, V. P.; Dhurandhar, S. V.; Dadhich, N.

    1985-12-01

    Motion of charged particles in the field of a charge placed near the Schwarzschild blackhole is considered. The electromagnetic field gets modified owing to gravitational field of the black hole. The system, charge plus the hole, is axisymmetric (no longer spherically symmetric) which poses difficulty in obtaining analytic solutions of equations of motion. However, motion along the axis and circular orbits about the axis of symmetry are discussed. In view of the asymmetry in charge distribution, a particle will have circular orbits only off the equatorial plane.

  3. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGES

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  4. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  5. 950809 Charged particle transport updated multi-group diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, E.G.; Perkins, S.T.; Dairiki, N.T.

    1995-09-01

    In 1974, a charged particle transport scheme was introduced which utilized a multi-group diffusion method for the spatial transport and slowing down of energetic ions in a hot plasma. In this treatment a diffusion coefficient was used which was flux-limited to provide, hopefully, some degree of accuracy when the slowing down of an energetic charged particle is dominated by Coulomb collisions with thermal ions and electrons in a plasma medium. An advantage of this method was a very fast, memory-contained program for calculating the behavior of energetic charged particles which resulted in smoothly varying particle number densities and energy depositions. The main limitation of the original multi-group charged particle diffusion scheme is its constraint to a basic ten group structure; the same ten group structure for each of the five energetic ions tracked. This is regarded as a severe limitation, inasmuch as more groups would be desired to simulate more accurately the corresponding Monte Carlo results of energies deposited over spatial zones from a charged particle source. More generally, it seems preferable to have a different group structure for each particle type since they are created at inherently different energies. In this paper, the basic theory and multi-group description will be given. This is followed by the specific techniques that were used to solve the resultant equations. Finally, the modifications that were made to the cross section data as well as the methods used for energy and momentum deposition are described.

  6. Medical physics--particle accelerators--the beginning.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines the early development of particle accelerators with the redesign from linear accelerator to cyclotron by Ernest Lawrence with a view to reducing the size of the machines as the power increased. There are minibiographies of Ernest Lawrence and his brother John. The concept of artificial radiation is outlined and the early attempts at patient treatment are mentioned. The reasons for trying and abandoning neutron therapy are discussed, and the early use of protons is described.

  7. Energetic particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions: Ulysses results

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.I.; Marsden, R.G.; Sanderson, T.R.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-07-01

    We present here statistical properties of energetic ions (tilde 1 MeV) accelerated by corotating interaction regions observed at the Ulysses spacecraft. We have correlated the tilde 1 MeV proton intensity measured near the trailing edges of the interaction regions with their compression ratio. We interpret our results in terms of the plasma conditions experienced at Ulysses and identify a likely source of the low energy seed particles accelerated at the interaction regions.

  8. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  9. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe by particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ibotombi N.; Devi, Bembem Y.

    2016-04-01

    A spatially flat FRW Universe in the context of particle creation has been discussed by assuming a variable deceleration parameter which is a function of scale factor. A dust model in which creation of particles giving a negative creation pressure has been studied. Treating the Universe as an open adiabatic system, it is supposed that matter creation takes place out of gravitational energy. In this model, the Universe shows an accelerating phase of its expansion. Total number of particles increases while number of particle density decreases. Some physical implications of this model are investigated.

  10. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  11. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  12. Particle bursts from thunderclouds: Natural particle accelerators above our heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Hovhannisyan, Armen

    2011-03-15

    Strong electrical fields inside thunderclouds give rise to fluxes of high-energy electrons and, consequently, gamma rays and neutrons. Gamma rays and electrons are currently detected by the facilities of low orbiting satellites and by networks of surface particle detectors. During intensive particle fluxes, coinciding with thunderstorms, series of particle bursts were detected by the particle detectors of Aragats Space Environmental Center at an altitude of 3250 m. We classify the thunderstorm ground enhancements in 2 categories, one lasting microseconds, and the other lasting tens of minutes. Both types of events can occur at the same time, coinciding with a large negative electric field between the cloud and the ground and negative intracloud lightning. Statistical analysis of the short thunderstorm ground enhancement bursts sample suggests the duration is less than 50 {mu}s and spatial extension is larger than 1000 m{sup 2}. We discuss the origin of thunderstorm ground enhancements and its connection to the terrestrial gamma flashes detected by orbiting gamma-ray observatories.

  13. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  14. Energetic charged particle sources in Saturn's and Jupiter's magnetoshperes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, Elias

    2015-04-01

    In this talk we review observations of high energy particle sources in the jovian and saturnian magnetospheres. We focus on both direct sources (e.g. CRAND, direct CME particle entry) and acceleration mechanisms (e.g. adiabatic heating, centrifugal interchange injections, wave particle interactions, impulsive events/transient radiation belts, reconnection etc.), using data mostly from Cassini, Galileo and Ulysses. We use a comparative approach, theoretical context and references to Earth observations to understand which of the sources and acceleration processes are fundamental for fast-rotating magnetospheres with internal plasma sources and which ones can be attributed to the specifics of each system.

  15. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2).

  16. On scaling properties of crossing the third-order resonance in particle accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Pang, X.; Jing, Y.; Luo, T.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study effects of charged particle beams crossing a third-order resonance in an accelerator. The distortion of invariant torus during the resonance crossing is used to set 20% emittance growth or 2.5% of trap fraction as the critical resonance strength. We find a simple scaling law for the critical resonance strength vs the tune ramp rate and the initial emittance. The scaling law can be derived by solving Hamilton's equation of motion with stationary phase condition. Such scaling law can be used to evaluate the performance in high power accelerators, such as the FFAG and cyclotron.

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  18. An Examination of Resonance, Acceleration, and Particle Dynamics in the Micro-Accelerator Platform

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, Josh; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.; Zhou, J.; Yoder, R.

    2010-11-04

    An effort to build a micron-scale dielectric-based slab-symmetric accelerator is underway at UCLA. The structure achieves acceleration via a resonant accelerating mode that is excited in an approximately 800 nm wide vacuum gap by a side coupled 800 nm laser. Detailed simulation results on structure fields and particle dynamics, using HFSS and VORPAL, are presented. We examine the quality factors of the accelerating modes for various structures and the excitations of non-accelerating destructive modes. Additionally, the results of an analytic and computational study of focusing, longitudinal dynamics and acceleration are described. Methods for achieving simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing are discussed, including modification of structure dimensions and slow variation of the coupling periodicity.

  19. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jets propagating into an unmagnetized plasmas. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and acceleration. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The properties of the radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants

  20. Stochastic acceleration and charge change of helium ions in the solar flare plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Stepanov, I. Yu.; Yoshimori, M.

    1998-10-01

    In order to explain the energy spectra and abundances of the He+ and He++ solar flare ions measured in some works, the authors calculated the behavior of these ions in solar plasma, taking into account both their stochastic acceleration by Alfvén waves and the possibility of charge exchange with the surrounding plasma. The results agree with the experiments if the plasma in the regions where acceleration takes place has a concentration and temperature on the order of N = 2×107 cm-3 and T = 6.31×104K, respectively. Recent observations of solar flares onboard the Yohkoh satellite have demonstrated that it is apparently impractical to expect the existence of such rarefied and low-temperature plasma in the flare loops. The calculations indicate that the high abundance of He+ is most likely due to its nonsolar origin. Some possibilities of enrichment of energetic particle fluxes by He+ ions are briefly discussed.

  1. High Energy Charged Particles in Space at One Astronomical Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    Single event effects and many other spacecraft anomalies are caused by positively charged high energy particles impinging on the vehicle and its component parts. Reviewed here are the current knowledge of the interplanetary particle environment in the energy ranges that are most important for these effects. State-of-the-art engineering models are briefly described along with comments on the future work required.

  2. Exploring Particle Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Rieger, F. M.

    2012-08-01

    Binary systems can be powerful sources of non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. When the latter are detected, then these objects are known as gamma ray binaries. In this work, we explore, in the context of gamma ray binaries, different acceleration processes to estimate their efficiency: Fermi I, Fermi II, shear acceleration, the converter mechanism, and magnetic reconnection. We find that Fermi I acceleration in a mildly relativistic shock can provide, although marginally, the multi-10 TeV particles required to explain observations. Shear acceleration may be a complementary mechanism, giving particles the final boost to reach such a high energies. Fermi II acceleration may be too slow to account for the observed very high energy photons, but may be suitable to explain extended low-energy emission. The converter mechanism seems to require rather high Lorentz factors but cannot be discarded a priori. Standard relativistic shock acceleration requires a highly turbulent, weakly magnetized downstream medium; magnetic reconnection, by itself possibly insufficient to reach very high energies, could perhaps facilitate such a conditions. Further theoretical developments, and a better source characterization, are needed to pinpoint the dominant acceleration mechanism, which need not be one and the same in all sources.

  3. Charge balance for the mesosphere with meteoric dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, H.; Robertson, S.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L.

    2015-05-01

    An aerosol particle charging model initially developed for noctilucent cloud ice particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain the data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) obtained by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from Andøya, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes (those with ionization rates above 20 cm-3 s-1) as a consequence of recombination on the MSPs being dominant at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and the nighttime rocket data suggest a photodetachment rate between 0.1 and 0.01 s-1. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. The MSP number densities that are the inputs to the charging model are taken from the CARMA/CHEM2D model. The CHAMPS data are more consistent with number densities generated with an assumed input flux from ablation of 4 t d-1 than with 44 t d-1 assumed previously.

  4. Charge Balance in the Mesosphere with Meteoric Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S. H.; Asmus, H.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol particle charging model developed initially for noctilucent cloud particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) returned by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from the Andøya rocket Range, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes as a consequence of recombination of electrons on the MSPs at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and nighttime data place constraints on the photodetachment rate. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction by atomic oxygen helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. MSP particle densities from the CARMA/CHEM2D model are in better agreement with rocket data for assumed values of the meteor input flux that are at the low end of the generally accepted range.

  5. Self-sustaining charging of identical colliding particles.

    PubMed

    Siu, Theo; Cotton, Jake; Mattson, Gregory; Shinbrot, Troy

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that identical material samples can charge one another after being brought into symmetric contact. The mechanism for this charging is not known. In this article, we use a simplified one-dimensional lattice model to analyze charging in the context of agitated particles. We find that the electric field from a single weakly polarized grain can feed back on itself by polarizing its neighbors, leading to an exponential growth in polarization. We show that, by incorporating partial neutralization between neighboring polarized particles, either uniform alignment of dipoles or complex charge and polarization waves can be produced. We reproduce a polarized state experimentally using identical colliding particles and raise several issues for future study. PMID:25353788

  6. Theoretical model of a soft particle with charged core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Dustin; Phan, Anh

    2014-03-01

    The numerical and analytical solutions of the electrostatic potentials of soft particles with an ion-permeable charged outer layer and a non-permeable charged core with constant charge densities are found using the Poisson-Boltzmann equations. The charged core is found to significantly alter the local potential within the soft particle, yet it has little effect on the potential outside its particle's boundaries. Previous experimental research into the electrical properties of the MS2 virus agree with these findings. Our results also suggest that there is only a slight change in the potential as the temperature is increased from 290 K to 310 K. The potential profile is found to be significantly affected by the ionic strength in the 1-600 mM range.

  7. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  8. Magnetospheric vortex formation: self-organized confinement of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Z; Saitoh, H; Morikawa, J; Yano, Y; Watanabe, S; Ogawa, Y

    2010-06-11

    A magnetospheric configuration gives rise to various peculiar plasma phenomena that pose conundrums to astrophysical studies; at the same time, innovative technologies may draw on the rich physics of magnetospheric plasmas. We have created a "laboratory magnetosphere" with a levitating superconducting ring magnet. Here we show that charged particles (electrons) self-organize a stable vortex, in which particles diffuse inward to steepen the density gradient. The rotating electron cloud is sustained for more than 300 s. Because of its simple geometry and self-organization, this system will have wide applications in confining single- and multispecies charged particles. PMID:20867249

  9. On charged particle tracks in cellulose nitrate and Lexan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Henke, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were performed aimed at developing plastic nuclear track detectors into quantitative tools for recording and measuring multicharged, heavy particles. Accurate track etch rate measurements as a function of LET were performed for cellulose nitrate and Lexan plastic detectors. This was done using a variety of incident charged particle types and energies. The effect of aging of latent tracks in Lexan in different gaseous atmospheres was investigated. Range distributions of high energy N-14 particle bevatron beams in nuclear emulsion were measured. Investigation of charge resolution and Bragg peak measurements were carried out using plastic nuclear track detectors.

  10. Radiation from an Accelerated Point Charge and Non-Inertial Observers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonov, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    It is known that observers comoving with a uniformly accelerated point charge detect the electromagnetic field of a charge as a static electric field. We show that one can find a similar family of observers, which detect the field of a charge as a static electric field, in the general case of arbitrary point-charge motion. We find the velocities…

  11. Particle Acceleration in SN1006 Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE data have been reduced, and a paper on the results is in progress. The main results have been presented in a poster at the January 2004 AAS meeting and an ApJ paper in press. The primary result is that the widths of the 0 VI lines in the NW filament are a bit less than the width expected if the oxygen kinetic temperature is 16 times the proton temperature (mass proportional heating). This is at variance with measurements of shocks in the heliosphere, where preferential heating of oxygen and other heavy species is observed. The paper discusses the theoretical implications for collisionless shock wave physics. A secondary result is that no O VI emission was observed from the NE filament. While the very different particle distribution in that region can partially account for the weakness of the O VI lines, the simplest interpretation is that the pre-shock density in the NE is less than 0.22 times the density in the NW.

  12. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  13. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  14. Charged-particle calculations using Boltzmann transport methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.; Robinson, M.T.; Holmes, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of radiation damage effects in fusion reactor neutron and ion irradiation environments are amenable to treatment by transport theory methods. In this paper, multigroup transport techniques are developed for the calculation of charged particle range distributions, reflection coefficients, and sputtering yields. The Boltzmann transport approach can be implemented, with minor changes, in standard neutral particle computer codes. With the multigroup discrete ordinates code, ANISN, determination of ion and target atom distributions as functions of position, energy, and direction can be obtained without the stochastic error associated with atomistic computer codes such as MARLOWE and TRIM. With the multigroup Monte Carlo code, MORSE, charged particle effects can be obtained for problems associated with very complex geometries. Results are presented for several charged particle problems. Good agreement is obtained between quantities calculated with the multigroup approach and those obtained experimentally or by atomistic computer codes.

  15. 50 years of research on particle acceleration in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    In 1965, and through the late 1960s, the heliosphere was considered to be a passive place, an impediment to the information on the galaxy contained in galactic cosmic ray observations, and on the Sun, from solar energetic particles. All this changed in the early 1970s with the discovery of the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), and the subsequent acceptance that the ACRs are ionized interstellar neutral gas that is accelerated in the heliosphere by four orders of magnitude in energy. In the mid-1970s, Pioneer 10 & 11 observations provided direct evidence of acceleration. In 1977-78, diffusive shock acceleration was introduced, and subsequently developed in detail, providing compelling explanations for, e.g., the observed acceleration in co-rotating interaction regions, and a likely explanation for the acceleration of ACRs at the termination shock of the solar wind. In 2004 and 2008, the Voyagers crossed the termination shock, did not observe the acceleration of the ACRs, but did observe that low- energy particles, up to a few MeV/nucleon, had identical spectra downstream from the termination shock, a distribution function that is a power law in particle speed with a spectral index of -5. When Voyager 1 reached ∼120 AU, where the high-energy ACRs are at peak intensity, the ACR spectrum is also a -5 spectrum. Moreover, observations of suprathermal tails in the solar wind in the inner solar system have a -5 spectrum, often peaking downstream, but not at shocks. These observations led to the development of a new acceleration mechanism, the pump acceleration mechanism of Fisk & Gloeckler, which can account for all the observed -5 spectra.

  16. A New Analytical Model for Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing analytical models describing the second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles due to collisions with MHD waves assume that the injected seed particles are already highly relativistic, despite the fact that the most prevalent source of particles is usually the local thermal background, which is typically a non-relativistic gas. This presents a problem because the momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient describing the interaction between the particles and the MHD waves is qualitatively different in the non-relativistic and highly relativistic limits. Since the existing analytical models are not able to address this situation, workers have had to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem, obtained by using a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. The model also incorporates the appropriate momentum dependence for the particle escape timescale, and the effect of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses, which are critical for establishing the location of the high-energy cutoff in the particle spectrum. The results can be used to model the acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed.

  17. ACCELERATION OF VERY SMALL DUST GRAINS DUE TO RANDOM CHARGE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2012-12-20

    We study the acceleration of very small dust grains including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons arising from electrostatic interactions of dust grains that have charge fluctuating randomly in time. Random charge fluctuations of very small grains due to discrete charging events (i.e., sticking collisions with electrons and ions in plasma, and emission of photoelectrons by UV photons) are simulated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The motion of dust grains in randomly fluctuating electric fields induced by surrounding charged grains is studied using MC simulations. We identify the acceleration induced by random charge fluctuations as a dominant acceleration mechanism for very small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We find that this acceleration mechanism is efficient for environments with a low degree of ionization (i.e., large Debye length), where charge fluctuations are slow but have a large amplitude. The implications of the present acceleration mechanism for grain coagulation and shattering in the diffuse ISM and dark clouds are also discussed.

  18. Small-scale magnetic islands near the heliospheric current sheet and their role in particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Zank, Gary; Li, Gang; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.; Dosch, Alexander; Malandraki, Olga E.; Zharkova, Valentina V.

    2015-04-01

    Increases of ion fluxes in the keV-MeV range are sometimes observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during periods when other sources are absent. These resemble solar energetic particle (SEP) events, but the events are weaker and apparently local. Conventional explanations based on either shock acceleration of charged particles or particle acceleration due to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary current sheets are not persuasive. We suggest instead that recurrent magnetic reconnection occurs at the HCS and smaller current sheets in the solar wind (Zharkova & Khabarova, ApJ, 2012), of which a consequence is particle energization by the dynamically evolving secondary current sheets and magnetic islands (Zank et al., ApJ, 2014; Drake et al., JRL, 2006). The effectiveness of the trapping and acceleration process associated with magnetic islands depends in part on the topology of the HCS. We show that the HCS possesses ripples superimposed on the large-scale flat or wavy structure. We conjecture that the ripples can efficiently confine plasma and provide tokamak-like conditions that are favorable for the appearance of small-scale magnetic islands that merge and/or contract. Particles trapped in the vicinity of merging islands and experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events are accelerated by the induced electric field, and experience first-order Fermi acceleration in contracting magnetic islands (Zank et al., ApJ, 2014). We present multi-spacecraft observations of magnetic island merging and particle energization in the absence of other sources, providing support for theory and simulations that show particle energization by reconnection related processes of magnetic island merging and contraction.

  19. Particle acceleration in solar active regions being in the state of self-organized criticality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    We review the recent observational results on flare initiation and particle acceleration in solar active regions. Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons and protons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field’s strength and configuration with test particle simulations. We work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations, based on a self-organized criticality models (SOC). A relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle’s guiding center within these configurations. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission and compare our results with the current observations.

  20. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. Our initial results of a jet-ambient interaction with anti-parallelmagnetic fields show pile-up of magnetic fields at the colliding shock, which may lead to reconnection and associated particle acceleration. We will investigate the radiation in a transient stage as a possible generation mechanism of precursors of prompt emission. In our simulations we calculate the radiation from electrons in the shock region. The detailed properties of this radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  1. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  2. Multipole radiation in charged-particle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper formulates the general problem of photon emission in particle scattering using a classical and quantum mechanical approach. The connection between the classical short collision time (SCT) and Born results is examined for various special classifications of problems. In the dipole case the two formulations yield results that can be expressed in the same form and for arbitrary scattering potential. For quadrupole emission the SCT and Born results are the same only for a short-range potential, however. The quadrupole problem is more sensitive to details in the process because the calculation requires an expansion of the total amplitude for the process to lowest order in the photon wave number or momentum. The special case of photon emission associated with spin-flip transitions during scattering is considered for spin-1/2 particles. Like classical magnetic dipole radiation, there is no infrared divergence feature for this type of emission.

  3. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapan, I.; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F. B.

    2016-09-01

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  4. Diffusiophoretic mobility of charge-regulating porous particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei C; Keh, Huan J

    2016-08-01

    The diffusiophoresis of a charge-regulating porous sphere, such as polyelectrolyte coil, with an arbitrary thickness of the electric double layer in an electrolyte solution prescribed with a concentration gradient is analytically studied for the first time. The ionogenic functional groups and hydrodynamic frictional segments distribute uniformly within the permeable particle, and a charge regulation model for the association and dissociation reactions of the functional groups relates the fixed charge density to the local electric potential. The electrokinetic equations governing the electric potential, ionic electrochemical potential, and fluid velocity distributions are solved as power-series expansions in the basic fixed charge density. An explicit formula for the diffusiophoretic mobility of the particle, which vanishes at the isoelectric point, is derived from a force balance. The effects of charge regulation on the diffusiophoretic mobility, which depend on various particle and electrolyte characteristics such as the reaction equilibrium constants of the ionogenic functional groups, are significant and interesting. The variation in the bulk concentration of the charge-determining ions can produce more than one reversal in the direction of the diffusiophoretic velocity. The obtained results differ conspicuously from those of impermeable particles and provide valuable information for the interpretation of experimental data.

  5. Analytic Method to Estimate Particle Acceleration in Flux Ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. (2006) proposed a kinetic mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by reconnection. In this model, particles that gyrate around magnetic field lines transit from island to island, increasing their energy by Fermi acceleration in those islands that are contracting. Based on these ideas, we present an analytic model to estimate the energy gain of particles orbiting around field lines inside a flux rope (2.5D magnetic island). We calculate the change in the velocity of the particles as the flux rope evolves in time. The method assumes a simple profile for the magnetic field of the evolving island; it can be applied to any case where flux ropes are formed. In our case, the flux-rope evolution is obtained from our recent high-resolution, compressible 2.5D MHD simulations of breakout eruptive flares. The simulations allow us to resolve in detail the generation and evolution of large-scale flux ropes as a result of sporadic and patchy reconnection in the flare current sheet. Our results show that the initial energy of particles can be increased by 2-5 times in a typical contracting island, before the island reconnects with the underlying arcade. Therefore, particles need to transit only from 3-7 islands to increase their energies by two orders of magnitude. These macroscopic regions, filled with a large number of particles, may explain the large observed rates of energetic electron production in flares. We conclude that this mechanism is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in flares, but further research is needed to extend our results to 3D flare conditions.

  6. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Many spectacular and violent phenomena in the high-energy universe exhibit nonthermal radiation spectra, from which we infer power-law energy distributions of the radiating particles. Relativistic magnetic reconnection, recognized as a leading mechanism of nonthermal particle acceleration, can efficiently transfer magnetic energy to energetic particles. We present a comprehensive particle-in-cell study of particle acceleration in 2D relativistic reconnection in both electron-ion and pair plasmas without guide field. We map out the power-law index α and the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum as functions of three key parameters: the system size (and initial layer length) L, the ambient plasma magnetization σ, and the ion/electron mass ratio (from 1 to 1836). We identify the transition between small- and large-system regimes: for small L, the system size affects the slope and extent of the high-energy spectrum, while for large enough L, α and the cutoff energy are independent of L. We compare high energy particle spectra and radiative (synchrotron and inverse Compton) signatures of the electrons, for pair and electron-ion reconnection. The latter cases maintain highly relativistic electrons, but include a range of different magnetizations yielding sub- to highly-relativistic ions. Finally, we show how nonthermal acceleration and radiative signatures alter when the radiation back-reaction becomes important. These results have important implications for assessing the promise and the limitations of relativistic reconnection as an astrophysically-important particle acceleration mechanism. This work is funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  7. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes as powerful particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Marisaldi, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Pittori, C; Palma, F; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Pucella, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D

    2011-01-01

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and γ rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of megavolts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere. PMID:21231775

  8. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes as powerful particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Marisaldi, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Argan, A; Trois, A; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Pittori, C; Palma, F; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Pucella, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D

    2011-01-01

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and γ rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of megavolts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere.

  9. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes as Powerful Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tavani, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Morelli, E.; Rossi, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.

    2011-01-07

    Strong electric discharges associated with thunderstorms can produce terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), i.e., intense bursts of x rays and {gamma} rays lasting a few milliseconds or less. We present in this Letter new TGF timing and spectral data based on the observations of the Italian Space Agency AGILE satellite. We determine that the TGF emission above 10 MeV has a significant power-law spectral component reaching energies up to 100 MeV. These results challenge TGF theoretical models based on runaway electron acceleration. The TGF discharge electric field accelerates particles over the large distances for which maximal voltages of hundreds of mega volts can be established. The combination of huge potentials and large electric fields in TGFs can efficiently accelerate particles in large numbers, and we reconsider here the photon spectrum and the neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere.

  10. Tracking the radiation reaction energy when charged bodies accelerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2015-08-01

    We consider radiation reaction and energy conservation in classical electromagnetism. We first treat the well-known problem of energy accounting during radiation from a uniformly accelerating particle. This gives rise to the following paradox: when the self-force vanishes, the system providing the applied force does only enough work to give the particle its kinetic energy—so where does the energy that is eventually radiated away come from? We answer this question using a modern treatment of radiation reaction and self-force, as it appears in the expression due to Eliezer and Ford and O'Connell. We clarify the influence of the Schott force, and we find that the radiated power is 2 q 2 a 0 . f 0 / ( 3 m c 3 ) , which differs from Larmor's formula. Finally, we present a simple and highly visual argument that enables one to track the radiated energy without the need to appeal to the far field in the distant future (the "wave zone").

  11. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  12. ENERGY SPECTRUM OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES ACCELERATED BY SHOCK WAVES: FROM FOCUSED TRANSPORT TO DIFFUSIVE ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Pingbing; Zhang Ming; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Rassoul, Hamid; Luo Xi

    2011-09-10

    The focused transport equation (FTE) includes all the necessary physics for modeling the shock acceleration of energetic particles with a unified description of first-order Fermi acceleration, shock drift acceleration, and shock surfing acceleration. It can treat the acceleration and transport of particles with an anisotropic distribution. In this study, the energy spectrum of pickup ions accelerated at shocks of various obliquities is investigated based on the FTE. We solve the FTE by using a stochastic approach. The shock acceleration leads to a two-component energy spectrum. The low-energy component of the spectrum is made up of particles that interact with shock one to a few times. For these particles, the pitch angle distribution is highly anisotropic, and the energy spectrum is variable depending on the momentum and pitch angle of injected particles. At high energies, the spectrum approaches a power law consistent with the standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. For a parallel shock, the high-energy component of the power-law spectrum, with the spectral index being the same as the prediction of DSA theory, starts just a few times the injection speed. For an oblique or quasi-perpendicular shock, the high-energy component of the spectrum exhibits a double power-law distribution: a harder power-law spectrum followed by another power-law spectrum with a slope the same as the spectral index of DSA. The shock acceleration will eventually go into the DSA regime at higher energies even if the anisotropy is not small. The intensity of the energy spectrum given by the FTE, in the high-energy range where particles get efficient acceleration in the DSA regime, is different from that given by the standard DSA theory for the same injection source. We define the injection efficiency {eta} as the ratio between them. For a parallel shock, the injection efficiency is less than 1, but for an oblique shock or a quasi-perpendicular shock it could be greater.

  13. Particle Acceleration and Nonthermal Emission in Relativistic Astrophysical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    The common observational feature of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and AGN jets is a broad nonthermal spectrum of synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation. It is usually assumed that the emitting electrons are accelerated to a power-law distribution at relativistic shocks, via the so-called Fermi mechanism. Despite decades of research, the Fermi acceleration process is still not understood from first principles. An assessment of the micro-physics of particle acceleration in relativistic shocks is of paramount importance to unveil the properties of astrophysical nonthermal sources, and it is the subject of this dissertation. In the first part of this thesis, I explore by means of fully-kinetic first-principle particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations the properties of relativistic shocks that propagate in electron-positron and electron-proton plasmas carrying uniform magnetic fields. I find that nonthermal particle acceleration only occurs if the upstream magnetization is weak (sigma<0.001), or if the pre-shock field is nearly aligned with the shock direction of propagation (quasi-parallel shocks). Relativistic shocks in PWNe, GRBs and AGN jets are usually thought to be appreciably magnetized (sigma>0.01) and quasi-perpendicular, yet they need to be efficient particle accelerators, in order to explain the prominent nonthermal signatures of these sources. Motivated by this discrepancy, I then relax the assumption of uniform pre-shock fields, and investigate the acceleration efficiency of perpendicular shocks that propagate in high-sigma flows with alternating magnetic fields. This is the geometry expected at the termination shock of pulsar winds, but it could also be relevant for Poynting-dominated jets in GRBs and AGNs. I show by means of PIC simulations that compression of the flow at the shock will force annihilation of nearby field lines, a process known as shock-driven reconnection. Magnetic reconnection can efficiently transfer the energy of

  14. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  15. Acceleration and Radiation Model of Particles in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Dauphin, Cyril; Vilmer, Nicole

    2006-08-01

    Cellular Automata (CA) models have successfully reproduced several statistical properties of solar flares such as the peak flux or the total flux distribution. We are using a CA model based on the concept of self organized criticality (SOC) to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in a solar flare. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assumed to be the consequence of a magnetic reconnection process, where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We relate the difference of energy gain of particles (alpha particles, protons and electrons) to the magnetic energy released and we calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions and the emitted radiation.

  16. Particle acceleration by turbulent magnetohydro-dynamic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Test particles in a two dimensional, turbulent MHD simulation are found to undergo significant acceleration. The magnetic field configuration is a periodic sheet pinch which undergoes reconnection. The test particles are trapped in the reconnection region for times of order an Alfven transit time in the large electric fields that characterize the turbulent reconnection process at the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number used in the simulation. The maximum speed attained by these particles is consistent with an analytic estimate which depends on the reconnection electric field, the Alfven speed, and the ratio of Larmor period to the Alfven transit time.

  17. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  18. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-03-10

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  19. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; /MIT

    2008-09-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  20. Particle Acceleration at Corotating Interaction Regions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This "cross-shock" gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of "preacceleration" for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  1. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  2. Case studies in space charge and plasma acceleration of charged beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzani, Armando; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    Plasma acceleration with electron or proton driver beams is a challenging opportunity for high-energy physics. An energy doubling experiment with electron drivers was successfully performed at SLAC and a key experiment AWAKE with proton drivers is on schedule at CERN. Simulations play an important role in choosing the best experimental conditions and in interpreting the results. The Vlasov equation is the theoretical tool to describe the interaction of a driver particle beam or a driver laser pulse with a plasma. Collective effects, such as tune shift and mismatch instabilities, appear in high intensity standard accelerators and are described by the Poisson-Vlasov equation. In the paper, we review the Vlasov equation in the electrostatic and fully electromagnetic cases. The general framework of variational principles is used to derive the equation, the local form of the balance equations and related conservation laws. In the electrostatic case, we remind the analytic Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) model and we propose an extension of the adiabatic theory for Hamiltonian systems, which ensures stability for perturbation of size ɛ on times of order 1 / ɛ. The variational framework is used to derive the Maxwell-Vlasov equations and related conservation laws and to briefly sketch the particle-in-cell (PIC) approximation schemes. Finally, the proton-driven acceleration is examined in the linear and quasi-linear regime. A PIC simulation with the code ALaDyn developed at Bologna University is presented to illustrate the longitudinal and transverse fields evolution which allow a witness electron bunch to be accelerated with a gradient of a few GeV/m. We also present some remarks on future perspectives.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK WITH A STOCHASTIC SHOCK OBLIQUITY APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Aaron D.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2013-08-01

    Observations by the plasma and magnetic field instruments on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft suggest that the termination shock is weak with a compression ratio of {approx}2. However, this is contrary to the observations of accelerated particle spectra at the termination shock, where standard diffusive shock acceleration theory predicts a compression ratio closer to {approx}2.9. Using our focused transport model, we investigate pickup proton acceleration at a stationary spherical termination shock with a moderately strong compression ratio of 2.8 to include both the subshock and precursor. We show that for the particle energies observed by the Voyager 2 Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument, pickup protons will have effective length scales of diffusion that are larger than the combined subshock and precursor termination shock structure observed. As a result, the particles will experience a total effective termination shock compression ratio that is larger than values inferred by the plasma and magnetic field instruments for the subshock and similar to the value predicted by diffusive shock acceleration theory. Furthermore, using a stochastically varying magnetic field angle, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the multiple power-law structure observed for the LECP spectra downstream of the termination shock.

  4. Complex Kepler Orbits and Particle Aggregation in Charged Microscopic Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Waitukaitis, Scott; Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Kepler orbits are usually associated with the motion of astronomical objects such as planets or comets. Here we observe such orbits at the microscale in a system of charged, insulating grains. By letting the grains fall freely under vacuum, we eliminate the effects of air drag and gravity, and by imaging them with a co-falling high-speed camera we track the relative positions of individual particles with high spatial and temporal precision. This makes it possible to investigate the behaviors caused by the combination of long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range, dissipative, contact interactions in unprecedented detail. We make the first direct observations of microscopic elliptical and hyperbolic Kepler orbits, collide-and-capture events between pairs of charged grains, and particle-by-particle aggregation into larger clusters. Our findings provide experimental evidence for electrostatic mechanisms that have been suspected, but not previously observed at the single-event level, as driving the early stages of particle aggregation in systems ranging from fluidized particle bed reactors to interstellar protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, since particles of different net charge and size are seen to aggregate into characteristic spatial configurations, our results suggest new possibilities for the formation of charge-stabilized ``granular molecules''. We can reproduce the observed molecule configurations by taking many-body, dielectric polarization effects into account.

  5. Extreme particle acceleration in the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Tavani, M; Bulgarelli, A; Piano, G; Sabatini, S; Striani, E; Evangelista, Y; Trois, A; Pooley, G; Trushkin, S; Nizhelskij, N A; McCollough, M; Koljonen, K I I; Pucella, G; Giuliani, A; Chen, A W; Costa, E; Vittorini, V; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mattaini, E; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mauri, A; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Santolamazza, P; Antonelli, A; Salotti, L

    2009-12-01

    Super-massive black holes in active galaxies can accelerate particles to relativistic energies, producing jets with associated gamma-ray emission. Galactic 'microquasars', which are binary systems consisting of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole accreting gas from a companion star, also produce relativistic jets, generally together with radio flares. Apart from an isolated event detected in Cygnus X-1, there has hitherto been no systematic evidence for the acceleration of particles to gigaelectronvolt or higher energies in a microquasar, with the consequence that we are as yet unsure about the mechanism of jet energization. Here we report four gamma-ray flares with energies above 100 MeV from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (an exceptional X-ray binary that sporadically produces radio jets). There is a clear pattern of temporal correlations between the gamma-ray flares and transitional spectral states of the radio-frequency and X-ray emission. Particle acceleration occurred a few days before radio-jet ejections for two of the four flares, meaning that the process of jet formation implies the production of very energetic particles. In Cygnus X-3, particle energies during the flares can be thousands of times higher than during quiescent states. PMID:19935645

  6. Acceleration PDFs of particles in rotating turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clercx, Herman; Perlekar, Prasad; Lavezzo, Valentina; Toschi, Federico

    2012-11-01

    Particle dispersion in buoyancy-driven rotating turbulent flows has direct relevance for many industrial and environmental applications. We have used a Lattice Boltzmann Method coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking algorithm to investigate the behaviour of passive and inertial particles released in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection. The flow domain is horizontally periodic and vertically confined. Both the gravity and the rotation vector are oriented in the vertical direction. Here we present the results of the acceleration PDFs of particles in both non-rotating and strongly rotating RB convection. It is found that the bulk acceleration PDF in non-rotating RB turbulence is like in homogeneous isotropic turbulence whereas rotation introduces anisotropy similar to acceleration PDFs obtained from experiments in (isothermal) forced rotating turbulence. These results and those obtained for inertial particles will be discussed. PP and VL were financially supported by the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of NWO. This work was sponsored by NWO-NCF (SH-176).

  7. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Zank, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  8. Highly Charged Particles Cause a Larger Current Blockage in Micropores Compared to Neutral Particles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinghua; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hinkle, Preston; Plett, Timothy S; Yang, Crystal; Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Digman, Michelle A; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2016-09-27

    Single pores in the resistive-pulse technique are used as an analytics tool to detect, size, and characterize physical as well as chemical properties of individual objects such as molecules and particles. Each object passing through a pore causes a transient change of the transmembrane current called a resistive pulse. In high salt concentrations when the pore diameter is significantly larger than the screening Debye length, it is assumed that the particle size and surface charge can be determined independently from the same experiment. In this article we challenge this assumption and show that highly charged hard spheres can cause a significant increase of the resistive-pulse amplitude compared to neutral particles of a similar diameter. As a result, resistive pulses overestimate the size of charged particles by even 20%. The observation is explained by the effect of concentration polarization created across particles in a pore, revealed by numerical modeling of ionic concentrations, ion current, and local electric fields. It is notable that in resistive-pulse experiments with cylindrical pores, concentration polarization was previously shown to influence ionic concentrations only at pore entrances; consequently, additional and transient modulation of resistive pulses was observed when a particle entered or left the pore. Here we postulate that concentration polarization can occur across transported particles at any particle position along the pore axis and affect the magnitude of the entire resistive pulse. Consequently, the recorded resistive pulses of highly charged particles reflect not only the particles' volume but also the size of the depletion zone created in front of the moving particle. Moreover, the modeling identified that the effective surface charge density of particles depended not only on the density of functional groups on the particle but also on the capacitance of the Stern layer. The findings are of crucial importance for sizing particles and

  9. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  10. Mariner-Jupiter-Saturn Low Energy Charged Particle Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peletier, D. P.; Gary, S. A.; Hogrefe, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Low Energy Charged Particle Experiment will be launched on the Mariner-Jupiter-Saturn spacecraft in August 1977. The experiment has been designed to perform particle measurements in the intense radiation belts of the Jovian and Saturnian environments, and to provide detailed spectral analysis of both solar and galactic particles in interplanetary space. A single instrument uses 23 solid-state detectors configured in two distinct detector subsystems: one optimized for interplanetary and interstellar measurements, the other for specific particle species, energies, and intensities expected near the planets.

  11. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Gary A.; Miao, Yinglong; Zhou, Shenggao; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  12. Design of asymmetric particles containing a charged interior and a neutral surface charge: comparative study on in vivo circulation of polyelectrolyte microgels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Jing; Luft, J Christopher; Tian, Shaomin; Raval, Jay S; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2014-07-16

    Lowering the modulus of hydrogel particles could enable them to bypass in vivo physical barriers that would otherwise filter particles with similar size but higher modulus. Incorporation of electrolyte moieties into the polymer network of hydrogel particles to increase the swelling ratio is a straightforward and quite efficient way to decrease the modulus. In addition, charged groups in hydrogel particles can also help secure cargoes. However, the distribution of charged groups on the surface of a particle can accelerate the clearance of particles. Herein, we developed a method to synthesize highly swollen microgels of precise size with near-neutral surface charge while retaining interior charged groups. A strategy was employed to enable a particle to be highly cross-linked with very small mesh size, and subsequently PEGylated to quench the exterior amines only without affecting the internal amines. Acidic degradation of the cross-linker allows for swelling of the particles to microgels with a desired size and deformability. The microgels fabricated demonstrated extended circulation in vivo compared to their counterparts with a charged surface, and could potentially be utilized in in vivo applications including as oxygen carriers or nucleic acid scavengers.

  13. APPARATUS FOR CLEANING GASES WITH ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, H.F.

    1960-02-01

    An apparatus is described for cleaning gases with the help of electrostatically charged pellets. The pellets are blown past baffles in a conduit and into the center of a rotuting body of the gas to be cleaned. The pellets are charged electrostatically by impinging on the baffles. The pellets collect the particles suspended in the gas in their passage from the center of the rotating body to its edge.

  14. Mass, charge, and energy separation by selective acceleration with a traveling potential hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, L. Schwager; Barr, W. L.; Lowder, R. S.; Post, R. F.

    1996-10-01

    A traveling electric potential hill has been used to generate an ion beam with an energy distribution that is mass dependent from a monoenergetic ion beam of mixed masses. This effect can be utilized as a novel method for mass separation applied to identification or enrichment of ions (e.g., of elements, isotopes, or molecules). This theory for mass-selective acceleration is presented here and is shown to be confirmed by experiment and by a time-dependent particle-in-cell computer simulation. Results show that monoenergetic ions with the particular mass of choice are accelerated by controlling the hill potential and the hill velocity. The hill velocity is typically 20%-30% faster than the ions to be accelerated. The ability of the hill to pickup a particular mass uses the fact that small kinetic energy differences in the lab frame appear much larger in the moving hill frame. Ions will gain energy from the approaching hill if their relative energy in the moving hill frame is less than the peak potential of the hill. The final energy of these accelerated ions can be several times the source energy, which facilitates energy filtering for mass purification or identification. If the hill potential is chosen to accelerate multiple masses, the heaviest mass will have the greatest final energy. Hence, choosing the appropriate hill potential and collector retarding voltage will isolate ions with the lightest, heaviest, or intermediate mass. In the experimental device, called a Solitron, purified 20Ne and 22Ne are extracted from a ribbon beam of neon that is originally composed of 20Ne:22Ne in the natural ratio of 91:9. The isotopic content of the processed beam is determined by measuring the energy distribution of the detected current. These results agree with the theory. In addition to mass selectivity, our theory can also be applied to the filtration of an ion beam according to charge state or energy. Because of this variety of properties, the Solitron is envisioned to

  15. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Toma, Kenji; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation and without back reaction to the field. Our results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energy through interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: the diffusion coefficient in the direction of the unperturbed flow is about 20 times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration works efficiently for energetic particles. We also cautiously note that in the shearing box approximation, particles that cross the simulation box many times along the radial direction undergo unphysical runaway acceleration by the Lorentz transformation, which needs to be taken into account with special care.

  16. Laser Absorption and Particle Acceleration at the Critical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-10-01

    Using high intensity lasers (I >= 5 ×1019 W /cm2) to accelerate particles at the critical surface offers the potential to deliver high fluence particle beams into dense matter. Potential applications include Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion, Radiation Pressure Acceleration, and probing high-density matter for basic plasma research. In order to tailor the beam characteristics of laser conversion efficiency, energy spectrum, beam divergence, and accelerated species (ions or electrons) to the given application - and of course to interpret the results of experiments - it is key to have an understanding of the underlying absorption and acceleration mechanisms. Much theoretical and simulation work has been done on this regime in recent years, and although it has become clear that mechanisms often invoked at lower intensities (i.e. JxB and Bruenel heating) are less or unimportant in these systems, debate still exists as to exactly what mechanisms will play the dominant role in laboratory relevant scenarios. We present recent results of simulations with the Particle-in-Cell code OSIRIS which sheds light on these issues. The authors acknowledge the support of the DOE Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter and Fast Ignition Physics under DOE Contract No. FC02-04ER54789 and DOE contracts DE-NA0001833 and DE-SC-0008316, and NSF grant ACI-13398893.

  17. Observational Evidence of Particle Acceleration Associated with Plasmoid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    We report a strong association between the particle acceleration and plasma motions found in the 2010 August 18 solar flare. The plasma motions are tracked in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft Ahead, and the signature of particle acceleration was investigated by using Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. In our previous paper, we reported that in EUV images many plasma blobs appeared in the current sheet above the flare arcade. They were ejected bidirectionally along the current sheet, and the blobs that were ejected sunward collided with the flare arcade. Some of them collided or merged with each other before they were ejected from the current sheet. We discovered impulsive radio bursts associated with such plasma motions (ejection, coalescence, and collision with the post flare loops). The radio bursts are considered to be the gyrosynchrotron radiation by nonthermal high energy electrons. In addition, the stereoscopic observation by AIA and EUVI suggests that plasma blobs had a three-dimensionally elongated structure. We consider that the plasma blobs were three-dimensional plasmoids (i.e., flux ropes) moving in a current sheet. We believe that our observation provides clear evidence of particle acceleration associated with the plasmoid motions. We discuss possible acceleration mechanisms on the basis of our results.

  18. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-10-15

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} or higher, and low temperature {approx}1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. New modes of particle acceleration, techniques & sources symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    A Symposium on {open_quotes}New Modes of Particle Acceleration Technique and Sources{close_quotes} was held August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was the first of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor the National Science Foundation, as part of our {open_quotes}New Ideas for Particle Accelerators{close_quotes} program. The symposia was organized and chaired by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of ITP/Brookhaven National Laboratory. This Symposium provided a perspective on the future direction of the Advanced Accelerator Research. The experimental study of elementary particles has become concentrated at a few large laboratories throughout the world because of the size and cost of the accelerator facilities needed for this work. For example, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, currently under construction, is 27 km in circumference and is being financed by the European membership of CERN plus contributions from non-member nations. An evolutionary approach to construction of ever higher energy colliders will only continue this trend towards high cost and large size.

  20. First Results from the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Zeitland, Cary

    2016-01-01

    The Charged Particle Detector (CPD) subsystem of the ISS-RAD detector has been making measurements of high-energy charged and neutral particles since the unit was deployed on Feb. 1, 2016. The CPD is nearly identical to the MSL-RAD instrument, but onboard data processing has been significantly modified to meet ISS requirements. We will present dose rates and LET spectra obtained over the first six months of operations, as well as preliminary results obtained from the limited sample of pulse-height analyzed raw data that has been telemetered to Earth.

  1. Self-Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Particles under Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly—the spontaneous organization of microscopic units into well-defined mesoscopic structures—is a fundamental mechanism for a broad variety of nanotechnology applications in material science. The central role played by the anisotropy resulting from asymmetric shapes of the units and/or well-defined bonding sites on the particle surface has been widely investigated, highlighting the importance of properly designing the constituent entities in order to control the resulting mesoscopic structures. Anisotropy driven self-assembly can also result from the multipolar interactions characterizing many naturally occurring systems, such as proteins and viral capsids, as well as experimentally synthesized colloidal particles. Heterogeneously charged particles represent a class of multipolar units that are characterized by a competitive interplay between anisotropic attractive and repulsive interactions, due to the repulsion/attraction between charged-like/oppositely charged regions on the particle surface. In the present work, axially symmetric quadrupolar colloids are considered in a confined planar geometry; the role of both the overall particle charge and the patch extension as well as the effect of the substrate charge are studied in thermodynamic conditions such that the formation of extended structures is favored. A general tendency to form quasi-two-dimensional aggregates where particles align their symmetry axes within the plane is observed; among these planar self-assembled scenarios, a clear distinction between the formation of microcrystalline gels—branched networks consisting of purely crystalline domains—as opposed to disordered aggregates can be observed based on the specific features of the particle–particle interaction. Additionally, the possible competition of interparticle and particle–substrate interactions affects the size and the internal structure of the aggregates and can possibly inhibit the aggregation process. PMID:23627740

  2. Resonance, particle dynamics, and particle transmission in the micro-accelerator platform

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, J.; Hazra, K. S.; Liu, G.; Sozer, E. B.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R. B.

    2012-12-21

    We describe particle dynamics in the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), a slab-symmetric dielectric laser accelerator (DLA), and model the expected performance of recently fabricated MAP structures. The quality of the structure resonances has been characterized optically, and results are compared with simulation. 3D trajectory analysis is used to model acceleration in those same structures 'as built.' Results are applied to ongoing beam transmission and acceleration tests at NLCTA/E-163, in which transmission of 60 MeV injected electrons through the beam channel of the MAP was clearly observed, despite the overfilling of the structure by the beam.

  3. A study of CR-39 track response to charged particles from NOVA implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. W.; Cable, M. D.; Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have exposed CR-39 track recording material to a number of NOVA implosions. Radiation from the implosion passed through an array of ranging filters, which aided identification of the incident particles and their energies. The etching procedure was calibrated by including a piece of track exposed to DD protons from a small accelerator. For the same shots, we quantitatively compare the DD neutron yield with the DD proton yield determined from the track. In DT implosions, tracks produced by neutron interactions prevent observation of charged-particle tracks that are produced by the processes of knock on, secondary, or tertiary fusion.

  4. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  5. Stopping power and scattering angle calculations of charged particle beams through thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.

    1991-03-01

    It is important to understand the effects of introducing foils into the path of charged particle beams. In the APS linac system, the intention is to insert thin foils before and after the positron generating target to protect the accelerating structures immediately before and after the target. Electron beams that pass through a dense material lose energy in collisions with the atomic electrons. The scattering path of electrons is much less straight than that of heavier particles (mu, pi meson, K meson, proton, etc.). After a short distance electrons tend to diffuse into the material, rather than proceeding in a rectilinear path.

  6. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  7. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  8. An expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Searfus, R.M.; Hernandez, J.E.

    1989-01-12

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  9. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  10. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIZED COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-ION SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-01-10

    We investigate shock structure and particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless electron-ion shocks by means of 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with ion-to-electron mass ratios (m{sub i} /m{sub e} ) ranging from 16 to 1000. We explore a range of inclination angles between the pre-shock magnetic field and the shock normal. In 'subluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles can escape ahead of the shock along the magnetic field lines, ions are efficiently accelerated via the first-order Fermi process. The downstream ion spectrum consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail, which contains {approx}5% of ions and {approx}30% of ion energy. Its slope is -2.1 {+-} 0.1. The scattering is provided by short-wavelength non-resonant modes produced by Bell's instability, whose growth is seeded by the current of shock-accelerated ions that propagate ahead of the shock. Upstream electrons enter the shock with lower energy than ions (albeit by only a factor of {approx}5 << m{sub i} /m{sub e} ), so they are more strongly tied to the field. As a result, only {approx}1% of the incoming electrons are accelerated at the shock before being advected downstream, where they populate a steep power-law tail (with slope -3.5 {+-} 0.1). For 'superluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles cannot outrun the shock along the field, the self-generated turbulence is not strong enough to permit efficient Fermi acceleration, and the ion and electron downstream spectra are consistent with thermal distributions. The incoming electrons are heated up to equipartition with ions, due to strong electromagnetic waves emitted by the shock into the upstream. Thus, efficient electron heating ({approx}>15% of the upstream ion energy) is the universal property of relativistic electron-ion shocks, but significant nonthermal acceleration of electrons ({approx}>2% by number, {approx}>10% by energy, with slope flatter than -2.5) is hard to achieve in

  11. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Support Vector Machine Based on Adaptive Acceleration Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  13. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  14. Support vector machine based on adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  15. Proceedings of the 1987 IEEE particle accelerator conference: Accelerator engineering and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, E.R.; Taylor, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 600 selections. Some of the titles are: The SPS Collider: Status and Outlook; Overview of Plasma Based Accelerating Schemes; A Low Voltage Repeater for Studies of E-Beam Wave Interactions; The Sideband Instability in Free Electron Laser; Three Bunch Energy Stabilization for the SLC Injector; and Particle Tracking in a Small Electron Storage Ring.

  16. Energetic charged particles in the uranian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cooper, J F; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McGuire, R; Chenette, D L

    1986-07-01

    During the encounter with Uranus, the cosmic ray system on Voyager 2 measured significant fluxes of energetic electrons and protons in the regions of the planets magnetosphere where these particles could be stably trapped. The radial distribution of electrons with energies of megaelectron volts is strongly modulated by the sweeping effects ofthe three major inner satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Umbriel. The phase space density gradient of these electrons indicates that they are diffusing radially inward from a source in the outer magnetosphere or magnetotail. Differences in the energy spectra of protons having energies of approximately 1 to 8 megaelectron volts from two different directions indicate a strong dependence on pitch angle. From the locations of the absorption signatures observed in the electron flux, a centered dipole model for the magnetic field of Uranus with a tilt of 60.1 degrees has been derived, and a rotation period of the planet of 17.4 hours has also been calculated. This model provides independent confirmaton of more precise determinations made by other Voyager experiments.

  17. The telegraph equation in charged particle transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Lorencz, K.; Williams, L. L.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new derivation of the telegraph equation which modifies its coefficients. First, an infinite order partial differential equation is obtained for the velocity space solid angle-averaged phase-space distribution of particles which underwent at least a few collisions. It is shown that, in the lowest order asymptotic expansion, this equation simplifies to the well-known diffusion equation. The second-order asymptotic expansion for isotropic small-angle scattering results in a modified telegraph equation with a signal propagation speed of v(5/11) exp 1/2 instead of the usual v/3 exp 1/2. Our derivation of a modified telegraph equation follows from an expansion of the Boltzmann equation in the relevant smallness parameters and not from a truncation of an eigenfunction expansion. This equation is consistent with causality. It is shown that, under steady state conditions in a convecting plasma, the telegraph equation may be regarded as a diffusion equation with a modified transport coefficient, which describes a combination of diffusion and cosmic-ray inertia.

  18. Charged Particle Spectroscopy on Omega (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.; Padalino, S.; Schwartz, B.; Olsen, M.; Wakeman, T.; Petrasso, R.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 2-MeV Van de Graaf Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo's Nuclear Structure Laboratory, a {sup 3}He-implanted tantalum target was bombarded by 450-keV deuterons to produce high energy protons via the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction. A 1500-{micro}m surface barrier detector with a 3/16 inch diameter collimator was placed at 8.75 cm from the target and 135{sup o} from the incident beam. A movable arm was setup so that an array of aluminum filters of varying thicknesses could be rotated in front of the detector. A 6-{micro}m mylar filter was also mounted on the movable arm and was used to calibrate the detector as described in the CR-39 experiment report. Eight aluminum filters with thicknesses ranging from 250pm to 1100{micro}m were in turn rotated in front of the collimator and spectra were taken for each. The results are shown on the attached graphs. The theoretical curve for each graph was generated using TRIM The exact energy distribution of the proton beam incident on the target was not known; because no such spectrum could be taken due to the high count rate for elastically scattered deuterons. Instead, it was assumed that the incident beam had a distribution similar to that measured through the 6-{micro}m mylar, namely, an average energy of 13.798 MeV with a standard deviation of 0.027 MeV. A program developed locally was used to generate an input file for TRIM with this distribution. Using this input file, TRIM simulations were run for various thicknesses of Aluminum, from 200 to 1100 {micro}m in 50-{micro}m increments. The solid line on the graph indicates the energies of the transmitted protons. The two dashed lines indicate one standard deviation above and below the average exit energy. TRIM agrees well with the experimental results.

  19. Particle acceleration and gamma-emission from solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, Leonty; Gan, W. Q.; Troitskaia, E. V.

    Experiments on SMM, Yohkoh, GRANAT, Compton GRO, INTEGRAL, RHESSI and CORONAS-F satellites over the past three decades have provided copious data for fundamental research relating to particle acceleration, transport and energetics in flares and to the ambient abun-dance of the corona, chromosphere and photosphere. We summarize main results of solar gamma-astronomy and try to appraise critically a real contribution of those results into modern understanding of solar flares, particle acceleration at the Sun and some properties of the solar atmosphere. Recent findings based on the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS-F measure-ments (source locations, spectrum peculiarities, 3He abundance etc.) are especially discussed. Some unusual features of extreme solar events have been found in gamma-ray production and generation of relativistic particles (solar cosmic rays). A number of different plausible assump-tions are considered concerning the details of underlying physical processes during large flares: existence of a steeper distribution of surrounding medium density, enhanced content of the 3He isotope, formation of magnetic trap with specific properties etc. Possible implications of these results are briefly discussed. It is emphasized that real progress in this field may be achieved only by combination of gamma-ray data in different energy ranges with multi-wave and ener-getic particle observations during the same event. We especially note several promising lines for the further studies: 1) resonant acceleration of the 3He ions in the corona; 2) timing of the flare evolution by gamma-ray fluxes in energy range above 90 MeV; 3) separation of gamma-ray fluxes from different sources at/near the Sun (e.g., different acceleration sources/episodes during the same flare, contribution of energetic particles accelerated by the CME-driven shocks etc.); 4) modeling of self-consistent time scenario of the event. Keywords: Sun: atmosphere density, solar flares; Particle acceleration

  20. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  1. Charged particle track reconstruction using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.; Fu, P.; Gabriel, T.; Handler, T.

    1992-12-31

    This paper summarizes the current state of our research in developing and applying artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm described here is based on a crude model of the retina. It takes as input the coordinates of each charged particle`s interaction point (``hit``) in the tracking chamber. The algorithm`s output is a set of vectors pointing to other hits that most likely to form a track.

  2. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  3. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-15

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λ{sub D}. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  4. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  5. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  6. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  7. GPU-accelerated adaptive particle splitting and merging in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qingang; Li, Bo; Xu, Ji

    2013-07-01

    Graphical processing unit (GPU) implementation of adaptive particle splitting and merging (APS) in the framework of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is presented. Particle splitting and merging process are carried out based on a prescribed criterion. Multiple time stepping technology is used to reduce computational cost further. Detailed implementations on both single- and multi-GPU are discussed. A benchmark test that is a flow past fixed periodic circles is simulated to investigate the accuracy and speed of the algorithm. Comparable precision with uniformly fine simulation is achieved by APS, whereas computational demand is reduced considerably. Satisfactory speedup and acceptable scalability are obtained, demonstrating that GPU-accelerated APS is a promising tool to speed up large-scale particle-based simulations.

  8. Extreme Particle Acceleration via Magnetic Reconnection in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Agile and Fermi of intense day-long synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula challenges classical models of pulsar wind nebulae and particle acceleration. We argue that the flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the nebula. Using relativistic test-particle simulations, we show that particles are naturally focused into a thin fan beam, deep inside the reconnection layer where the magnetic field is small. The particles then suffer less from synchrotron losses and pile up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop in the layer. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum above 100 MeV is consistent with the September 2010 flare observations. No detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This scenario provides a viable explanation for the Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares.

  9. AKR breakup and auroral particle acceleration at substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Misawa, H.; Yumoto, K.; Parks, G. K.; Anderson, R. R.; Menietti, J. D.; Donovan, E. F.; Honary, F.; Spanswick, E.

    2008-09-01

    The dynamical behavior of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is investigated in connection with auroral particle acceleration at substorm onsets using high-time-resolution wave spectrograms provided by Polar/PWI electric field observations. AKR develops explosively at altitudes above a preexisting low-altitude AKR source at substorm onsets. This "AKR breakup" suggests an abrupt formation of a new field-aligned acceleration region above the preexisting acceleration region. The formation of the new acceleration region is completed in a very short time (amplitude increases 10,000 times in 30 seconds), suggesting that the explosive development is confined to a localized region. AKR breakups are usually preceded (1-3 minutes) by the appearance and/or gradual enhancement of the low-altitude AKR. This means that the explosive formation of the high-altitude electric field takes place in the course of the growing low-altitude acceleration. The development of the low-altitude acceleration region is thus a necessary condition for the ignition of the high-altitude bursty acceleration. The dH/dt component from a search-coil magnetometer at ground shows that a few minutes prior to substorm onsets, the quasi-DC component begins a negative excursion that is nearly synchronized with the start of the gradual enhancement of the low-altitude AKR, indicating a precursor-like behavior for the substorm. This negative variation of dH/dt suggests an exponentially increasing ionospheric current induced by the upward field-aligned current. At substorm onsets, the decrease in the quasi-DC variation of dH/dt further accelerates, indicating a sudden reinforcement of the field-aligned current.

  10. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than ‑ 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  11. Single particles accelerate final stages of capillary break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Anke; Fiscina, Jorge Eduardo; Wagner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite-time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well-known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. This accelerated regime is characterized by an asymmetric shape of the filament with an enhanced curvature that depends on the size and the spatial distribution of the particles within the capillary thread.

  12. Recent advances in UHV techniques for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Rao

    1995-01-01

    The ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) requirements for storage rings and accelerators, and the development of the science and technology of UHV for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices have been recently reviewed by N.B. Mistry and H.F. Dylla respectively. In this paper, the latest developments in the advancement of UHV techniques for the vacuum integrity of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and for successfully dealing with the synchrotron radiation related beam line vacuum problem encountered in the design of the SSC are reviewed: the review includes developments in extreme sensitivity He leak detection technique based on the dynamic adsorption and desorption of He, operation of ionization gauges at Lhe temperatures, metal sponges for the effective cryopumping of H{sup 2} and He to pressures better than 10{sup -14} torr, and low cost and high He sensitivity RGA's. The details of a new extreme sensitivity He leak detector system are also discussed here.

  13. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  14. Silicon PIN diode array hybrids for charged particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.L.; Dunwoodie, W.M.; Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G.; Gaalema, S.

    1988-09-01

    We report on the design of silicon PIN diode array hybrids for use as charged particle detectors. A brief summary of the need for vertex detectors is presented. Circuitry, block diagrams and device specifications are included. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Thermodynamic model for bouncing charged particles inside a capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Mameghani, Pooya

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an equation of state for a conducting particle inside a charged parallel-plate capacitor and show that it is similar to the equation of state for an ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic process. We describe a simple experiment that shows reasonable agreement with the theoretical model.

  16. Electromagnetic field of fractal distribution of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2005-08-15

    Electric and magnetic fields of fractal distribution of charged particles are considered. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. The fractional integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Using the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equation, the simple examples of the fields of homogeneous fractal distribution are considered. The electric dipole and quadrupole moments for fractal distribution are derived.

  17. Some developments in neutron and charged particle dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Bos, Adrie J J; d'Errico, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing need for dosimetry of neutrons and charged particles. Increasing exposure levels are reported in the nuclear industry, deriving from more frequent in-service entries at commercial nuclear power plants, and from increased plant decommissioning and refurbishment activities. Another need stems from the compliance with requirements of the regulations and standards. The European Council directive 96/29 requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv a(-1). On average, aircrew members exceed this value. Further, there is a trend of increasing use of charged particles in radiotherapy. The present situation is that we have reasonably good photon dosemeters, but neutron and charged particle dosemeters are still in need of improvements. This work highlights some of the developments in this field. It is mainly concentrated on some developments in passive dosimetry, in particular thermally and optically stimulated luminescent detectors, indicating the direction of ongoing research. It shows that passive dosemeters are still a very active field. Active dosemeters will not be discussed with the exception of new developments in microdosimetric measurements [new types of tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs)]. The TEPC is unique in its ability to provide a simultaneous determination of neutron / charged particle / gamma ray doses, or dose equivalents using a single detector. PMID:16987918

  18. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  19. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  20. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Derbenev, Ivan N; Filippov, Anatoly V; Stace, Anthony J; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-28

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent. PMID:27586900