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Sample records for accelerating epistasis analysis

  1. Accelerating epistasis analysis in human genetics with consumer graphics hardware

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human geneticists are now capable of measuring more than one million DNA sequence variations from across the human genome. The new challenge is to develop computationally feasible methods capable of analyzing these data for associations with common human disease, particularly in the context of epistasis. Epistasis describes the situation where multiple genes interact in a complex non-linear manner to determine an individual's disease risk and is thought to be ubiquitous for common diseases. Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) is an algorithm capable of detecting epistasis. An exhaustive analysis with MDR is often computationally expensive, particularly for high order interactions. This challenge has previously been met with parallel computation and expensive hardware. The option we examine here exploits commodity hardware designed for computer graphics. In modern computers Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have more memory bandwidth and computational capability than Central Processing Units (CPUs) and are well suited to this problem. Advances in the video game industry have led to an economy of scale creating a situation where these powerful components are readily available at very low cost. Here we implement and evaluate the performance of the MDR algorithm on GPUs. Of primary interest are the time required for an epistasis analysis and the price to performance ratio of available solutions. Findings We found that using MDR on GPUs consistently increased performance per machine over both a feature rich Java software package and a C++ cluster implementation. The performance of a GPU workstation running a GPU implementation reduces computation time by a factor of 160 compared to an 8-core workstation running the Java implementation on CPUs. This GPU workstation performs similarly to 150 cores running an optimized C++ implementation on a Beowulf cluster. Furthermore this GPU system provides extremely cost effective performance while leaving the CPU

  2. Dynamics in Epistasis Analysis.

    PubMed

    Awdeh, Aseel; Phenix, Hilary; Kaern, Mads; Perkins, Theodore

    2017-01-16

    Finding regulatory relationships between genes, including the direction and nature of influence between them, is a fundamental challenge in the field of molecular genetics. One classical approach to this problem is epistasis analysis. Broadly speaking, epistasis analysis infers the regulatory relationships between a pair of genes in a genetic pathway by considering the patterns of change in an observable trait resulting from single and double deletion of genes. While classical epistasis analysis has yielded deep insights on numerous genetic pathways, it is not without limitations. Here, we explore the possibility of dynamic epistasis analysis, in which, in addition to performing genetic perturbations of a pathway, we drive the pathway by a time-varying upstream signal. We explore the theoretical power of dynamical epistasis analysis by conducting an identifiability analysis of Boolean models of genetic pathways, comparing static and dynamic approaches. We find that even relatively simple input dynamics greatly increases the power of epistasis analysis to discriminate alternative network structures. Further, we explore the question of experiment design, and show that a subset of short time-varying signals, which we call dynamic primitives, allow maximum discriminative power with a reduced number of experiments.

  3. Reconstructability analysis of epistasis.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The literature on epistasis describes various methods to detect epistatic interactions and to classify different types of epistasis. Reconstructability analysis (RA) has recently been used to detect epistasis in genomic data. This paper shows that RA offers a classification of types of epistasis at three levels of resolution (variable-based models without loops, variable-based models with loops, state-based models). These types can be defined by the simplest RA structures that model the data without information loss; a more detailed classification can be defined by the information content of multiple candidate structures. The RA classification can be augmented with structures from related graphical modeling approaches. RA can analyze epistatic interactions involving an arbitrary number of genes or SNPs and constitutes a flexible and effective methodology for genomic analysis.

  4. Epistasis analysis using information theory.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Hu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce entropy-based measures derived from information theory for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. We provide a general overview of the methods and highlight some of the modifications that have greatly improved its power for genetic analysis. We end with a few published studies of complex human diseases that have used these measures.

  5. Epistasis can accelerate adaptive diversification in haploid asexual populations.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Cortland K

    2015-03-07

    A fundamental goal of the biological sciences is to determine processes that facilitate the evolution of diversity. These processes can be separated into ecological, physiological, developmental and genetic. An ecological process that facilitates diversification is frequency-dependent selection caused by competition. Models of frequency-dependent adaptive diversification have generally assumed a genetic basis of phenotype that is non-epistatic. Here, we present a model that indicates diversification is accelerated by an epistatic basis of phenotype in combination with a competition model that invokes frequency-dependent selection. Our model makes use of a genealogical model of epistasis and insights into the effects of balancing selection on the genealogical structure of a population to understand how epistasis can facilitate diversification. The finding that epistasis facilitates diversification may be informative with respect to empirical results that indicate an epistatic basis of phenotype in experimental bacterial populations that experienced adaptive diversification.

  6. Epistasis analysis using artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Hill, Doug P

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce artificial intelligence (AI) methodology for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. The ultimate goal of our AI strategy is to analyze genome-wide genetics data as a human would using sources of expert knowledge as a guide. The methodology presented here is based on computational evolution, which is a type of genetic programming. The ability to generate interesting solutions while at the same time learning how to solve the problem at hand distinguishes computational evolution from other genetic programming approaches. We provide a general overview of this approach and then present a few examples of its application to real data.

  7. Dynamic Network-Based Epistasis Analysis: Boolean Examples

    PubMed Central

    Azpeitia, Eugenio; Benítez, Mariana; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we focus on how the hierarchical and single-path assumptions of epistasis analysis can bias the inference of gene regulatory networks. Here we emphasize the critical importance of dynamic analyses, and specifically illustrate the use of Boolean network models. Epistasis in a broad sense refers to gene interactions, however, as originally proposed by Bateson, epistasis is defined as the blocking of a particular allelic effect due to the effect of another allele at a different locus (herein, classical epistasis). Classical epistasis analysis has proven powerful and useful, allowing researchers to infer and assign directionality to gene interactions. As larger data sets are becoming available, the analysis of classical epistasis is being complemented with computer science tools and system biology approaches. We show that when the hierarchical and single-path assumptions are not met in classical epistasis analysis, the access to relevant information and the correct inference of gene interaction topologies is hindered, and it becomes necessary to consider the temporal dynamics of gene interactions. The use of dynamical networks can overcome these limitations. We particularly focus on the use of Boolean networks that, like classical epistasis analysis, relies on logical formalisms, and hence can complement classical epistasis analysis and relax its assumptions. We develop a couple of theoretical examples and analyze them from a dynamic Boolean network model perspective. Boolean networks could help to guide additional experiments and discern among alternative regulatory schemes that would be impossible or difficult to infer without the elimination of these assumption from the classical epistasis analysis. We also use examples from the literature to show how a Boolean network-based approach has resolved ambiguities and guided epistasis analysis. Our article complements previous accounts, not only by focusing on the implications of the hierarchical and

  8. Functional Regression Models for Epistasis Analysis of Multiple Quantitative Traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Futao; Xie, Dan; Liang, Meimei; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, most genetic analyses of phenotypes have focused on analyzing single traits or analyzing each phenotype independently. However, joint epistasis analysis of multiple complementary traits will increase statistical power and improve our understanding of the complicated genetic structure of the complex diseases. Despite their importance in uncovering the genetic structure of complex traits, the statistical methods for identifying epistasis in multiple phenotypes remains fundamentally unexplored. To fill this gap, we formulate a test for interaction between two genes in multiple quantitative trait analysis as a multiple functional regression (MFRG) in which the genotype functions (genetic variant profiles) are defined as a function of the genomic position of the genetic variants. We use large-scale simulations to calculate Type I error rates for testing interaction between two genes with multiple phenotypes and to compare the power with multivariate pairwise interaction analysis and single trait interaction analysis by a single variate functional regression model. To further evaluate performance, the MFRG for epistasis analysis is applied to five phenotypes of exome sequence data from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) to detect pleiotropic epistasis. A total of 267 pairs of genes that formed a genetic interaction network showed significant evidence of epistasis influencing five traits. The results demonstrate that the joint interaction analysis of multiple phenotypes has a much higher power to detect interaction than the interaction analysis of a single trait and may open a new direction to fully uncovering the genetic structure of multiple phenotypes.

  9. Epistasis analysis using multifactor dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Andrews, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) methodology and software package for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. We provide a general overview of the method and then highlight some of the key functions of the open-source MDR software package that is freely distributed. We end with a few examples of published studies of complex human diseases that have used MDR.

  10. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  11. JBASE: Joint Bayesian Analysis of Subphenotypes and Epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Recep; Kim, TaeHyung; Kazan, Hilal; Oh, Yoomi; Cruz, Miguel; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Peralta, Jesus; Escobedo, Jorge; Parra, Esteban J.; Kim, Philip M.; Goldenberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Rapid advances in genotyping and genome-wide association studies have enabled the discovery of many new genotype–phenotype associations at the resolution of individual markers. However, these associations explain only a small proportion of theoretically estimated heritability of most diseases. In this work, we propose an integrative mixture model called JBASE: joint Bayesian analysis of subphenotypes and epistasis. JBASE explores two major reasons of missing heritability: interactions between genetic variants, a phenomenon known as epistasis and phenotypic heterogeneity, addressed via subphenotyping. Results: Our extensive simulations in a wide range of scenarios repeatedly demonstrate that JBASE can identify true underlying subphenotypes, including their associated variants and their interactions, with high precision. In the presence of phenotypic heterogeneity, JBASE has higher Power and lower Type 1 Error than five state-of-the-art approaches. We applied our method to a sample of individuals from Mexico with Type 2 diabetes and discovered two novel epistatic modules, including two loci each, that define two subphenotypes characterized by differences in body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. We successfully replicated these subphenotypes and epistatic modules in an independent dataset from Mexico genotyped with a different platform. Availability and implementation: JBASE is implemented in C++, supported on Linux and is available at http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼goldenberg/JBASE/jbase.tar.gz. The genotype data underlying this study are available upon approval by the ethics review board of the Medical Centre Siglo XXI. Please contact Dr Miguel Cruz at mcruzl@yahoo.com for assistance with the application. Contact: anna.goldenberg@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26411870

  12. Epistasis in monkeyflowers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John K

    2005-12-01

    Epistasis contributes significantly to intrapopulation variation in floral morphology, development time, and male fitness components of Mimulus guttatus. This is demonstrated with a replicated line-cross experiment involving slightly over 7000 plants. The line-cross methodology is based on estimates for means. It thus has greater power than the variance partitioning approaches historically used to estimate epistasis within populations. The replication of the breeding design across many pairs of randomly extracted, inbred lines is necessary given the diversity of multilocus genotypes residing within an outbred deme. Male fitness is shown to exhibit synergistic epistasis, an accelerating decline in fitness with inbreeding. Synergism is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for a mutational deterministic hypothesis for the evolutionary maintenance of sexual reproduction. Unlike male fitness measures, flower morphology and development time yield positive evidence of epistasis but not of synergism. The results for these traits suggest that epistatic effects are variable across genetic backgrounds or sets of interacting loci.

  13. Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis: A Multi-Parameter Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model for Consistency of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin; Chu, Chi-Ming; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been proven to be a successful strategy for identifying genetic variants associated with complex human traits. However, there is still a large heritability gap between GWAS and transitional family studies. The "missing heritability" has been suggested to be due to lack of studies focused on epistasis, also called gene-gene interactions, because individual trials have often had insufficient sample size. Meta-analysis is a common method for increasing statistical power. However, sufficient detailed information is difficult to obtain. A previous study employed a meta-regression-based method to detect epistasis, but it faced the challenge of inconsistent estimates. Here, we describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, called "Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis" (ETMA), which uses genotype summary data to obtain consistent estimates of epistasis effects in meta-analysis. We defined a series of conditions to generate simulation data and tested the power and type I error rates in ETMA, individual data analysis and conventional meta-regression-based method. ETMA not only successfully facilitated consistency of evidence but also yielded acceptable type I error and higher power than conventional meta-regression. We applied ETMA to three real meta-analysis data sets. We found significant gene-gene interactions in the renin-angiotensin system and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism pathway, with strong supporting evidence. In addition, glutathione S-transferase (GST) mu 1 and theta 1 were confirmed to exert independent effects on cancer. We concluded that the application of ETMA to real meta-analysis data was successful. Finally, we developed an R package, etma, for the detection of epistasis in meta-analysis [etma is available via the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/etma/index.html].

  14. Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis: A Multi-Parameter Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model for Consistency of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin; Chu, Chi-Ming; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been proven to be a successful strategy for identifying genetic variants associated with complex human traits. However, there is still a large heritability gap between GWAS and transitional family studies. The “missing heritability” has been suggested to be due to lack of studies focused on epistasis, also called gene–gene interactions, because individual trials have often had insufficient sample size. Meta-analysis is a common method for increasing statistical power. However, sufficient detailed information is difficult to obtain. A previous study employed a meta-regression-based method to detect epistasis, but it faced the challenge of inconsistent estimates. Here, we describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, called “Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis” (ETMA), which uses genotype summary data to obtain consistent estimates of epistasis effects in meta-analysis. We defined a series of conditions to generate simulation data and tested the power and type I error rates in ETMA, individual data analysis and conventional meta-regression-based method. ETMA not only successfully facilitated consistency of evidence but also yielded acceptable type I error and higher power than conventional meta-regression. We applied ETMA to three real meta-analysis data sets. We found significant gene–gene interactions in the renin–angiotensin system and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism pathway, with strong supporting evidence. In addition, glutathione S-transferase (GST) mu 1 and theta 1 were confirmed to exert independent effects on cancer. We concluded that the application of ETMA to real meta-analysis data was successful. Finally, we developed an R package, etma, for the detection of epistasis in meta-analysis [etma is available via the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/etma/index.html]. PMID:27045371

  15. Effect of varying epistasis on the evolution of recombination.

    PubMed

    Kouyos, Roger D; Otto, Sarah P; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2006-06-01

    Whether recombination decelerates or accelerates a population's response to selection depends, at least in part, on how fitness-determining loci interact. Realistically, all genomes likely contain fitness interactions both with positive and with negative epistasis. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the conditions under which the potential beneficial effects of recombination with negative epistasis prevail over the detrimental effects of recombination with positive epistasis. Here, we examine the simultaneous effects of diverse epistatic interactions with different strengths and signs in a simplified model system with independent pairs of interacting loci and selection acting only on the haploid phase. We find that the average form of epistasis does not predict the average amount of linkage disequilibrium generated or the impact on a recombination modifier when compared to results using the entire distribution of epistatic effects and associated single-mutant effects. Moreover, we show that epistatic interactions of a given strength can produce very different effects, having the greatest impact when selection is weak. In summary, we observe that the evolution of recombination at mutation-selection balance might be driven by a small number of interactions with weak selection rather than by the average epistasis of all interactions. We illustrate this effect with an analysis of published data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus to draw conclusions on the evolution of recombination from experimental data, it is necessary to consider the distribution of epistatic interactions together with the associated selection coefficients.

  16. Optimizing Dietary Restriction for Genetic Epistasis Analysis and Gene Discovery in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mair, William; Panowski, Siler H.; Shaw, Reuben J.; Dillin, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) increases mammalian lifespan and decreases susceptibility to many age-related diseases. Lifespan extension due to DR is conserved across a wide range of species. Recent research has focused upon genetically tractable model organisms such as C. elegans to uncover the genetic mechanisms that regulate the response to DR, in the hope that this information will provide insight into the mammalian response and yield potential therapeutic targets. However, no consensus exists as to the best protocol to apply DR to C. elegans and potential key regulators of DR are protocol-specific. Here we define a DR method that better fulfills criteria required for an invertebrate DR protocol to mirror mammalian studies. The food intake that maximizes longevity varies for different genotypes and informative epistasis analysis with another intervention is only achievable at this ‘optimal DR’ level. Importantly therefore, the degree of restriction imposed using our method can easily be adjusted to determine the genotype-specific optimum DR level. We used this protocol to test two previously identified master regulators of DR in the worm. In contrast to previous reports, we find that DR can robustly extend the lifespan of worms lacking the AMP-activated protein kinase catalytic subunit AAK2 or the histone deacetylase SIR-2.1, highlighting the importance of first optimizing DR to identify universal regulators of DR mediated longevity. PMID:19229346

  17. Genotype Correlation Analysis Reveals Pathway-Based Functional Disequilibrium and Potential Epistasis in the Human Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Bush, William S.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Epistasis is thought to be a pervasive part of complex phenotypes due to the dynamics and complexity of biological systems, and a further understanding of epistasis in the context of biological pathways may provide insight into the etiology of complex disease. In this study, we use genotype data from the International HapMap Project to characterize the functional dependencies between alleles in the human interactome as defined by KEGG pathways. We performed chi-square tests to identify non-independence between functionally-related SNP pairs within parental Caucasian and Yoruba samples. We further refine this list by testing for skewed transmission of pseudo-haplotypes to offspring using a haplotype-based TDT test. From these analyses, we identify pathways enriched for functional disequilibrium, and a set of 863 SNP pairs (representing 453 gene pairs) showing consistent non-independence and transmission distortion. These results represent gene pairs with strong evidence of epistasis within the context of a biological function.

  18. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis.

    PubMed

    Skwark, Marcin J; Croucher, Nicholas J; Puranen, Santeri; Chewapreecha, Claire; Pesonen, Maiju; Xu, Ying Ying; Turner, Paul; Harris, Simon R; Beres, Stephen B; Musser, James M; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-02-01

    enhances the future potential of epistasis analysis for systems biology, and can complement genome-wide association studies as a means of formulating hypotheses for targeted experimental work.

  19. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pesonen, Maiju; Musser, James M.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    enhances the future potential of epistasis analysis for systems biology, and can complement genome-wide association studies as a means of formulating hypotheses for targeted experimental work. PMID:28207813

  20. Analysis of heterogeneity and epistasis in physiological mixed populations by combined structural equation modelling and latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Werge, Thomas; Jørgensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    homogenous subpopulations and on inclusion of epistasis in the analysis, whereas epistasis (i.e. genetic networks) is ubiquitous and should be the basis in modelling any biological process. PMID:18611252

  1. The causes of epistasis.

    PubMed

    de Visser, J Arjan G M; Cooper, Tim F; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-12-22

    Since Bateson's discovery that genes can suppress the phenotypic effects of other genes, gene interactions-called epistasis-have been the topic of a vast research effort. Systems and developmental biologists study epistasis to understand the genotype-phenotype map, whereas evolutionary biologists recognize the fundamental importance of epistasis for evolution. Depending on its form, epistasis may lead to divergence and speciation, provide evolutionary benefits to sex and affect the robustness and evolvability of organisms. That epistasis can itself be shaped by evolution has only recently been realized. Here, we review the empirical pattern of epistasis, and some of the factors that may affect the form and extent of epistasis. Based on their divergent consequences, we distinguish between interactions with or without mean effect, and those affecting the magnitude of fitness effects or their sign. Empirical work has begun to quantify epistasis in multiple dimensions in the context of metabolic and fitness landscape models. We discuss possible proximate causes (such as protein function and metabolic networks) and ultimate factors (including mutation, recombination, and the importance of natural selection and genetic drift). We conclude that, in general, pleiotropy is an important prerequisite for epistasis, and that epistasis may evolve as an adaptive or intrinsic consequence of changes in genetic robustness and evolvability.

  2. Genetic analysis of an allergic rhinitis cohort reveals an intercellular epistasis between FAM134B and CD39

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular ATP is a pro-inflammatory molecule released by damaged cells. Regulatory T cells (Treg) can suppress inflammation by hydrolysing this molecule via ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1), also termed as CD39. Multiple studies have reported differences in CD39+ Treg percentages in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Hepatitis B and HIV-1. In addition, CD39 polymorphisms have been implicated in immune-phenotypes such as susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and AIDS progression. However none of the studies published so far has linked disease-associated variants with differences in CD39 Treg surface expression. This study aims at identifying variants affecting CD39 expression on Treg and at evaluating their association with allergic rhinitis, a disease characterized by a strong Treg involvement. Methods Cohorts consisting of individuals of different ethnicities were employed to identify any association of CD39 variants to surface expression. Significant variant(s) were tested for disease association in a published GWAS cohort by one-locus and two-locus genetic analyses based on logistic models. Further functional characterization was performed using existing microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells. Results Our study shows that rs7071836, a promoter SNP in the CD39 gene region, affects the cell surface expression on Treg cells but not on other CD39+ leukocyte subsets. Epistasis analysis revealed that, in conjunction with a SNP upstream of the FAM134B gene (rs257174), it increased the risk of allergic rhinitis (P = 1.98 × 10-6). As a promoter SNP, rs257174 controlled the expression of the gene in monocytes but, notably, not in Treg cells. Whole blood transcriptome data of three large cohorts indicated an inverse relation in the expression of the two proteins. While this observation was in line with the epistasis data, it also implied that a functional link must exist. Exposure of monocytes to

  3. Deep epistasis in human metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imielinski, Marcin; Belta, Calin

    2010-06-01

    We extend and apply a method that we have developed for deriving high-order epistatic relationships in large biochemical networks to a published genome-scale model of human metabolism. In our analysis we compute 33 328 reaction sets whose knockout synergistically disables one or more of 43 important metabolic functions. We also design minimal knockouts that remove flux through fumarase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to play an important role in human cancer. Most of these knockout sets employ more than eight mutually buffering reactions, spanning multiple cellular compartments and metabolic subsystems. These reaction sets suggest that human metabolic pathways possess a striking degree of parallelism, inducing "deep" epistasis between diversely annotated genes. Our results prompt specific chemical and genetic perturbation follow-up experiments that could be used to query in vivo pathway redundancy. They also suggest directions for future statistical studies of epistasis in genetic variation data sets.

  4. Estimating directional epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis, i.e., the fact that gene effects depend on the genetic background, is a direct consequence of the complexity of genetic architectures. Despite this, most of the models used in evolutionary and quantitative genetics pay scant attention to genetic interactions. For instance, the traditional decomposition of genetic effects models epistasis as noise around the evolutionarily-relevant additive effects. Such an approach is only valid if it is assumed that there is no general pattern among interactions—a highly speculative scenario. Systematic interactions generate directional epistasis, which has major evolutionary consequences. In spite of its importance, directional epistasis is rarely measured or reported by quantitative geneticists, not only because its relevance is generally ignored, but also due to the lack of simple, operational, and accessible methods for its estimation. This paper describes conceptual and statistical tools that can be used to estimate directional epistasis from various kinds of data, including QTL mapping results, phenotype measurements in mutants, and artificial selection responses. As an illustration, I measured directional epistasis from a real-life example. I then discuss the interpretation of the estimates, showing how they can be used to draw meaningful biological inferences. PMID:25071828

  5. Biological knowledge-driven analysis of epistasis in human GWAS with application to lipid traits.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Keinan, Alon; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    While the importance of epistasis is well established, specific gene-gene interactions have rarely been identified in human genome-wide association studies (GWAS), mainly due to low power associated with such interaction tests. In this chapter, we integrate biological knowledge and human GWAS data to reveal epistatic interactions underlying quantitative lipid traits, which are major risk factors for coronary artery disease. To increase power to detect interactions, we only tested pairs of SNPs filtered by prior biological knowledge, including GWAS results, protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and pathway information. Using published GWAS and 9,713 European Americans (EA) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, we identified an interaction between HMGCR and LIPC affecting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. We then validated this interaction in additional multiethnic cohorts from ARIC, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Both HMGCR and LIPC are involved in the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins, and LIPC itself has been marginally associated with HDL-C. Furthermore, no significant interaction was detected using PPI and pathway information, mainly due to the stringent significance level required after correcting for the large number of tests conducted. These results suggest the potential of biological knowledge-driven approaches to detect epistatic interactions in human GWAS, which may hold the key to exploring the role gene-gene interactions play in connecting genotypes and complex phenotypes in future GWAS.

  6. Symbolic modeling of epistasis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Barney, Nate; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Gui, Jiang; White, Bill C

    2007-01-01

    The workhorse of modern genetic analysis is the parametric linear model. The advantages of the linear modeling framework are many and include a mathematical understanding of the model fitting process and ease of interpretation. However, an important limitation is that linear models make assumptions about the nature of the data being modeled. This assumption may not be realistic for complex biological systems such as disease susceptibility where nonlinearities in the genotype to phenotype mapping relationship that result from epistasis, plastic reaction norms, locus heterogeneity, and phenocopy, for example, are the norm rather than the exception. We have previously developed a flexible modeling approach called symbolic discriminant analysis (SDA) that makes no assumptions about the patterns in the data. Rather, SDA lets the data dictate the size, shape, and complexity of a symbolic discriminant function that could include any set of mathematical functions from a list of candidates supplied by the user. Here, we outline a new five step process for symbolic model discovery that uses genetic programming (GP) for coarse-grained stochastic searching, experimental design for parameter optimization, graphical modeling for generating expert knowledge, and estimation of distribution algorithms for fine-grained stochastic searching. Finally, we introduce function mapping as a new method for interpreting symbolic discriminant functions. We show that function mapping when combined with measures of interaction information facilitates statistical interpretation by providing a graphical approach to decomposing complex models to highlight synergistic, redundant, and independent effects of polymorphisms and their composite functions. We illustrate this five step SDA modeling process with a real case-control dataset.

  7. Integrated pathway and epistasis analysis reveals interactive effect of genetic variants at TERF1 and AFAP1L2 loci on melanoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Vaysse, Amaury; Wei, Qingyi; Chen, Wei V.; Mohamdi, Hamida; Maubec, Eve; Lavielle, Nolwenn; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have characterized 13 loci associated with melanoma, which only account for a small part of melanoma risk. To identify new genes with too small an effect to be detected individually but which collectively influence melanoma risk and/or show interactive effects, we used a two-step analysis strategy including pathway analysis of genome-wide SNP data, in a first step, and epistasis analysis within significant pathways, in a second step. Pathway analysis, using the gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) approach and the gene ontology (GO) database, was applied to the outcomes of MELARISK (3,976 subjects) and MDACC (2,827 subjects) GWASs. Cross-gene SNP-SNP interaction analysis within melanoma-associated GOs was performed using the INTERSNP software. Five GO categories were significantly enriched in genes associated with melanoma (FDR≤5% in both studies): response to light stimulus, regulation of mitotic cell cycle, induction of programmed cell death, cytokine activity and oxidative phosphorylation. Epistasis analysis, within each of the five significant GOs, showed significant evidence for interaction for one SNP pair at TERF1 and AFAP1L2 loci (pmeta-int =2.0×10−7, which met both the pathway and overall multiple-testing corrected thresholds that are equal to 9.8×10−7 and 2.0×10−7, respectively) and suggestive evidence for another pair involving correlated SNPs at the same loci (pmeta-int =3.6×10−6 ). This interaction has important biological relevance given the key role of TERF1 in telomere biology and the reported physical interaction between TERF1 and AFAP1L2 proteins. This finding brings a novel piece of evidence for the emerging role of telomere dysfunction into melanoma development. PMID:25892537

  8. Consequences of Epistasis on Growth in an Erhualian × White Duroc Pig Cross

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanmei

    2017-01-01

    Epistasis describes an interaction between the effects of loci. We included epistasis in quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of growth at a series of ages in a cross of a Chinese pig breed, Erhualian, with a commercial line, White Duroc. Erhualian pigs have much lower growth rates than White Duroc. We improved a method for genomewide testing of epistasis and present a clear analysis workflow. We also suggest a new approach for interpreting epistasis results where significant additive and dominance effects of a locus in specific backgrounds are determined. In total, seventeen QTL were found and eleven showed epistasis. Loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4 and 7 were highlighted as affecting growth at more than one age or forming an interaction network. Epistasis resulted in both the QTL on chromosomes 3 and 7 having effects in opposite directions. We believe it is the first time for the chromosome 7 locus that an allele from a Chinese breed has been found to decrease growth. The consequences of epistasis were diverse. Results were impacted by using growth rather than body weight as the phenotype and by correcting for an effect of mother. Epistasis made a considerable contribution to growth in this population and modelling epistasis was important for accurately determining QTL effects. PMID:28060815

  9. The decline in fitness with inbreeding: evidence for negative dominance-by-dominance epistasis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sharp, N P; Agrawal, A F

    2016-04-01

    Genetic interactions can play an important role in the evolution of reproductive strategies. In particular, negative dominance-by-dominance epistasis for fitness can theoretically favour sex and recombination. This form of epistasis can be detected statistically because it generates nonlinearity in the relationship between fitness and inbreeding coefficient. Measures of fitness in progressively inbred lines tend to show limited evidence for epistasis. However, tests of this kind can be biased against detecting an accelerating decline due to line losses at higher inbreeding levels. We tested for dominance-by-dominance epistasis in Drosophila melanogaster by examining viability at five inbreeding levels that were generated simultaneously, avoiding the bias against detecting nonlinearity that has affected previous studies. We find an accelerating rate of fitness decline with inbreeding, indicating that dominance-by-dominance epistasis is negative on average, which should favour sex and recombination.

  10. Parallel emergence of negative epistasis across experimental lineages.

    PubMed

    Zee, Peter C; Velicer, Gregory J

    2017-01-27

    Epistatic interactions can greatly impact evolutionary phenomena, particularly the process of adaptation. Here, we leverage four parallel experimentally evolved lineages to study the emergence and trajectories of epistatic interactions in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A social gene (pilA) necessary for effective group swarming on soft agar had been deleted from the common ancestor of these lineages. During selection for competitiveness at the leading edge of growing colonies, two lineages evolved qualitatively novel mechanisms for greatly increased swarming on soft agar, whereas the other two lineages evolved relatively small increases in swarming. By reintroducing pilA into different genetic backgrounds along the four lineages, we tested whether parallel lineages showed similar patterns of epistasis. In particular, we tested whether a pattern of negative epistasis between accumulating mutations and pilA previously found in the fastest lineage would be found only in the two evolved lineages with the fastest and most striking swarming phenotypes, or rather was due to common epistatic structure across all lineages arising from the generic fixation of adaptive mutations. Our analysis reveals the emergence of negative epistasis across all four independent lineages. Further, we present results showing that the observed negative epistasis is not due exclusively to evolving populations approaching a maximum phenotypic value that inherently limits positive effects of pilA reintroduction, but rather involves direct antagonistic interactions between accumulating mutations and the reintroduced social gene.

  11. The causes of epistasis in genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Macía, Javier; Solé, Ricard V; Elena, Santiago F

    2012-02-01

    Epistasis refers to the nonadditive interactions between genes in determining phenotypes. Considerable efforts have shown that, even for a given organism, epistasis may vary both in intensity and sign. Recent comparative studies supported that the overall sign of epistasis switches from positive to negative as the complexity of an organism increases, and it has been hypothesized that this change shall be a consequence of the underlying gene network properties. Why should this be the case? What characteristics of genetic networks determine the sign of epistasis? Here we show, by evolving genetic networks that differ in their complexity and robustness against perturbations but that perform the same tasks, that robustness increased with complexity and that epistasis was positive for small nonrobust networks but negative for large robust ones. Our results indicate that robustness and negative epistasis emerge as a consequence of the existence of redundant elements in regulatory structures of genetic networks and that the correlation between complexity and epistasis is a byproduct of such redundancy, allowing for the decoupling of epistasis from the underlying network complexity.

  12. Epistasis and the Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    The fitness effects of a mutation can depend, sometimes dramatically, on genetic background; this phenomenon is often referred to as "epistasis." Epistasis can have important practical consequences in the context of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). For example, genetic background plays an important role in determining the costs of resistance, and hence in whether resistance will persist in the absence of antibiotic pressure. Furthermore, interactions between resistance mutations can have important implications for the evolution of multi-drug resistance. I argue that there is a need to better characterize the extent and nature of epistasis for mutations and horizontally transferred elements conferring AMR, particularly in clinical contexts. Furthermore, I suggest that epistasis should be an important consideration in attempts to slow or limit the evolution of AMR.

  13. Epistasis and the Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    The fitness effects of a mutation can depend, sometimes dramatically, on genetic background; this phenomenon is often referred to as “epistasis.” Epistasis can have important practical consequences in the context of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). For example, genetic background plays an important role in determining the costs of resistance, and hence in whether resistance will persist in the absence of antibiotic pressure. Furthermore, interactions between resistance mutations can have important implications for the evolution of multi-drug resistance. I argue that there is a need to better characterize the extent and nature of epistasis for mutations and horizontally transferred elements conferring AMR, particularly in clinical contexts. Furthermore, I suggest that epistasis should be an important consideration in attempts to slow or limit the evolution of AMR. PMID:28261193

  14. Pervasive Cryptic Epistasis in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lunzer, Mark; Golding, G. Brian; Dean, Antony M.

    2010-01-01

    The functional effects of most amino acid replacements accumulated during molecular evolution are unknown, because most are not observed naturally and the possible combinations are too numerous. We created 168 single mutations in wild-type Escherichia coli isopropymalate dehydrogenase (IMDH) that match the differences found in wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa IMDH. 104 mutant enzymes performed similarly to E. coli wild-type IMDH, one was functionally enhanced, and 63 were functionally compromised. The transition from E. coli IMDH, or an ancestral form, to the functional wild-type P. aeruginosa IMDH requires extensive epistasis to ameliorate the combined effects of the deleterious mutations. This result stands in marked contrast with a basic assumption of molecular phylogenetics, that sites in sequences evolve independently of each other. Residues that affect function are scattered haphazardly throughout the IMDH structure. We screened for compensatory mutations at three sites, all of which lie near the active site and all of which are among the least active mutants. No compensatory mutations were found at two sites indicating that a single site may engage in compound epistatic interactions. One complete and three partial compensatory mutations of the third site are remote and lie in a different domain. This demonstrates that epistatic interactions can occur between distant (>20Å) sites. Phylogenetic analysis shows that incompatible mutations were fixed in different lineages. PMID:20975933

  15. Interactive analysis environment of unified accelerator libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, V.; Malitsky, N.; Talman, R.

    2006-04-01

    Unified Accelerator Libraries (UAL, http://www.ual.bnl.gov) software is an open accelerator simulation environment addressing a broad spectrum of accelerator tasks ranging from efficient online-oriented modeling to full-scale realistic beam dynamics studies. The paper introduces a new package integrating UAL simulation algorithms with the QT-based Graphical User Interface and the ROOT data analysis and visualization framework ( http://root.cern.ch). The primary user application is implemented as an interactive and configurable Accelerator Physics Player. Its interface to visualization components is based on the QT layer ( http://root.bnl.gov) supported by the STAR experiment.

  16. Enabling personal genomics with an explicit test of epistasis.

    PubMed

    Greene, Casey S; Himmelstein, Daniel S; Nelson, Heather H; Kelsey, Karl T; Williams, Scott M; Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Moore, Jason H

    2010-01-01

    One goal of personal genomics is to use information about genomic variation to predict who is at risk for various common diseases. Technological advances in genotyping have spawned several personal genetic testing services that market genotyping services directly to the consumer. An important goal of consumer genetic testing is to provide health information along with the genotyping results. This has the potential to integrate detailed personal genetic and genomic information into healthcare decision making. Despite the potential importance of these advances, there are some important limitations. One concern is that much of the literature that is used to formulate personal genetics reports is based on genetic association studies that consider each genetic variant independently of the others. It is our working hypothesis that the true value of personal genomics will only be realized when the complexity of the genotype-to-phenotype mapping relationship is embraced, rather than ignored. We focus here on complexity in genetic architecture due to epistasis or nonlinear gene-gene interaction. We have previously developed a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) algorithm and software package for detecting nonlinear interactions in genetic association studies. In most prior MDR analyses, the permutation testing strategy used to assess statistical significance was unable to differentiate MDR models that captured only interaction effects from those that also detected independent main effects. Statistical interpretation of MDR models required post-hoc analysis using entropy-based measures of interaction information. We introduce here a novel permutation test that allows the effects of nonlinear interactions between multiple genetic variants to be specifically tested in a manner that is not confounded by linear additive effects. We show using simulated nonlinear interactions that the power using the explicit test of epistasis is no different than a standard permutation

  17. Two-Stage Genome-Wide Search for Epistasis with Implementation to Recombinant Inbred Lines (RIL) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Pavel; Korol, Abraham B.; Reiner-Benaim, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Objective and Methods This paper proposes an inegrative two-stage genome-wide search for pairwise epistasis on expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The traits are clustered into multi-trait complexes that account for correlations between them that may result from common epistasis effects. The search is done by first screening for epistatic regions and then using dense markers within the identified regions, resulting in substantial reduction in the number of tests for epistasis. The FDR is controlled using a hierarchical procedure that accounts for the search structure. Each combination of trait and marker-pair is tested using a model that accounts for both statistical and functional interpretations of epistasis and considers orthogonal effects, such that their contributions to heritability can be estimated individually. We examine the impact of using multi-trait complexes rather than single traits, and of using a hierarchical search for epistasis rather than skipping the initial screen for epistatic regions. We apply the proposed algorithm on Arabidopsis transcription data. Principal Findings Both epistasis detection power and heritability contributed by epistasis increased when using multi-trait complexes rather than single traits. Epistatic effects common to the eQTLs included in the complexes have higher chance of being identified by analysis of multi-trait complexes, particularly when epistatic effects on individual traits are small. Compared to direct testing for all potential epistatic effects, the hierarchical search was substantially more powerful in detecting epistasis, while controlling the FDR at the desired level. Association in functional roles within genomic regions was observed, supporting an initial screen for epistatic QTLs. PMID:25536193

  18. Confronting the missing epistasis problem: on the reproducibility of gene-gene interactions.

    PubMed

    Murk, William; Bracken, Michael B; DeWan, Andrew T

    2015-08-01

    Epistasis (gene-gene interaction) is thought to play an integral role in the genetic basis of complex traits, and a significant amount of research has been invested into identifying this phenomenon in human disease. However, the overall success of empirical studies of epistasis in humans is unclear, as such studies are rarely systematically evaluated. Here, we have selected asthma as an example of a well-studied, complex human disease, and provide a critical analysis and replication attempt of nearly all prior reports of epistasis for this disease. Of 191 previously reported interactions, we find that 39.8% were not originally identified using an explicit test for interaction and thus may not have been true epistatic effects to begin with. Moreover, directions of effect were not described for 46.1% of the interactions, which prevents their rigorous replication. In the original studies, attempts at replication were made for 15.2% of the interactions, and 7.3% were actually replicated. In the current study, we were able to evaluate 85.9% of the interactions using a large asthma dataset from the GABRIEL Consortium. None of these interactions could be replicated based on strict criteria. However, we found nominally significant (p < 0.05) evidence in support of 23.8% of the evaluated interactions. Although many reports of epistasis are not robustly supported in the published literature, our results suggest that at least some of these reports may have been true-positive examples of epistasis. In general, improvements in empirical studies of epistasis are called for, in order to better understand the importance of this phenomenon in human disease.

  19. A survey about methods dedicated to epistasis detection.

    PubMed

    Niel, Clément; Sinoquet, Christine; Dina, Christian; Rocheleau, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, findings of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) improved our knowledge and understanding of disease genetics. To date, thousands of SNPs have been associated with diseases and other complex traits. Statistical analysis typically looks for association between a phenotype and a SNP taken individually via single-locus tests. However, geneticists admit this is an oversimplified approach to tackle the complexity of underlying biological mechanisms. Interaction between SNPs, namely epistasis, must be considered. Unfortunately, epistasis detection gives rise to analytic challenges since analyzing every SNP combination is at present impractical at a genome-wide scale. In this review, we will present the main strategies recently proposed to detect epistatic interactions, along with their operating principle. Some of these methods are exhaustive, such as multifactor dimensionality reduction, likelihood ratio-based tests or receiver operating characteristic curve analysis; some are non-exhaustive, such as machine learning techniques (random forests, Bayesian networks) or combinatorial optimization approaches (ant colony optimization, computational evolution system).

  20. Analysis techniques for residual acceleration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Various aspects of residual acceleration data are of interest to low-gravity experimenters. Maximum and mean values and various other statistics can be obtained from data as collected in the time domain. Additional information may be obtained through manipulation of the data. Fourier analysis is discussed as a means of obtaining information about dominant frequency components of a given data window. Transformation of data into different coordinate axes is useful in the analysis of experiments with different orientations and can be achieved by the use of a transformation matrix. Application of such analysis techniques to residual acceleration data provides additional information than what is provided in a time history and increases the effectiveness of post-flight analysis of low-gravity experiments.

  1. Likelihood analysis of the Local Group acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, I.; Branchini, E.; Teodoro, L.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; McMahon, R.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-04-01

    We compute the acceleration of the Local Group using 11 206 IRAS galaxies from the recently completed all-sky PSCz redshift survey. Measuring the acceleration vector in redshift space generates systematic uncertainties caused by the redshift-space distortions in the density field. We therefore assign galaxies to their real-space positions by adopting a non-parametric model for the velocity field that relies solely on the linear gravitational instability (GI) and linear biasing hypotheses. Remaining systematic contributions to the measured acceleration vector are corrected for by using PSCz mock catalogues from N-body experiments. The resulting acceleration vector points ~15 away from the CMB dipole apex, with a remarkable alignment between small- and large-scale contributions. A considerable fraction (~65 per cent) of the measured acceleration is generated within 40 h^-1 Mpc, with a non-negligible contribution from scales between 90 and 140 h^-1 Mpc, after which the acceleration amplitude seems to have converged. The local group acceleration from PSCz appears to be consistent with the one determined from the IRAS 1.2-Jy galaxy catalogue once the different contributions from shot noise have been taken into account. The results are consistent with the gravitational instability hypothesis and do not indicate any strong deviations from the linear biasing relation on large scales. A maximum-likelihood analysis of the cumulative PSCz dipole is performed within a radius of 150 h^-1 Mpc, in which we account for non-linear effects, shot noise and finite sample size. The aim is to constrain the beta=Omega^0.6/b parameter and the power spectrum of density fluctuations. We obtain beta=0.70^+0.35_-0.2 at 1sigma confidence level. The likelihood analysis is not very sensitive to the shape of the power spectrum, because of the rise in the amplitude of the dipole beyond 40 h^-1 Mpc and the increase in shot noise on large scales. There is, however, a weak indication that within the

  2. Analysis of acceleration signals using wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Sekine, M; Tamura, T; Akay, M; Togawa, T; Fukui, Y

    2000-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to discriminate the acceleration signal for horizontal level and stairway walking using wavelet-based fractal analysis method. The acceleration signal was measured close to the center of gravity of the body, while the subjects walked continuously in the corridor and up and down the stairs. We used the wavelet-based fractal analysis method to discriminate walking pattern. The parameter H which is related directly to the fractal dimension was estimated by the wavelet coefficient and was changed into low value during walking upstairs. By manually setting the threshold level for individual, it was possible to discriminate walking upstairs from the other walking type. However, the common feature among subjects was not shown between level walking and walking downstairs.

  3. Rapid appearance of epistasis during adaptive divergence following colonization.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Scott P; Dingle, Hugh; Famula, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    Theory predicts that short-term adaptation within populations depends on additive (A) genetic effects, while gene-gene interactions 'epistasis (E)' are important only in long-term evolution. However, few data exist on the genetic architecture of adaptive variation, and the relative importance of A versus non-additive genetic effects continues to be a central controversy of evolutionary biology after more than 70 years of debate. To examine this issue directly, we conducted hybridization experiments between two populations of wild soapberry bugs that have strongly differentiated in 100 or fewer generations following a host plant shift. Contrary to expectation, we found that between-population E and dominance (D) have appeared quickly in the evolution of new phenotypes. Rather than thousands of generations, adaptive gene differences between populations have evolved in tens. Such complex genetic variation could underlie the seemingly extreme rates of evolution that are increasingly reported in many taxa. In the case of the soapberry bug, extraordinary ecological opportunity, rather than mortality, may have created hard selection for genetic variants. Because ultimate division of populations into genetic species depends on epistatic loss of hybrid compatibility, local adaptation based on E may accelerate macro-evolutionary diversification. PMID:12952643

  4. Acceleration of Data Analysis Applications using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillmore, D.; Messmer, P.; Mullowney, P.; Amyx, K.

    2008-12-01

    The vast amount of data collected by present and future scientific instruments, sensors and numerical models requires a significant increase in computing power for analysis. In many cases, processing time on a single workstation becomes impractical. While clusters of commodity processors can be utilized to accelerate some of these tasks, the relatively high software development cost, as well as acquisition and operational costs, make them less attractive for broad use. Over the past few years, another class of architectures has gained some popularity, namely heterogeneous architectures, which consist of general purpose processors connected to specialized processors. One of the most prominent examples are Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which offer a tremendous amount of floating-point processing power due to demand for high-quality graphics in the computer game market. However, in order to harness this processing power, software developers have to develop with a detailed understanding of the underlying hardware. This burden on the developer is often hardly justifiable considering the rapid evolution of the hardware. In this talk, we will introduce GPULib, an open source library that enables scientists to accelerate their data analysis tasks using the GPUs already installed in their system from within high-level languages like IDL or MATLAB, and present examples and possible speedup from real-world data analysis applications. This work is funded through NASA Phase II SBIR Grant NNG06CA13C.

  5. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-07-31

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothesis, we introduce a finite population evolutionary process that combines a recombination modifier formalism with a gene-regulatory network model. We demonstrate that when reproductive mode and epistasis are allowed to coevolve, asexual reproduction outcompetes sexual reproduction. In addition, no correlation is found between the level of synergistic epistasis and the fixation time of the asexual mode. However, a significant correlation is found between the level of antagonistic epistasis and asexual mode fixation time. This asymmetry can be explained by the greater reduction in fitness imposed by sexual reproduction as compared with asexual reproduction. Our findings present evidence and suggest plausible explanations that challenge both the deterministic mutation hypothesis and recent arguments asserting the importance of emergent synergistic epistasis in the maintenance of sexual reproduction.

  6. Analysis of a triple testcross design with recombinant inbred lines reveals a significant role of epistasis in heterosis for biomass-related traits in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kusterer, Barbara; Muminovic, Jasmina; Utz, H Friedrich; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Barth, Susanne; Heckenberger, Martin; Meyer, Rhonda C; Altmann, Thomas; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2007-04-01

    Primary causes of heterosis are still unknown. Our goal was to investigate the extent and underlying genetic causes of heterosis for five biomass-related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana. We (i) investigated the relative contribution of dominance and epistatic effects to heterosis in the hybrid C24 x Col-0 by generation means analysis and estimates of variance components based on a triple testcross (TTC) design with recombinant inbred lines (RILs), (ii) estimated the average degree of dominance, and (iii) examined the importance of reciprocal and maternal effects in this cross. In total, 234 RILs were crossed to parental lines and their F1's. Midparent heterosis (MPH) was high for rosette diameter at 22 days after sowing (DAS) and 29 DAS, growth rate (GR), and biomass yield (BY). Using the F2-metric, directional dominance prevailed for the majority of traits studied but reciprocal and maternal effects were not significant. Additive and dominance variances were significant for all traits. Additive x additive and dominance x dominance variances were significant for all traits but GR. We conclude that dominance as well as digenic and possibly higher-order epistatic effects play an important role in heterosis for biomass-related traits. Our results encourage the use of Arabidopsis hybrid C24 x Col-0 for identification and description of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for heterosis for biomass-related traits and further genomic studies.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for Behçet's disease and epistasis between HLA-B*51 and ERAP1.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Yohei; Bertsias, George; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Ozyazgan, Yilmaz; Sacli, F Sevgi; Erer, Burak; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Emrence, Zeliha; Cakar, Atilla; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Satorius, Colleen; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Yoonhee; Wood, Geryl M; Ombrello, Michael J; Meguro, Akira; Gül, Ahmet; Remmers, Elaine F; Kastner, Daniel L

    2013-02-01

    Individuals with Behçet's disease suffer from episodic inflammation often affecting the orogenital mucosa, skin and eyes. To discover new susceptibility loci for Behçet's disease, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 779,465 SNPs with imputed genotypes in 1,209 Turkish individuals with Behçet's disease and 1,278 controls. We identified new associations at CCR1, STAT4 and KLRC4. Additionally, two SNPs in ERAP1, encoding ERAP1 p.Asp575Asn and p.Arg725Gln alterations, recessively conferred disease risk. These findings were replicated in 1,468 independent Turkish and/or 1,352 Japanese samples (combined meta-analysis P < 2 × 10(-9)). We also found evidence for interaction between HLA-B*51 and ERAP1 (P = 9 × 10(-4)). The CCR1 and STAT4 variants were associated with gene expression differences. Three risk loci shared with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis (the MHC class I region, ERAP1 and IL23R and the MHC class I-ERAP1 interaction), as well as two loci shared with inflammatory bowel disease (IL23R and IL10) implicate shared pathogenic pathways in the spondyloarthritides and Behçet's disease.

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for Behçet's disease and epistasis between HLA-B*51 and ERAP1

    PubMed Central

    Kirino, Yohei; Bertsias, George; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Ozyazgan, Yilmaz; Sacli, F. Sevgi; Erer, Burak; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Emrence, Zeliha; Cakar, Atilla; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Satorius, Colleen; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Yoonhee; Wood, Geryl M.; Ombrello, Michael J.; Meguro, Akira; Gül, Ahmet; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kastner, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Behçet's disease (BD) suffer from episodic inflammation often affecting the orogenital mucosa, skin, and eyes. To discover new BD-susceptibility loci, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 779,465 SNPs with imputed genotypes in 1,209 Turkish BD patients and 1,278 controls. We identified novel associations at CCR1, STAT4, and KLRC4. Additionally, two SNPs in ERAP1, encoding ERAP1 p.Asp575Asn and p.Arg725Gln, recessively conferred disease risk. These findings replicated in 1,468 independent Turkish and/or 1,352 Japanese samples (combined meta-analysis p < 2 × 10−9). We also found evidence for interaction between HLA-B*51 and ERAP1 (p = 9 × 10−4). The CCR1 and STAT4 variants were associated with gene expression differences. Three risk loci shared with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis (MHC-I, ERAP1, and IL23R, and the MHC-I-ERAP1 interaction), as well as two loci shared with inflammatory bowel disease (IL23R and IL10) implicate shared pathogenic pathways in the spondyloarthritides and BD. PMID:23291587

  9. Accelerating DNA analysis applications on GPU clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2010-06-13

    DNA analysis is an emerging application of high performance bioinformatic. Modern sequencing machinery are able to provide, in few hours, large input streams of data which needs to be matched against exponentially growing databases known fragments. The ability to recognize these patterns effectively and fastly may allow extending the scale and the reach of the investigations performed by biology scientists. Aho-Corasick is an exact, multiple pattern matching algorithm often at the base of this application. High performance systems are a promising platform to accelerate this algorithm, which is computationally intensive but also inherently parallel. Nowadays, high performance systems also include heterogeneous processing elements, such as Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), to further accelerate parallel algorithms. Unfortunately, the Aho-Corasick algorithm exhibits large performance variabilities, depending on the size of the input streams, on the number of patterns to search and on the number of matches, and poses significant challenges on current high performance software and hardware implementations. An adequate mapping of the algorithm on the target architecture, coping with the limit of the underlining hardware, is required to reach the desired high throughputs. Load balancing also plays a crucial role when considering the limited bandwidth among the nodes of these systems. In this paper we present an efficient implementation of the Aho-Corasick algorithm for high performance clusters accelerated with GPUs. We discuss how we partitioned and adapted the algorithm to fit the Tesla C1060 GPU and then present a MPI based implementation for a heterogeneous high performance cluster. We compare this implementation to MPI and MPI with pthreads based implementations for a homogeneous cluster of x86 processors, discussing the stability vs. the performance and the scaling of the solutions, taking into consideration aspects such as the bandwidth among the different nodes.

  10. Unraveling epistasis with triple testcross progenies of near-isogenic lines.

    PubMed

    Reif, Jochen C; Kusterer, Barbara; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Meyer, Rhonda C; Altmann, Thomas; Schön, Chris C; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2009-01-01

    Libraries of near-isogenic lines (NILs) are a powerful plant genetic resource to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Nevertheless, QTL mapping with NILs is mostly restricted to genetic main effects. Here we propose a two-step procedure to map additive-by-additive digenic epistasis with NILs. In the first step, a generation means analysis of parents, their F(1) hybrid, and one-segment NILs and their triple testcross (TTC) progenies is used to identify in a one-dimensional scan loci exhibiting QTL-by-background interactions. In a second step, one-segment NILs with significant additive-by-additive background interactions are used to produce particular two-segment NILs to test for digenic epistatic interactions between these segments. We evaluated our approach by analyzing a random subset of a genomewide Arabidopsis thaliana NIL library for growth-related traits. The results of our experimental study illustrated the potential of the presented two-step procedure to map additive-by-additive digenic epistasis with NILs. Furthermore, our findings suggested that additive main effects as well as additive-by-additive digenic epistasis strongly influence the genetic architecture underlying growth-related traits of A. thaliana.

  11. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  12. Accelerating Large Data Analysis By Exploiting Regularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Ellsworth, David

    2003-01-01

    We present techniques for discovering and exploiting regularity in large curvilinear data sets. The data can be based on a single mesh or a mesh composed of multiple submeshes (also known as zones). Multi-zone data are typical to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Regularities include axis-aligned rectilinear and cylindrical meshes as well as cases where one zone is equivalent to a rigid-body transformation of another. Our algorithms can also discover rigid-body motion of meshes in time-series data. Next, we describe a data model where we can utilize the results from the discovery process in order to accelerate large data visualizations. Where possible, we replace general curvilinear zones with rectilinear or cylindrical zones. In rigid-body motion cases we replace a time-series of meshes with a transformed mesh object where a reference mesh is dynamically transformed based on a given time value in order to satisfy geometry requests, on demand. The data model enables us to make these substitutions and dynamic transformations transparently with respect to the visualization algorithms. We present results with large data sets where we combine our mesh replacement and transformation techniques with out-of-core paging in order to achieve significant speed-ups in analysis.

  13. Genomic Prediction of Genotypic Effects with Epistasis and Environment Interactions for Yield-Related Traits of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Linzhong; Yue, Yao; Snyder, John H.; Ma, Chaozhi; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is an economically important oil crop, yet the genetic architecture of its complex traits remain largely unknown. Here, genome-wide association study was conducted for eight yield-related traits to dissect the genetic architecture of additive, dominance, epistasis, and their environment interaction. Additionally, the optimal genotype combination and the breeding value of superior line, superior hybrid and existing best line in mapping population were predicted for each trait in two environments based on the predicted genotypic effects. As a result, 17 quantitative trait SNPs (QTSs) were identified significantly for target traits with total heritability varied from 58.47 to 87.98%, most of which were contributed by dominance, epistasis, and environment-specific effects. The results indicated that non-additive effects were large contributions to heritability and epistasis, and also noted that environment interactions were important variants for oilseed breeding. Our study facilitates the understanding of genetic basis of rapeseed yield trait, helps to accelerate rapeseed breading, and also offers a roadmap for precision plant breeding via marker-assisted selection. PMID:28270831

  14. On the evolution of epistasis III: the haploid case with mutation.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Uri; Feldman, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Whether interaction between genes is better represented by synergistic or antagonistic epistasis has been a focus of experimental research in bacterial population genetics. Our previous research on evolution of modifiers of epistasis in diploid systems has indicated that the strength of positive or negative epistasis should increase provided linkage disequilibrium is maintained. Here we study a modifier of epistasis in fitness between two loci in a haploid system. Epistasis is modified in the neighborhood of a mutation-selection balance. We show that when linkage in the three-locus system is tight, an increase in the frequency of a modifier allele that induces either more negative or more positive epistasis is possible. Epistasis here can be measured on either an additive or multiplicative scale.

  15. Gait analysis using gravitational acceleration measured by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Todoh, Masahiro; Morikawa, Manabu; Nakayasu, Minoru; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-02-09

    A novel method for measuring human gait posture using wearable sensor units is proposed. The sensor units consist of a tri-axial acceleration sensor and three gyro sensors aligned on three axes. The acceleration and angular velocity during walking were measured with seven sensor units worn on the abdomen and the lower limb segments (both thighs, shanks and feet). The three-dimensional positions of each joint are calculated from each segment length and joint angle. Joint angle can be estimated mechanically from the gravitational acceleration along the anterior axis of the segment. However, the acceleration data during walking includes three major components; translational acceleration, gravitational acceleration and external noise. Therefore, an optimization analysis was represented to separate only the gravitational acceleration from the acceleration data. Because the cyclic patterns of acceleration data can be found during constant walking, a FFT analysis was applied to obtain some characteristic frequencies in it. A pattern of gravitational acceleration was assumed using some parts of these characteristic frequencies. Every joint position was calculated from the pattern under the condition of physiological motion range of each joint. An optimized pattern of the gravitational acceleration was selected as a solution of an inverse problem. Gaits of three healthy volunteers were measured by walking for 20s on a flat floor. As a result, the acceleration data of every segment was measured simultaneously. The characteristic three-dimensional walking could be shown by the expression using a stick figure model. In addition, the trajectories of the knee joint in the horizontal plane could be checked by visual imaging on a PC. Therefore, this method provides important quantitive information for gait diagnosis.

  16. A balanced accuracy function for epistasis modeling in imbalanced datasets using multifactor dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Velez, Digna R; White, Bill C; Motsinger, Alison A; Bush, William S; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Williams, Scott M; Moore, Jason H

    2007-05-01

    Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was developed as a method for detecting statistical patterns of epistasis. The overall goal of MDR is to change the representation space of the data to make interactions easier to detect. It is well known that machine learning methods may not provide robust models when the class variable (e.g. case-control status) is imbalanced and accuracy is used as the fitness measure. This is because most methods learn patterns that are relevant for the larger of the two classes. The goal of this study was to evaluate three different strategies for improving the power of MDR to detect epistasis in imbalanced datasets. The methods evaluated were: (1) over-sampling that resamples with replacement the smaller class until the data are balanced, (2) under-sampling that randomly removes subjects from the larger class until the data are balanced, and (3) balanced accuracy [(sensitivity+specificity)/2] as the fitness function with and without an adjusted threshold. These three methods were compared using simulated data with two-locus epistatic interactions of varying heritability (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) and minor allele frequency (0.2, 0.4) that were embedded in 100 replicate datasets of varying sample sizes (400, 800, 1600). Each dataset was generated with different ratios of cases to controls (1 : 1, 1 : 2, 1 : 4). We found that the balanced accuracy function with an adjusted threshold significantly outperformed both over-sampling and under-sampling and fully recovered the power. These results suggest that balanced accuracy should be used instead of accuracy for the MDR analysis of epistasis in imbalanced datasets.

  17. The evolution of sex and recombination in response to abiotic or coevolutionary fluctuations in epistasis.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Sylvain; Otto, Sarah P

    2007-04-01

    Evolutionary biologists have identified several factors that could explain the widespread phenomena of sex and recombination. One hypothesis is that host-parasite interactions favor sex and recombination because they favor the production of rare genotypes. A problem with many of the early models of this so-called Red Queen hypothesis is that several factors are acting together: directional selection, fluctuating epistasis, and drift. It is thus difficult to identify what exactly is selecting for sex in these models. Is one factor more important than the others or is it the synergistic action of these different factors that really matters? Here we focus on the analysis of a simple model with a single mechanism that might select for sex: fluctuating epistasis. We first analyze the evolution of sex and recombination when the temporal fluctuations are driven by the abiotic environment. We then analyze the evolution of sex and recombination in a two-species coevolutionary model, where directional selection is absent (allele frequencies remain fixed) and temporal variation in epistasis is induced by coevolution with the antagonist species. In both cases we contrast situations with weak and strong selection and derive the evolutionarily stable (ES) recombination rate. The ES recombination rate is most sensitive to the period of the cycles, which in turn depends on the strength of epistasis. In particular, more virulent parasites cause more rapid cycles and consequently increase the ES recombination rate of the host. Although the ES strategy is maximized at an intermediate period, some recombination is favored even when fluctuations are very slow. By contrast, the amplitude of the cycles has no effect on the ES level of sex and recombination, unless sex and recombination are costly, in which case higher-amplitude cycles allow the evolution of higher rates of sex and recombination. In the coevolutionary model, the amount of recombination in the interacting species also has

  18. Computational analysis of a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpening, Jeremy H.

    The pulsed inductive plasma accelerator allows for ionization of a cold gas propellant to plasma and acceleration of plasma with the same current pulse and without plasma contact with any part. This is beneficial since erosion is never a problem and lifetimes are limited only by the amount of carried propellant. To date, work involving the pulsed inductive plasma accelerator concept has been largely experimental with minimal computational analysis. The goal of the present research was to develop a computational tool using Maxwell's equations coupled with the Navier-Stokes fluid equations to fully analyze a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator. A plasma model was developed using the Saha equation and partition functions to calculate all required thermodynamic properties. The solution to Maxwell's equations was verified accurate and then coupled computations with propellant plasma were conducted. These coupled computations showed good order of magnitude accuracy with a simple onedimensional model however failed when the plasma began to accelerate due to the Lorentz force. The electric field, magnetic field, current density, and Lorentz force were all aligned in the proper vector directions. The computational failure occurred due to rapid, fictitious increases in the induced electric field in the vacuum created between the accelerating plasma and drive coil. Possible solutions to this problem are to decrease the time step and refine the grid density. Although complete acceleration of propellant plasma has yet to be computationally computed, this study has shown successful coupled computations with Maxwell and Navier-Stokes equations for a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator.

  19. Analysis of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional treatments of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity have led to certain difficulties of interpretation. Certain reversals in the apparent gravitational field of an accelerated body may be avoided by simpler analysis based on the use of restricted conformal transformations. In the conformal theory the velocity of light remains constant even for experimenters in accelerated motion. The problem considered is that of rectilinear motion with a variable velocity. The motion takes place along the x or x' axis of two coordinate systems.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  1. Reverse Pathway Genetic Approach Identifies Epistasis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, Michela; Tsang, Kathryn; Bearden, Carrie E.; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-gene interaction, or epistasis, plays a large role in complex traits in model organisms, genome-wide by genome-wide searches for two-way interaction have limited power in human studies. We thus used knowledge of a biological pathway in order to identify a contribution of epistasis to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans, a reverse-pathway genetic approach. Based on previous observation of increased ASD symptoms in Mendelian disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway (RASopathies), we showed that common SNPs in RASopathy genes show enrichment for association signal in GWAS (P = 0.02). We then screened genome-wide for interactors with RASopathy gene SNPs and showed strong enrichment in ASD-affected individuals (P < 2.2 x 10−16), with a number of pairwise interactions meeting genome-wide criteria for significance. Finally, we utilized quantitative measures of ASD symptoms in RASopathy-affected individuals to perform modifier mapping via GWAS. One top region overlapped between these independent approaches, and we showed dysregulation of a gene in this region, GPR141, in a RASopathy neural cell line. We thus used orthogonal approaches to provide strong evidence for a contribution of epistasis to ASDs, confirm a role for the Ras/MAPK pathway in idiopathic ASDs, and to identify a convergent candidate gene that may interact with the Ras/MAPK pathway. PMID:28076348

  2. Epistasis and the selective advantage of sex and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Viviane M.; da Silva, Juliana K.; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2008-09-01

    The understanding of the central mechanisms favoring sex and recombination in real populations is one of the fundamental issues in evolutionary biology. Based on a previous stochastic formulation for the study of sex, here we aim to investigate the conditions under which epistasis favors the fixation of the sexual mode of reproduction in a given population. In addition, we try to identify the evolutionary forces which contribute to this process. One considers a finite population model which assumes the existence of a recombination modifier allele that can activate the recombination mechanism. We have found that sex is very little favored in a scenario of antagonistic epistasis, and this advantage only occurs in a narrow range of values of the selection coefficient sd . On the other hand, synergistic epistasis favors recombination in a very broad domain. However, the major mechanism contributing to the spreading of the modifier allele depends on the range of values of sd . At large sd , background selection favors recombination since it increases the efficacy of selection, while at low sd Muller’s ratchet is the leading mechanism.

  3. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  4. Epistasis between mutations is host-dependent for an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Lalić, Jasna; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-02-23

    How, and to what extent, does the environment influence the way mutations interact? Do environmental changes affect both the sign and the magnitude of epistasis? Are there any correlations between environments in the variability, sign or magnitude of epistasis? Very few studies have tackled these questions. Here, we addressed them in the context of viral emergence. Most emerging viruses are RNA viruses with small genomes, overlapping reading frames and multifunctional proteins for which epistasis is abundant. Understanding the effect of host species in the sign and magnitude of epistasis will provide insights into the evolutionary ecology of infectious diseases and the predictability of viral emergence.

  5. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Zachary R.; Harms, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the “scale” of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps. PMID:28100592

  6. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Zachary R; Harms, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the "scale" of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps.

  7. Analysis of flame acceleration in open or vented obstructed pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Sadek, Jad; Akkerman, V'yacheslav

    2017-01-01

    While flame propagation through obstacles is often associated with turbulence and/or shocks, Bychkov et al. [V. Bychkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 164501 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.164501] have revealed a shockless, conceptually laminar mechanism of extremely fast flame acceleration in semiopen obstructed pipes (one end of a pipe is closed; a flame is ignited at the closed end and propagates towards the open one). The acceleration is devoted to a powerful jet flow produced by delayed combustion in the spaces between the obstacles, with turbulence playing only a supplementary role in this process. In the present work, this formulation is extended to pipes with both ends open in order to describe the recent experiments and modeling by Yanez et al. [J. Yanez et al., arXiv:1208.6453] as well as the simulations by Middha and Hansen [P. Middha and O. R. Hansen, Process Safety Prog. 27, 192 (2008) 10.1002/prs.10242]. It is demonstrated that flames accelerate strongly in open or vented obstructed pipes and the acceleration mechanism is similar to that in semiopen ones (shockless and laminar), although acceleration is weaker in open pipes. Starting with an inviscid approximation, we subsequently incorporate hydraulic resistance (viscous forces) into the analysis for the sake of comparing its role to that of a jet flow driving acceleration. It is shown that hydraulic resistance is actually not required to drive flame acceleration. In contrast, this is a supplementary effect, which moderates acceleration. On the other hand, viscous forces are nevertheless an important effect because they are responsible for the initial delay occurring before the flame acceleration onset, which is observed in the experiments and simulations. Accounting for this effect provides good agreement between the experiments, modeling, and the present theory.

  8. Analysis of Accelerants in Fire Debris - Data Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, W

    1997-06-01

    Analysis of accelerants in fire debris involves the isolation of residual volatiles from the matrix and the analysis of these volatiles, usually by gas chromatography (GC). The resulting chromatograms are interpreted by comparing to a library of accelerant chromatograms obtained under similar conditions. This review first mentions ASTM's system in classifying fire accelerants into light petroleum distillates, gasoline, medium petroleum distillates, kerosene, heavy petroleum distillates, and unclassified compounds. Chromatograms with well-resolved n-alkane homolog patterns are most recognizable. Chromatograms that are inadequately resolved can be improved by columns having higher efficiency or selectivity, while those with too much interference can be improved by physical removal or reduction of these interfering compounds or selective detection. Using a mass spectrometer (MS) as the detector in GC/MS applications allows the display of common ions shared by compounds with similar structural features, thus greatly facilitating pattern recognition practices. Computer algorithms are now available for automated recognition of patterns possessed by various categories of accelerants. The state-of-the-art in forensic laboratories' analysis of accelerants in fire debris is presented as an appendix to this review. Data generated in annual proficiency tests over an 8-year period (1987-1995) revealed increased use of GC/MS instrumentation and some persisting problems, which include false positives and difficulties associated with component discrimination in the sample preparation process and recognition of partially evaporated distillates.

  9. Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction to detect epistasis for quantitative traits in the presence of error-free and noisy data.

    PubMed

    Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Van Lishout, François; Van Steen, Kristel

    2011-06-01

    Detecting gene-gene interactions or epistasis in studies of human complex diseases is a big challenge in the area of epidemiology. To address this problem, several methods have been developed, mainly in the context of data dimensionality reduction. One of these methods, Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction, has so far mainly been applied to case-control studies. In this study, we evaluate the power of Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction for quantitative traits to detect gene-gene interactions (epistasis) in the presence of error-free and noisy data. Considered sources of error are genotyping errors, missing genotypes, phenotypic mixtures and genetic heterogeneity. Our simulation study encompasses a variety of settings with varying minor allele frequencies and genetic variance for different epistasis models. On each simulated data, we have performed Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction in two ways: with and without adjustment for main effects of (known) functional SNPs. In line with binary trait counterparts, our simulations show that the power is lowest in the presence of phenotypic mixtures or genetic heterogeneity compared to scenarios with missing genotypes or genotyping errors. In addition, empirical power estimates reduce even further with main effects corrections, but at the same time, false-positive percentages are reduced as well. In conclusion, phenotypic mixtures and genetic heterogeneity remain challenging for epistasis detection, and careful thought must be given to the way important lower-order effects are accounted for in the analysis.

  10. E/M launcher vibration and acceleration data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grzesik, R.G.; Mitchell, D.E.; Sebastian, J.H. ); Chin, I.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on acquired acceleration curves for projectiles electromagnetically launched out of the non-stiff, (epoxy fiber wrapped copper rails) 50 mm Benet barrel which were very noisy and difficult to interpret. The cause for the noise was assumed to be the induced vibration from the barrel and projectile. Standard numerical smoothing techniques were not deemed plausible candidates for mathematical analysis because using them alone would have resulted in curves which would have been superficially smoothed over, concealing possibly interesting transient responses and/or distorting valuable acceleration data. The barrel low frequency vibrations were too interwoven with the acceleration signal and could not be extracted non-intrusively, and the high frequency barrel vibrations were not apparent. The projectile vibrations turned out to be negligible being on the order of magnitude of the accelerometer's background noise.

  11. Simple genomes, complex interactions: Epistasis in RNA virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Santiago F.; Solé, Ricard V.; Sardanyés, Josep

    2010-06-01

    Owed to their reduced size and low number of proteins encoded, RNA viruses and other subviral pathogens are often considered as being genetically too simple. However, this structural simplicity also creates the necessity for viral RNA sequences to encode for more than one protein and for proteins to carry out multiple functions, all together resulting in complex patterns of genetic interactions. In this work we will first review the experimental studies revealing that the architecture of viral genomes is dominated by antagonistic interactions among loci. Second, we will also review mathematical models and provide a description of computational tools for the study of RNA virus dynamics and evolution. As an application of these tools, we will finish this review article by analyzing a stochastic bit-string model of in silico virus replication. This model analyzes the interplay between epistasis and the mode of replication on determining the population load of deleterious mutations. The model suggests that, for a given mutation rate, the deleterious mutational load is always larger when epistasis is predominantly antagonistic than when synergism is the rule. However, the magnitude of this effect is larger if replication occurs geometrically than if it proceeds linearly.

  12. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system.

  13. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  14. Predicting epistasis: an experimental test of metabolic control theory with bacterial transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    MacLean, R C

    2010-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between mutations are thought to play a crucial role in a number of evolutionary processes, including adaptation and sex. Evidence for epistasis is abundant, but tests of general theoretical models that can predict epistasis are lacking. In this study, I test the ability of metabolic control theory to predict epistasis using a novel experimental approach that combines phenotypic and genetic perturbations of enzymes involved in gene expression and protein synthesis in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These experiments provide experimental support for two key predictions of metabolic control theory: (i) epistasis between genes involved in the same pathway is antagonistic; (ii) epistasis becomes increasingly antagonistic as mutational severity increases. Metabolic control theory is a general theory that applies to any set of genes that are involved in the same linear processing chain, not just metabolic pathways, and I argue that this theory is likely to have important implications for predicting epistasis between functionally coupled genes, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance. Finally, this study highlights the fact that phenotypic manipulations of gene activity provide a powerful method for studying epistasis that complements existing genetic methods.

  15. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  16. Analysis of Male Pheromones That Accelerate Female Reproductive Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Kelly A.; Webb, William; Stowers, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Male odors can influence a female's reproductive physiology. In the mouse, the odor of male urine results in an early onset of female puberty. Several volatile and protein pheromones have previously been reported to each account for this bioactivity. Here we bioassay inbred BALB/cJ females to study pheromone-accelerated uterine growth, a developmental hallmark of puberty. We evaluate the response of wild-type and mutant mice lacking a specialized sensory transduction channel, TrpC2, and find TrpC2 function to be necessary for pheromone-mediated uterine growth. We analyze the relative effectiveness of pheromones previously identified to accelerate puberty through direct bioassay and find none to significantly accelerate uterine growth in BALB/cJ females. Complementary to this analysis, we have devised a strategy of partial purification of the uterine growth bioactivity from male urine and applied it to purify bioactivity from three different laboratory strains. The biochemical characteristics of the active fraction of all three strains are inconsistent with that of previously known pheromones. When directly analyzed, we are unable to detect previously known pheromones in urine fractions that generate uterine growth. Our analysis indicates that pheromones emitted by males to advance female puberty remain to be identified. PMID:21347429

  17. Analysis of accelerants and fire debris using aroma detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.

    1997-01-17

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of electronic aroma detection technologies for the detection and identification of accelerant residues in suspected arson debris. Through the analysis of known accelerant residues, a trained neural network was developed for classifying suspected arson samples. Three unknown fire debris samples were classified using this neural network. The item corresponding to diesel fuel was correctly identified every time. For the other two items, wide variations in sample concentration and excessive water content, producing high sample humidities, were shown to influence the sensor response. Sorbent sampling prior to aroma detection was demonstrated to reduce these problems and to allow proper neural network classification of the remaining items corresponding to kerosene and gasoline.

  18. Accelerated Gibbs Sampling for Infinite Sparse Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andrzejewski, D M

    2011-09-12

    The Indian Buffet Process (IBP) gives a probabilistic model of sparse binary matrices with an unbounded number of columns. This construct can be used, for example, to model a fixed numer of observed data points (rows) associated with an unknown number of latent features (columns). Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are often used for IBP inference, and in this technical note, we provide a detailed review of the derivations of collapsed and accelerated Gibbs samplers for the linear-Gaussian infinite latent feature model. We also discuss and explain update equations for hyperparameter resampling in a 'full Bayesian' treatment and present a novel slice sampler capable of extending the accelerated Gibbs sampler to the case of infinite sparse factor analysis by allowing the use of real-valued latent features.

  19. Robustness and epistasis in mutation-selection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Andrea; Krug, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the fitness advantage associated with the robustness of a phenotype against deleterious mutations using deterministic mutation-selection models of a quasispecies type equipped with a mesa-shaped fitness landscape. We obtain analytic results for the robustness effect which become exact in the limit of infinite sequence length. Thereby, we are able to clarify a seeming contradiction between recent rigorous work and an earlier heuristic treatment based on mapping to a Schrödinger equation. We exploit the quantum mechanical analogy to calculate a correction term for finite sequence lengths and verify our analytic results by numerical studies. In addition, we investigate the occurrence of an error threshold for a general class of epistatic landscapes and show that diminishing epistasis is a necessary but not sufficient condition for error threshold behaviour.

  20. A multi-beamlet analysis of the MITICA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fonnesu, N. Agostinetti, P.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Kisaki, M.

    2015-04-08

    The thermo-mechanical analysis and the mechanical design of the accelerator of MITICA (i.e. the full size prototype of the ITER neutral beam injector under construction at RFX [1]) are based on the calculation of the power deposition induced by particle impacts. This calculation is performed by EAMCC [2], a relativistic particle tracking code based on the Monte-Carlo method for describing collisions inside the accelerator, under prescribed electric and magnetic fields. The magnetic field maps are produced by 3D codes, while the electric field maps come from the 2D axi-symmetric code SLACCAD [3]. In order to perform a multi-beamlet analysis, which allows to take into account the beamlet-beamlet repulsion, and to consider other effects neglected under the hypothesis of axi-symmetric beam, a fully 3D version of the code is required. In this paper, a modified version of EAMCC, fully 3D, capable of modifying the mesh of the 3D maps and of dealing with uneven meshes is presented. A finer mesh is used just in the regions where a more detailed description of the fields is required, for a more realistic simulation. A comparison between the original code and the modified version is presented at first, as a validation of the modifications introduced in the latter. Subsequently, the main results of a single-beamlet analysis performed with the two versions of the code are shown and the differences between the 2D and the 3D simulations discussed. The last part is dedicated to the multi-beamlet simulation of the accelerator.

  1. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  2. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses.

  3. The Benefits of Acceleration: An Outcomes Analysis of Dual Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    This study adds to the growing body of research with a focus on (1) the characteristics of accelerated (dual enrolled) students versus their counterparts who did not participate in accelerated programs; (2) differences in academic outcomes of accelerated and non-accelerated students; and (3) differences in days to complete the associate degree for…

  4. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    PubMed

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  5. Learning genetic epistasis using Bayesian network scoring criteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene-gene epistatic interactions likely play an important role in the genetic basis of many common diseases. Recently, machine-learning and data mining methods have been developed for learning epistatic relationships from data. A well-known combinatorial method that has been successfully applied for detecting epistasis is Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR). Jiang et al. created a combinatorial epistasis learning method called BNMBL to learn Bayesian network (BN) epistatic models. They compared BNMBL to MDR using simulated data sets. Each of these data sets was generated from a model that associates two SNPs with a disease and includes 18 unrelated SNPs. For each data set, BNMBL and MDR were used to score all 2-SNP models, and BNMBL learned significantly more correct models. In real data sets, we ordinarily do not know the number of SNPs that influence phenotype. BNMBL may not perform as well if we also scored models containing more than two SNPs. Furthermore, a number of other BN scoring criteria have been developed. They may detect epistatic interactions even better than BNMBL. Although BNs are a promising tool for learning epistatic relationships from data, we cannot confidently use them in this domain until we determine which scoring criteria work best or even well when we try learning the correct model without knowledge of the number of SNPs in that model. Results We evaluated the performance of 22 BN scoring criteria using 28,000 simulated data sets and a real Alzheimer's GWAS data set. Our results were surprising in that the Bayesian scoring criterion with large values of a hyperparameter called α performed best. This score performed better than other BN scoring criteria and MDR at recall using simulated data sets, at detecting the hardest-to-detect models using simulated data sets, and at substantiating previous results using the real Alzheimer's data set. Conclusions We conclude that representing epistatic interactions using BN models

  6. Hybrid breakdown caused by epistasis-based recessive incompatibility in a cross of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Eiji; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Toshio; Kato, Hiroshi; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Viability and fertility in organisms depend on epistatic interactions between loci maintained in lineages. Here, we describe reduced fitness of segregants (hybrid breakdown, HB) that emerged in an F2 population derived from a cross between 2 rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars, "Tachisugata" (TS) and "Hokuriku 193" (H193), despite both parents and F1s showing normal fitness. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses detected 13 QTLs for 4 morphological traits associated with the HB and 6 associated with principal component scores calculated from values of the morphological traits in the F2 population. Two-way analysis of variance of the putative QTLs identified 4 QTL pairs showing significant epistasis; among them, a pair on chromosomes 1 and 12 made the greatest contribution to HB. The finding was supported by genetic experiments using F3 progeny. HB emerged only when a plant was homozygous for the TS allele at the QTL on chromosome 1 and homozygous for the H193 allele at the QTL on chromosome 12, indicating that each allele behaves as recessive to the other. Our results support the idea that epistasis is an essential part of hybrid fitness.

  7. CDC7/DBF4 functions in the translesion synthesis branch of the RAD6 epistasis group in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa-Brandão, Luis; Sclafani, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    CDC7 and DBF4 encode the essential Cdc7-Dbf4 protein kinase required for DNA replication in eukaryotes from yeast to human. Cdc7-Dbf4 is also required for DNA damage-induced mutagenesis, one of several postreplicational DNA damage tolerance mechanisms mediated by the RAD6 epistasis group. Several genes have been determined to function in separate branches within this group, including RAD5, REV3/REV7 (Pol zeta), RAD30 (Pol eta), and POL30 (PCNA). An extensive genetic analysis of the interactions between CDC7 and REV3, RAD30, RAD5, or POL30 in response to DNA damage was done to determine its role in the RAD6 pathway. CDC7, RAD5, POL30, and RAD30 were found to constitute four separate branches of the RAD6 epistasis group in response to UV and MMS exposure. CDC7 is also shown to function separately from REV3 in response to MMS. However, they belong in the same pathway in response to UV. We propose that the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase associates with components of the translesion synthesis pathway and that this interaction is dependent upon the type of DNA damage. Finally, activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and the resulting cell cycle delay is intact in cdc7Delta mcm5-bob1 cells, suggesting a direct role for CDC7 in DNA repair/damage tolerance. PMID:15342501

  8. Cancer type-dependent genetic interactions between cancer driver alterations indicate plasticity of epistasis across cell types

    PubMed Central

    Park, Solip; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancers, like many diseases, are normally caused by combinations of genetic alterations rather than by changes affecting single genes. It is well established that the genetic alterations that drive cancer often interact epistatically, having greater or weaker consequences in combination than expected from their individual effects. In a stringent statistical analysis of data from > 3,000 tumors, we find that the co-occurrence and mutual exclusivity relationships between cancer driver alterations change quite extensively in different types of cancer. This cannot be accounted for by variation in tumor heterogeneity or unrecognized cancer subtypes. Rather, it suggests that how genomic alterations interact cooperatively or partially redundantly to driver cancer changes in different types of cancers. This re-wiring of epistasis across cell types is likely to be a basic feature of genetic architecture, with important implications for understanding the evolution of multicellularity and human genetic diseases. In addition, if this plasticity of epistasis across cell types is also true for synthetic lethal interactions, a synthetic lethal strategy to kill cancer cells may frequently work in one type of cancer but prove ineffective in another. PMID:26227665

  9. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  10. Two rules for the detection and quantification of epistasis and other interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Günter P

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally statistical interactions and epistasis are defined with respect to the ANOVA model of additive effects; that is, epistasis is defined as a deviation from the additive mode of combining main effects of gene substitutions. Furthermore, the definition is relative to a particular scale and epistasis can potentially be eliminated by a non-linear transformation of the underlying phenotype variables. The latter fact raises questions of the scientific validity of the concept if interaction, given its presumed arbitrariness. Here I am arguing that the arbitrariness in the definition and detection of epistasis, and any other interaction, can be eliminated if we observe measurement theoretical constraints on the treatment of quantitative data. I propose two principles for determining the appropriate reference model for the detection of epistasis. The first is the principle of effect propagation stating that the scale type of the effect measure determines the reference model for defining epistasis. For instance, if effects are measured as differences, then the reference model has to be additive. If the reference effects are fold differences, then the reference model has to be multiplicative. A mathematical justification for this rule is provided. The second principle is called irrelevant effects and derives from the principle of meaningfulness in measurement theory. In short, the rule says that the reference model is determined by the allowable scale transformations of the variables measured. The justification for this rule is that any mathematical model in which these variables figure have to be invariant to allowable scale transformations. These two rules can effectively eliminate the arbitrariness in the definition, detection, and quantification of epistasis or any other interaction effect.

  11. Multiple drug resistance genes in malaria -- from epistasis to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Refour, Philippe

    2005-08-01

    A decline in our ability to successfully treat patients with malaria infections of the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum with cheap quinoline drugs has led to a huge escalation in morbidity and mortality in recent years. Many approaches have been taken, including classical genetics, reverse genetics and molecular epidemiology, to identify the molecular determinants underlying this resistance. The contribution of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene, pfmdr1, to antimalarial resistance has been a source of controversy for over a decade since it was first identified. In the current issue of Molecular Microbiology, Sidhu and colleagues use powerful reverse genetics to demonstrate the importance of commonly occurring alleles of pfmdr1 in conferring resistance to the second-line drugs quinine and sensitivity to the new alternatives mefloquine and artemisinin. They also elegantly highlight the importance of genetic background and epistasis between pfmdr1 and other potential modulators of drug resistance. Such molecular knowledge will facilitate surveillance/monitoring and aid the development of strategies for the reversal of resistance.

  12. SIMS analysis of high-performance accelerator niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P.; Stevie, F. A.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigsbee, J, M.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Griffis, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    Niobium is used to fabricate superconducting radio frequency accelerator modules because of its high critical temperature, high critical magnetic field, and easy formability. Recent experiments have shown a very significant improvement in performance (over 100%) after a high-temperature bake at 1400 degrees C for 3h. SIMS analysis of this material showed the oxygen profile was significantly deeper than the native oxide with a shape that is indicative of diffusion. Positive secondary ion mass spectra showed the presence of Ti with a depth profile similar to that of O. It is suspected that Ti is associated with the performance improvement. The source of Ti contamination in the anneal furnace has been identified, and a new furnace was constructed without Ti. Initial results from the new furnace do not show the yield improvement. Further analyses should determine the relationship of Ti to cavity performance.

  13. Bayesian Analysis of Peak Ground Acceleration Attenuation Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Mu Heqing; Yuen Kaveng

    2010-05-21

    Estimation of peak ground acceleration is one of the main issues in civil and earthquake engineering practice. The Boore-Joyner-Fumal empirical formula is well known for this purpose. In this paper we propose to use the Bayesian probabilistic model class selection approach to obtain the most suitable prediction model class for the seismic attenuation formula. The optimal model class is robust in the sense that it has balance between the data fitting capability and the sensitivity to noise. A database of strong-motion records is utilized for the analysis. It turns out that the optimal model class is simpler than the full order attenuation model suggested by Boore, Joyner and Fumal (1993).

  14. Long-Range Epistasis Mediated by Structural Change in a Model of Ligand Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik D; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-01-01

    Recent analyses of amino acid mutations in proteins reveal that mutations at many pairs of sites are epistatic-i.e., their effects on fitness are non-additive-the combined effect of two mutations being significantly larger or smaller than the sum of their effects considered independently. Interestingly, epistatic sites are not necessarily near each other in the folded structure of a protein, and may even be located on opposite sides of a molecule. However, the mechanistic reasons for long-range epistasis remain obscure. Here, we study long-range epistasis in proteins using a previously developed model in which off-lattice polymers are evolved under ligand binding constraints. Epistatic effects in the model are qualitatively similar to those recently reported for small proteins, and many are long-range. We find that a major reason for long-range epistasis is conformational change-a recurrent theme in both positive and negative epistasis being the transfer, or exchange of material between the ordered nucleus, which supports the binding site, and the liquid-like surface of a folded molecule. These local transitions in phase and folded structure are largely responsible for long-range epistasis in our model.

  15. Long-Range Epistasis Mediated by Structural Change in a Model of Ligand Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analyses of amino acid mutations in proteins reveal that mutations at many pairs of sites are epistatic—i.e., their effects on fitness are non—additive—the combined effect of two mutations being significantly larger or smaller than the sum of their effects considered independently. Interestingly, epistatic sites are not necessarily near each other in the folded structure of a protein, and may even be located on opposite sides of a molecule. However, the mechanistic reasons for long–range epistasis remain obscure. Here, we study long–range epistasis in proteins using a previously developed model in which off–lattice polymers are evolved under ligand binding constraints. Epistatic effects in the model are qualitatively similar to those recently reported for small proteins, and many are long–range. We find that a major reason for long–range epistasis is conformational change—a recurrent theme in both positive and negative epistasis being the transfer, or exchange of material between the ordered nucleus, which supports the binding site, and the liquid–like surface of a folded molecule. These local transitions in phase and folded structure are largely responsible for long–range epistasis in our model. PMID:27870911

  16. Measuring epistasis in fitness landscapes: The correlation of fitness effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Schmiegelt, Benjamin; Weinreich, Daniel; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Tajima, Fumio; Achaz, Guillaume

    2016-05-07

    Genotypic fitness landscapes are constructed by assessing the fitness of all possible combinations of a given number of mutations. In the last years, several experimental fitness landscapes have been completely resolved. As fitness landscapes are high-dimensional, simple measures of their structure are used as statistics in empirical applications. Epistasis is one of the most relevant features of fitness landscapes. Here we propose a new natural measure of the amount of epistasis based on the correlation of fitness effects of mutations. This measure has a natural interpretation, captures well the interaction between mutations and can be obtained analytically for most landscape models. We discuss how this measure is related to previous measures of epistasis (number of peaks, roughness/slope, fraction of sign epistasis, Fourier-Walsh spectrum) and how it can be easily extended to landscapes with missing data or with fitness ranks only. Furthermore, the dependence of the correlation of fitness effects on mutational distance contains interesting information about the patterns of epistasis. This dependence can be used to uncover the amount and nature of epistatic interactions in a landscape or to discriminate between different landscape models.

  17. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Matthew George; Adamic, Mary Louise; Olson, John Eric; Baeck, D. L.; Fox, R. V.; Hahn, P. A.; Jenson, D. D.; Lister, T. E.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  18. Review: High-performance computing to detect epistasis in genome scale data sets.

    PubMed

    Upton, Alex; Trelles, Oswaldo; Cornejo-García, José Antonio; Perkins, James Richard

    2016-05-01

    It is becoming clear that most human diseases have a complex etiology that cannot be explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or simple additive combinations; the general consensus is that they are caused by combinations of multiple genetic variations. The limited success of some genome-wide association studies is partly a result of this focus on single genetic markers. A more promising approach is to take into account epistasis, by considering the association of multiple SNP interactions with disease. However, as genomic data continues to grow in resolution, and genome and exome sequencing become more established, the number of combinations of variants to consider increases rapidly. Two potential solutions should be considered: the use of high-performance computing, which allows us to consider a larger number of variables, and heuristics to make the solution more tractable, essential in the case of genome sequencing. In this review, we look at different computational methods to analyse epistatic interactions within disease-related genetic data sets created by microarray technology. We also review efforts to use epistatic analysis results to produce biomarkers for diagnostic tests and give our views on future directions in this field in light of advances in sequencing technology and variants in non-coding regions.

  19. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  20. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Adamic; J. E. Olson; D. D. Jenson; J. G. Eisenmenger; M. G. Watrous

    2012-09-01

    This NA 22 funded research project investigated the transition of iodine isotopic analyses from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. Previous work (Fiscal Year 2010) had demonstrated comparable data from TIMS and AMS. With AMS providing comparable data with improved background levels and vastly superior sample throughput, improvement in the sample extraction from environmental sample matrices was needed to bring sample preparation throughput closer to the operation level of the instrument. Previous research used an extraction chemistry that was not optimized for yield or refined for reduced labor to prove the principle. This research was done to find an extraction with better yield using less labor per sample to produce a sample ready for the AMS instrument. An extraction method using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was developed for removal of iodine species from high volume air filters. The TMAH with gentle heating was superior to the following three extraction methods: ammonium hydroxide aided by sonication, acidic and basic extraction aided by microwave, and ethanol mixed with sodium hydroxide. Taking the iodine from the extraction solvent to being ready for AMS analysis was accomplished by a direct precipitation, as well as, using silver wool to harvest the iodine from the TMAH. Portions of the same filters processed in FY 2010 were processed again with the improved extraction scheme followed by successful analysis by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The data favorably matched the data obtained in 2010. The time required for analysis has been reduced over the aqueous extraction/AMS approach developed in FY 2010. For a hypothetical batch of 30 samples, the AMS methodology is about 10 times faster than the traditional gas phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than TIMS. This results from the

  1. Epistasis and Quantitative Traits: Using Model Organisms to Study Gene-Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of epistasis in the genetic architecture of quantitative traits is controversial, despite the biological plausibility that non-linear molecular interactions underpin the genotype-phenotype map. This controversy arises because most genetic variation for quantitative traits is additive. However, additive variance is consistent with pervasive epistatic gene action. Here, I discuss experimental designs to detect the contribution of epistasis to quantitative trait phenotypes in model organisms. These studies indicate that epistatic gene action is common, and that additivity can be an emergent property of underlying genetic interaction networks. Epistasis causes hidden quantitative genetic variation in natural populations and could be responsible for the small additive effects, missing heritability and lack of replication typically observed for human complex traits. PMID:24296533

  2. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  3. Population Genetics of Marine Pelecypods. III. Epistasis between Functionally Related Isoenzymes of MYTILUS EDULIS

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, Jeffry B.; Koehn, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution of interlocus genotypic combinations was examined in Mytilus edulis for interdependence between two loci synthesizing functionally related isoenzymes. There is significant dependence between the Leucine Aminopeptidase and Aminopeptidase loci, which we attribute to epistasis, since the magnitude of dependency varies with age. Furthermore, dependency varies in magnitude with position in the intertidal zone from which samples were taken, suggesting that epistasis is a function of the combination of certain non-homologous alleles as well as of the environmental circumstance in which the combinations occur. PMID:4700061

  4. Preliminary analysis of accelerated space flight ionizing radiation testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stock, L. V.; Carter, D. J.; Chang, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary analysis shows that radiation dose equivalent to 30 years in the geosynchronous environment can be accumulated in a typical composite material exposed to space for 2 years or less onboard a spacecraft orbiting from perigee of 300 km out to the peak of the inner electron belt (approximately 2750 km). Future work to determine spacecraft orbits better tailored to materials accelerated testing is indicated. It is predicted that a range of 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 10th power rads would be accumulated in 3-6 mil thick epoxy/graphite exposed by a test spacecraft orbiting in the inner electron belt. This dose is equivalent to the accumulated dose that this material would be expected to have after 30 years in a geosynchronous orbit. It is anticipated that material specimens would be brought back to Earth after 2 years in the radiation environment so that space radiation effects on materials could be analyzed by laboratory methods.

  5. High-performance computing in accelerating structure design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai; Folwell, Nathan; Ge, Lixin; Guetz, Adam; Ivanov, Valentin; Kowalski, Marc; Lee, Lie-Quan; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Schussman, Greg; Stingelin, Lukas; Uplenchwar, Ravindra; Wolf, Michael; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok

    2006-03-01

    Future high-energy accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will accelerate multi-bunch beams of high current and low emittance to obtain high luminosity, which put stringent requirements on the accelerating structures for efficiency and beam stability. While numerical modeling has been quite standard in accelerator R&D, designing the NLC accelerating structure required a new simulation capability because of the geometric complexity and level of accuracy involved. Under the US DOE Advanced Computing initiatives (first the Grand Challenge and now SciDAC), SLAC has developed a suite of electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids and utilizing high-performance computing to provide an advanced tool for modeling structures at accuracies and scales previously not possible. This paper will discuss the code development and computational science research (e.g. domain decomposition, scalable eigensolvers, adaptive mesh refinement) that have enabled the large-scale simulations needed for meeting the computational challenges posed by the NLC as well as projects such as the PEP-II and RIA. Numerical results will be presented to show how high-performance computing has made a qualitative improvement in accelerator structure modeling for these accelerators, either at the component level (single cell optimization), or on the scale of an entire structure (beam heating and long-range wakefields).

  6. High-Performance Computing in Accelerating Structure Design And Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.H.; Folwell, N.; Ge, Li-Xin; Guetz, A.; Ivanov, V.; Kowalski, M.; Lee, L.Q.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.; Stingelin, L.; Uplenchwar, R.; Wolf, M.; Xiao, L.L.; Ko, K.; /SLAC /PSI, Villigen /Illinois U., Urbana

    2006-06-27

    Future high-energy accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will accelerate multi-bunch beams of high current and low emittance to obtain high luminosity, which put stringent requirements on the accelerating structures for efficiency and beam stability. While numerical modeling has been quite standard in accelerator R&D, designing the NLC accelerating structure required a new simulation capability because of the geometric complexity and level of accuracy involved. Under the US DOE Advanced Computing initiatives (first the Grand Challenge and now SciDAC), SLAC has developed a suite of electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids and utilizing high performance computing to provide an advanced tool for modeling structures at accuracies and scales previously not possible. This paper will discuss the code development and computational science research (e.g. domain decomposition, scalable eigensolvers, adaptive mesh refinement) that have enabled the large-scale simulations needed for meeting the computational challenges posed by the NLC as well as projects such as the PEP-II and RIA. Numerical results will be presented to show how high performance computing has made a qualitative improvement in accelerator structure modeling for these accelerators, either at the component level (single cell optimization), or on the scale of an entire structure (beam heating and long range wakefields).

  7. Selective genotyping with epistasis can be utilized for a major quantitative trait locus mapping in hypertension in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Y; Tanase, H; Nabika, T; Otsuka, K; Sasaki, T; Suzawa, T; Morii, T; Yamori, Y; Saruta, T

    2000-01-01

    Epistasis used to be considered an obstacle in mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) despite its significance. Numerous epistases have proved to be involved in quantitative genetics. We established a backcross model that demonstrates a major QTL for hypertension (Ht). Seventy-eight backcrossed rats (BC), derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Fischer 344 rats, showed bimodal distribution of systolic blood pressure (BP) values and a phenotypic segregation ratio consistent with 1:1. In this backcross analysis, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase (Serca) II heterozygotes showed widespread bimodality in frequency distribution of BP values and obviously demonstrated Ht. First, in genome-wide screening, Mapmaker/QTL analysis mapped Ht at a locus between D1Mgh8 and D1Mit4 near Sa in all 78 BC. The peak logarithm of the odds (LOD) score reached 5.3. Second, Serca II heterozygous and homozygous BC were analyzed separately using Mapmaker/QTL. In the 35 Serca II heterozygous BC, the peak LOD score was 3.8 at the same locus whereas it did not reach statistical significance in the 43 Serca II homozygotes. Third, to map Ht efficiently, we selected 18 Serca II heterozygous BC with 9 highest and 9 lowest BP values. In these 18 BC, the peak LOD score reached 8.1. In 17 of the 18, D1Mgh8 genotypes (homo or hetero) qualitatively cosegregated with BP phenotypes (high or low) (P < 0.0001, by chi-square analysis). In conclusion, selective genotyping with epistasis can be utilized for a major QTL mapping near Sa on chromosome 1 in SHR. PMID:10835399

  8. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    Funding was received from NA-22 to investigate transitioning iodine isotopic analyses to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The present method uses gas-phase chemistry followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). It was anticipated that the AMS approach could provide comparable data, with improved background levels and superior sample throughput. An aqueous extraction method was developed for removal of iodine species from high-volume air filters. Ethanol and sodium hydroxide, plus heating and ultrasonic treatment, were used to successfully extract iodine from loaded high-volume air filters. Portions of the same filters were also processed in the traditional method and analyzed by TIMS for comparison. Aliquot parts of the aqueous extracts were analyzed by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel visited several AMS laboratories in the US, Spain, and Switzerland. Experience with AMS systems from several manufacturers was gained, and relationships were developed with key personnel at the laboratories. Three batches of samples were analyzed in Switzerland, and one in Spain. Results show that the INL extraction method successfully extracted enough iodine from high-volume air filters to allow AMS analysis. Comparison of the AMS and TIMS data is very encouraging; while the TIMS showed about forty percent more atoms of 129I, the 129/127 ratios tracked each other very well between the two methods. The time required for analysis is greatly reduced for the aqueous extraction/AMS approach. For a hypothetical batch of thirty samples, the AMS methodology is about five times faster than the traditional gas-phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than for TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and cleanup of molecular interferences. We showed that an aqueous extraction of high

  9. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E. Wes

    2013-07-05

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  10. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2013-08-02

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  11. Feature-based analysis of plasma-based particle acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam, and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Positive and Negative Lateral Acceleration on Isometric Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    of Neck Muscle Fatigue Due to Lateral Acceleration by Surface EMG Analysis. MS Thesis . Wright State University, Ohio: School of Aerospace Medicine...LATERAL ACCELERATION ON MS Thesis ISOMETRIC FATIGUE IN THE FOREARM 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER F 7. AUTHOR(*) 13. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(o...acceleration environment. The DES and surface electromyogram ( EMG ) techniques were used to measure any differ- ences In Isometric strength, endurance, and

  13. Ant Species Differences Determined by Epistasis between Brood and Worker Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Linksvayer, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    Epistasis arising from physiological interactions between gene products often contributes to species differences, particularly those involved in reproductive isolation. In social organisms, phenotypes are influenced by the genotypes of multiple interacting individuals. In theory, social interactions can give rise to an additional type of epistasis between the genomes of social partners that can contribute to species differences. Using a full-factorial cross-fostering design with three species of closely related Temnothorax ants, I found that adult worker size was determined by an interaction between the genotypes of developing brood and care-giving workers, i.e. intergenomic epistasis. Such intergenomic social epistasis provides a strong signature of coevolution between social partners. These results demonstrate that just as physiologically interacting genes coevolve, diverge, and contribute to species differences, so do socially interacting genes. Coevolution and conflict between social partners, especially relatives such as parents and offspring, has long been recognized as having widespread evolutionary effects. This coevolutionary process may often result in coevolved socially-interacting gene complexes that contribute to species differences. PMID:17912371

  14. Direct and indirect genetic effects of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing.

    PubMed

    Immonen, E; Collet, M; Goenaga, J; Arnqvist, G

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are involved in ageing and their function requires coordinated action of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Epistasis between the two genomes can influence lifespan but whether this also holds for reproductive senescence is unclear. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria predicts sex differences in the efficacy of selection on mitonuclear genotypes that should result in differences between females and males in mitochondrial genetic effects. Mitonuclear genotype of a focal individual may also indirectly affect trait expression in the mating partner. We tested these predictions in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using introgression lines harbouring distinct mitonuclear genotypes. Our results reveal both direct and indirect sex-specific effects of mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing. Females harbouring coadapted mitonuclear genotypes showed higher lifetime fecundity due to slower senescence relative to novel mitonuclear combinations. We found no evidence for mitonuclear coadaptation in males. Mitonuclear epistasis not only affected age-specific ejaculate weight, but also influenced male age-dependent indirect effects on traits expressed by their female partners (fecundity, egg size, longevity). These results demonstrate important consequences of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis for both mating partners, consistent with a role for mitonuclear genetic constraints upon sex-specific adaptive evolution.

  15. Effects of epistasis on infectivity range during host-parasite coevolution.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Ben; Gupta, Sunetra; Buckling, Angus

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how parasites adapt to changes in host resistance is crucial to evolutionary epidemiology. Experimental studies have demonstrated that parasites are more capable of adapting to gradual, rather than sudden changes in host phenotype, as the latter may require multiple mutations that are unlikely to arise simultaneously. A key, but as yet unexplored factor is precisely how interactions between mutations (epistasis) affect parasite evolution. Here, we investigate this phenomenon in the context of infectivity range, where parasites may experience selection to infect broader sets of genotypes. When epistasis is strongly positive, we find that parasites are unlikely to evolve broader infectivity ranges if hosts exhibit sudden, rather than gradual changes in phenotype, in close agreement with empirical observations. This is due to a low probability of fixing multiple mutations that individually confer no immediate advantage. When epistasis is weaker, parasites are more likely to evolve broader infectivity ranges if hosts make sudden changes in phenotype, which can be explained by a balance between mutation supply and selection. Thus, we demonstrate that both the rate of phenotypic change in hosts and the form of epistasis between mutations in parasites are crucial in shaping the evolution of infectivity range.

  16. Direct and indirect genetic effects of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, E; Collet, M; Goenaga, J; Arnqvist, G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in ageing and their function requires coordinated action of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Epistasis between the two genomes can influence lifespan but whether this also holds for reproductive senescence is unclear. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria predicts sex differences in the efficacy of selection on mitonuclear genotypes that should result in differences between females and males in mitochondrial genetic effects. Mitonuclear genotype of a focal individual may also indirectly affect trait expression in the mating partner. We tested these predictions in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using introgression lines harbouring distinct mitonuclear genotypes. Our results reveal both direct and indirect sex-specific effects of mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing. Females harbouring coadapted mitonuclear genotypes showed higher lifetime fecundity due to slower senescence relative to novel mitonuclear combinations. We found no evidence for mitonuclear coadaptation in males. Mitonuclear epistasis not only affected age-specific ejaculate weight, but also influenced male age-dependent indirect effects on traits expressed by their female partners (fecundity, egg size, longevity). These results demonstrate important consequences of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis for both mating partners, consistent with a role for mitonuclear genetic constraints upon sex-specific adaptive evolution. PMID:26732015

  17. Evolution and polymorphism in the multilocus Levene model with no or weak epistasis.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    Evolution and the maintenance of polymorphism under the multilocus Levene model with soft selection are studied. The number of loci and alleles, the number of demes, the linkage map, and the degree of dominance are arbitrary, but epistasis is absent or weak. We prove that, without epistasis and under mild, generic conditions, every trajectory converges to a stationary point in linkage equilibrium. Consequently, the equilibrium and stability structure can be determined by investigating the much simpler gene-frequency dynamics on the linkage-equilibrium manifold. For a haploid species an analogous result is shown. For weak epistasis, global convergence to quasi-linkage equilibrium is established. As an application, the maintenance of multilocus polymorphism is explored if the degree of dominance is intermediate at every locus and epistasis is absent or weak. If there are at least two demes, then arbitrarily many multiallelic loci can be maintained polymorphic at a globally asymptotically stable equilibrium. Because this holds for an open set of parameters, such equilibria are structurally stable. If the degree of dominance is not only intermediate but also deme independent, and loci are diallelic, an open set of parameters yielding an internal equilibrium exists only if the number of loci is strictly less than the number of demes. Otherwise, a fully polymorphic equilibrium exists only nongenerically, and if it exists, it consists of a manifold of equilibria. Its dimension is determined. In the absence of genotype-by-environment interaction, however, a manifold of equilibria occurs for an open set of parameters. In this case, the equilibrium structure is not robust to small deviations from no genotype-by-environment interaction. In a quantitative-genetic setting, the assumptions of no epistasis and intermediate dominance are equivalent to assuming that in every deme directional selection acts on a trait that is determined additively, i.e., by nonepistatic loci with

  18. Improving power output of inertial energy harvesters by employing principal component analysis of input acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilek, Jan; Hadas, Zdenek

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose the use of principal component analysis to process the measured acceleration data in order to determine the direction of acceleration with the highest variance on given frequency of interest. This method can be used for improving the power generated by inertial energy harvesters. Their power output is highly dependent on the excitation acceleration magnitude and frequency, but the axes of acceleration measurements might not always be perfectly aligned with the directions of movement, and therefore the generated power output might be severely underestimated in simulations, possibly leading to false conclusions about the feasibility of using the inertial energy harvester for the examined application.

  19. Discovering epistasis in large scale genetic association studies by exploiting graphics cards

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Guo, Yunfei

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous investments made in collecting DNA samples and generating germline variation data across thousands of individuals in modern genome-wide association studies (GWAS), progress has been frustratingly slow in explaining much of the heritability in common disease. Today's paradigm of testing independent hypotheses on each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker is unlikely to adequately reflect the complex biological processes in disease risk. Alternatively, modeling risk as an ensemble of SNPs that act in concert in a pathway, and/or interact non-additively on log risk for example, may be a more sensible way to approach gene mapping in modern studies. Implementing such analyzes genome-wide can quickly become intractable due to the fact that even modest size SNP panels on modern genotype arrays (500k markers) pose a combinatorial nightmare, require tens of billions of models to be tested for evidence of interaction. In this article, we provide an in-depth analysis of programs that have been developed to explicitly overcome these enormous computational barriers through the use of processors on graphics cards known as Graphics Processing Units (GPU). We include tutorials on GPU technology, which will convey why they are growing in appeal with today's numerical scientists. One obvious advantage is the impressive density of microprocessor cores that are available on only a single GPU. Whereas high end servers feature up to 24 Intel or AMD CPU cores, the latest GPU offerings from nVidia feature over 2600 cores. Each compute node may be outfitted with up to 4 GPU devices. Success on GPUs varies across problems. However, epistasis screens fare well due to the high degree of parallelism exposed in these problems. Papers that we review routinely report GPU speedups of over two orders of magnitude (>100x) over standard CPU implementations. PMID:24348518

  20. A Massively Parallel Solver for the Mechanical Harmonic Analysis of Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    O. Kononenko

    2015-02-17

    ACE3P is a 3D massively parallel simulation suite that developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that can perform coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical study. Effectively utilizing supercomputer resources, ACE3P has become a key simulation tool for particle accelerator R and D. A new frequency domain solver to perform mechanical harmonic response analysis of accelerator components is developed within the existing parallel framework. This solver is designed to determine the frequency response of the mechanical system to external harmonic excitations for time-efficient accurate analysis of the large-scale problems. Coupled with the ACE3P electromagnetic modules, this capability complements a set of multi-physics tools for a comprehensive study of microphonics in superconducting accelerating cavities in order to understand the RF response and feedback requirements for the operational reliability of a particle accelerator. (auth)

  1. Case–Cohort Analysis with Accelerated Failure Time Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lan; Cai, Jianwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary In a case–cohort design, covariates are assembled only for a subcohort that is randomly selected from the entire cohort and any additional cases outside the subcohort. This design is appealing for large cohort studies of rare disease, especially when the exposures of interest are expensive to ascertain for all the subjects. We propose statistical methods for analyzing the case–cohort data with a semiparametric accelerated failure time model that interprets the covariates effects as to accelerate or decelerate the time to failure. Asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are developed. The finite sample properties of case–cohort estimator and its relative efficiency to full cohort estimator are assessed via simulation studies. A real example from a study of cardiovascular disease is provided to illustrate the estimating procedure. PMID:18537948

  2. Analysis of complex cardiovascular flow with three-component acceleration-encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alex J; Staehle, Felix; Bock, Jelena; Jung, Bernd A; Markl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Functional information regarding cardiac performance, pressure gradients, and local flow derangement are available from blood acceleration fields. Thus, this study examines a 2D and 3D phase contrast sequence optimized to efficiently encode three-directional, time-resolved acceleration in vitro and in vivo. Stenosis phantom acceleration measurements were compared to acceleration derived from standard velocity encoded phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., "velocity-derived acceleration"). For in vivo analysis, three-directional 2D acceleration maps were compared to velocity-derived acceleration using regions proximal and distal to the aortic valve in six healthy volunteers at 1.5 and 3.0 T (voxel size = 1.4 × 2.1 × 8 mm, temporal resolution = 16-20 ms). In addition, a 4D acceleration sequence was evaluated for feasibility in a healthy volunteer and postrepair biscuspid aortic valve patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm. The phantom magnetic resonance acceleration measurements were more accurate (nonturbulent root mean square error = 2.2 vs. 5.1 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) and 10 times less noisy (nonturbulent σ = 0.9 vs. 13.6 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) than velocity-derived acceleration. Acceleration mapping of the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic arch exhibited signal voids colocated with complex flow events such as vortex formation and high order motion. 4D acceleration data, visualized in combination with the velocity data, may provide new insight into complex flow phenomena.

  3. Evolutionary interplay between structure, energy and epistasis in the coat protein of the ϕX174 phage family

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Viral capsids are structurally constrained by interactions among the amino acids (AAs) of their constituent proteins. Therefore, epistasis is expected to evolve among physically interacting sites and to influence the rates of substitution. To study the evolution of epistasis, we focused on the major structural protein of the ϕX174 phage family by first reconstructing the ancestral protein sequences of 18 species using a Bayesian statistical framework. The inferred ancestral reconstruction differed at eight AAs, for a total of 256 possible ancestral haplotypes. For each ancestral haplotype and the extant species, we estimated, in silico, the distribution of free energies and epistasis of the capsid structure. We found that free energy has not significantly increased but epistasis has. We decomposed epistasis up to fifth order and found that higher-order epistasis sometimes compensates pairwise interactions making the free energy seem additive. The dN/dS ratio is low, suggesting strong purifying selection, and that structure is under stabilizing selection. We synthesized phages carrying ancestral haplotypes of the coat protein gene and measured their fitness experimentally. Our findings indicate that stabilizing mutations can have higher fitness, and that fitness optima do not necessarily coincide with energy minima. PMID:28053111

  4. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lin, C.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 {mu}m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 {mu}m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  5. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David Juarez

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  6. A universal postprocessing toolkit for accelerator simulation and data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1998-12-16

    The Self-Describing Data Sets (SDDS) toolkit comprises about 70 generally-applicable programs sharing a common data protocol. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), SDDS performs the vast majority of operational data collection and processing, most data display functions, and many control functions. In addition, a number of accelerator simulation codes use SDDS for all post-processing and data display. This has three principle advantages: first, simulation codes need not provide customized post-processing tools, thus simplifying development and maintenance. Second, users can enhance code capabilities without changing the code itself, by adding SDDS-based pre- and post-processing. Third, multiple codes can be used together more easily, by employing SDDS for data transfer and adaptation. Given its broad applicability, the SDDS file protocol is surprisingly simple, making it quite easy for simulations to generate SDDS-compliant data. This paper discusses the philosophy behind SDDS, contrasting it with some recent trends, and outlines the capabilities of the toolkit. The paper also gives examples of using SDDS for accelerator simulation.

  7. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  8. Epistasis and natural selection shape the mutational architecture of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam G; Bürger, Reinhard; Arnold, Stevan J

    2014-05-14

    The evolutionary trajectories of complex traits are constrained by levels of genetic variation as well as genetic correlations among traits. As the ultimate source of all genetic variation is mutation, the distribution of mutations entering populations profoundly affects standing variation and genetic correlations. Here we use an individual-based simulation model to investigate how natural selection and gene interactions (that is, epistasis) shape the evolution of mutational processes affecting complex traits. We find that the presence of epistasis allows natural selection to mould the distribution of mutations, such that mutational effects align with the selection surface. Consequently, novel mutations tend to be more compatible with the current forces of selection acting on the population. These results suggest that in many cases mutational effects should be seen as an outcome of natural selection rather than as an unbiased source of genetic variation that is independent of other evolutionary processes.

  9. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; ...

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  10. Coupled microvibration analysis of a reaction wheel assembly including gyroscopic effects in its accelerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Aglietti, Guglielmo S.; Ren, Weijia

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the coupled microvibration analysis of a cantilever configured Reaction Wheel Assembly with soft-suspension system. A RWA-seismic mass coupled microvibration measurement system is presented and its model validated against test results. The importance of the RWA driving point accelerances in coupled microvibration analysis is thoroughly discussed. A RWA accelerance measurement system has been designed to measure the driving point accelerances in both static (flywheel not spinning) and dynamic (flywheel spinning) conditions. Analytically, RWA static accelerance is obtained by frequency response analysis of a finite element model. The traditionally ignored gyroscopic effects in the accelerances are included in the model and their effects with respect to traditional models are shown both theoretically and experimentally. Although at high angular speed, when nonlinearities in the microvibrations prevent an accurate simulation, it is shown that the predicted microvibrations match more closely with the test results when considering gyroscopic effects in RWA accelerances than those predicted using the traditional method. The presented coupled microvibration analysis method is also very efficient in practice and is applicable in an industrial environment.

  11. Epistasis Constrains Mutational Pathways of Hemoglobin Adaptation in High-Altitude Pikas

    PubMed Central

    Tufts, Danielle M.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Revsbech, Inge G.; Projecto-Garcia, Joana; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Weber, Roy E.; Fago, Angela; Moriyama, Hideaki; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the roles of mutational pleiotropy and epistasis in shaping trajectories of protein evolution. This question can be addressed most directly by using site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mutational landscape of protein function in experimentally defined regions of sequence space. Here, we evaluate how pleiotropic trade-offs and epistatic interactions influence the accessibility of alternative mutational pathways during the adaptive evolution of hemoglobin (Hb) function in high-altitude pikas (Mammalia: Lagomorpha). By combining ancestral protein resurrection with a combinatorial protein-engineering approach, we examined the functional effects of sequential mutational steps in all possible pathways that produced an increased Hb–O2 affinity. These experiments revealed that the effects of mutations on Hb–O2 affinity are highly dependent on the temporal order in which they occur: Each of three β-chain substitutions produced a significant increase in Hb–O2 affinity on the ancestral genetic background, but two of these substitutions produced opposite effects when they occurred as later steps in the pathway. The experiments revealed pervasive epistasis for Hb–O2 affinity, but affinity-altering mutations produced no significant pleiotropic trade-offs. These results provide insights into the properties of adaptive substitutions in naturally evolved proteins and suggest that the accessibility of alternative mutational pathways may be more strongly constrained by sign epistasis for positively selected biochemical phenotypes than by antagonistic pleiotropy. PMID:25415962

  12. What’s Downstream? A Set of Classroom Exercises to Help Students Understand Recessive Epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer K.; Wood, William B.; Smith, Michelle K.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students in genetics and developmental biology courses often struggle with the concept of epistasis because they are unaware that the logic of gene interactions differs between enzymatic pathways and signaling pathways. If students try to develop and memorize a single simple rule for predicting epistatic relationships without taking into account the nature of the pathway under consideration, they can become confused by cases where the rule does not apply. To remedy this problem, we developed a short pre-/post-test, an in-class activity for small groups, and a series of clicker questions about recessive epistasis in the context of a signaling pathway that intersects with an enzymatic pathway. We also developed a series of homework problems that provide deliberate practice in applying concepts in epistasis to different pathways and experimental situations. Students show significant improvement from pretest to posttest, and perform well on homework and exam questions following this activity. Here we describe these materials, as well as the formative and summative assessment results from one group of students to show how the activities impact student learning. PMID:24358383

  13. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis of baseball pitching in acceleration phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y T; Ford, H T; Ford, H T; Shin, D M

    1995-02-01

    To examine the relationships of pitching performance to maximum external rotation of the shoulder and to time in the acceleration phase, 3 male baseball pitchers were tested using three-dimensional cinematography. Analysis indicated that increasing maximum external rotation of the shoulder at the very beginning of the acceleration phase would help to generate a higher pitching ball velocity since a greater linear and angular displacement could be used to accelerate the throwing forearm. Slowing the wrist action just before ball-release may be a key technique to increasing pitching velocity of the ball.

  14. Accelerated rare event sampling: Refinement and Ising model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David; Lee, Yong Hwan

    In this paper, a recently introduced accelerated sampling technique [D. Yevick, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 27, 1650041 (2016)] for constructing transition matrices is further developed and applied to a two-dimensional 32×32 Ising spin system. By permitting backward displacements up to a certain limit for each forward step while evolving the system to first higher and then lower energies within a restricted interval that is steadily displaced toward zero temperature as the computation proceeds, accuracy can be greatly enhanced. Simultaneously, the elements obtained from numerous independent calculations are collected in a single transition matrix. The relative accuracy of this novel method is established through a comparison to a transition matrix procedure based on the Metropolis algorithm in which the temperature is appropriately varied during the calculation and the results interpreted in terms of the distribution of realizations over both energy and magnetization.

  15. Analysis of ICRF-Accelerated Ions in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2007-09-28

    MHD-induced losses of fast ions with energy in the MeV range have been observed during high-power ICRF heating of hydrogen minority ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (R{sub 0}{approx_equal}1.65 m, a{approx_equal}0.5 m). ICRF heating and ICRF-driven fast ions in discharges exhibiting fast ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and a new core-localised MHD instability are analysed. It is found that the lost ions are ICRF-accelerated trapped protons with energy in the range of 0.3-1.6 MeV, orbit widths of 20-35 cm, and turning points at r/a>0.5 and at major radii close to the cyclotron resonance {omega} = {omega}{sub cH}(R). The presence of such protons is consistent with ICRF modelling.

  16. Omega3P: A Parallel Finite-Element Eigenmode Analysis Code for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Omega3P is a parallel eigenmode calculation code for accelerator cavities in frequency domain analysis using finite-element methods. In this report, we will present detailed finite-element formulations and resulting eigenvalue problems for lossless cavities, cavities with lossy materials, cavities with imperfectly conducting surfaces, and cavities with waveguide coupling. We will discuss the parallel algorithms for solving those eigenvalue problems and demonstrate modeling of accelerator cavities through different examples.

  17. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnizki, J; Ben Aliz, Y; Grin, A; Horvitz, Z; Perry, A; Weissman, L; Davis, G Kirk; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  18. Hamiltonian analysis for linearly acceleration-dependent Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Miguel; Gómez-Cortés, Rosario; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efraín

    2016-06-01

    We study the constrained Ostrogradski-Hamilton framework for the equations of motion provided by mechanical systems described by second-order derivative actions with a linear dependence in the accelerations. We stress out the peculiar features provided by the surface terms arising for this type of theories and we discuss some important properties for this kind of actions in order to pave the way for the construction of a well defined quantum counterpart by means of canonical methods. In particular, we analyse in detail the constraint structure for these theories and its relation to the inherent conserved quantities where the associated energies together with a Noether charge may be identified. The constraint structure is fully analyzed without the introduction of auxiliary variables, as proposed in recent works involving higher order Lagrangians. Finally, we also provide some examples where our approach is explicitly applied and emphasize the way in which our original arrangement results in propitious for the Hamiltonian formulation of covariant field theories.

  19. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  20. Comprehensive identification and analysis of human accelerated regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gittelman, Rachel M.; Hun, Enna; Ay, Ferhat; Madeoy, Jennifer; Pennacchio, Len; Noble, William S.; Hawkins, R. David; Akey, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that changes in gene regulation have played an important role in human evolution, but regulatory DNA has been much more difficult to study compared with protein-coding regions. Recent large-scale studies have created genome-scale catalogs of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To better define regulatory DNA that has been subject to human-specific adaptive evolution, we performed comprehensive evolutionary and population genetics analyses on over 18 million DHSs discovered in 130 cell types. We identified 524 DHSs that are conserved in nonhuman primates but accelerated in the human lineage (haDHS), and estimate that 70% of substitutions in haDHSs are attributable to positive selection. Through extensive computational and experimental analyses, we demonstrate that haDHSs are often active in brain or neuronal cell types; play an important role in regulating the expression of developmentally important genes, including many transcription factors such as SOX6, POU3F2, and HOX genes; and identify striking examples of adaptive regulatory evolution that may have contributed to human-specific phenotypes. More generally, our results reveal new insights into conserved and adaptive regulatory DNA in humans and refine the set of genomic substrates that distinguish humans from their closest living primate relatives. PMID:26104583

  1. Thermal analysis of SC quadrupoles in accelerator interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Novitski, Igor; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents results of a thermal analysis and operation margin calculation performed for NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn low-beta quadrupoles in collider interaction regions. Results of the thermal analysis for NbTi quadrupoles are compared with the relevant experimental data. An approach to quench limit measurements for Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles is discussed.

  2. Analysis of Voltage Signals from Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lizarazo, J.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-30

    We present two techniques used in the analysis of voltage tap data collected during recent tests of superconducting magnets developed by the Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The first technique was used on a quadrupole to provide information about quench origins that could not be obtained using the time-of-flight method. The second technique illustrates the use of data from transient flux imbalances occurring during magnet ramping to diagnose changes in the current-temperature margin of a superconducting cable. In both cases, the results of this analysis contributed to make improvements on subsequent magnets.

  3. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  4. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method.

    PubMed

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  5. Vibration isolation analysis of clutches based on trouble shooting of vehicle accelerating noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Lai; Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Jing, Xingjian; Ahmed, Waizuddin

    2016-11-01

    Vehicle accelerating noise is a troublesome issue commonly existing in automobiles, leading to negative passenger experience. Considering real experimental results and practical issues, a nonlinear 3-degree of freedom (DOF) torsional model of the clutch system is developed for reducing abnormal noise during vehicle accelerating. In this model, the nonlinear characteristics of the multi-staged clutch damper and the gear backlash are carefully studied. This greatly facilitates the analysis of the vibration transmission characteristics of the clutch and helps understanding of the influence of each critical physical parameter on noise generation. To reduce the accelerating noise, an optimization method for the clutch dynamics is proposed, based on the parameter analysis results, and the effectiveness is validated both in simulations and experiments.

  6. X Chromosome SNPs Were Heavily Involved In Epistasis Effects Of Net Merit Component Traits In Contemporary U.S. Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pairwise epistasis effects of net merit and its eight component traits were tested in 1654 contemporary U.S. Holstein cows using the BovineSNP50 (45,878 SNPs). A large number of epistasis effects exceeded the genome-wide significance of 5% type-I error with the Bonferroni correction and a QTL map of...

  7. EMG and acceleration signal analysis for quantifying the effects of medication in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Saara M; Kankaanpaa, Markku; Tarvainen, Mika P; Nuutinen, Juho; Airaksinen, Olavi; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor disabilities that can be alleviated reasonably with appropriate medication. However, there is a lack of objective methods for quantifying the efficacy of treatment in PD. We applied here an objective method for quantifying the effects of medication in PD using EMG and acceleration measurements and analysis. In the method, four signal features were calculated from the EMG and acceleration recordings of both sides of the body: the kurtosis and recurrence rate of EMG, and the amplitude and sample entropy of acceleration. Principal component approach was used for reducing the number of variables. EMG and acceleration data measured from nine PD patients were used for analysis. The patients were measured in four different medication conditions: with medication off, and two and three and four hours after taking the medication. The results showed that in eight patients the EMG recordings changed into less spiky and the acceleration recordings into more complex after taking the medication. A reverse phenomenon in the signal characteristics was observed in seven patients 3-4 hours after taking the medication. The results indicate that the presented method is potentially useful for quantifying objectively the effects of medication on the neuromuscular function in PD.

  8. Neutronics analysis for an accelerator-based nuclear waste transmuter

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.; Beard, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    The neutronic analysis for a target/blanket design that is capable of supporting the high level waste stream from 2.5 LWR`s is described. The target consists of a set of solid tungsten and lead plates, cooled by heavy water and surrounded by a lead annulus. The annular blanket, which surrounds the target, consists of a set of AcO{sub 2} slurry bearing tubes, each 3 meters long, surrounded by heavy water moderator. Heat removal from the slurry tubes is by passing the rapidly moving slurry through an external heat exchanger. There are separate regions for long-lived fission product burning. Using the Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP we have optimized the design for a minimum beam current of 62.5 mA of 1.6 GeV protons.

  9. WarpIV: In Situ Visualization and Analysis of Ion Accelerator Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E Wes

    2016-01-01

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. This supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  10. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; Grote, David P.; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E. Wes

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  11. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; ...

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analyticsmore » to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.« less

  12. Design and Analysis of a Micro-Optical Position Readout for Acceleration Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, Fred M.; Holswade, Scott C.; Shagam, Richard N.

    1999-07-08

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a MEMS-based trajectory safety subsystem, which allows enablement of critical functions only after a particular acceleration environment has been achieved. The device, known as an Environmental Sensing Device (ESD), consists of a suspended moving shuttle that translates a given distance when exposed to an appropriate acceleration environment. The shuttle contains an embedded code, consisting of grating structures, that is illuminated and optically read using a semiconductor laser and detector integrated together in a GaAs-based Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) flip-chip bonded to the assembly. This paper will describe the optical design and performance analysis of the embedded code features in the shuttle.

  13. Status of MAPA (Modular Accelerator Physics Analysis) and the Tech-X Object-Oriented Accelerator Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, J. R.; Shasharina, S.; Bruhwiler, D. L.

    1998-04-01

    The MAPA code is a fully interactive accelerator modeling and design tool consisting of a GUI and two object-oriented C++ libraries: a general library suitable for treatment of any dynamical system, and an accelerator library including many element types plus an accelerator class. The accelerator library inherits directly from the system library, which uses hash tables to store any relevant parameters or strings. The GUI can access these hash tables in a general way, allowing the user to invoke a window displaying all relevant parameters for a particular element type or for the accelerator class, with the option to change those parameters. The system library can advance an arbitrary number of dynamical variables through an arbitrary mapping. The accelerator class inherits this capability and overloads the relevant functions to advance the phase space variables of a charged particle through a string of elements. Among other things, the GUI makes phase space plots and finds fixed points of the map. We discuss the object hierarchy of the two libraries and use of the code.

  14. Analysis of output trends from Varian 2100C/D and 600C/D accelerators.

    PubMed

    Grattan, M W D; Hounsell, A R

    2011-01-07

    Analysis of Varian linear accelerator output trends is reported. Two groups, consisting of four matched Varian 2100C/D and four matched Varian 600C/D accelerators, with different designs of monitor chamber, have been investigated and the data acquired from regular calibrated ion chamber/electrometer measurements of the output performance of the eight accelerators analysed. The trend of machine output with time, having removed the effect of adjusting the monitor chamber response, was compared on a monthly and annual basis for monitor chambers with ages ranging between 1 year and 7 years. The results indicate that the response is generally consistent within each set of accelerators with different monitor chamber designs. Those used in a Varian 600C/D machine result in a reduction in measured output over time, with an average monthly reduction of 0.35 ± 0.09% over the course of the first 4 years of use. The chambers used in a 2100C/D accelerator result in an increase in measured output over time, with an average monthly increase of 0.26 ± 0.09% over the course of the first 4 years of use. The output increase then reduces towards the end of this period of time, with the average monthly change falling to -0.03 ± 0.02% for the following 3 years. The output response trend was similar for all clinical energies used on the 2100C/D accelerators--6, 15 MV x-ray beams, and 4, 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beams. By tracking these changes it has been possible to predict the response over time to allow appropriate adjustments in monitor chamber response to maintain a measured accelerator output within tolerance and give confidence in performance. It has also provided data to indicate the need for planned preventative intervention and indicate if the monitor chamber response is behaving as expected.

  15. Interface for the rapid analysis of liquid samples by accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Thomas, Avi; Daley, Paul F; Salazar Quintero, Gary A; Bench, Graham

    2014-02-04

    An interface for the analysis of liquid sample having carbon content by an accelerator mass spectrometer including a wire, defects on the wire, a system for moving the wire, a droplet maker for producing droplets of the liquid sample and placing the droplets of the liquid sample on the wire in the defects, a system that converts the carbon content of the droplets of the liquid sample to carbon dioxide gas in a helium stream, and a gas-accepting ion source connected to the accelerator mass spectrometer that receives the carbon dioxide gas of the sample in a helium stream and introduces the carbon dioxide gas of the sample into the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of the Off-Normal Conditions of the SPIDER Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2011-09-26

    In the context of the development of the 1 MV neutral beam injector for the ITER tokamak, the study on beam formation and acceleration has considerable importance. This effort includes the ion source and accelerator SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an Rf plasma) ion source, planned to be built in Padova, and designed to extract and accelerate a 355 A/m{sup 2} current of H{sup -}(or 285 A/m{sup 2} D{sup -}) up to 100 kV. Exhaustive simulations were already carried out during the accelerator optimization leading to the present design. However, as it is expected that the accelerator shall operate also in case of pre-programmed or undesired off-normal conditions, the investigation of a large set of off-normal scenarios is necessary. These analyses will also be useful for the evaluation of the real performances of the machine, and should help in interpreting experimental results, or in identifying dangerous operating conditions.The present contribution offers an overview of the results obtained during the investigation of these off-normal conditions, by means of different modeling tools and codes. The results, showed a good flexibility of the device in different operating conditions. Where the consequences of the abnormalities appeared to be problematic further analysis were addressed.

  18. Synergistic interaction between ankle and knee during hopping revealed through induced acceleration analysis.

    PubMed

    João, Filipa; Veloso, António; Cabral, Sílvia; Moniz-Pereira, Vera; Kepple, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The forces produced by the muscles can deliver energy to a target segment they are not attached to, by transferring this energy throughout the other segments in the chain. This is a synergistic way of functioning, which allows muscles to accelerate or decelerate segments in order to reach the target one. The purpose of this study was to characterize the contribution of each lower extremity joint to the vertical acceleration of the body's center of mass during a hopping exercise. To accomplish this, an induced acceleration analysis was performed using a model with eight segments. The results indicate that the strategies produced during a hopping exercise rely on the synergy between the knee and ankle joints, with most of the vertical acceleration being produced by the knee extensors, while the ankle plantar flexors act as stabilizers of the foot. This synergy between the ankle and the knee is perhaps a mechanism that allows the transfer of power from the knee muscles to the ground, and we believe that in this particular task the net action of the foot and ankle moments is to produce a stable foot with little overall acceleration.

  19. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  20. A fast and powerful W-test for pairwise epistasis testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maggie Haitian; Sun, Rui; Guo, Junfeng; Weng, Haoyi; Lee, Jack; Hu, Inchi; Sham, Pak Chung; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying

    2016-07-08

    Epistasis plays an essential role in the development of complex diseases. Interaction methods face common challenge of seeking a balance between persistent power, model complexity, computation efficiency, and validity of identified bio-markers. We introduce a novel W-test to identify pairwise epistasis effect, which measures the distributional difference between cases and controls through a combined log odds ratio. The test is model-free, fast, and inherits a Chi-squared distribution with data adaptive degrees of freedom. No permutation is needed to obtain the P-values. Simulation studies demonstrated that the W-test is more powerful in low frequency variants environment than alternative methods, which are the Chi-squared test, logistic regression and multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR). In two independent real bipolar disorder genome-wide associations (GWAS) datasets, the W-test identified significant interactions pairs that can be replicated, including SLIT3-CENPN, SLIT3-TMEM132D, CNTNAP2-NDST4 and CNTCAP2-RTN4R The genes in the pairs play central roles in neurotransmission and synapse formation. A majority of the identified loci are undiscoverable by main effect and are low frequency variants. The proposed method offers a powerful alternative tool for mapping the genetic puzzle underlying complex disorders.

  1. Cuckoo search epistasis: a new method for exploring significant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Aflakparast, M; Salimi, H; Gerami, A; Dubé, M-P; Visweswaran, S; Masoudi-Nejad, A

    2014-06-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing technology has resulted in the ability to measure millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from thousands of individuals. Although these high-dimensional data have paved the way for better understanding of the genetic architecture of common diseases, they have also given rise to challenges in developing computational methods for learning epistatic relationships among genetic markers. We propose a new method, named cuckoo search epistasis (CSE) for identifying significant epistatic interactions in population-based association studies with a case-control design. This method combines a computationally efficient Bayesian scoring function with an evolutionary-based heuristic search algorithm, and can be efficiently applied to high-dimensional genome-wide SNP data. The experimental results from synthetic data sets show that CSE outperforms existing methods including multifactorial dimensionality reduction and Bayesian epistasis association mapping. In addition, on a real genome-wide data set related to Alzheimer's disease, CSE identified SNPs that are consistent with previously reported results, and show the utility of CSE for application to genome-wide data.

  2. A fast and powerful W-test for pairwise epistasis testing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maggie Haitian; Sun, Rui; Guo, Junfeng; Weng, Haoyi; Lee, Jack; Hu, Inchi; Sham, Pak Chung; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epistasis plays an essential role in the development of complex diseases. Interaction methods face common challenge of seeking a balance between persistent power, model complexity, computation efficiency, and validity of identified bio-markers. We introduce a novel W-test to identify pairwise epistasis effect, which measures the distributional difference between cases and controls through a combined log odds ratio. The test is model-free, fast, and inherits a Chi-squared distribution with data adaptive degrees of freedom. No permutation is needed to obtain the P-values. Simulation studies demonstrated that the W-test is more powerful in low frequency variants environment than alternative methods, which are the Chi-squared test, logistic regression and multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR). In two independent real bipolar disorder genome-wide associations (GWAS) datasets, the W-test identified significant interactions pairs that can be replicated, including SLIT3-CENPN, SLIT3-TMEM132D, CNTNAP2-NDST4 and CNTCAP2-RTN4R. The genes in the pairs play central roles in neurotransmission and synapse formation. A majority of the identified loci are undiscoverable by main effect and are low frequency variants. The proposed method offers a powerful alternative tool for mapping the genetic puzzle underlying complex disorders. PMID:27112568

  3. Epistasis and the Structure of Fitness Landscapes: Are Experimental Fitness Landscapes Compatible with Fisher's Geometric Model?

    PubMed

    Blanquart, François; Bataillon, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The fitness landscape defines the relationship between genotypes and fitness in a given environment and underlies fundamental quantities such as the distribution of selection coefficient and the magnitude and type of epistasis. A better understanding of variation in landscape structure across species and environments is thus necessary to understand and predict how populations will adapt. An increasing number of experiments investigate the properties of fitness landscapes by identifying mutations, constructing genotypes with combinations of these mutations, and measuring the fitness of these genotypes. Yet these empirical landscapes represent a very small sample of the vast space of all possible genotypes, and this sample is often biased by the protocol used to identify mutations. Here we develop a rigorous statistical framework based on Approximate Bayesian Computation to address these concerns and use this flexible framework to fit a broad class of phenotypic fitness models (including Fisher's model) to 26 empirical landscapes representing nine diverse biological systems. Despite uncertainty owing to the small size of most published empirical landscapes, the inferred landscapes have similar structure in similar biological systems. Surprisingly, goodness-of-fit tests reveal that this class of phenotypic models, which has been successful so far in interpreting experimental data, is a plausible in only three of nine biological systems. More precisely, although Fisher's model was able to explain several statistical properties of the landscapes-including the mean and SD of selection and epistasis coefficients-it was often unable to explain the full structure of fitness landscapes.

  4. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectric structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.

  5. Thermal performance analysis and measurements of the prototype cryomodules of European XFEL accelerator - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Barbanotti, S.; Eschke, J.; Jensch, K.; Klos, R.; Maschmann, W.; Petersen, B.; Sawlanski, O.

    2014-11-01

    The European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), the research facility currently under construction in the Hamburg area, Germany, is based on a superconducting linear accelerator that brings electrons to almost the speed of light. The linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerating cryomodules (CMs) operating at the temperature of 2 K. The thermal performances of the accelerator CMs are a key element to determine the heat load budget, the required capacity and the cost of the XFEL refrigerating system and to guarantee its efficient operation. The measurement of the thermal performances of the CMs is also an important step in the qualification of the CMs during the series production. This paper describes the thermal performance analysis of the European XFEL prototype cryomodules. The analysis takes into account all the main contributors (multilayer insulation, current leads, power couplers, support posts, and cavities) to the static and dynamic heat loads at various cryogenic temperature levels. Existing empirical databases are reviewed and used to evaluate the heat transfer through the multilayer insulation and numerical simulations are developed to investigate the heat loads generated from the different CM components.

  6. Reciprocal sign epistasis and truncation selection: When is recombination favorable in a pre-breeding program with a selfing species?

    PubMed

    Vagne, Constance; David, Jacques; Tavaud, Muriel; Fontez, Bénédicte

    2015-12-07

    Since the dawn of agriculture, humans have applied artificial selection on traits of interest, regardless of their genetic architecture. Yet, still today, most models used to study and streamline this process overlook genetic interactions. In this study, we determined the conditions in which a target genotype can be fixed when truncation selection is applied on an epistatic trait. Previous studies have shown that reciprocal sign epistasis with two fitness peaks of unequal height involves multiple equilibrium states, i.e. below one critical parameter value, such as a critical recombination rate, one genotype may be fixed, and above it, another one may be fixed. Using a haploid bi-locus model, we identified which genotype would be fixed, and how quickly, in an infinite population selected for a phenotypic trait subject to reciprocal sign epistasis with unequal peak heights, depending on two criteria: the recombination rate and percentage of selected individuals. The critical parameter values at which bistability sets in, were also calculated. These results were complemented by stochastic simulations in finite populations. Our results confirmed that, in the case of fitness under reciprocal sign epistasis, high recombination rates induce blockage at the local optimum or attainment of an equilibrium state between the two peaks. However, if linkage disequilibrium is negative in the initial population, recombination is necessary to create the most favorable genotype. Therefore, in this case, reciprocal sign epistasis favors non-null recombination rates, particularly if selection is intense.

  7. Proton and Helium Injection Into First Order Fermi Acceleration at Shocks: Hybrid Simulation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikova, Galina; Malkov, Mikhail; Sagdeev, Roald; Liseykina, Tatjana; Hanusch, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Elemental composition of galactic cosmic rays (CR) probably holds the key to their origin. Most likely, they are accelerated at collisionless shocks in supernova remnants, but the acceleration mechanism is not entirely understood. One complicated problem is ``injection'', a process whereby the shock selects a tiny fraction of particles to keep on crossing its front and gain more energy. Comparing the injection rates of particles with different mass to charge ratio is a powerful tool for studying this process. Recent advances in measurements of CR He/p ratio have provided particularly important new clues. We performed a series of hybrid simulations and analyzed a joint injection of protons and Helium, in conjunction with upstream waves they generate. The emphasis of this work is on the bootstrap aspects of injection manifested in particle confinement to the shock and, therefore, their continuing acceleration by the self-driven waves. The waves are initially generated by He and protons in separate spectral regions, and their interaction plays a crucial role in particle acceleration. The work is ongoing and new results will be reported along with their analysis and comparison with the latest data from the AMS-02 space-based spectrometer. Work supported Grant RFBR 16-01-00209, NASA ATP-program under Award NNX14AH36G, and by the US Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  8. UV-accelerated test based on analysis of field-exposed PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioda, T.

    2011-09-01

    We proposed an UV accelerated test condition for an EVA encapsulant, based on analysis of long term field exposed PV modules. We found that strong UV irradiation into EVA encapsulant test sample led to the fast decomposition of UV absorber formulated in EVA encapsulant, which has never seen in the field exposed PV modules. Thus, the integrating UV intensity of 60 W/m2 and black panel temperature of 110°C using a xenon weather-o-meter were suitable as an UV accelerated test condition. With this proposed test condition, which shows that 1 week exposure by xenon light corresponds to 1 year field exposure, we can predict discoloration rate of EVA encapsulant. In addition, we evaluated change in peel strength to glass for Mitsui's and the other commercially available EVA encapsulants during UV accelerated test with the proposed condition. There was no large change in peel strength for our EVA encapsulant during the UV accelerated test. On the other hand, we observed that the competitor's EVA encapsulant showed the large decrease of peel strength to glass at early stage, even no change in yellowness index (YI). This result indicates not only YI change but also peel strength change should be evaluated for design of reliable PV module and encapsulant.

  9. Radiation shielding analysis of a special linear accelerator for electron beam and X-ray.

    PubMed

    Kang, W G; Pyo, S H; Alkhuraiji, T S; Han, B S; Kang, C M

    2017-01-31

    The King AbdulAziz City for Science & Technology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia plans to build a 10 MeV, 15 kW linear accelerator (LINAC) for electron beam and X-ray. The accelerator will be supplied by EB Tech, Republic of Korea, and the design and construction of the accelerator building will be conducted in the cooperation with EB Tech. This report presents the shielding analysis of the accelerator building using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). In order to improve the accuracy in estimating deep radiation penetration and to reduce computation time, various variance reduction techniques, including the weight window (WW) method, the deterministic transport (DXTRAN) spheres were considered. Radiation levels were estimated at selected locations in the shielding facility running MCNP6 for particle histories up to 1.0×10+8. The final results indicated that the calculated doses at all selected detector locations met the dose requirement of 50 mSv/yr, which is the United State Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) requirement.

  10. Wavelet Analysis of Acceleration Response of Beam Under the Moving Mass for Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Tanuja; Chatterjee, Animesh

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, acceleration response of cracked beam is analyzed by using the wavelet transform to detect the crack presence, its location and also to predict the crack severity. The equation of motion of beam under the moving mass is solved by using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. A code is written by expanding the equation for first three vibration modes. Acceleration signal of the damaged beam under the moving mass contains the discontinuity at the crack location. This discontinuity contained in the acceleration signal is sufficiently visible but it is very small for some signals. Therefore, the acceleration signals are transformed using the wavelet analysis. A wavelet coefficient peak occurs at the location of discontinuity, so that we can identify the crack presence and its location. From the value of wavelet coefficient peak, we can also predict the crack effect with respect to the change in velocity of moving mass and change in crack depth. The main advantage of this method is that the wavelet coefficient peak is sufficiently higher even for the higher velocities and small size crack.

  11. Numerical analysis of the sensitivity of crystal growth experiments to spacecraft residual acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. I. D.; Amiroudine, Sakir; Ouazzani, Jalil; Rosenberger, Franz

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the sensitivity of the Bridgman-Stockbarger crystal growth method, using an idealized model for a range of operating and boundary conditions over a variety of accelerations. Attention is given to the dopant nonuniformity at the melt-crystal interface. The largest compositional nonuniformities are found to occur for disturbances whose amplitudes are greater than 10 exp 6 g, and frequencies below 0.1 Hz.

  12. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-06-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned approximately 0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motionwas estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spotmotion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate.

  13. Three Dimensional Gait Analysis Using Wearable Acceleration and Gyro Sensors Based on Quaternion Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Miyagawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for three dimensional gait analysis using wearable sensors and quaternion calculations. Seven sensor units consisting of a tri-axial acceleration and gyro sensors, were fixed to the lower limbs. The acceleration and angular velocity data of each sensor unit were measured during level walking. The initial orientations of the sensor units were estimated using acceleration data during upright standing position and the angular displacements were estimated afterwards using angular velocity data during gait. Here, an algorithm based on quaternion calculation was implemented for orientation estimation of the sensor units. The orientations of the sensor units were converted to the orientations of the body segments by a rotation matrix obtained from a calibration trial. Body segment orientations were then used for constructing a three dimensional wire frame animation of the volunteers during the gait. Gait analysis was conducted on five volunteers, and results were compared with those from a camera-based motion analysis system. Comparisons were made for the joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal plane. The average RMSE and correlation coefficient (CC) were 10.14 deg and 0.98, 7.88 deg and 0.97, 9.75 deg and 0.78 for the hip, knee and ankle flexion angles, respectively. PMID:23877128

  14. Design and analysis of solder connections using accelerated approximate procedure with disturbed state concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenack, Russell

    The accelerated approximate procedure developed and used herein for analysis, design and parametric optimization in electronic packaging is based on the disturbed state concept (DSC) and the hierarchical single surface (HISS) constitutive models. Over the past many years the benefits of the DSC/HISS model, compared to those of available plasticity models, have been demonstrated and validated for a wide range of materials and solder connections. When the DSC/HISS model is implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code, it is well suited for failure analyses of lead/tin solder connections under cyclic thermal and mechanical loading that are typically occur in electronic packages. Unfortunately, an analysis of a single solder connection, for approximately 4000 or more cycles, can require much effort and computer time, which may be too long to be of practical use. The accelerated approximate procedure significantly reduces the effort and the analysis time to approximately 10 to 15 minutes on a Pentium 4, 3.2 GHz personal computer. The main emphasis of this dissertation is the use of the unified DSC model with the finite element procedure to predict the behavior of chip-substrate solder connections. The DSC code is used to validate the performance of a number of packages (144 BPGA, 313 PBGA) tested in the laboratory under thermomechanical loading. Using the accelerated approximate procedure, the effect of the variable thickness solder connection in a plane stress idealization is compared with that of the constant thickness assumption, and a three-dimensional analysis. It shows that the analysis with variable thickness (in plane stress idealization) yields improved results. The accelerated approximate procedure is then used to perform parametric design analyses of a solder connection by varying a number of important factors such as connection size, shape and misalignment. The effects of varying the DSC/HISS parameters on cycle life are also analyzed. The results of

  15. Experimental design and analysis for accelerated degradation tests with Li-ion cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Thomas, Edward Victor; Jungst, Rudolph George; Roth, Emanuel Peter

    2003-08-01

    This document describes a general protocol (involving both experimental and data analytic aspects) that is designed to be a roadmap for rapidly obtaining a useful assessment of the average lifetime (at some specified use conditions) that might be expected from cells of a particular design. The proposed experimental protocol involves a series of accelerated degradation experiments. Through the acquisition of degradation data over time specified by the experimental protocol, an unambiguous assessment of the effects of accelerating factors (e.g., temperature and state of charge) on various measures of the health of a cell (e.g., power fade and capacity fade) will result. In order to assess cell lifetime, it is necessary to develop a model that accurately predicts degradation over a range of the experimental factors. In general, it is difficult to specify an appropriate model form without some preliminary analysis of the data. Nevertheless, assuming that the aging phenomenon relates to a chemical reaction with simple first-order rate kinetics, a data analysis protocol is also provided to construct a useful model that relates performance degradation to the levels of the accelerating factors. This model can then be used to make an accurate assessment of the average cell lifetime. The proposed experimental and data analysis protocols are illustrated with a case study involving the effects of accelerated aging on the power output from Gen-2 cells. For this case study, inadequacies of the simple first-order kinetics model were observed. However, a more complex model allowing for the effects of two concurrent mechanisms provided an accurate representation of the experimental data.

  16. A shift from magnitude to sign epistasis during adaptive evolution of a bacterial social trait.

    PubMed

    Zee, Peter C; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Yu, Yuen-Tsu N; Kraemer, Susanne A; Keller, Heike; Ossowski, Stephan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Velicer, Gregory J

    2014-09-01

    Although the importance of epistasis in evolution has long been recognized, remarkably little is known about the processes by which epistatic interactions evolve in real time in specific biological systems. Here, we have characterized how the epistatic fitness relationship between a social gene and an adapting genome changes radically over a short evolutionary time frame in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. We show that a highly beneficial effect of this social gene in the ancestral genome is gradually reduced--and ultimately reversed into a deleterious effect--over the course of an experimental adaptive trajectory in which a primitive form of novel cooperation evolved. This reduction and reversal of a positive social allelic effect is driven solely by changes in the genetic context in which the gene is expressed as new mutations are sequentially fixed during adaptive evolution, and explicitly demonstrates a significant evolutionary change in the genetic architecture of an ecologically important social trait.

  17. Conservation and rewiring of functional modules revealed by an epistasis map in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Roguev, Assen; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Zofall, Martin; Zhang, Ke; Fischer, Tamas; Collins, Sean R; Qu, Hongjing; Shales, Michael; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Ideker, Trey; Grewal, Shiv I; Weissman, Jonathan S; Krogan, Nevan J

    2008-10-17

    An epistasis map (E-MAP) was constructed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, by systematically measuring the phenotypes associated with pairs of mutations. This high-density, quantitative genetic interaction map focused on various aspects of chromosome function, including transcription regulation and DNA repair/replication. The E-MAP uncovered a previously unidentified component of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (rsh1) and linked the RNAi pathway to several other biological processes. Comparison of the S. pombe E-MAP to an analogous genetic map from the budding yeast revealed that, whereas negative interactions were conserved between genes involved in similar biological processes, positive interactions and overall genetic profiles between pairs of genes coding for physically associated proteins were even more conserved. Hence, conservation occurs at the level of the functional module (protein complex), but the genetic cross talk between modules can differ substantially.

  18. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  19. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M. H.; Gonin, I.; Passarelli, D.; Sukanov, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Yakovlev, V.

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  20. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Li, G.

    2014-08-28

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  1. Failure modes and effects criticality analysis and accelerated life testing of LEDs for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, M.; Christou, A.

    2012-12-01

    While use of LEDs in Fiber Optics and lighting applications is common, their use in medical diagnostic applications is not very extensive. Since the precise value of light intensity will be used to interpret patient results, understanding failure modes [1-4] is very important. We used the Failure Modes and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) tool to identify the critical failure modes of the LEDs. FMECA involves identification of various failure modes, their effects on the system (LED optical output in this context), their frequency of occurrence, severity and the criticality of the failure modes. The competing failure modes/mechanisms were degradation of: active layer (where electron-hole recombination occurs to emit light), electrodes (provides electrical contact to the semiconductor chip), Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surface layer (used to improve current spreading and light extraction), plastic encapsulation (protective polymer layer) and packaging failures (bond wires, heat sink separation). A FMECA table is constructed and the criticality is calculated by estimating the failure effect probability (β), failure mode ratio (α), failure rate (λ) and the operating time. Once the critical failure modes were identified, the next steps were generation of prior time to failure distribution and comparing with our accelerated life test data. To generate the prior distributions, data and results from previous investigations were utilized [5-33] where reliability test results of similar LEDs were reported. From the graphs or tabular data, we extracted the time required for the optical power output to reach 80% of its initial value. This is our failure criterion for the medical diagnostic application. Analysis of published data for different LED materials (AlGaInP, GaN, AlGaAs), the Semiconductor Structures (DH, MQW) and the mode of testing (DC, Pulsed) was carried out. The data was categorized according to the materials system and LED structure such as AlGaInP-DH-DC, Al

  2. Utilization of Integrated Process Control, Data Capture, and Data Analysis in Construction of Accelerator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Madre; Charles Reece; Joseph Ozelis; Valerie Bookwalter

    2003-05-12

    Jefferson Lab has developed a web-based system that integrates commercial database, data analysis, document archiving and retrieval, and user interface software, into a coherent knowledge management product (Pansophy). This product provides important tools for the successful pursuit of major projects such as accelerator system development and construction, by offering elements of process and procedure control, data capture and review, and data mining and analysis. After a period of initial development, Pansophy is now being used in Jefferson Lab's SNS superconducting linac construction effort, as a means for structuring and implementing the QA program, for process control and tracking, and for cryomodule test data capture and presentation/analysis. Development of Pansophy is continuing, in particular data queries and analysis functions that are the cornerstone of its utility.

  3. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), The NSLS 200 MeV Linear Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.; Ackerman, A.I.; Dickinson, T.; Heese, R.N.; Larson, R.A.; Neuls, C.W.; Pjerov, S.; Sheehan, J.F.

    1993-06-15

    The radiological, fire and electrical hazards posed by a 200 MeV electron Linear Accelerator, which the NSLS Department will install and commission within a newly assembled structure, are addressed in this Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Although it is clear that this accelerator is intended to be the injector for a future experimental facility, we address only the Linac in the present PSAR since neither the final design nor the operating characteristics of the experimental facility are known at the present time. The fire detection and control system to be installed in the building is judged to be completely adequate in terms of the marginal hazard presented - no combustible materials other than the usual cabling associated with such a facility have been identified. Likewise, electrical hazards associated with power supplies for the beam transport magnets and accelerator components such as the accelerator klystrons and electron gun are classified as marginal in terms of potential personnel injury, cost of equipment lost, program downtime and public impact perceptions as defined in the BNL Environmental Safety and Health Manual and the probability of occurrence is deemed to be remote. No unusual features have been identified for the power supplies or electrical distribution system, and normal and customary electrical safety standards as practiced throughout the NSLS complex and the Laboratory are specified in this report. The radiation safety hazards are similarly judged to be marginal in terms of probability of occurrence and potential injury consequences since, for the low intensity operation proposed - a factor of 25 less than the maximum Linac capability specified by the vendor - the average beam power is only 0.4 watts. The shielding specifications given in this report will give adequate protection to both the general public and nonradiation workers in areas adjacent to the building as well as radiation workers within the controlled access building.

  4. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  5. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  6. Analysis of longitudinal bunching in an FEL driven two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.; Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Donohue, J.T.; Gouard, P.; Rullier, J.L.; Vermare, C.

    2000-08-01

    Recent experiments have explored the use of a free-electron laser (FEL) as a buncher for a microwave two-beam accelerator, and the subsequent driving of a standing-wave rf output cavity. Here the authors present a deeper analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of the electron bunches as they are transported from the end of the FEL and through the output cavity. In particular, the authors examine the effect of the transport region and cavity aperture to filter the bunched portion of the beam.

  7. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The NASA five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion-resistant high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 billion Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  8. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    DOE PAGES

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectricmore » structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.« less

  9. Shielding analysis at the upper section of the accelerator-driven system.

    PubMed

    Sasa, Toshinobu; Yang, Jin An; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The proton beam duct of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) acts as a streaming path for spallation neutrons and photons and causes the activation of the magnets and other devices above the subcritical core. We have performed a streaming analysis at the upper section of the lead-bismuth target/cooled ADS (800 MWth). MCNPX was used to calculate the radiation dose from streamed neutrons and photons through the beam duct. For the secondary photon production calculation, cross sections for several actinides were substituted with plutonium because of the lack of gamma production cross section. From the results of this analysis, the neutron dose from the beam duct is seen to be about 20 orders higher than that of the bulk shield. The magnets and shield plug are heavily irradiated by streaming neutrons according to the DCHAIN-SP analysis.

  10. LeuT conformational sampling utilizing accelerated molecular dynamics and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James R; Gedeon, Patrick C; Grant, Barry J; Madura, Jeffry D

    2012-07-03

    Monoamine transporters (MATs) function by coupling ion gradients to the transport of dopamine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Despite their importance in regulating neurotransmission, the exact conformational mechanism by which MATs function remains elusive. To this end, we have performed seven 250 ns accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of the leucine transporter, a model for neurotransmitter MATs. By varying the presence of binding-pocket leucine substrate and sodium ions, we have sampled plausible conformational states representative of the substrate transport cycle. The resulting trajectories were analyzed using principal component analysis of transmembrane helices 1b and 6a. This analysis revealed seven unique structures: two of the obtained conformations are similar to the currently published crystallographic structures, one conformation is similar to a proposed open inward structure, and four conformations represent novel structures of potential importance to the transport cycle. Further analysis reveals that the presence of binding-pocket sodium ions is necessary to stabilize the locked-occluded and open-inward conformations.

  11. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV N20e7+ beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0°, top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6° in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h =1 and h =2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h =1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h =2.

  12. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  13. Accelerating Policy Decisions to Adopt Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccine: A Global, Multivariable Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Jessica C.; Stack, Meghan L.; Richmond, Marcie R.; Bear, Allyson P.; Hajjeh, Rana A.; Bishai, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Adoption of new and underutilized vaccines by national immunization programs is an essential step towards reducing child mortality. Policy decisions to adopt new vaccines in high mortality countries often lag behind decisions in high-income countries. Using the case of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, this paper endeavors to explain these delays through the analysis of country-level economic, epidemiological, programmatic and policy-related factors, as well as the role of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI Alliance). Methods and Findings Data for 147 countries from 1990 to 2007 were analyzed in accelerated failure time models to identify factors that are associated with the time to decision to adopt Hib vaccine. In multivariable models that control for Gross National Income, region, and burden of Hib disease, the receipt of GAVI support speeded the time to decision by a factor of 0.37 (95% CI 0.18–0.76), or 63%. The presence of two or more neighboring country adopters accelerated decisions to adopt by a factor of 0.50 (95% CI 0.33–0.75). For each 1% increase in vaccine price, decisions to adopt are delayed by a factor of 1.02 (95% CI 1.00–1.04). Global recommendations and local studies were not associated with time to decision. Conclusions This study substantiates previous findings related to vaccine price and presents new evidence to suggest that GAVI eligibility is associated with accelerated decisions to adopt Hib vaccine. The influence of neighboring country decisions was also highly significant, suggesting that approaches to support the adoption of new vaccines should consider supply- and demand-side factors. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20305714

  14. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  15. First Results from a Principal Component Analysis of Tycho's SNR: Evidence for Cosmic Ray Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J. S.; Hughes, J. P.; Badenes, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). PCA is a statistical technique we implemented to characterize X-ray spectra extracted from distinct spatial regions across the entire image of the remnant. We used the PCA to determine the location of the contact discontinuity (CD) in Tycho, which marks the boundary between shocked ejecta and shocked interstellar material, and found an azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of 241". For the average radius of the outer blast wave (BW) we found 251". Taking account of projection effects, the ratio of BW:CD is 1:0.93, which is inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The BW:CD ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. Such a scenario is further supported by evidence from the morphology and spectral nature of the BW emission for the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons. We also present PCA results regarding the ranges in Si and Fe composition in Tycho, and a newly uncovered spectral variation in the form of a low energy excess that has not been previously noted.

  16. Waveband Analysis of Track Irregularities in High-Speed Railway from On-Board Acceleration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Seok; Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Young Guk; Kim, Seog Won; Park, Choonsoo

    This paper is focused on waveband analysis of the lateral and vertical track irregularities from the on-board acceleration measurement of in-service high-speed trains. The track irregularities play important roles to determine dynamic stability of vehicles and ride quality of passengers, so that their amplitude and wavelength should be monitored continuously and carefully. Measuring acceleration at the axle-box or bogie of the trains has been under consideration for low-cost implementation and robust to a harsh railway environment. To estimate the track irregularities, lateral and vertical vibration caused by the wheel/track interaction is measured by the axle-box and bogie mounted accelerometers of an in-service high-speed train. A Kalman filter is used to prevent unrealistic drifts in the estimation. By applying the waveband-pass and compensation filters to the estimated displacement, it is possible to estimate the track irregularities. A distance-wavelength representation is used to identify their waveband in an intuitive way. It is verified by comparing with a commercial track geometry measurement system. From their comparison, it confirms that the representation can produce a satisfactory result.

  17. The metabolic background is a global player in Saccharomyces gene expression epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Shliaha, Pavel; Schwarz, Roland; Capuano, Floriana; Vowinckel, Jakob; Radmanesfahar, Elahe; Krüger, Antje; Calvani, Enrica; Michel, Steve; Börno, Stefan; Christen, Stefan; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Timmermann, Bernd; Lilley, Kathryn S; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression in response to nutrient availability is fundamental to the genotype-phenotype relationship. The metabolic-genetic make-up of the cell, as reflected in auxotrophy, is hence a likely determinant of gene expression. Here, we addressed the importance of the metabolic-genetic background by monitoring transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in a repertoire of sixteen Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory backgrounds, combinatorially perturbed in histidine, leucine, methionine and uracil biosynthesis. The metabolic background affected up to 85% of the coding genome. Suggesting widespread confounding, these transcriptional changes showed, on average, 83% overlap between unrelated auxotrophs, and 35% with previously published transcriptomes generated for non-metabolic gene knock-outs. Background-dependent gene expression correlated with metabolic flux and acted, predominantly through masking or suppression, on 88% of transcriptional interactions epistatically. As consequence, the deletion of the same metabolic gene in a different background could provoke an entirely different transcriptional response. Propagating to the proteome and scaling up at the metabolome, metabolic background dependencies reveal the prevalence of metabolism-dependent epistasis at all regulatory levels. Urging for a fundamental change of the prevailing laboratory practice of using auxotrophs and nutrient supplemented media, these results reveal epistatic intertwining of metabolism with gene expression on the genomic scale. PMID:27572163

  18. Genetic architecture of metabolic rate: environment specific epistasis between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in an insect.

    PubMed

    Arnqvist, Göran; Dowling, Damian K; Eady, Paul; Gay, Laurene; Tregenza, Tom; Tuda, Midori; Hosken, David J

    2010-12-01

    The extent to which mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation is involved in adaptive evolutionary change is currently being reevaluated. In particular, emerging evidence suggests that mtDNA genes coevolve with the nuclear genes with which they interact to form the energy producing enzyme complexes in the mitochondria. This suggests that intergenomic epistasis between mitochondrial and nuclear genes may affect whole-organism metabolic phenotypes. Here, we use crossed combinations of mitochondrial and nuclear lineages of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus and assay metabolic rate under two different temperature regimes. Metabolic rate was affected by an interaction between the mitochondrial and nuclear lineages and the temperature regime. Sequence data suggests that mitochondrial genetic variation has a role in determining the outcome of this interaction. Our genetic dissection of metabolic rate reveals a high level of complexity, encompassing genetic interactions over two genomes, and genotype × genotype × environment interactions. The evolutionary implications of these results are twofold. First, because metabolic rate is at the root of life histories, our results provide insights into the complexity of life-history evolution in general, and thermal adaptation in particular. Second, our results suggest a mechanism that could contribute to the maintenance of nonneutral mtDNA polymorphism.

  19. Statistical epistasis networks reduce the computational complexity of searching three-locus genetic models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Moore, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of sequencing technologies makes thousands to millions of genetic attributes available for testing associations with various biological traits. Searching this enormous high-dimensional data space imposes a great computational challenge in genome-wide association studies. We introduce a network-based approach to supervise the search for three-locus models of disease susceptibility. Such statistical epistasis networks (SEN) are built using strong pairwise epistatic interactions and provide a global interaction map to search for higher-order interactions by prioritizing genetic attributes clustered together in the networks. Applying this approach to a population-based bladder cancer dataset, we found a high susceptibility three-way model of genetic variations in DNA repair and immune regulation pathways, which holds great potential for studying the etiology of bladder cancer with further biological validations. We demonstrate that our SEN-supervised search is able to find a small subset of three-locus models with significantly high associations at a substantially reduced computational cost.

  20. COMT x DRD4 epistasis impacts prefrontal cortex function underlying response control.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Dresler, Thomas; Baehne, Christina G; Heine, Monika; Boreatti-Hümmer, Andrea; Jacob, Christian P; Renner, Tobias J; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex plays a major role in cognitive control, but it is unclear how single genes and gene-gene interactions (genetic epistasis) impact neural and behavioral phenotypes. Both dopamine (DA) availability ("inverted U-model") and excitatory versus inhibitory DA receptor stimulation ("dual-state theory") have been linked to important principles of prefrontal processing. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT; Val158Met) and DA D4-receptor (DRD4; 48 bp VNTR) genotypes were analyzed for effects on behavioral and neural correlates of prefrontal response control (NoGo-anteriorization, NGA) using a Go-NoGo task and electroencephalography (114 controls and 181 patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder).  DRD4 and COMT epistatically interacted on the NGA, whereas single genes and diagnosis showed no significant impact. Subjects with presumably relatively increased D4-receptor function (DRD4: no 7R-alleles) displayed an inverted U-relationship between the NGA and increasing COMT-dependent DA levels, whereas subjects with decreased D4-sensitivity (7R) showed a U-relationship. This interaction was supported by 7R-allele dose effects and mirrored by reaction time variability (non-significant after multiple testing correction). Combining previous theories of prefrontal DA functioning, neural stability at intermediate DA levels may be accompanied by the risk of overly decreased neural flexibility if inhibitory DA receptor function is additionally decreased. Our findings might help to disentangle the genetic basis of dopaminergic mechanisms underlying prefrontal (dys)function.

  1. On the Impact of a Quadratic Acceleration Term in the Analysis of Position Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Klos, Anna; Bos, Machiel Simon; Hunegnaw, Addisu; Teferle, Felix Norman

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position time series generally assumes that each of the coordinate component series is described by the sum of a linear rate (velocity) and various periodic terms. The residuals, the deviations between the fitted model and the observations, are then a measure of the epoch-to-epoch scatter and have been used for the analysis of the stochastic character (noise) of the time series. Often the parameters of interest in GNSS position time series are the velocities and their associated uncertainties, which have to be determined with the highest reliability. It is clear that not all GNSS position time series follow this simple linear behaviour. Therefore, we have added an acceleration term in the form of a quadratic polynomial function to the model in order to better describe the non-linear motion in the position time series. This non-linear motion could be a response to purely geophysical processes, for example, elastic rebound of the Earth's crust due to ice mass loss in Greenland, artefacts due to deficiencies in bias mitigation models, for example, of the GNSS satellite and receiver antenna phase centres, or any combination thereof. In this study we have simulated 20 time series with different stochastic characteristics such as white, flicker or random walk noise of length of 23 years. The noise amplitude was assumed at 1 mm/y-/4. Then, we added the deterministic part consisting of a linear trend of 20 mm/y (that represents the averaged horizontal velocity) and accelerations ranging from minus 0.6 to plus 0.6 mm/y2. For all these data we estimated the noise parameters with Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) using the Hector software package without taken into account the non-linear term. In this way we set the benchmark to then investigate how the noise properties and velocity uncertainty may be affected by any un-modelled, non-linear term. The velocities and their uncertainties versus the accelerations for

  2. Age- and gender-specific epistasis between ADA and TNF-α influences human life-expectancy.

    PubMed

    Napolioni, Valerio; Carpi, Francesco M; Giannì, Paola; Sacco, Roberto; Di Blasio, Luca; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Lucarini, Nazzareno; Persico, Antonio M

    2011-11-01

    Aging is a complex phenotype with multiple determinants but a strong genetic component significantly impacts on survival to extreme ages. The dysregulation of immune responses occurring with increasing age is believed to contribute to human morbidity and mortality. Conversely, some genetic determinants of successful aging might reside in those polymorphisms for the immune system genes regulating immune responses. Here we examined the main effects of single loci and multi-locus interactions to test the hypothesis that the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genes may influence human life-expectancy. ADA (22G>A, rs73598374) and TNF-α (-308G>A, rs1800629; -238G>A, rs361525) functional SNPs have been determined for 1071 unrelated healthy individuals from Central Italy (18-106 years old) divided into three gender-specific age classes defined according to demographic information and accounting for the different survivals between sexes: for men (women), the first class consists of individuals<66 years old (<73 years old), the second class of individuals 66-88 years old (73-91 years old), and the third class of individuals>88 years old (>91 years old). Single-locus analysis showed that only ADA 22G>A is significantly associated with human life-expectancy in males (comparison 1 (age class 2 vs. age class 1), O.R. 1.943, P=0.036; comparison 2 (age class 3 vs. age class 2), O.R. 0.320, P=0.0056). Age- and gender-specific patterns of epistasis between ADA and TNF-α were found using Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR). In comparison 1, a significant two-loci interaction occurs in females between ADA 22G>A and TNF-α -238G>A (Sign Test P=0.011). In comparison 2, both two-loci and three-loci interaction are significant associated with increased life-expectancy over 88 years in males. In conclusion, we report that a combination of functional SNPs within ADA and TNF-α genes can influence life-expectancy in a gender

  3. Preliminary Study of the Effects of Prolonged Acceleration on Spinal Dynamics of Baboons. 1. Acceleration. 2. Biomechanical Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    cortical thickness, increased diameter/cortlcal thickness ratio, thinned and distorted epiphyseal plate, and thickened condylar cartilage in female rats...histomorphometric and histodynamic (tetracycline fixation) studies were conducted on calcified sections by analyzing six bone parameters (e,g,, bone volume , relative...growth cartilage alterations, a decrease in bone volume without an Increase in osteocytic activity, and (by tetracycline fluroescent analysis) a reduced

  4. Accelerated Monte Carlo Simulation for Safety Analysis of the Advanced Airspace Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David

    2010-01-01

    Safe separation of aircraft is a primary objective of any air traffic control system. An accelerated Monte Carlo approach was developed to assess the level of safety provided by a proposed next-generation air traffic control system. It combines features of fault tree and standard Monte Carlo methods. It runs more than one order of magnitude faster than the standard Monte Carlo method while providing risk estimates that only differ by about 10%. It also preserves component-level model fidelity that is difficult to maintain using the standard fault tree method. This balance of speed and fidelity allows sensitivity analysis to be completed in days instead of weeks or months with the standard Monte Carlo method. Results indicate that risk estimates are sensitive to transponder, pilot visual avoidance, and conflict detection failure probabilities.

  5. On a thermal analysis of a second stripper for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-08-04

    This memo summarizes simple calculations and results of the thermal analysis on the second stripper to be used in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Both liquid (Sodium) and solid (Titanium and Vanadium) stripper concepts were considered. These calculations were intended to provide basic information to evaluate the feasibility of liquid (thick film) and solid (rotating wheel) second strippers. Nuclear physics calculations to estimate the volumetric heat generation in the stripper material were performed by 'LISE for Excel'. In the thermal calculations, the strippers were modeled as a thin 2D plate with uniform heat generation within the beam spot. Then, temperature distributions were computed by assuming that the heat spreads conductively in the plate in radial direction without radiative heat losses to surroundings.

  6. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  7. Accelerator-Based PIXE and STIM Analysis of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Stanaland, T.L.; Boudreaux, P.; Elberson, L.; Fontenot, J.; Gates, E.; Greco, R.; McBride, M.; Woodward, A.; Edwards, D.

    2003-08-26

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. A totally reflective sail experiences a pressure of 9.1 {mu}Pa at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. One of the current challenges is to develop strong, lightweight, and radiation resistant sail materials. This paper will discuss initial results from a Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) analysis of candidate solar sail materials.

  8. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the third volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of appendices C through U of the report

  9. Accelerated design and quality control of impact modifiers for plastics through atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gunter

    2011-03-01

    Standard polymer resins are often too brittle or do not meet other mechanical property requirements for typical polymer applications. To achieve desired properties it is common to disperse so called ``impact modifiers'', which are spherical latex particles with diameters of much less than one micrometer, into the pure resin. Understanding and control of the entire process from latex particle formation to subsequent dispersion into polymer resins are necessary to accelerate the development of new materials that meet specific application requirements. In this work AFM imaging and nanoindentation techniques in combination with AFM-based spectroscopic techniques were applied to assess latex formation and dispersion. The size and size distribution of the latex particles can be measured based on AFM amplitude modulation images. AFM phase images provide information about the chemical homogeneity of individual particles. Nanoindentation may be used to estimate their elastic and viscoelastic properties. Proprietary creep and nanoscale Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) tests that we have developed were used to measure these mechanical properties. The small size of dispersed latex inclusions requires local mechanical and spectroscopic analysis techniques with high lateral and spatial resolution. We applied the CRAVE AFM method, developed at NIST, to perform mechanical analysis of individual latex inclusions and compared results with those obtained using nanoscale DMA. NanoIR, developed by Anasys Inc., and principal component confocal Raman were used for spectroscopic analysis and results from both techniques compared.

  10. Fast Electromagnetic Analysis of MRI Transmit RF Coils Based on Accelerated Integral Equation Methods.

    PubMed

    Villena, Jorge Fernandez; Polimeridis, Athanasios G; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L; White, Jacob K; Daniel, Luca

    2016-11-01

    A fast frequency domain full-wave electromagnetic simulation method is introduced for the analysis of MRI coils loaded with the realistic human body models. The approach is based on integral equation methods decomposed into two domains: 1) the RF coil array and shield, and 2) the human body region where the load is placed. The analysis of multiple coil designs is accelerated by introducing the precomputed magnetic resonance Green functions (MRGFs), which describe how the particular body model used responds to the incident fields from external sources. These MRGFs, which are precomputed once for a given body model, can be combined with any integral equation solver and reused for the analysis of many coil designs. This approach provides a fast, yet comprehensive, analysis of coil designs, including the port S-parameters and the electromagnetic field distribution within the inhomogeneous body. The method solves the full-wave electromagnetic problem for a head array in few minutes, achieving a speed up of over 150 folds with root mean square errors in the electromagnetic field maps smaller than 0.4% when compared to the unaccelerated integral equation-based solver. This enables the characterization of a large number of RF coil designs in a reasonable time, which is a first step toward an automatic optimization of multiple parameters in the design of transmit arrays, as illustrated in this paper, but also receive arrays.

  11. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  12. Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Stuart I; Kohl, James Arthur; Granroth, Garrett E; Miller, Ross G; Doucet, Mathieu; Stansberry, Dale V; Proffen, Thomas E; Taylor, Russell J; Dillow, David

    2014-01-01

    ORNL operates the world's brightest neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Funded by the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Science, this national user facility hosts hundreds of scientists from around the world, providing a platform to enable break-through research in materials science, sustainable energy, and basic science. While the SNS provides scientists with advanced experimental instruments, the deluge of data generated from these instruments represents both a big data challenge and a big data opportunity. For example, instruments at the SNS can now generate multiple millions of neutron events per second providing unprecedented experiment fidelity but leaving the user with a dataset that cannot be processed and analyzed in a timely fashion using legacy techniques. To address this big data challenge, ORNL has developed a near real-time streaming data reduction and analysis infrastructure. The Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis (ADARA) system provides a live streaming data infrastructure based on a high-performance publish subscribe system, in situ data reduction, visualization, and analysis tools, and integration with a high-performance computing and data storage infrastructure. ADARA allows users of the SNS instruments to analyze their experiment as it is run and make changes to the experiment in real-time and visualize the results of these changes. In this paper we describe ADARA, provide a high-level architectural overview of the system, and present a set of use-cases and real-world demonstrations of the technology.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  14. Rift strength controls rapid plate accelerations: A global analysis of Pangea fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.; Williams, S.; Butterworth, N. P.; Müller, D.

    2015-12-01

    Motions of Earth's plates are thought to be driven by slab pull, basal drag, and ridge push. Here we propose that plate motions during supercontinental fragmentation are decisively controlled by the non-linear decay of a resistive force: rift strength. We use state-of-the-art global tectonic reconstructions and the new geotectonic analysis tool pyGPlates to analyze the transition from rifting to sea-floor spreading of well-studied post-Pangea rift systems (Central Atlantic, South Atlantic, Iberia/Newfoundland, Australia/Antarctica, North Atlantic, South China Sea, Gulf of California). In all cases, continental extension starts with a slow phase (< 10 mm/yr, full extension velocity) followed by a rapid acceleration over periods of a few My that introduces a fast rift phase (> 10 mm/yr). The transition from slow to fast extension takes place long before crustal break-up. In fact, we find that approximately half of the present day rifted margin area was created during the slow, and the other half during the fast phase. We reproduce the transition from slow to fast rifting using numerical forward models with force boundary conditions, such that rift velocities are not imposed but instead evolve naturally in response to changing strength of the rift. These models show that the two-phase velocity behavior during rifting and the rapid speed-up are intrinsic features of continental rupture that can be robustly inferred for different crust and mantle rheologies.It has been proposed that abrupt plate accelerations can be caused by plume-lithosphere interaction, subduction initiation, and slab detachment. However, none of these mechanisms explains our result that plate speed-up systematically precedes continental break-up. We therefore propose dynamic rift weakening as a new mechanism for rapid plate motion changes.

  15. A Domestic cat X Chromosome Linkage Map and the Sex-Linked orange Locus: Mapping of orange, Multiple Origins and Epistasis Over nonagouti

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nelson, George; David, Victor A.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Eizirik, Eduardo; Roelke, Melody E.; Kehler, James S.; Hannah, Steven S.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the domestic cat X chromosome was generated with the goal of localizing the genomic position of the classic X-linked orange (O) locus. Microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 3 Mb were selected from sequence traces of the cat 1.9× whole genome sequence (WGS), including the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1). Extreme variation in recombination rates (centimorgans per megabase) was observed along the X chromosome, ranging from a virtual absence of recombination events in a region estimated to be >30 Mb to recombination frequencies of 15.7 cM/Mb in a segment estimated to be <0.3 Mb. This detailed linkage map was applied to position the X-linked orange gene, placing this locus on the q arm of the X chromosome, as opposed to a previously reported location on the p arm. Fine mapping placed the locus between markers at positions 106 and 116.8 Mb in the current 1.9×-coverage sequence assembly of the cat genome. Haplotype analysis revealed potential recombination events that could reduce the size of the candidate region to 3.5 Mb and suggested multiple origins for the orange phenotype in the domestic cat. Furthermore, epistasis of orange over nonagouti was demonstrated at the genetic level. PMID:19189955

  16. Dominance and epistasis are the main contributors to heterosis for plant height in rice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guojing; Zhan, Wei; Chen, Huaxia; Xing, Yongzhong

    2014-02-01

    The genetic basis of heterosis has been debated for over 100 years regarding whether dominance or overdominance plays a more important role and the answer is still unclear. The major limitation to assess the contribution of a single locus has been the genetic background noise due to genome-wide segregation of multiple loci. To dissect the genetic basis of heterosis at a single locus for plant height, we developed a set of 202 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) of an elite hybrid, Shanyou 63, the best hybrid rice in China in the 1990s. Fifteen CSSLs had varied plant heights within lines. A total of 15 partial dominance QTLs for plant height were detected in these 15 CSSL-F2 populations. All hybrids between the 15 CSSLs and the recurrent parent, Zhenshan 97, were shorter than the corresponding CSSLs, but taller than Zhenshan 97. These indicated that these 15 QTLs were also heterosis loci (HLs) contributed to heterosis acted in dominance. Each HL contributed from -7.4 to 14.4% of midparent heterosis. Additive by additive (AA) and additive by dominance (AD) interactions were detected in the Tetra-F2 population segregating at the four major QTLs with the largest effects on plant height. Substantial negative AA effects were detected between two major QTLs QPH7.2 and QPH7.3, which increased heterosis in the study. Thus we concluded that dominance and epistasis are the major genetic basis of plant height heterosis, which could explain the better parent heterosis in Shanyou 63.

  17. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; ...

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  18. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  19. Mitonuclear Epistasis for Development Time and Its Modification by Diet in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Biancani, Leann M.; Zhu, Chen-Tseh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear genes have to operate in a coordinated manner to maintain organismal function, and the regulation of this homeostasis presents a substantial source of potential epistatic (G × G) interactions. How these interactions shape the fitness landscape is poorly understood. Here we developed a novel mitonuclear epistasis model, using selected strains of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and mitochondrial genomes from within Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans to test the hypothesis that mtDNA × nDNA interactions influence fitness. In total we built 72 genotypes (12 nuclear backgrounds × 6 mtDNA haplotypes, with 3 from each species) to dissect the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Each genotype was assayed on four food environments. We found considerable variation in several phenotypes, including development time and egg-to-adult viability, and this variation was partitioned into genetic (G), environmental (E), and higher-order (G × G, G × E, and G × G × E) components. Food type had a significant impact on development time and also modified mitonuclear epistases, evidencing a broad spectrum of G × G × E across these genotypes. Nuclear background effects were substantial, followed by mtDNA effects and their G × G interaction. The species of mtDNA haplotype had negligible effects on phenotypic variation and there was no evidence that mtDNA variation has different effects on male and female fitness traits. Our results demonstrate that mitonuclear epistases are context dependent, suggesting the selective pressure acting on mitonuclear genotypes may vary with food environment in a genotype-specific manner. PMID:26966258

  20. Accelerated test design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an accelerated life test program for electric batteries is discussed. A number of observations and suggestions on the procedures and objectives for conducting an accelerated life test program are presented. Equations based on nonlinear regression analysis for predicting the accelerated life test parameters are discussed.

  1. FAM-MDR: a flexible family-based multifactor dimensionality reduction technique to detect epistasis using related individuals.

    PubMed

    Cattaert, Tom; Urrea, Víctor; Naj, Adam C; De Lobel, Lizzy; De Wit, Vanessa; Fu, Mao; Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Shen, Haiqing; Calle, M Luz; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Edwards, Todd L; Van Steen, Kristel

    2010-04-22

    We propose a novel multifactor dimensionality reduction method for epistasis detection in small or extended pedigrees, FAM-MDR. It combines features of the Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model And Regression approach (GRAMMAR) with Model-Based MDR (MB-MDR). We focus on continuous traits, although the method is general and can be used for outcomes of any type, including binary and censored traits. When comparing FAM-MDR with Pedigree-based Generalized MDR (PGMDR), which is a generalization of Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) to continuous traits and related individuals, FAM-MDR was found to outperform PGMDR in terms of power, in most of the considered simulated scenarios. Additional simulations revealed that PGMDR does not appropriately deal with multiple testing and consequently gives rise to overly optimistic results. FAM-MDR adequately deals with multiple testing in epistasis screens and is in contrast rather conservative, by construction. Furthermore, simulations show that correcting for lower order (main) effects is of utmost importance when claiming epistasis. As Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a complex phenotype likely influenced by gene-gene interactions, we applied FAM-MDR to examine data on glucose area-under-the-curve (GAUC), an endophenotype of T2DM for which multiple independent genetic associations have been observed, in the Amish Family Diabetes Study (AFDS). This application reveals that FAM-MDR makes more efficient use of the available data than PGMDR and can deal with multi-generational pedigrees more easily. In conclusion, we have validated FAM-MDR and compared it to PGMDR, the current state-of-the-art MDR method for family data, using both simulations and a practical dataset. FAM-MDR is found to outperform PGMDR in that it handles the multiple testing issue more correctly, has increased power, and efficiently uses all available information.

  2. Foreign exchange market data analysis reveals statistical features that predict price movement acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Ochiai, Tomoshiro

    2012-05-01

    Increasingly accessible financial data allow researchers to infer market-dynamics-based laws and to propose models that are able to reproduce them. In recent years, several stylized facts have been uncovered. Here we perform an extensive analysis of foreign exchange data that leads to the unveiling of a statistical financial law. First, our findings show that, on average, volatility increases more when the price exceeds the highest (or lowest) value, i.e., breaks the resistance line. We call this the breaking-acceleration effect. Second, our results show that the probability P(T) to break the resistance line in the past time T follows power law in both real data and theoretically simulated data. However, the probability calculated using real data is rather lower than the one obtained using a traditional Black-Scholes (BS) model. Taken together, the present analysis characterizes a different stylized fact of financial markets and shows that the market exceeds a past (historical) extreme price fewer times than expected by the BS model (the resistance effect). However, when the market does, we predict that the average volatility at that time point will be much higher. These findings indicate that any Markovian model does not faithfully capture the market dynamics.

  3. Enhanced analysis of steroids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using microwave-accelerated derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Colosi, Dominic M; Stutts, Whitney L; Mora-Montero, Diana C; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2009-08-15

    Derivatization of steroids is typically required before analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); nevertheless, the derivatization process can often be time-consuming and irreproducible. Although several strategies have been employed to enhance this process, few have the potential of microwave-accelerated derivatization (MAD) to be more efficient than traditional thermal derivatization methods. MAD using a synthesis microwave system was evaluated and compared to traditional thermal derivatization methods in terms of yield, reproducibility, and overall analysis time. Parameters affecting MAD, including reaction temperature, time, and power, were systematically optimized for several silyl reagents (BSTFA with TMCS, MSTFA, and BSA) and other derivatization procedures (MOX reagent and MTBSTFA). MSTFA was found to derivatize best with the microwave, as demonstrated by the enhanced relative response factors (RRFs). BSTFA with TMCS, on the other hand, did not couple as well, but RRF values improved significantly upon addition of polar solvents. The rapid (1 min) derivatization reactions associated with MAD had comparable RRFs for all reagents with those obtained with thermal heating (>30 min). This study highlights the best methods for analyzing a comprehensive variety of steroids and also provides ideal strategies for MAD of steroids on an individual or class level.

  4. Both Epistasis and Diversifying Selection Drive the Structural Evolution of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Mucin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ibeh, Neke; Nshogozabahizi, Jean Claude

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Throughout the last 3 decades, Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreaks have been confined to isolated areas within Central Africa; however, the 2014 variant reached unprecedented transmission and mortality rates. While the outbreak was still under way, it was reported that the variant leading up to this outbreak evolved faster than previous EBOV variants, but evidence for diversifying selection was undetermined. Here, we test this selection hypothesis and show that while previous EBOV outbreaks were preceded by bursts of diversification, evidence for site-specific diversifying selection during the emergence of the 2014 EBOV clade is weak. However, we show strong evidence supporting an interplay between selection and correlated evolution (epistasis), particularly in the mucin-like domain (MLD) of the EBOV glycoprotein. By reconstructing ancestral structures of the MLD, we further propose a structural mechanism explaining how the substitutions that accumulated between 1918 and 1969 distorted the MLD, while more recent epistatic substitutions restored part of the structure, with the most recent substitution being adaptive. We suggest that it is this complex interplay between weak selection, epistasis, and structural constraints that has shaped the evolution of the 2014 EBOV variant. IMPORTANCE The role that selection plays in the emergence of viral epidemics remains debated, particularly in the context of the 2014 EBOV outbreak. Most critically, should such evidence exist, it is generally unclear how this relates to function and increased virulence. Here, we show that the viral lineage leading up to the 2014 outbreak underwent a complex interplay between selection and correlated evolution (epistasis) in a protein region that is critical for immune evasion. We then reconstructed the three-dimensional structure of this domain and showed that the initial mutations in this lineage deformed the structure, while subsequent mutations restored part of the structure. Along this

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. Linear to non linear analysis for positron acceleration in plasma hollow channel wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Ligia Diana; An, Weiming; Mori, Warren B.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators are promising candidates for future generation compact accelerators. The standard regime of operation, non-linear or blowout regime, is reached when a particle bunch space charge or laser pulse ponderomotive force radially expels plasma electrons forming a bucket of ions that defocus positron bunches, thus preventing their acceleration. To avoid defocusing, hollow plasma channels have been considered. The corresponding wakefields have been examined in the linear and non-linear excitation regimes for electrons. It is therefore important to extend the theory for positron acceleration, particularly in the nonlinear regime where the wakefields strongly differ. In this work we explore the wakefield structure, examine the differences between the electron and positron beam cases, and explore positron acceleration in nonlinear regimes. We support our findings with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations performed with OSIRIS and quasi-3D and QuickPIC.

  8. Evaluation and analysis of the residual radioactivity for the 15UD Pelletron accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sonkawade, R. G.

    2007-07-01

    For the assessment of radiological impact of the accelerators, it will be better to have the documented information on activation of metal parts of the accelerator components. It is very much essential to get reliable data on these subjects. During acceleration of light ion, the residual radioactivity in the accelerator facility was found near the Analyzing Magnet, single slit, Beam Profile Monitors (BPM), Faraday Cups (FC), bellows, beginning of switching magnet bellows, at the target and the ladder. Study with HPGE detector gives an insight of the formation of the short or long lived radionuclides. The different targets used in the light ion experiment were also monitored and proper decommissioning and decontamination steps were followed. This paper presents the data of residual radioactivity in the 15UD Pelletron accelerator infrastructure. (author)

  9. Analysis of transmitted optical spectrum enabling accelerated testing of multijunction concentrating photovoltaic designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology has recently gained interest based on its scalability and expected low levelized cost of electricity. The reliability of encapsulation materials used in CPV systems, however, is not well established. For example, the present qualification test for CPV modules includes only real-time ultraviolet (UV) exposure, i.e., methods for accelerated UV testing have not yet been developed. To better define the stress inherent to CPV systems, the UV and infrared spectra transmitted through representative optical systems were evaluated. Measurements of optical components are used to assess expected optical performance and quantify damaging optical exposure. Optical properties (transmittance, refractive index, reflectance, and absorptance) of candidate materials (including PMMA, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, and quartz refractors), components (including Ag- and Al-enabled reflectors), and encapsulants (including EVA, ionomer, PDMS, PPMS, polyolefin, and PVB) were identified. The activation spectrum was calculated for the representative optical systems using an assumed action spectrum to compare the expected damaging dose of UV radiation delivered to the cell encapsulation. The dose and flux analysis identifies the significance of IR relative to UV exposure for CPV systems. Because UV light is typically more highly attenuated, the UV dose within the encapsulation may not greatly exceed the unconcentrated global solar condition, but the thermal load scales nearly directly with the geometric concentration. Relative to a previous analysis for crystalline silicon cell technology, the analysis here is performed for III-V multijunction technology. Novel aspects here also include additional materials (such as TPU encapsulation) and additional components (transmission through silicone on glass lenses, antireflective coatings, and the front glass used with reflective systems, as well as reflection off of the cell).

  10. Analysis of Monte Carlo accelerated iterative methods for sparse linear systems: Analysis of Monte Carlo accelerated iterative methods for sparse linear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Benzi, Michele; Evans, Thomas M.; Hamilton, Steven P.; ...

    2017-03-05

    Here, we consider hybrid deterministic-stochastic iterative algorithms for the solution of large, sparse linear systems. Starting from a convergent splitting of the coefficient matrix, we analyze various types of Monte Carlo acceleration schemes applied to the original preconditioned Richardson (stationary) iteration. We expect that these methods will have considerable potential for resiliency to faults when implemented on massively parallel machines. We also establish sufficient conditions for the convergence of the hybrid schemes, and we investigate different types of preconditioners including sparse approximate inverses. Numerical experiments on linear systems arising from the discretization of partial differential equations are presented.

  11. Accelerator-based trace element analysis of foods and agriculture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagunas-Solar, Manuel C.; Piña U, Cecilia; Solís, Corina; Mireles, Alibech

    2008-05-01

    An accelerator-based analytical method for measuring trace elements in foods and agricultural products was developed, optimized, validated and compared using reference standards. The method's initial phase is a new, rapid and effective digestion process of a small mass analyte in an aqueous media containing H2O2. Digestion is initiated by radicals formed in water with pulsed UV (PUV) induced (laser) photolysis, which rapidly react with organic matter. After digestion, trace metals are pre-concentrated as carbamates and deposited as thin targets onto Teflon filters. Conventional particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence (XRF) methods are then used to analyze elements in the sample. When foods and other agricultural commodities (i.e., soils, feeds) are analyzed, the combined method named pulsed UV (PUV)/PIXE results in enhanced detection of trace elements such as Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb at ∼1 mg/kg (1 ppm) levels, without lengthy, acid-based digestions. It provides improvements in digestion kinetics and processing time enhancing analytical sensitivity and element recovery. Precision and recovery yields were confirmed with food reference standards. The analysis of edible foods from contaminated agricultural areas is also reported.

  12. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  13. Cost Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Systems of Accelerator Magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M

    2003-06-02

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) has a proposed 85% overall availability goal, the availability specifications for all its 7200 magnets and their 6167 power supplies are 97.5% each. Thus all of the electromagnets and their power supplies must be highly reliable or quickly repairable. Improved reliability or repairability comes at a higher cost. We have developed a set of analysis procedures for magnet designers to use as they decide how much effort to exert, i.e. how much money to spend, to improve the reliability of a particular style of magnet. We show these procedures being applied to a standard SLAC electromagnet design in order to make it reliable enough to meet the NLC availability specs. First, empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus design experience are used to calculate MTBF for failure modes identified through a FMEA. Availability for one particular magnet can be calculated. Next, labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the total cost of all failures over a 30-year lifetime. Opportunity costs are included. Engineers choose from amongst various designs by comparing lifecycle costs.

  14. Large scale neural circuit mapping data analysis accelerated with the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yulin; Veidenbaum, Alexander V.; Nicolau, Alex; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern neuroscience research demands computing power. Neural circuit mapping studies such as those using laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) produce large amounts of data and require intensive computation for post-hoc processing and analysis. New Method Here we report on the design and implementation of a cost-effective desktop computer system for accelerated experimental data processing with recent GPU computing technology. A new version of Matlab software with GPU enabled functions is used to develop programs that run on Nvidia GPUs to harness their parallel computing power. Results We evaluated both the central processing unit (CPU) and GPU-enabled computational performance of our system in benchmark testing and practical applications. The experimental results show that the GPU-CPU co-processing of simulated data and actual LSPS experimental data clearly outperformed the multi-core CPU with up to a 22x speedup, depending on computational tasks. Further, we present a comparison of numerical accuracy between GPU and CPU computation to verify the precision of GPU computation. In addition, we show how GPUs can be effectively adapted to improve the performance of commercial image processing software such as Adobe Photoshop. Comparison with Existing Method(s) To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GPU application in neural circuit mapping and electrophysiology-based data processing. Conclusions Together, GPU enabled computation enhances our ability to process large-scale data sets derived from neural circuit mapping studies, allowing for increased processing speeds while retaining data precision. PMID:25277633

  15. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J. W.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J.; Coffin, R. B.

    2000-10-01

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C 1-C 5) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO 2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO 2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day.

  16. Analysis and design of nonlocal spin devices with electric-field-induced spin-transport acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Yota; Akushichi, Taiju; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    We apply electric-field-induced acceleration for spin transport to a four-terminal nonlocal device and theoretically analyze its Hanle-effect signals. The effect of the ferromagnetic contact widths of the spin injector and detector on the signals is carefully discussed. Although Hanle-effect signals are randomized owing to the effect of the contact widths, this can be excluded by selecting an appropriate electric field for acceleration of spin transport. Spin lifetime can be correctly extracted by nonlocal devices with electric-field acceleration even using the spin injector and detector with finite contact widths.

  17. Analysis and design of nonlocal spin devices with electric-field-induced spin-transport acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Takamura, Yota; Akushichi, Taiju; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2015-05-07

    We apply electric-field-induced acceleration for spin transport to a four-terminal nonlocal device and theoretically analyze its Hanle-effect signals. The effect of the ferromagnetic contact widths of the spin injector and detector on the signals is carefully discussed. Although Hanle-effect signals are randomized owing to the effect of the contact widths, this can be excluded by selecting an appropriate electric field for acceleration of spin transport. Spin lifetime can be correctly extracted by nonlocal devices with electric-field acceleration even using the spin injector and detector with finite contact widths.

  18. Problems and pit-falls in testing for G × E and epistasis in candidate gene studies of human behavior.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Lindon; Verhulst, Brad

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions about the genetic architecture of a phenotype relating to the contributions of genetic additivity, dominance, epistasis or genotype × environment interaction, depend upon the statistical and distributional properties of the measured trait. This dependence is frequently ignored in contemporary genetic studies and can radically change the conclusions that may be drawn from the data. The interdependence of the conclusions about genetic architecture and instruments used for behavioral measurement is explored by simulated studies of the interaction between candidate genes and measured environment in psychiatric genetics. Trait values are simulated (N = 100,000) under several commonly encountered scenarios and subjected to two simulated 20-item psychological tests each comprising items with different patterns of difficulty and sensitivity to variation (discriminating power) in the latent trait. Test scores are generated for each test by summing the binary responses across all items. The full model for digenic additive and non-additive genetic effects and G × E is fitted to the trait values and test scores under a range of different simulated genetic architectures. Untransformed test scores show complex patterns of epistasis and G × E even when the underlying effects of genes and environment are purely additive and the transformation of symptom counts does not fully recover the simulated underlying genetic architecture. Accordingly, failing to allow for the theory of measurement when analyzing details of genetic architecture may frequently lead to replicable over-reporting of interactions and mislead potential investigators and funding agencies.

  19. Problems and Pit-Falls in Testing for G × E and Epistasis in Candidate Gene Studies of Human Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions about the genetic architecture of a phenotype relating to the contributions of genetic additivity, dominance, epistasis or genotype × environment interaction, depend upon the statistical and distributional properties of the measured trait. This dependence is frequently ignored in contemporary genetic studies and can radically change the conclusions that may be drawn from the data. The interdependence of the conclusions about genetic architecture and instruments used for behavioral measurement is explored by simulated studies of the interaction between candidate genes and measured environment in psychiatric genetics. Trait values are simulated (N = 100,000) under several commonly encountered scenarios and subjected to two simulated 20-item psychological tests each comprising items with different patterns of difficulty and sensitivity to variation (discriminating power) in the latent trait. Test scores are generated for each test by summing the binary responses across all items. The full model for digenic additive and non-additive genetic effects and G × E is fitted to the trait values and test scores under a range of different simulated genetic architectures. Untransformed test scores show complex patterns of epistasis and G × E even when the underlying effects of genes and environment are purely additive and the transformation of symptom counts does not fully recover the simulated underlying genetic architecture. Accordingly, failing to allow for the theory of measurement when analyzing details of genetic architecture may frequently lead to replicable over-reporting of interactions and mislead potential investigators and funding agencies. PMID:25195167

  20. Epistasis and the Structure of Fitness Landscapes: Are Experimental Fitness Landscapes Compatible with Fisher’s Geometric Model?

    PubMed Central

    Blanquart, François; Bataillon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fitness landscape defines the relationship between genotypes and fitness in a given environment and underlies fundamental quantities such as the distribution of selection coefficient and the magnitude and type of epistasis. A better understanding of variation in landscape structure across species and environments is thus necessary to understand and predict how populations will adapt. An increasing number of experiments investigate the properties of fitness landscapes by identifying mutations, constructing genotypes with combinations of these mutations, and measuring the fitness of these genotypes. Yet these empirical landscapes represent a very small sample of the vast space of all possible genotypes, and this sample is often biased by the protocol used to identify mutations. Here we develop a rigorous statistical framework based on Approximate Bayesian Computation to address these concerns and use this flexible framework to fit a broad class of phenotypic fitness models (including Fisher’s model) to 26 empirical landscapes representing nine diverse biological systems. Despite uncertainty owing to the small size of most published empirical landscapes, the inferred landscapes have similar structure in similar biological systems. Surprisingly, goodness-of-fit tests reveal that this class of phenotypic models, which has been successful so far in interpreting experimental data, is a plausible in only three of nine biological systems. More precisely, although Fisher’s model was able to explain several statistical properties of the landscapes—including the mean and SD of selection and epistasis coefficients—it was often unable to explain the full structure of fitness landscapes. PMID:27052568

  1. Partial Dominance, Overdominance, Epistasis and QTL by Environment Interactions Contribute to Heterosis in Two Upland Cotton Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Cai, Shihu; Wang, Xiaocui; Li, Yuhua; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Hua, Jinping

    2015-12-29

    Based on two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, two corresponding backcross (BC) populations were constructed to elucidate the genetic basis of heterosis in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The yield, and yield components, of these populations were evaluated in three environments. At the single-locus level, 78 and 66 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected using composite interval mapping in RIL and BC populations, respectively, and 29 QTL were identified based on mid-parental heterosis (MPH) data of two hybrids. Considering all traits together, a total of 50 (64.9%) QTL with partial dominance effect, and 27 (35.1%) QTL for overdominance effect were identified in two BC populations. At the two-locus level, 120 and 88 QTL with main effects (M-QTL), and 335 and 99 QTL involved in digenic interactions (E-QTL), were detected by inclusive composite interval mapping in RIL and BC populations, respectively. A large number of QTL by environment interactions (QEs) for M-QTL and E-QTL were detected in three environments. For most traits, average E-QTL explained a larger proportion of phenotypic variation than did M-QTL in two RIL populations and two BC populations. It was concluded that partial dominance, overdominance, epistasis, and QEs all contribute to heterosis in Upland cotton, and that partial dominance resulting from single loci and epistasis play a relatively more important role than other genetic effects in heterosis in Upland cotton.

  2. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affects fitness within species but does not contribute to fixed incompatibilities between species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Montooth, Kristi L.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient mitochondrial function requires physical interactions between the proteins encoded by the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Co-evolution between these genomes may result in the accumulation of incompatibilities between divergent lineages. We test whether mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities have accumulated within the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup by combining divergent mitochondrial and nuclear lineages and quantifying the effects on relative fitness. Precise placement of nine mtDNAs from D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana into two D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds reveals significant mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affecting fitness in females. Combining the mitochondrial genomes with three different D. melanogaster X chromosomes reveals significant epistasis for male fitness between X-linked and mitochondrial variation. However, we find no evidence that the more than 500 fixed differences between the mitochondrial genomes of D. melanogaster and the D. simulans species complex are incompatible with the D. melanogaster nuclear genome. Rather, the interactions of largest effect occur between mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms that segregate within species of the D. melanogaster species subgroup. We propose that a low mitochondrial substitution rate, resulting from a low mutation rate and/or efficient purifying selection, precludes the accumulation of mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities among these Drosophila species. PMID:20624176

  3. The use of vapour phase ultra-violet spectroscopy for the analysis of arson accelerants in fire scene debris.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, R J; Atwell, T; Cole, M D

    2001-12-01

    A method has been developed for the analysis of arson accelerants in fire scene debris by vapour phase ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopy. The method is rapid, inexpensive, simple to use and is sufficiently sensitive and discriminating to be of use for the analysis of crime scene samples. Application to casework samples is described. On occasion, the method offers additional information to that which can be obtained by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and represents a useful adjunct to these techniques. In addition, the method offers advantages where the use of GC-MS analysis of arson accelerants in fire scene debris is not a practical proposition.

  4. Extending PowerPack for Profiling and Analysis of High Performance Accelerator-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Chang, Hung-Ching; Song, Shuaiwen; Su, Chun-Yi; Meyer, Timmy; Mooring, John; Cameron, Kirk

    2014-12-01

    Accelerators offer a substantial increase in efficiency for high-performance systems offering speedups for computational applications that leverage hardware support for highly-parallel codes. However, the power use of some accelerators exceeds 200 watts at idle which means use at exascale comes at a significant increase in power at a time when we face a power ceiling of about 20 megawatts. Despite the growing domination of accelerator-based systems in the Top500 and Green500 lists of fastest and most efficient supercomputers, there are few detailed studies comparing the power and energy use of common accelerators. In this work, we conduct detailed experimental studies of the power usage and distribution of Xeon-Phi-based systems in comparison to the NVIDIA Tesla and at SandyBridge.

  5. Analysis of Transmitted Optical Spectrum Enabling Accelerated Testing of CPV Designs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2009-07-01

    Reliability of CPV systems' materials is not well known; methods for accelerated UV testing have not been developed. UV and IR spectra transmitted through representative optical systems are evaluated.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of an asymmetric Monte Carlo beam model of a Siemens Primus accelerator.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Eric C; Sawkey, Daren L; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2012-03-08

    The assumption of cylindrical symmetry in radiotherapy accelerator models can pose a challenge for precise Monte Carlo modeling. This assumption makes it difficult to account for measured asymmetries in clinical dose distributions. We have performed a sensitivity study examining the effect of varying symmetric and asymmetric beam and geometric parameters of a Monte Carlo model for a Siemens PRIMUS accelerator. The accelerator and dose output were simulated using modified versions of BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc that allow lateral offsets of accelerator components and lateral and angular offsets for the incident electron beam. Dose distributions were studied for 40 × 40 cm² fields. The resulting dose distributions were analyzed for changes in flatness, symmetry, and off-axis ratio (OAR). The electron beam parameters having the greatest effect on the resulting dose distributions were found to be electron energy and angle of incidence, as high as 5% for a 0.25° deflection. Electron spot size and lateral offset of the electron beam were found to have a smaller impact. Variations in photon target thickness were found to have a small effect. Small lateral offsets of the flattening filter caused significant variation to the OAR. In general, the greatest sensitivity to accelerator parameters could be observed for higher energies and off-axis ratios closer to the central axis. Lateral and angular offsets of beam and accelerator components have strong effects on dose distributions, and should be included in any high-accuracy beam model.

  7. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-05

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  8. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42-216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy. The

  9. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis reveals accelerated genic evolution in a Tibet fish, Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liandong; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2014-12-26

    Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of organismal adaptation to the Tibetan Plateau at a genomic scale can provide insights into the process of adaptive evolution. Many highland species have been investigated and various candidate genes that may be responsible for highland adaptation have been identified. However, we know little about the genomic basis of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of a schizothoracine fish (Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus) and used it to identify potential genetic mechanisms of highland adaptation. We obtained totally 66,105 assembled unigenes, of which 7,232 were assigned as putative one-to-one orthologs in zebrafish. Comparative gene annotations from several species indicated that at least 350 genes lost and 41 gained since the divergence between G. pachycheilus and zebrafish. An analysis of 6,324 orthologs among zebrafish, fugu, medaka, and spotted gar identified consistent evidence for genome-wide accelerated evolution in G. pachycheilus and only the terminal branch of G. pachycheilus had an elevated Ka/Ks ratio than the ancestral branch. Many functional categories related to hypoxia and energy metabolism exhibited rapid evolution in G. pachycheilus relative to zebrafish. Genes showing signature of rapid evolution and positive selection in the G. pachycheilus lineage were also enriched in functions associated with energy metabolism and hypoxia. The first genomic resources for fish in the Tibetan Plateau and evolutionary analyses provided some novel insights into highland adaptation in fishes and served as a foundation for future studies aiming to identify candidate genes underlying the genetic bases of adaptation to Tibet in fishes.

  10. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Accelerated Genic Evolution in a Tibet Fish, Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liandong; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of organismal adaptation to the Tibetan Plateau at a genomic scale can provide insights into the process of adaptive evolution. Many highland species have been investigated and various candidate genes that may be responsible for highland adaptation have been identified. However, we know little about the genomic basis of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing of a schizothoracine fish (Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus) and used it to identify potential genetic mechanisms of highland adaptation. We obtained totally 66,105 assembled unigenes, of which 7,232 were assigned as putative one-to-one orthologs in zebrafish. Comparative gene annotations from several species indicated that at least 350 genes lost and 41 gained since the divergence between G. pachycheilus and zebrafish. An analysis of 6,324 orthologs among zebrafish, fugu, medaka, and spotted gar identified consistent evidence for genome-wide accelerated evolution in G. pachycheilus and only the terminal branch of G. pachycheilus had an elevated Ka/Ks ratio than the ancestral branch. Many functional categories related to hypoxia and energy metabolism exhibited rapid evolution in G. pachycheilus relative to zebrafish. Genes showing signature of rapid evolution and positive selection in the G. pachycheilus lineage were also enriched in functions associated with energy metabolism and hypoxia. The first genomic resources for fish in the Tibetan Plateau and evolutionary analyses provided some novel insights into highland adaptation in fishes and served as a foundation for future studies aiming to identify candidate genes underlying the genetic bases of adaptation to Tibet in fishes. PMID:25543049

  11. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs.

  12. Calcium isolation from large-volume human urine samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-08-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for (41)Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after (41)Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide (41)Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background.

  13. Analysis of possible improvement of acceleration of a high-velocity air-breathing flying vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2008-09-01

    Results of parametric calculations of the total aeropropulsive characteristics and characteristics of acceleration of a small-scale high-velocity flying vehicle with an air-breathing engine are presented. Integral parameters of acceleration from the flight Mach number M∞ = 4 to M∞ = 7 are determined, namely, the time required fuel stock, and range. A schematic configuration of the vehicle is considered, which allows studying the basic parameters, such as the forebody shape, the angles of surfaces of compression of the stream captured by the inlet, angles of external aerodynamic surfaces of the airframe, relative planform area of the wing panels, and relative area of the nozzle cross section. A comparative estimate of the effect of these parameters shows that it is possible to improve the characteristics of acceleration of vehicles of the type considered.

  14. Analysis of the Acceleration Process of SEPs by an Interplanetary Shock for Bastille Day Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G. M.; Han, Y. B.

    Based on the solar energetic particle (SEP) data from ACE and GOES satellites, the acceleration of SEP by CME-driven shock in interplanetary space was investigated. The results showed that the acceleration process of SEP by the Bastille CME-driven shock ran through the whole space from the sun to the magnetosphere. The highest energy of SEP accelerated by the shock was greater than 100MeV. A magnetic bottle associated with the CME captured a lot of high energy particles with some of them having energy greater than 100MeV. Based on magnetic field data of solar wind observed by ACE data, we found that the the magnetic bottle associated with the Bastille CME was the sheath caused by the CME in fact.

  15. Variability in Working Memory Performance Explained by Epistasis versus Polygenic Scores in the ZNF804A Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Derek; Anney, Richard; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Donohoe, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Importance We investigated the variation in neuropsychological function explained by risk alleles at the psychosis susceptibility gene ZNF804A and its interacting partners using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polygenic score and epistatic analyses. Of particular importance was the relative contribution of the polygenic score versus epistasis in variation explained. Objective The objectives were twofold: first, to assess the association between SNPs in ZNF804A and the ZNF804A polygenic score with measures of cognition in cases with psychosis. The second was to assess whether epistasis within the ZNF804A pathway could explain additional variation above and beyond that explained by the polygenic score. Design, Setting and Participants Patients with psychosis (N = 424) were assessed in areas of cognitive ability impaired in schizophrenia including IQ, memory, attention and social cognition. We used the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium (PGC1) schizophrenia GWAS to calculate a polygenic score based on identified risk variants within this genetic pathway. Cognitive measures significantly associated with the polygenic score were tested for an epistatic component using a training set (N = 170), which was used to develop linear regression models containing the polygenic score and two-SNP interactions. The best-fitting models were tested for replication in two independent test sets of cases: 1) 170 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 2) 84 patients with broad psychosis (including bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and other psychosis). Results Higher polygenic scores were associated with poorer performance amongst patients on IQ, memory and social cognition, explaining 1-3% of variation on these scores (p-values ranged from 0.012-0.034). Using a narrow psychosis training set and independent test sets of narrow phenotype psychosis (schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder), broad psychosis, and controls (N = 89) respectively, the

  16. Theoretical analysis of acceleration measurements in a model of an operating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jonathan R.; Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark A.

    2010-04-01

    Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines. These unsteady loads and the resulting damage initiation and propagation are difficult to predict. Unsteady loads enter at the rotor and are transmitted to the drivetrain. The current generation of wind turbine has drivetrain-mounted vibration and bearing temperature sensors, a nacelle-mounted inertial measurement unit, and a nacelle-mounted anemometer and wind vane. Some advanced wind turbines are also equipped with strain measurements at the root of the rotor. This paper analyzes additional measurements in a rotor blade to investigate the complexity of these unsteady loads. By identifying the spatial distribution, amplitude, and frequency bandwidth of these loads, design improvements could be facilitated to reduce uncertainties in reliability predictions. In addition, dynamic load estimates could be used in the future to control high-bandwidth aerodynamic actuators distributed along the rotor blade to reduce the saturation of slower pitch actuators currently used for wind turbine blades. Local acceleration measurements are made along a rotor blade to infer operational rotor states including deflection and dynamic modal contributions. Previous work has demonstrated that acceleration measurements can be experimentally acquired on an operating wind turbine. Simulations on simplified rotor blades have also been used to demonstrate that mean blade loading can be estimated based on deflection estimates. To successfully apply accelerometers in wind turbine applications for load identification, the spectral and spatial characteristics of each excitation source must be understood so that the total acceleration measurement can be decomposed into contributions from each source. To demonstrate the decomposition of acceleration measurements in conjunction with load estimation methods, a flexible body model has been created with MSC.ADAMSThe benefit of using a simulation model as opposed

  17. Theoretical analysis of acceleration measurements in a model of an operating wind turbine.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark Allen; White, Jonathan Randall

    2010-04-01

    Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines. These unsteady loads and the resulting damage initiation and propagation are difficult to predict. Unsteady loads enter at the rotor and are transmitted to the drivetrain. The current generation of wind turbine has drivetrain-mounted vibration and bearing temperature sensors, a nacelle-mounted inertial measurement unit, and a nacelle-mounted anemometer and wind vane. Some advanced wind turbines are also equipped with strain measurements at the root of the rotor. This paper analyzes additional measurements in a rotor blade to investigate the complexity of these unsteady loads. By identifying the spatial distribution, amplitude, and frequency bandwidth of these loads, design improvements could be facilitated to reduce uncertainties in reliability predictions. In addition, dynamic load estimates could be used in the future to control high-bandwidth aerodynamic actuators distributed along the rotor blade to reduce the saturation of slower pitch actuators currently used for wind turbine blades. Local acceleration measurements are made along a rotor blade to infer operational rotor states including deflection and dynamic modal contributions. Previous work has demonstrated that acceleration measurements can be experimentally acquired on an operating wind turbine. Simulations on simplified rotor blades have also been used to demonstrate that mean blade loading can be estimated based on deflection estimates. To successfully apply accelerometers in wind turbine applications for load identification, the spectral and spatial characteristics of each excitation source must be understood so that the total acceleration measurement can be decomposed into contributions from each source. To demonstrate the decomposition of acceleration measurements in conjunction with load estimation methods, a flexible body model has been created with MSC.ADAMS{copyright} The benefit of using a simulation model

  18. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, Giuseppe Aprile, Daniele; Agostinetti, Piero; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-15

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by “off-normal” operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the “off-normal” operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  19. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  20. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  1. Predicting punching acceleration from selected strength and power variables in elite karate athletes: a multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Kobal, Ronaldo; Gil, Saulo; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between punching acceleration and selected strength and power variables in 19 professional karate athletes from the Brazilian National Team (9 men and 10 women; age, 23 ± 3 years; height, 1.71 ± 0.09 m; and body mass [BM], 67.34 ± 13.44 kg). Punching acceleration was assessed under 4 different conditions in a randomized order: (a) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum speed (FS), (b) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum impact (FI), (c) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum speed, and (d) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum impact. The selected strength and power variables were as follows: maximal dynamic strength in bench press and squat-machine, squat and countermovement jump height, mean propulsive power in bench throw and jump squat, and mean propulsive velocity in jump squat with 40% of BM. Upper- and lower-body power and maximal dynamic strength variables were positively correlated to punch acceleration in all conditions. Multiple regression analysis also revealed predictive variables: relative mean propulsive power in squat jump (W·kg-1), and maximal dynamic strength 1 repetition maximum in both bench press and squat-machine exercises. An impact-oriented instruction and a self-selected distance to start the movement seem to be crucial to reach the highest acceleration during punching execution. This investigation, while demonstrating strong correlations between punching acceleration and strength-power variables, also provides important information for coaches, especially for designing better training strategies to improve punching speed.

  2. Finite element analysis of head-neck kinematics under simulated rear impact at different accelerations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing Hang; Tan, Soon Huat; Teo, Ee Chon

    2008-07-01

    The information on the variation of ligament strains over time after rear impact has been seldom investigated. In the current study, a detailed three-dimensional C0-C7 finite element model of the whole head-neck complex developed previously was modified to include T1 vertebra. Rear impact of half sine-pulses with peak values of 3.5g, 5g, 6.5g and 8g respectively were applied to the inferior surface of the T1 vertebral body to validate the simulated variations of the intervertebral segmental rotations and to investigate the ligament tensions of the cervical spine under different levels of accelerations. The simulated kinematics of the head-neck complex showed relatively good agreement with the experimental data with most of the predicted peak values falling within one standard deviation of the experimental data. Under rear impact, the whole C0-T1 structure formed an S-shaped curvature with flexion at the upper levels and extension at the lower levels at early stage after impact, during which the lower cervical levels might experience hyperextensions. The predicted high resultant strain of the capsular ligaments, even at low impact acceleration compared with other ligament groups, suggests their susceptibility to injury. The peak impact acceleration has a significant effect on the potential injury of ligaments. Under higher accelerations, most ligaments will reach failure strain in a much shorter time immediately after impact.

  3. Pedestrian movement analysis in transfer station corridor: Velocity-based and acceleration-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Yongkai; Ran, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, pedestrians are classified into aggressive and conservative ones by their temper. Aggressive pedestrians' walking through crowd in transfer station corridor is analyzed. Treating pedestrians as particles, this paper uses the modified social force model (MSFM) as the building block, where forces involve self-driving force, repulsive force and friction force. The proposed model in this paper is a discrete model combining the MSFM and cellular automata (CA) model, where the updating rules of the CA are redefined with MSFM. Due to the continuity of values generated by the MSFM, we use the fuzzy logic to discretize the continuous values into cells pedestrians can move in one step. With the observation that stimulus around pedestrians influences their acceleration directly, an acceleration-based movement model is presented, compared to the generally reviewed velocity-based movement model. In the acceleration-based model, a discretized version of kinematic equation is presented based on the acceleration discretized with fuzzy logic. In real life, some pedestrians would rather keep their desired speed and this is also mimicked in this paper, which is called inertia. Compared to the simple triangular membership function, a trapezoidal membership function and a piecewise linear membership function are used to capture pedestrians' inertia. With the trapezoidal and the piecewise linear membership function, many overlapping scenarios should be carefully handled and Dubois and Prade's four-index method is used to completely describe the relative relationship of fuzzy quantities. Finally, a simulation is constructed to demonstrate the effect of our model.

  4. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  5. Predictors of Local Recurrence Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Lyden, Maureen; Beitsch, Peter; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze a pooled set of nearly 2,000 patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) Mammosite Registry Trial and at William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) to identify factors associated with local recurrence following accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,961 women underwent partial breast irradiation between April 1993 and November 2010 as part of the ASBS Registry Trial or at WBH. Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed for each group and for the pooled cohort. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed including age, tumor stage/size, estrogen receptor status, surgical margins, and lymph node status to determine their association with IBTR. Results: The two groups weres similar, but WBH patients were more frequently node positive, had positive margins, and were less likely to be within the American Society for Radiation Oncology-unsuitable group. At 5 years, the rates of IBTR, RR, DM, DFS, CSS, and OS for the pooled group of patients were 2.9%, 0.5%, 2.4%, 89.1%, 98.5%, and 91.8%, respectively. The 5-year rate of true recurrence/marginal miss was 0.8%. Univariate analysis of IBTR found that negative estrogen receptor status (odds ratio [OR], 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.55-5.13, p = 0.0007) was the only factor significantly associated with IBTR, while a trend was seen for age less than 50 (OR 1.80, 95% confidence interval 0.90-3.58, p = 0.10). Conclusions: Excellent 5-year outcomes were seen following APBI in over 1,900 patients. Estrogen receptor negativity was the only factor associated with IBTR, while a trend for age less than 50 was noted. Significant differences in factors associated with IBTR were noted between cohorts, suggesting that factors driving IBTR may be predicated based on the risk

  6. The Valley-of-Death: reciprocal sign epistasis constrains adaptive trajectories in a constant, nutrient limiting environment.

    PubMed

    Chiotti, Kami E; Kvitek, Daniel J; Schmidt, Karen H; Koniges, Gregory; Schwartz, Katja; Donckels, Elizabeth A; Rosenzweig, Frank; Sherlock, Gavin

    2014-12-01

    The fitness landscape is a powerful metaphor for describing the relationship between genotype and phenotype for a population under selection. However, empirical data as to the topography of fitness landscapes are limited, owing to difficulties in measuring fitness for large numbers of genotypes under any condition. We previously reported a case of reciprocal sign epistasis (RSE), where two mutations individually increased yeast fitness in a glucose-limited environment, but reduced fitness when combined, suggesting the existence of two peaks on the fitness landscape. We sought to determine whether a ridge connected these peaks so that populations founded by one mutant could reach the peak created by the other, avoiding the low-fitness "Valley-of-Death" between them. Sequencing clones after 250 generations of further evolution provided no evidence for such a ridge, but did reveal many presumptive beneficial mutations, adding to a growing body of evidence that clonal interference pervades evolving microbial populations.

  7. Ultra-trace analysis of (41)Ca in urine by accelerator mass spectrometry: an inter-laboratory comparison.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George S; Hillegonds, Darren J; Muzikar, Paul; Goehring, Brent

    2013-10-15

    A (41)Ca interlaboratory comparison between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Purdue Rare Isotope Laboratory (PRIME Lab) has been completed. Analysis of the ratios assayed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) shows that there is no statistically significant difference in the ratios. Further, Bayesian analysis shows that the uncertainties reported by both facilities are correct with the possibility of a slight under-estimation by one laboratory. Finally, the chemistry procedures used by the two facilities to produce CaF2 for the cesium sputter ion source are robust and don't yield any significant differences in the final result.

  8. Partial Dominance, Overdominance and Epistasis as the Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yumei; Hua, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Determination of genetic basis of heterosis may promote hybrid production in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). This study was designed to explore the genetic mechanism of heterosis for yield and yield components in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations derived from a hybrid ‘Xinza No. 1’. Replicated yield field trials of the progenies were conducted in 2008 and 2009. Phenotypic data analyses indicated overdominance in F1 for yield and yield components. Additive and dominance effects at single-locus level and digenic epistatic interactions at two-locus level were analyzed by 421 marker loci spanning 3814 cM of the genome. A total of 38 and 49 QTLs controlling yield and yield components were identified in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations, respectively. Analyses of these QTLs indicated that the effects of partial dominance and overdominance contributed to heterosis in Upland cotton simultaneously. Most of the QTLs showed partial dominance whereas 13 QTLs showing overdominance in F2:3 population, and 19 QTLs showed overdominance in F2:4. Among them, 21 QTLs were common in both F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations. A large number of two-locus interactions for yield and yield components were detected in both generations. AA (additive × additive) epistasis accounted for majority portion of epistatic effects. Thirty three complementary two-locus homozygotes (11/22 and 22/11) were the best genotypes for AA interactions in terms of bolls per plant. Genotypes of double homozygotes, 11/22, 22/11 and 22/22, performed best for AD/DA interactions, while genotype of 11/12 performed best for DD interactions. These results indicated that (1) partial dominance and overdominance effects at single-locus level and (2) epistasis at two-locus level elucidated the genetic basis of heterosis in Upland cotton. PMID:26618635

  9. Partial Dominance, Overdominance and Epistasis as the Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Liang, Qingzhi; Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Hua, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Determination of genetic basis of heterosis may promote hybrid production in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). This study was designed to explore the genetic mechanism of heterosis for yield and yield components in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations derived from a hybrid 'Xinza No. 1'. Replicated yield field trials of the progenies were conducted in 2008 and 2009. Phenotypic data analyses indicated overdominance in F1 for yield and yield components. Additive and dominance effects at single-locus level and digenic epistatic interactions at two-locus level were analyzed by 421 marker loci spanning 3814 cM of the genome. A total of 38 and 49 QTLs controlling yield and yield components were identified in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations, respectively. Analyses of these QTLs indicated that the effects of partial dominance and overdominance contributed to heterosis in Upland cotton simultaneously. Most of the QTLs showed partial dominance whereas 13 QTLs showing overdominance in F2:3 population, and 19 QTLs showed overdominance in F2:4. Among them, 21 QTLs were common in both F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations. A large number of two-locus interactions for yield and yield components were detected in both generations. AA (additive × additive) epistasis accounted for majority portion of epistatic effects. Thirty three complementary two-locus homozygotes (11/22 and 22/11) were the best genotypes for AA interactions in terms of bolls per plant. Genotypes of double homozygotes, 11/22, 22/11 and 22/22, performed best for AD/DA interactions, while genotype of 11/12 performed best for DD interactions. These results indicated that (1) partial dominance and overdominance effects at single-locus level and (2) epistasis at two-locus level elucidated the genetic basis of heterosis in Upland cotton.

  10. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  11. Functional Data Analysis of Spaceflight-Induced Changes in Coordination and Phase in Head Pitch Acceleration During Treadmill Walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Peters, Brian; Feiveson, Alan; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from spaceflight experience neurovestibular disturbances during head movements and attempt to mitigate them by limiting head motion. Analyses to date of the head movements made during walking have concentrated on amplitude and variability measures extracted from ensemble averages of individual gait cycles. Phase shifts within each gait cycle can be determined by functional data analysis through the computation of time-warping functions. Large, localized variations in the timing of peaks in head kinematics may indicate changes in coordination. The purpose of this study was to determine timing changes in head pitch acceleration of astronauts during treadmill walking before and after flight. Six astronauts (5M/1F; age = 43.5+/-6.4yr) participated in the study. Subjects walked at 1.8 m/sec (4 mph) on a motorized treadmill while reading optotypes displayed on a computer screen 4 m in front of their eyes. Three-dimensional motion of the subject s head was recorded with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) device. Data were recorded twice before flight and four times after landing. The head pitch acceleration was calculated by taking the time derivative of the pitch velocity data from the IMU. Data for each session with each subject were time-normalized into gait cycles, then registered to align significant features and create a mean curve. The mean curves of each postflight session for each subject were re-registered based on their preflight mean curve to create time-warping functions. The root mean squares (RMS) of these warping functions were calculated to assess the deviation of head pitch acceleration mean curves in each postflight session from the preflight mean curve. After landing, most crewmembers exhibited localized shifts within their head pitch acceleration regimes, with the greatest deviations in RMS occurring on landing day or 1 day after landing. These results show that the alteration of head pitch coordination due to spaceflight may be

  12. Bayesian Analysis of Step-Stress Accelerated Life Test with Exponential Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Pan, R.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we propose a general Bayesian inference approach to the step-stress accelerated life test with type II censoring. We assume that the failure times at each stress level are exponentially distributed and the test units are tested in an increasing order of stress levels. We formulate the prior distribution of the parameters of life-stress function and integrate the engineering knowledge of product failure rate and acceleration factor into the prior. The posterior distribution and the point estimates for the parameters of interest are provided. Through the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrate a nonconjugate prior case using an industrial example. It is shown that with the Bayesian approach, the statistical precision of parameter estimation is improved and, consequently, the required number of failures could be reduced.

  13. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Hammond, Kenneth C.; Schwartz, Robert M.; Veitzer, Seth A.

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  14. Verification analysis of the toroidal accelerator rotor platform wind energy conversion system: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes research undertaken at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the purpose of evaluating the performance, defining the structure and system configurations, and assessing the economic merit of the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) wind energy conversion system. The TARP wind energy system is a highly versatile system-design having broad-based application potential ranging from small-kilowatt capacity units to large-megawatt utility-scale power plants. 4 refs., 27 figs., 19 tabs.

  15. Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a singificant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospects in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

  16. Impact Acceleration Response of the Selspot Motion Analysis System and an Endevco Angular Accelerometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    consists of caliper brakes which grip the track rails when activated by onboard compressed nitrogen gas. The track rails are one inch thick and the total...coasting or by brake application. Various acceleration profiles may be obtained by changing the differential pressures, the travel length of the...thrust assembly and the metering structure on the thrust piston. The sled glides along the track rails on 21 twelve glide pads. The sled braking system

  17. Contaminant Analysis of Polycrystalline and Single Crystal Niobium Used in Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    F. A. Stevie; Z. Zhu; D. P. Griffis; G. R. Myneni; P. Kneisel

    2005-07-10

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) can characterize the surface and near surface of Nb used in accelerator cavities. Results show Nb oxide in the 2-3 nm range, a depleted H concentration in the oxide compared with the bulk, and N, C, O lower in an annealed single crystal sample than several polycrystalline samples. Other metallic contaminants are primarily at the surface, but tantalum is distributed uniformly through the material.

  18. Continuous wavelet transform analysis of acceleration signals measured from a wave buoy.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-08-19

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals.

  19. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  20. Doppler Broadening Analysis of Steel Specimens Using Accelerator Based In Situ Pair Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarashvili, V.; Wells, D. P.; Roy, A. K.

    2009-03-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) techniques can be utilized as a sensitive probe of defects in materials. Studying these microscopic defects is very important for a number of industries in order to predict material failure or structural integrity. We have been developing gamma-induced pair-production techniques to produce positrons in thick samples (˜4-40 g/cm2, or ˜0.5-5 cm in steel). These techniques are called 'Accelerator-based Gamma-induced Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy' (AG-PAS). We have begun testing the capabilities of this technique for imaging of defect densities in thick structural materials. As a first step, a linear accelerator (LINAC) was employed to produce photon beams by stopping 15 MeV electrons in a 1 mm thick tungsten converter. The accelerator is capable of operating with 30-60 ns pulse width, up to 200 mA peak current at 1 kHz repetition rate. The highly collimated bremsstrahlung beam impinged upon our steel tensile specimens, after traveling through a 1.2 m thick concrete wall. Annihilation radiation was detected by a well-shielded and collimated high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). Conventional Doppler broadening spectrometry (DBS) was performed to determine S, W and T parameters for our samples.

  1. Development and analysis of a metal-fueled accelerator-driven burner

    SciTech Connect

    Lypsch, F.; Hill, R.N.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the safety characteristics of an accelerator driven metal fueled fast system to a critical core on a consistent basis to determine how these characteristics are affected solely by subcritically of the system. To accomplish this an accelerator proton beam/tungsten neutron source model is surrounded by a subcritical blanket using metallic fuel and sodium as coolant. The consequences of typical accident transients, namely unprotected transient overpower (TOP), loss of heat sink (LOHS), and loss of flow (LOP) were calculated for the hybrid system and compared to corresponding results for a metal-fueled fast reactor. Results indicate that the subcritical system exhibits superior performance for TOP (reactivity-induced) transits; however, only in the critical system are reactivity feedbacks able to cause passive shutdown in the LOHS ad LOP events. Therefore, for a full spectrum of accident initiators considered, the overall safety behavior of accelerator-driven metal-fueled systems can neither be concluded to be worse nor to be better than advanced reactor designs which rely on passive safety features.

  2. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  3. Development and Use of Life-Cycle Analysis Capabilites To Evaluate, Select, and Implement Plans to Accelerate Hanford Site Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, Michael R.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2004-02-28

    Over the past year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress in developing and executing plans to transform and accelerate cleanup of the Hanford Site. Notable progress has been in the cleanup of the River Corridor, including the relocation of spent nuclear fuel to the Central Plateau, and the stabilization of plutonium materials. However, difficult work still remains. DOE has already accelerated the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission from 2070 to 2035 and believes its completion can be achieved even sooner by reducing excess conservatism, substantively changing technical strategy and management approach, and making new front-end investments. Work is well under way in the detailed planning, analyses and decision making required to implement and support the execution of the accelerated cleanup program at Hanford. Various cleanup, contract, and regulatory approaches are being explored. DOE has instituted a process that allows DOE to efficiently explore and test alternative cleanup approaches using a life-cycle model. This paper provides a means to share the planning approach and the life-cycle modeling and analysis tools used with other sites and interested parties. This paper will be of particular interest to analysts performing similar planning and evaluations at other sites as well as provide insight into the current status of Hanford’s cleanup program and DOE’s plans for the future.

  4. A new convergence analysis and perturbation resilience of some accelerated proximal forward–backward algorithms with errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reem, Daniel; De Pierro, Alvaro

    2017-04-01

    Many problems in science and engineering involve, as part of their solution process, the consideration of a separable function which is the sum of two convex functions, one of them possibly non-smooth. Recently a few works have discussed inexact versions of several accelerated proximal methods aiming at solving this minimization problem. This paper shows that inexact versions of a method of Beck and Teboulle (fast iterative shrinkable tresholding algorithm) preserve, in a Hilbert space setting, the same (non-asymptotic) rate of convergence under some assumptions on the decay rate of the error terms The notion of inexactness discussed here seems to be rather simple, but, interestingly, when comparing to related works, closely related decay rates of the errors terms yield closely related convergence rates. The derivation sheds some light on the somewhat mysterious origin of some parameters which appear in various accelerated methods. A consequence of the analysis is that the accelerated method is perturbation resilient, making it suitable, in principle, for the superiorization methodology. By taking this into account, we re-examine the superiorization methodology and significantly extend its scope. This work was supported by FAPESP 2013/19504-9. The second author was supported also by CNPq grant 306030/2014-4.

  5. Mechanical Design and Analysis of a 200 MHz, Bolt-together RFQ forthe Accelerator Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve; Hoff, Matt; Li, Derun; Staples, John; Wells,Russell

    2007-06-20

    A high-yield neutron source to screen sea-land cargocontainers for shielded Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) has been designedat LBNL [1,2]. The Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source (ADNS) uses theD(d,n)3He reaction to create a forward directed neutron beam. Keycomponents are a high-current radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ)accelerator and a high-power target capable of producing a neutron fluxof>107 n/(cm2 cdot s) at a distance of 2.5 m. The mechanical designand analysis of the four-module, bolt-together RFQ will be presentedhere. Operating at 200 MHz, the 5.1 m long RFQ will accelerate a 40 mAdeuteron beam to 6 MeV. At a 5 percent duty factor, the time-average d+beam current on target is 1.5 mA. Each of the 1.27 m long RFQ moduleswill consist of four solid OFHC copper vanes. A specially designed 3-DO-ring will provide vacuum sealing between both the vanes and themodules. RF connections are made with canted coil spring contacts. Aseries of 60 water-cooled pi-mode rods provides quadrupole modestabilization. A set of 80 evenly spaced fixed slug tuners is used forfinal frequency adjustment and local field perturbationcorrection.

  6. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  7. What Factors Are Associated with Grade Acceleration? An Analysis and Comparison of Two U.S. Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Ryan; Lohman, David; Marron, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of whole-grade acceleration for the highest achieving students in K-12 education are widely acknowledged. However, much less is known about which personal, family, and school factors are correlated with student acceleration. Which children are grade accelerated in K-7 education? Have factors associated with grade acceleration changed…

  8. Application of accelerated solvent extraction in the analysis of organic contaminants, bioactive and nutritional compounds in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanwen; Ge, Xusheng; Lv, Yunkai; Wang, Anbang

    2012-05-11

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) has become a popular green extraction technology for different classes of organic contaminants present in numerous kinds of food and feed for food safety. The parameters affecting ASE efficiency and application advancement of ASE in the analysis of organic contaminants, natural toxins compounds as well as bioactive and nutritional compounds in animal origin food, plant origin food and animal feed are reviewed in detail. ASE is a fully automated and reliable extraction technique with many advantages over traditional extraction techniques, so it could be especially useful for routine analyses of pollutants in food and feed.

  9. SU-C-BRD-03: Analysis of Accelerator Generated Text Logs for Preemptive Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Able, CM; Baydush, AH; Nguyen, C; Munley, MT; Gersh, J; Ndlovu, A; Rebo, I; Booth, J; Perez, M; Sintay, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model to analyze medical accelerator generated parameter and performance data that will provide an early warning of performance degradation and impending component failure. Methods: A robust 6 MV VMAT quality assurance treatment delivery was used to test the constancy of accelerator performance. The generated text log files were decoded and analyzed using statistical process control (SPC) methodology. The text file data is a single snapshot of energy specific and overall systems parameters. A total of 36 system parameters were monitored which include RF generation, electron gun control, energy control, beam uniformity control, DC voltage generation, and cooling systems. The parameters were analyzed using Individual and Moving Range (I/MR) charts. The chart limits were calculated using a hybrid technique that included the use of the standard 3σ limits and the parameter/system specification. Synthetic errors/changes were introduced to determine the initial effectiveness of I/MR charts in detecting relevant changes in operating parameters. The magnitude of the synthetic errors/changes was based on: the value of 1 standard deviation from the mean operating parameter of 483 TB systems, a small fraction (≤ 5%) of the operating range, or a fraction of the minor fault deviation. Results: There were 34 parameters in which synthetic errors were introduced. There were 2 parameters (radial position steering coil, and positive 24V DC) in which the errors did not exceed the limit of the I/MR chart. The I chart limit was exceeded for all of the remaining parameters (94.2%). The MR chart limit was exceeded in 29 of the 32 parameters (85.3%) in which the I chart limit was exceeded. Conclusion: Statistical process control I/MR evaluation of text log file parameters may be effective in providing an early warning of performance degradation or component failure for digital medical accelerator systems. Research is Supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  10. Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ramesh Chandra

    1996-11-01

    High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

  11. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated ball rolling contact fatigue tests were determined. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.215 times 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed; normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  12. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  13. ACCELERATORS: Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-07-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  14. Calibration of a new experimental chamber for PIXE analysis at the Accelerator Facilities Division of Atomic Energy Centre Dhaka (AECD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Taufique; Shariff, Md. Asad; Hossein, Amzad; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Fazlul Hoque, A. K. M.; Chowdhuri, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A new experimental chamber has been installed at the 3 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facilities Division in the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, to perform different Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. The calibration of this new setup for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique has been done using a set of thin MicroMatter standards and GUPIX (PIXE spectrum analysis software), which is explicated in this paper. The effective thicknesses of the beryllium window of the X-ray detector and of the different absorbers used were determined. For standardization, the so called instrumental constant H (product of detector solid angle and the correction factor for the setup) as function of X-ray energy were determined and stored inside the GUPIX library for further PIXE analysis.

  15. Analysis of the dynamics of a nutating body. [numerical analysis of displacement, velocity, and acceleration of point on mechanical drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The equations for the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of a point in a nutating body are developed. These are used to derive equations for the inertial moment developed by a nutating body of arbitrary shape. Calculations made for a previously designed nutating plate transmission indicate that that device is severely speed limited because of the very high magnitude inertial moment.

  16. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  17. Comparison of spectral analysis of vibration using commercial knock sensor and 3-axis acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Ł.; Walczak, D.; Szczurowski, K.; Radkowski, S.

    2016-09-01

    With the development of internal combustion engines, engineers attempt to reduce the noise and vibration generated. Due to the high cost of fuel, are increasingly looking for new sources of power in order to reduce costs. In diesel engines, an increasingly popular method is the admixture of propane-butane. This follows because of the price of the fuel as well as to improve the efficiency of combustion. With the development of this type of dual fuel power seems to be a reasonable study of the effects of LPG to generate noise and vibration, as well as an attempt to evaluate the combustion process. Unfortunately, too much addition of LPG causes a phenomenon called knock consisting in abnormal, uneven, explosive combustion of fuels in reciprocating engines. This phenomenon may lead to a reduction in engine performance and permanent damage. Control of the knock detection uses vibration acceleration sensors recording the high frequency ranges. Within the framework of the research conducted by the team of authors, an attempt was made to compare the vibroacoustic signals originating from the commercial knocking sensor with a three-axis acceleration sensor. These signals were subject to a quick Fourier transform in the purpose of analysing the amplitude spectra.

  18. Analysis on weathering characteristics of volcanic rocks in Dokdo, Korea based on accelerated weatehring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ik; Song, Won-Kyong; Kim, Bok-Chul; Kang, Jinseok

    2010-05-01

    Dokdo consists of small volcanic islands located in the southern part of the East Sea. Accelerated weathering tests was performed to examine the physico-mechanical characteristics of volcanic rocks in Dokdo. Rock core specimens of trachyandesite, andesitic dyke and ash tuff were prepared, and double soxhlet extractors(DSE) and peristatic pumps were used for accelerating the weathering processes. The DSE was designed to perform cyclic leaching tests for rock core specimen using distilled water at seventy degrees centigrade. The core specimens which are classified according to pre-test weathering grades placed in the lower part of the DSE, and periodically exposed to hot distilled water at every ninety minutes. On the other hand the peristatic pumps were utilized to induce leaching by distilled or brine water at normal temperature. The physico-mechanical property changes including rock surface appearance, microscopic structure and rock strength were analyzed with the results obtained from both experiments performed for 120 days. The conducted research in this study have shown that the methodologies of artificial weathering experiments have strong capability to understand the weathering characteristics of the rocks effectively.

  19. Acceleration of plasma flows in the closed magnetic fields: Simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2006-06-15

    Within the framework of a two-fluid description, possible pathways for the generation of fast flows (dynamical as well as steady) in the closed magnetic fields are established. It is shown that a primary plasma flow (locally sub-Alfvenic) is accelerated while interacting with ambient arcade-like closed field structures. The time scale for creating reasonably fast flows (> or approx. 100 km/s) is dictated by the initial ion skin depth, while the amplification of the flow depends on local plasma {beta}. It is shown that distances over which the flows become 'fast' are {approx}0.01R{sub 0} from the interaction surface (R{sub 0} being a characteristic length of the system); later, the fast flow localizes (with dimensions < or approx. 0.05R{sub 0}) in the upper central region of the original arcade. For fixed initial temperature, the final speed (> or approx. 500 km/s) of the accelerated flow and the modification of the field structure are independent of the time duration (lifetime) of the initial flow. In the presence of dissipation, these flows are likely to play a fundamental role in the heating of the finely structured stellar atmospheres; their relevance to the solar wind is also obvious.

  20. Use of simple x-ray measurement in the performance analysis of cryogenic RF accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; M. Drury; R. May; C. Reece

    1996-10-01

    X-ray emission by radiofrequency (RF) resonant cavities has long been known to accelerator health physicists as a potentially serious source of radiation exposure. The authors points out the danger of klystrons and microwave cavities by stating that the radiation source term is erratic and may be unpredictable depending on microscopic surface conditions which change with time. He also states the x-ray output is a rapidly increasing function of RF input power. At Jefferson Lab, the RF cavities used to accelerate the electron beam employ superconducting technology. X-rays are emitted at high cavity gradients, and measurements of cavity x-rays are valuable for health physics purposes and provide a useful diagnostic tool for assessing cavity performance. The quality factor (Q) for superconducting RF resonant cavities used at Jefferson Lab, is typically 5 x 10{sup 9} for the nominal design gradient of 5 MVm{sup {minus}1}. This large value for Q follows from the small resistive loss in superconducting technology. The operating frequency is 1,497 MHz. In the absence of beam, the input power for a cavity is typically 750 W and the corresponding dissipated power is 2.6 W. At 5 MWm{sup {minus}1}, the input power is 3 kW fully beam loaded. At higher gradients, performance degradation tends to occur due to the onset of electron field emission from defects in the cavity.

  1. Microwave-accelerated derivatization for the simultaneous gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of natural and synthetic estrogenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yuegang; Zhang, Kai; Lin, Yuejuan

    2007-05-04

    A rapid microwave-accelerated derivatization process for the GC-MS analysis of steroid estrogens, estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and mestranol (MeEE2), was developed. Under microwave irradiation, the five estrogenic hormones studied were simultaneously derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA)+trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) in pyridine solution. Effects of irradiation time (15-120 s) and power level (240-800 W) on the yield of the derivatization were investigated. The derivatization under the irradiation of 800 W microwave for 60s produced comparable results when compared with the conventional heating process in a sand bath for 30 min at 80 degrees C in terms of derivatization yield, linearity and precision for all steroid hormones tested. The calibration curves are linear between 3.00 and 3.00 x 10(2) microg mL(-1). The square of the regression coefficients (R(2)) range from 0.979 to 1.000. The applicability of the method was evaluated on spiked river and distilled water samples at two concentrations, 25.0 and 2.00 x 10(2) ng mL(-1). The recoveries obtained by using microwave heating (60s, 800 W) were similar to those by conventional heating. When combined solid-phase extraction (SPE) with the application of the microwave-accelerated derivatization proposed here, the detection limits of 0.02-0.1 ng L(-1) for the steroid hormones have been achieved. The results demonstrated that microwave-accelerated derivatization is an efficient and suitable sample preparation method for the GC-MS analysis of estrogenic steroids.

  2. Two-Locus Heterogeneity Cannot Be Distinguished from Two-Locus Epistasis on the Basis of Affected-Sib-Pair Data

    PubMed Central

    Vieland, Veronica J.; Huang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    The observation of multiple linkage signals in the course of conducting genome screens for complex disorders raises the question of whether distinct genes represent independent causes of disease (heterogeneity) or whether they interact to produce the phenotype of interest (epistasis); and there has been a corresponding interest in statistical methods for detecting and/or exploiting the distinction between these two possibilities. At the same time, researchers are increasingly relying on affected-sib-pair (ASP) data. Here, we demonstrate an apparently unrecognized fact about two-locus (2L) models and ASP data, namely, 2L heterogeneity and 2L epistasis cannot, in general, be distinguished from one another on the basis of ASP marker data, as a matter of mathematical principle and therefore regardless of sample size. By the same token, correlations across ASPs in single-locus LOD scores or other measures also cannot be used to distinguish 2L heterogeneity from 2L epistasis. This raises questions about the measurement of gene-gene interactions in terms of patterns of correlation in marker data. Portions of our results carry over to larger pedigree structures as well, as long as only affected individuals are included in analyses; the extent to which our overall findings apply to general pedigrees (including unaffected individuals) remains to be investigated. PMID:12830401

  3. Negative epistasis and evolvability in TEM-1 β-lactamase – The thin line between an enzyme’s conformational freedom and disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dellus-Gur, Eynat; Elias, Mikael; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Salverda, Merijn L.M.; de Visser, J. Arjan G.M.; Fraser, James S.; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Epistasis is a key factor in evolution, since it determines which combinations of mutations provide adaptive solutions and which mutational pathways towards these solutions are accessible by natural selection. There is growing evidence for the pervasiveness of sign epistasis – a complete reversion of mutational effects, particularly in protein evolution, yet its molecular basis remains poorly understood. We describe the structural basis of sign epistasis between G238S and R164S, two adaptive mutations in the antibiotic-resistance enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase. Separated by 10Å, these mutations initiate two separate trajectories towards increased hydrolysis rates and resistance towards second and third-cephalosporins antibiotics. Both mutations allow the enzyme’s active-site to adopt alternative conformations and accommodate the new antibiotics. By solving the corresponding set of crystal structures we found that whereas G238S induces discrete conformations, R164S causes local disorder. When combined, the mutations in 238 and 164 induce local disorder whereby nonproductive conformations that perturb the enzyme’s catalytic pre-organization dominate. Specifically, Asn170 that coordinates the deacylating water molecule is misaligned, in both the free and the inhibitor-bound double mutant. This local disorder is not restored by stabilizing, global suppressor mutations and thus leads to an evolutionary cul-de-sac. Conformational dynamism therefore underlines the reshaping potential of proteins structures and functions, but also limits protein evolvability because of the fragility of the interactions networks that maintain protein structures. PMID:26004540

  4. The impact of high-order epistasis in the within-host fitness of a positive-sense plant RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Lalić, J; Elena, S F

    2015-12-01

    RNA viruses are the main source of emerging infectious diseases because of the evolutionary potential bestowed by their fast replication, large population sizes and high mutation and recombination rates. However, an equally important property, which is usually neglected, is the topography of the fitness landscape. How many fitness maxima exist and how well they are connected is especially interesting, as this determines the number of accessible evolutionary pathways. To address this question, we have reconstructed a region of the fitness landscape of tobacco etch potyvirus constituted by mutations observed during the experimental adaptation of the virus to the novel host Arabidopsis thaliana. Fitness was measured for many genotypes and showed the existence of multiple peaks and holes in the landscape. We found prevailing epistatic effects between mutations, with cases of reciprocal sign epistasis being common among pairs of mutations. We also found that high-order epistasis was as important as pairwise epistasis in their contribution to fitness. Therefore, results suggest that the landscape was rugged due to the existence of holes caused by lethal genotypes, that a very limited number of potential neutral paths exist and that it contained a single adaptive peak.

  5. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  6. DEX: Increasing the Capability of Scientific Data Analysis Pipelines by Using Efficient Bitmap Indices to Accelerate Scientific Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Stockinger, Kurt; Shalf, John; Bethel, Wes; Wu, Kesheng

    2005-02-04

    We describe a new approach to scalable data analysis that enables scientists to manage the explosion in size and complexity of scientific data produced by experiments and simulations. Our approach uses a novel combination of efficient query technology and visualization infrastructure. The combination of bit map indexing, which is a data management technology that accelerates queries on large scientific datasets, with a visualization pipeline for generating images of abstract data results in a tool suitable for use by scientists in fields where data size and complexity poses a barrier to efficient analysis. Our architecture and implementation, which we call DEX (short for dexterous data explorer), directly addresses the problem of ''too much data'' by focusing analysis on data deemed to be ''scientifically interesting'' via a user-specified selection criteria. The architectural concepts and implementation are applicable to wide variety of scientific data analysis and visualization applications. This paper presents an architectural overview of the system along with an analysis showing substantial performance over traditional visualization pipelines. While performance gains are a significant result, even more important is the new functionality not present in any visualization analysis software--namely the ability to perform interactive, multi-dimensional queries to refine regions of interest that are later used as input to analysis or visualization.

  7. Verification analysis of the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform wind energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Robert E.

    1988-09-01

    A unique wind energy system, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) is studied. The TARP system places the rotors in pairs on either side of a torus-shaped platform, so that the wind is forced to flow into the rotors. As the wind is forced around the form, it picks up velocity and turns the rotors faster, generating more power. By concentrating the wind's power, the TARP system can be constructed in modules using 10 foot diameter rotor blades. Mounted on a track suspension system, the rotors are able to yaw with the wind to take advantage of breezes from any direction. The basic TARP design was tested and modified in a wind tunnel. The system was then analyzed for its integration into a farm silo and as a multistacked wind power needle. It was determined that the TARP technology would be feasible for application involving sites with high wind velocities, including some sites in New York State.

  8. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  9. Ultra-trace analysis of 36Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry: an interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Merchel, S; Bremser, W; Alfimov, V; Arnold, M; Aumaître, G; Benedetti, L; Bourlès, D L; Caffee, M; Fifield, L K; Finkel, R C; Freeman, S P H T; Martschini, M; Matsushi, Y; Rood, D H; Sasa, K; Steier, P; Takahashi, T; Tamari, M; Tims, S G; Tosaki, Y; Wilcken, K M; Xu, S

    2011-07-01

    A first international (36)Cl interlaboratory comparison has been initiated. Evaluation of the final results of the eight participating accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) laboratories on three synthetic AgCl samples with (36)Cl/Cl ratios at the 10(-11), 10(-12), and 10(-13) level shows no difference in the sense of simple statistical significance. However, more detailed statistical analyses demonstrate certain interlaboratory bias and underestimation of uncertainties by some laboratories. Following subsequent remeasurement and reanalysis of the data from some AMS facilities, the round-robin data indicate that (36)Cl/Cl data from two individual AMS laboratories can differ by up to 17%. Thus, the demand for further work on harmonising the (36)Cl-system on a worldwide scale and enlarging the improvement of measurements is obvious.

  10. Analysis of accelerated failure time data with dependent censoring using auxiliary variables via nonparametric multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Hu, Chengcheng

    2015-08-30

    We consider the situation of estimating the marginal survival distribution from censored data subject to dependent censoring using auxiliary variables. We had previously developed a nonparametric multiple imputation approach. The method used two working proportional hazards (PH) models, one for the event times and the other for the censoring times, to define a nearest neighbor imputing risk set. This risk set was then used to impute failure times for censored observations. Here, we adapt the method to the situation where the event and censoring times follow accelerated failure time models and propose to use the Buckley-James estimator as the two working models. Besides studying the performances of the proposed method, we also compare the proposed method with two popular methods for handling dependent censoring through the use of auxiliary variables, inverse probability of censoring weighted and parametric multiple imputation methods, to shed light on the use of them. In a simulation study with time-independent auxiliary variables, we show that all approaches can reduce bias due to dependent censoring. The proposed method is robust to misspecification of either one of the two working models and their link function. This indicates that a working proportional hazards model is preferred because it is more cumbersome to fit an accelerated failure time model. In contrast, the inverse probability of censoring weighted method is not robust to misspecification of the link function of the censoring time model. The parametric imputation methods rely on the specification of the event time model. The approaches are applied to a prostate cancer dataset.

  11. An accelerated buoyancy adhesion assay combined with 3-D morphometric analysis for assessing osteoblast adhesion on microgrooved substrata.

    PubMed

    Sobral, J M; Malheiro, V N; Clyne, T W; Harris, J; Rezk, R; O'Neill, W; Markaki, A E

    2016-07-01

    An accelerated negative buoyancy method has been developed to assess cell adhesion strength. This method has been used in conjunction with 3-D morphometric analysis to understand the effects of surface topology on cell response. Aligned micro-grooved surface topographies (with a range of groove depths) were produced on stainless steel 316L substrates by laser ablation. An investigation was carried out on the effect of the micro-grooved surface topography on cell adhesion strength, cell and nucleus volumes, cell phenotypic expression and attachment patterns. Increased hydrophobicity and anisotropic wettability was observed on surfaces with deeper grooves. A reduction was noted in cell volume, projected areas and adhesion sites for deeper grooves, linked to lower cell proliferation and differentiation rates and also to reduced adhesion strength. The results suggest that the centrifugation assay combined with three-dimensional cell morphometric analysis has considerable potential for obtaining improved understanding of the cell/substrate interface.

  12. SU-E-T-144: Effective Analysis of VMAT QA Generated Trajectory Log Files for Medical Accelerator Predictive Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Able, CM; Baydush, AH; Nguyen, C; Munley, MT; Gersh, J; Ndlovu, A; Rebo, I; Booth, J; Perez, M; Sintay, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of SPC analysis for a model predictive maintenance process that uses accelerator generated parameter and performance data contained in trajectory log files. Methods: Each trajectory file is decoded and a total of 131 axes positions are recorded (collimator jaw position, gantry angle, each MLC, etc.). This raw data is processed and either axis positions are extracted at critical points during the delivery or positional change over time is used to determine axis velocity. The focus of our analysis is the accuracy, reproducibility and fidelity of each axis. A reference positional trace of the gantry and each MLC is used as a motion baseline for cross correlation (CC) analysis. A total of 494 parameters (482 MLC related) were analyzed using Individual and Moving Range (I/MR) charts. The chart limits were calculated using a hybrid technique that included the use of the standard 3σ limits and parameter/system specifications. Synthetic errors/changes were introduced to determine the initial effectiveness of I/MR charts in detecting relevant changes in operating parameters. The magnitude of the synthetic errors/changes was based on: TG-142 and published analysis of VMAT delivery accuracy. Results: All errors introduced were detected. Synthetic positional errors of 2mm for collimator jaw and MLC carriage exceeded the chart limits. Gantry speed and each MLC speed are analyzed at two different points in the delivery. Simulated Gantry speed error (0.2 deg/sec) and MLC speed error (0.1 cm/sec) exceeded the speed chart limits. Gantry position error of 0.2 deg was detected by the CC maximum value charts. The MLC position error of 0.1 cm was detected by the CC maximum value location charts for every MLC. Conclusion: SPC I/MR evaluation of trajectory log file parameters may be effective in providing an early warning of performance degradation or component failure for medical accelerator systems.

  13. SU-E-T-495: Neutron Induced Electronics Failure Rate Analysis for a Single Room Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, N; DeWees, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the failure rate as a function of neutron dose of the range modulator's servo motor controller system (SMCS) while shielded with Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and unshielded in a single room proton accelerator. Methods: Two experimental setups were constructed using two servo motor controllers and two motors. Each SMCS was then placed 30 cm from the end of the plugged proton accelerator applicator. The motor was then turned on and observed from outside of the vault while being irradiated to known neutron doses determined from bubble detector measurements. Anytime the motor deviated from the programmed motion a failure was recorded along with the delivered dose. The experiment was repeated using 9 cm of BPE shielding surrounding the SMCS. Results: Ten SMCS failures were recorded in each experiment. The dose per monitor unit for the unshielded SMCS was 0.0211 mSv/MU and 0.0144 mSv/MU for the shielded SMCS. The mean dose to produce a failure for the unshielded SMCS was 63.5 ± 58.3 mSv versus 17.0 ±12.2 mSv for the shielded. The mean number of MUs between failures were 2297 ± 1891 MU for the unshielded SMCS and 2122 ± 1523 MU for the shielded. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked test showed the dose between failures were significantly different (P value = 0.044) while the number of MUs between failures were not (P value = 1.000). Statistical analysis determined a SMCS neutron dose of 5.3 mSv produces a 5% chance of failure. Depending on the workload and location of the SMCS, this failure rate could impede clinical workflow. Conclusion: BPE shielding was shown to not reduce the average failure of the SMCS and relocation of the system outside of the accelerator vault was required to lower the failure rate enough to avoid impeding clinical work flow.

  14. Sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis and the evolution of mitochondrial bioenergetics, ageing, and life history in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Mirko; Stojković, Biljana; Savković, Uroš; Immonen, Elina; Tucić, Nikola; Lazarević, Jelica; Arnqvist, Göran

    2017-02-01

    The role of mitochondrial DNA for the evolution of life-history traits remains debated. We examined mitonuclear effects on the activity of the multisubunit complex of the electron transport chain (ETC) involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) across lines of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus selected for a short (E) or a long (L) life for more than >160 generations. We constructed and phenotyped mitonuclear introgression lines, which allowed us to assess the independent effects of the evolutionary history of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. The nuclear genome was responsible for the largest share of divergence seen in ageing. However, the mitochondrial genome also had sizeable effects, which were sex-specific and expressed primarily as epistatic interactions with the nuclear genome. The effects of mitonuclear disruption were largely consistent with mitonuclear coadaptation. Variation in ETC activity explained a large proportion of variance in ageing and life-history traits and this multivariate relationship differed somewhat between the sexes. In conclusion, mitonuclear epistasis has played an important role in the laboratory evolution of ETC complex activity, ageing, and life histories and these are closely associated. The mitonuclear architecture of evolved differences in life-history traits and mitochondrial bioenergetics was sex-specific.

  15. Statistical Epistasis and Progressive Brain Change in Schizophrenia: An Approach for Examining the Relationships Between Multiple Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.; Wilcox, Marsha A.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Epping, Eric; Ziebell, Steven; Zeien, Eugene; Weiss, Brett; Wassink, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although schizophrenia is generally considered to occur as a consequence of multiple genes that interact with one another, very few methods have been developed to model epistasis. Phenotype definition has also been a major challenge for research on the genetics of schizophrenia. In this report we use novel statistical techniques to address the high dimensionality of genomic data, and we apply a refinement in phenotype definition by basing it on the occurrence of brain changes during the early course of the illness, as measured by repeated MR scans (i.e., an “intermediate phenotype.” The method combines a machine learning algorithm, the ensemble method using stochastic gradient boosting, with traditional general linear model statistics. We began with fourteen genes that are relevant to schizophrenia based on association studies or their role in neurodevelopment and then used statistical techniques to reduce them to five genes and 17 SNPs that had a significant statistical interaction: 5 for PDE4B, 4 for RELN, 4 for ERBB4, 3 for DISC1, and one for NRG1. Five of the SNPs involved in these interactions replicate previous research, in that these five SNPs have previously been identified as schizophrenia vulnerability markers or implicate cognitive processes relevant to schizophrenia. This ability to replicate previous work suggests that our method has potential for detecting a meaningful epistatic relationships among the genes that influence brain abnormalities in schizophrenia. PMID:21876540

  16. Statistical epistasis and progressive brain change in schizophrenia: an approach for examining the relationships between multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, N C; Wilcox, M A; Ho, B-C; Epping, E; Ziebell, S; Zeien, E; Weiss, B; Wassink, T

    2012-11-01

    Although schizophrenia is generally considered to occur as a consequence of multiple genes that interact with one another, very few methods have been developed to model epistasis. Phenotype definition has also been a major challenge for research on the genetics of schizophrenia. In this report, we use novel statistical techniques to address the high dimensionality of genomic data, and we apply a refinement in phenotype definition by basing it on the occurrence of brain changes during the early course of the illness, as measured by repeated magnetic resonance scans (i.e., an 'intermediate phenotype.') The method combines a machine-learning algorithm, the ensemble method using stochastic gradient boosting, with traditional general linear model statistics. We began with 14 genes that are relevant to schizophrenia, based on association studies or their role in neurodevelopment, and then used statistical techniques to reduce them to five genes and 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had a significant statistical interaction: five for PDE4B, four for RELN, four for ERBB4, three for DISC1 and one for NRG1. Five of the SNPs involved in these interactions replicate previous research in that, these five SNPs have previously been identified as schizophrenia vulnerability markers or implicate cognitive processes relevant to schizophrenia. This ability to replicate previous work suggests that our method has potential for detecting a meaningful epistatic relationship among the genes that influence brain abnormalities in schizophrenia.

  17. Comparison Study of Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet Systems for an Accelerator Using Cost-Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C

    2004-02-19

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be one-of-a-kind facilities, and to meet their luminosity goals they must have guaranteed availability over their several decade lifetimes. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is one viable option for a 1 TeV electron-positron linear collider, it has an 85% overall availability goal. We previously showed how a traditional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of a SLAC electromagnet leads to reliability-enhancing design changes. Traditional FMEA identifies failure modes with high risk but does not consider the consequences in terms of cost, which could lead to unnecessarily expensive components. We have used a new methodology, ''Life Cost-Based FMEA'', which measures risk of failure in terms of cost, in order to evaluate and compare two different technologies that might be used for the 8653 NLC magnets: electromagnets or permanent magnets. The availabilities for the two different types of magnet systems have been estimated using empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus expert opinion on permanent magnet failure modes and industry standard failure data. Labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are predicted using a Monte Carlo simulation of all possible magnet failures over a 30-year lifetime. Our goal is to maximize up-time of the NLC through magnet design improvements and the optimal combination of electromagnets and permanent magnets, while reducing magnet system lifecycle costs.

  18. Theoretical and experimental analysis of a linear accelerator endowed with single feed coupler with movable short-circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Forno, Massimo Dal; Craievich, Paolo; Penco, Giuseppe; Vescovo, Roberto

    2013-11-15

    The front-end injection systems of the FERMI@Elettra linac produce high brightness electron beams that define the performance of the Free Electron Laser. The photoinjector mainly consists of the radiofrequency (rf) gun and of two S-band rf structures which accelerate the beam. Accelerating structures endowed with a single feed coupler cause deflection and degradation of the electron beam properties, due to the asymmetry of the electromagnetic field. In this paper, a new type of single feed structure with movable short-circuit is proposed. It has the advantage of having only one waveguide input, but we propose a novel design where the dipolar component is reduced. Moreover, the racetrack geometry allows to reduce the quadrupolar component. This paper presents the microwave design and the analysis of the particle motion inside the linac. A prototype has been machined at the Elettra facility to verify the new coupler design and the rf field has been measured by adopting the bead-pull method. The results are here presented, showing good agreement with the expectations.

  19. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer’s disease research and development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-01-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7–9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5–2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4–9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040. PMID:24673372

  20. Accelerated calendar and pulse life analysis of lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Case, Herbert L.; Liaw, Bor Yann; Urbina, Angel; Paez, Thomas L.; Doughty, Daniel H.

    Sandia National Laboratories has been studying calendar and pulse discharge life of prototype high-power lithium-ion cells as part of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program. One of the goals of ATD is to establish validated accelerated life test protocols for lithium-ion cells in the hybrid electric vehicle application. In order to accomplish this, aging experiments have been conducted on 18650-size cells containing a chemistry representative of these high-power designs. Loss of power and capacity are accompanied by increasing interfacial impedance at the cathode. These relationships are consistent within a given state-of-charge (SOC) over the range of storage temperatures and times. Inductive models have been used to construct detailed descriptions of the relationships between power fade and aging time and to relate power fade, capacity loss and impedance rise. These models can interpolate among the different experimental conditions and can also describe the error surface when fitting life prediction models to the data.

  1. A Bayesian approach to joint analysis of multivariate longitudinal data and parametric accelerated failure time.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng

    2014-02-20

    Impairment caused by Parkinson's disease (PD) is multidimensional (e.g., sensoria, functions, and cognition) and progressive. Its multidimensional nature precludes a single outcome to measure disease progression. Clinical trials of PD use multiple categorical and continuous longitudinal outcomes to assess the treatment effects on overall improvement. A terminal event such as death or dropout can stop the follow-up process. Moreover, the time to the terminal event may be dependent on the multivariate longitudinal measurements. In this article, we consider a joint random-effects model for the correlated outcomes. A multilevel item response theory model is used for the multivariate longitudinal outcomes and a parametric accelerated failure time model is used for the failure time because of the violation of proportional hazard assumption. These two models are linked via random effects. The Bayesian inference via MCMC is implemented in 'BUGS' language. Our proposed method is evaluated by a simulation study and is applied to DATATOP study, a motivating clinical trial to determine if deprenyl slows the progression of PD.

  2. Analysis and comparison between electric and magnetic power couplers for accelerators in Free Electron Lasers (FEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpico, C.; Grudiev, A.; Vescovo, R.

    2016-10-01

    Free-electron lasers represent a new and exciting class of coherent optical sources possessing broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is driven by a 200 m long, S-band linac: the high energy part of the linac is equipped with 6 m long backward traveling wave (BTW) structures. The structures have small iris radius and a nose cone geometry which allows for high gradient operation. Development of new high-gradient, S-band accelerating structures for the replacement of the existing BTWs is under consideration. This paper investigates two possible solutions for the RF power couplers suitable for a linac driven FEL which require reduced wakefields effects, high operating gradient and very high reliability. The first part of the manuscript focuses on the reduction of residual field asymmetries, while in the second analyzes RF performances, the peak surface fields and the expected breakdown rate. In the conclusion, two solutions are compared and pros and cons are highlighted.

  3. Verification analysis of the toroidal accelerator rotor platform wind energy conversion system. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have studied a unique wind energy system, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP). The TARP system places the rotors in pairs on either side of a torus-shaped platform, so that the wind is forced to flow into the rotors. As the wind is forced around the form, it picks up velocity and turns the rotors faster, generating more power. By concentrating the wind's power, the TARP system can be constructed in modules using 10-foot-diameter rotor blades. Mounted on a track suspension system, the rotors are able to yaw with the wind to take advantage of breezes from any direction. In this project, the basic TARP design was tested and modified in a wind tunnel. The system was then analyzed for its integration into a farm silo and as a multi-stacked wind power needle. It was determined that the TARP technology would be feasible for applications involving sites with high wind velocities, including some sites in New York State.

  4. Accelerated stress testing and diagnostic analysis of degradation in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, David S.

    2008-08-01

    Solar cell module reliability is inextricably linked to cell-level reliability. This is particularly so with thin-film technologies. In CdTe, reliability issues historically associate with back contact stability and the use of Cu as an extrinsic dopant. Using a simple approach by which identical cells are heated under open-circuit bias and 1-sun illumination, degradation activation energies of 0.63 and 2.94 eV in laboratory-scale CdS/CdTe devices were identified in the accelerated stress temperature range of 60 to 120 °C. At lower stress temperatures, cell performance changes were linearly correlated with changes in both fill factor (FF) and short-circuit current (Jsc). At higher stress temperatures, changes in efficiency were correlated with changes in FF and open-circuit voltage (Voc). The measured activation energy of 0.63 is associated with Cu-diffusion. During the early stage of stress testing, which may provide additional back contact annealing, improvements in FF were due to Cu-diffusion. Decreased performance observed at longer stress times (decreased FF and Voc), according to a two-diode Pspice model, were due to both increased space-charge recombination (near the junction) and decreased recombination in the bulk. Kirkendall void formation (S-outdiffusion) at the CdS/CdTe interface is given as responsible for the 2.9 eV degradation mechanism.

  5. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) for Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Toxicity and Survival Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dandekar, Prasad; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Kate

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the current protocol of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy was initiated to improve survival while limiting toxicities. Methods and Materials: All patients with ATC from 1991 to 2002 were accrued and received megavoltage radiotherapy from the mastoid processes to the carina up to 60 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.8 and 2 Gy, 6 hours apart. Results: Thirty-one patients were accrued with a median age of 69 years, and 55% were women. Debulking was performed in 26%, and total thyroidectomy, in 6%, whereas 68% received radical radiotherapy alone. Local control data were available for 27 patients: 22% had a complete response, 26% had a partial response, 15% showed progressive disease, and 37% showed static disease. Median overall survival for all 31 patients was 70 days (95% confidence interval, 40-99). There was no significant difference in median survival between patients younger (70 days) and older than 70 years (42 days), between men (70 days) and women (49days), and between patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (77 days) and radical radiotherapy alone (35 days). Grade III or higher skin erythema was seen in 56% patients; desquamation in 21%; dysphagia in 74%; and esophagitis in 79%. Conclusion: The current protocol failed to offer a significant survival benefit, was associated with severe toxicities, and thus was discontinued. There is a suggestion that younger patients with operable disease have longer survival, but this would require a larger study to confirm it.

  6. Fourier analysis of Solar atmospheric numerical simulations accelerated with GPUs (CUDA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marur, A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar dynamics from the convection zone creates a variety of waves that may propagate through the solar atmosphere. These waves are important in facilitating the energy transfer between the sun's surface and the corona as well as propagating energy throughout the solar system. How and where these waves are dissipated remains an open question. Advanced 3D numerical simulations have furthered our understanding of the processes involved. Fourier transforms to understand the nature of the waves by finding the frequency and wavelength of these waves through the simulated atmosphere, as well as the nature of their propagation and where they get dissipated. In order to analyze the different waves produced by the aforementioned simulations and models, Fast Fourier Transform algorithms will be applied. Since the processing of the multitude of different layers of the simulations (of the order of several 100^3 grid points) would be time intensive and inefficient on a CPU, CUDA, a computing architecture that harnesses the power of the GPU, will be used to accelerate the calculations.

  7. Analysis of a Symmetric Terahertz Dielectric-Lined Rectangular Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    We study, using computational methods based on analytic theory as well as a PIC code, the wakefields set up in a seven-zone symmetric rectangular THZ structure, and find that for overall transverse x/y dimensions 2.121 mmx0.6 mm, two 5-GeV drive bunches (3 nC, with x/y/z dimensions 0.3/0.3/0.12 mm{sup 3} as available at SLAC) will set up an axial wakefield {approx}350 MV/m in the witness channel, with a transformer ratio {approx}18-20. The symmetry of the structure ensures not only that small transverse forces are imposed on the witness bunch, but also that the two components of transverse force are equal and opposite at the bunch location so as to enable dynamical stabilization in an accelerator comprising many modules. Transverse forces on the drive bunch tails may allow bunches to move {approx}0.5-1 m without suffering excessive erosion.

  8. Stochastic Modeling and Analysis of Multiple Nonlinear Accelerated Degradation Processes through Information Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fuqiang; Liu, Le; Li, Xiaoyang; Liao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated degradation testing (ADT) is an efficient technique for evaluating the lifetime of a highly reliable product whose underlying failure process may be traced by the degradation of the product’s performance parameters with time. However, most research on ADT mainly focuses on a single performance parameter. In reality, the performance of a modern product is usually characterized by multiple parameters, and the degradation paths are usually nonlinear. To address such problems, this paper develops a new s-dependent nonlinear ADT model for products with multiple performance parameters using a general Wiener process and copulas. The general Wiener process models the nonlinear ADT data, and the dependency among different degradation measures is analyzed using the copula method. An engineering case study on a tuner’s ADT data is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results illustrate that the proposed method is quite effective in estimating the lifetime of a product with s-dependent performance parameters. PMID:27509499

  9. Pharmacokinetic analysis of 14C-ursodiol in newborn infants using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gordi, Toufigh; Baillie, Rebecca; Vuong, Le T; Abidi, Saira; Dueker, Stephen; Vasquez, Herbert; Pegis, Priscilla; Hopper, Andrew O; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies in the neonatal population are often limited by the small volume of blood that can be collected. The high sensitivity of (14) C-accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables pharmacokinetic studies to be conducted with greatly reduced sample volumes. We demonstrated the utility of AMS in infants by studying the plasma pharmacokinetic behavior of nanogram doses of (14) C-ursodiol administered as a non-perturbing microdose or as a microtracer with therapeutic doses of non-labeled ursodiol in infants. Five non-cholestatic infants were administered 3 consecutive oral microdoses of (14) C-ursodiol: 8 ng (1.0 nCi), 26 ng (3.3 nCi), and 80 ng (10 nCi) 48 hours apart. Three additional infants with cholestasis were administered a single 80 ng (10.0 nCi) oral dose of (14) C-ursodiol together with a therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg of non-labeled ursodiol. A pharmacokinetic model describing ursodiol concentrations was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The pharmacokinetics of ursodiol in this pilot study were best described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. This study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of microdose and microtrace methodology in pediatric research.

  10. Analysis of efficient ion acceleration with multi-picosecond LFEX laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Yogo, Akifumi; Mima, Kunioki; Tosaki, Shota; Koga, Keisuke; Nagatomo, Hideo; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Horishi

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate an efficient proton acceleration reaching 30 MeV by using high contrast, kilojoule, picosecond laser LFEX at the peak intensity of 2.3 ×1018 W/cm2. Owing to the large spot size of 70 μm FWHM, the target foil expands one-dimensionally during the multi-picosecond pulse duration time, which yields the electron heating beyond the ponderomotive scaling observed in the experiment. We present by a 1D PIC simulation that the electron temperature evolves in time while the electrons recirculate between the front and rear surfaces of the expanding plasma. A theoretical calculation for the ion maximum energy that takes the temperature evolution into account agrees with the experimental result quantitatively. Being supported by the experiment and simulation, our theoretical model for the non-isothermal plasma expansion dynamics will provide an important basis for understanding the multi-picosecond high intensity laser-plasma interactions and for various applications such as energetic ion beam generation for medical applications and fast ignition-based laser fusion.

  11. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: design, analysis, and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, K D; Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Chandler, G A; Knapp, P F; Leeper, R J; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Torres, J A

    2014-04-01

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r(2) decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm(2) and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  12. An analysis of spatially varying turbulent Prandtl number in a flow with local acceleration and deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunbum; Lee, Wook; Kang, Seongwon; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) is an important parameter in turbulent flows used in many engineering models for heat transfer. In the present study, spatial variation of Prt in a wall-bounded turbulent flow is investigated using DNS. We derived a form of Prt applicable to a general flow configuration, using the least-square method in a manner consistent with the turbulent viscosity model in LES. For a flow subject to local acceleration and deceleration induced by the wall geometry, we performed a parametric study for the Reynolds number, Prandtl number and a geometric factor using DNS. A comparison of the data from DNS and RANS with a constant Prt indicates the potential of improved RANS predictions using the present variable Prt subject to the local flow field. Also, it is observed that the local pressure gradient has an important effect on the Prt field. From the flow statistics, a few flow variables showing higher correlations with Prt are identified. An elementary model for Prt is devised, and used for RANS prediction producing a more accurate prediction of the heat transfer rate. Corresponding author

  13. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer's disease research and development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7-9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5-2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4-9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040.

  14. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  15. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  16. Participation in the definition, conduct, and analysis of particle accelerator experiments for the first Spacelab Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) is a joint endeavor between NASA and the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Sciences (ISAS) in Japan. Its objectives are to use energetic electron beams to investigate beam-atmosphere interactions and beam-plasma interactions in the earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere using the shuttle Spacelab. Two flights of SEPAC have occurred to date (Spacelab 1 on STS-9 in Nov.-Dec. 1983 and ATLAS 1 on STS-45 in Mar.-Apr. 1992). The SEPAC instrumentation is available for future missions, and the scientific results of the first two missions justify further investigations; however, at present there are no identifiable future flight opportunities. As specified in the contract, the primary purpose of this report is to review the scientific accomplishments of the ATLAS 1 SEPAC experiments, which have been documented in the published literature, with only a brief review of the earlier Spacelab 1 results. One of the main results of the Spacelab 1 SEPAC experiments was that the ejection of plasma from the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjet was effective in maintaining vehicle charge neutralization during electron beam firings, but only for a brief period of 10 ms or so. Therefore, a xenon plasma contactor, which can provide continuous vehicle charge neutralization, was developed for the ATLAS 1 SEPAC experiments. Because of the successful operation of the plasma contactor on ATLAS 1, it was possible to perform experiments on beam-plasma interactions and beam-atmosphere interactions at the highest beam power levels of SEPAC. In addition, the ability of the plasma contactor to eject neutral xenon led to a successful experiment on the critical ionization velocity (CIV) phenomena on ATLAS 1.

  17. Mediation Analysis with Survival Outcomes: Accelerated Failure Time vs. Proportional Hazards Models

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Lois A.; MacKinnon, David P.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Baraldi, Amanda N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Survival time is an important type of outcome variable in treatment research. Currently, limited guidance is available regarding performing mediation analyses with survival outcomes, which generally do not have normally distributed errors, and contain unobserved (censored) events. We present considerations for choosing an approach, using a comparison of semi-parametric proportional hazards (PH) and fully parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) approaches for illustration. Method: We compare PH and AFT models and procedures in their integration into mediation models and review their ability to produce coefficients that estimate causal effects. Using simulation studies modeling Weibull-distributed survival times, we compare statistical properties of mediation analyses incorporating PH and AFT approaches (employing SAS procedures PHREG and LIFEREG, respectively) under varied data conditions, some including censoring. A simulated data set illustrates the findings. Results: AFT models integrate more easily than PH models into mediation models. Furthermore, mediation analyses incorporating LIFEREG produce coefficients that can estimate causal effects, and demonstrate superior statistical properties. Censoring introduces bias in the coefficient estimate representing the treatment effect on outcome—underestimation in LIFEREG, and overestimation in PHREG. With LIFEREG, this bias can be addressed using an alternative estimate obtained from combining other coefficients, whereas this is not possible with PHREG. Conclusions: When Weibull assumptions are not violated, there are compelling advantages to using LIFEREG over PHREG for mediation analyses involving survival-time outcomes. Irrespective of the procedures used, the interpretation of coefficients, effects of censoring on coefficient estimates, and statistical properties should be taken into account when reporting results. PMID:27065906

  18. Monitoring the FLASH Cryomodule Transportation from DESY Hamburg to CEA Saclay: Coupler Contact, Vacuum, Acceleration and Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barbanotti, S.; Bosotti, A.; Fusetti, M.; Michelato, P.; Bertolini, A.; Berry, S.; Dorlot, M.; Madec, C.; Napoly, O.; Amirikas, R.; Boehnert, M.; /DESY /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    With a view to the series production of one hundred, 12 m long XFEL 1.3 GHz cryomodules and their transportation from the assembly site at CEA Saclay (F) to the installation site at DESY Hamburg (D) a test transportation of a FLASH cryomodule has been performed, in the condition foreseen for the mass transportation. The present study examines the stresses induced on the module and verifies the damping capabilities of the transport frame in order to minimize risk of damage to the most critical components. During the transportation, acceleration and vibration have been monitored as well as coupler antenna contacts and vacuum performances. This paper describes the analysis performed and compares those results to the data of a similar transportation study at Fermilab for the CM1 cryomodule.

  19. Acceleration analysis of multi-rigid body system and its application for vehicle based stabilized platform system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Luo, Erjuan; Jia, Lei; Liu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The traditional representation of acceleration of a rigid body is given in terms of the angular acceleration and linear acceleration of a point attached to the rigid body. Since this representation has no coordinate invariance, the acceleration transformation of a multi-rigid-body system is complicated. In this paper, the physical meaning of the time derivative of a twist is investigated. It reveals that the rigid-body acceleration comprises the angular acceleration and tangent acceleration of a point which is attached to the rigid body and instantaneously coincident with the origin of frame in use. Their composition presents a six-dimensional representation of the rigid-body acceleration, which is verified to be of coordinate invariance. Based on the representation, the transformation of the rigid-body accelerations is performed conveniently, and the corresponding formula of composition accelerations of one rigid body relative to any other bodies in a multi-rigid-body system is presented. The method is then extended to the application of a vehicle stabilized platform system. The method is verified to be effective by analyzing the virtual prototype of the vehicle-based stabilized platform system. This paper builds a bridge for the six-dimensional rigid-body acceleration from theory achievements to practical application.

  20. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  1. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  2. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  3. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  4. Accelerating analysis for metabolomics, drugs and their metabolites in biological samples using multidimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Blagoj S; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Marriott, Philip J

    2009-05-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the great enabling analytical tools available to the chemical and biochemical analyst for the measurement of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. From the analysis result, it is possible to assess progress in chemical reactions, to monitor environmental pollutants in a wide range of soil, water or air samples, to determine if an athlete or horse trainer has contravened doping laws, or if crude oil has migrated through subsurface rock to a reservoir. Each of these scenarios and samples has an associated implementation method for GC-MS. However, few samples and the associated interpretation of data is as complex or important as biochemical sample analysis for trace drugs or metabolites. Improving the analysis in both the GC and MS domains is a continual search for better separation, selectivity and sensitivity. Multidimensional methods are playing important roles in providing quality data to address the needs of analysts.

  5. Instrumental photon activation analysis using the linear accelerator at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.

    1982-10-01

    Charcoal, charcoal residue, potting soil, aluminum foil, bismuth germanate, and petroleum samples have been investigated using instrumental photon activation analysis (i.e., no radiochemistry). The major and minor elements routinely observed by this nondestructive method were: C, C1, Ca, Fe, Mg, Si, and K. A comprehensive review of the principles of IPAA was also included in the study. The principles were applied to a theoretical analysis of an oil sample in which the trace element concentrations were known. It was concluded that IPAA is a highly sensitive technique which could be used to fingerprint oils.

  6. Data Streaming for Metabolomics: Accelerating Data Processing and Analysis from Days to Minutes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The speed and throughput of analytical platforms has been a driving force in recent years in the “omics” technologies and while great strides have been accomplished in both chromatography and mass spectrometry, data analysis times have not benefited at the same pace. Even though personal computers have become more powerful, data transfer times still represent a bottleneck in data processing because of the increasingly complex data files and studies with a greater number of samples. To meet the demand of analyzing hundreds to thousands of samples within a given experiment, we have developed a data streaming platform, XCMS Stream, which capitalizes on the acquisition time to compress and stream recently acquired data files to data processing servers, mimicking just-in-time production strategies from the manufacturing industry. The utility of this XCMS Online-based technology is demonstrated here in the analysis of T cell metabolism and other large-scale metabolomic studies. A large scale example on a 1000 sample data set demonstrated a 10 000-fold time savings, reducing data analysis time from days to minutes. Further, XCMS Stream has the capability to increase the efficiency of downstream biochemical dependent data acquisition (BDDA) analysis by initiating data conversion and data processing on subsets of data acquired, expanding its application beyond data transfer to smart preliminary data decision-making prior to full acquisition. PMID:27983788

  7. Data Streaming for Metabolomics: Accelerating Data Processing and Analysis from Days to Minutes.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Burke, J Rafael; Aisporna, Aries E; Benton, H Paul; Rinehart, Duane; Fang, Mingliang; Huan, Tao; Warth, Benedikt; Forsberg, Erica; Abe, Brian T; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Wolan, Dennis W; Teyton, Luc; Lairson, Luke; Siuzdak, Gary

    2017-01-17

    The speed and throughput of analytical platforms has been a driving force in recent years in the "omics" technologies and while great strides have been accomplished in both chromatography and mass spectrometry, data analysis times have not benefited at the same pace. Even though personal computers have become more powerful, data transfer times still represent a bottleneck in data processing because of the increasingly complex data files and studies with a greater number of samples. To meet the demand of analyzing hundreds to thousands of samples within a given experiment, we have developed a data streaming platform, XCMS Stream, which capitalizes on the acquisition time to compress and stream recently acquired data files to data processing servers, mimicking just-in-time production strategies from the manufacturing industry. The utility of this XCMS Online-based technology is demonstrated here in the analysis of T cell metabolism and other large-scale metabolomic studies. A large scale example on a 1000 sample data set demonstrated a 10 000-fold time savings, reducing data analysis time from days to minutes. Further, XCMS Stream has the capability to increase the efficiency of downstream biochemical dependent data acquisition (BDDA) analysis by initiating data conversion and data processing on subsets of data acquired, expanding its application beyond data transfer to smart preliminary data decision-making prior to full acquisition.

  8. Industrial applications of accelerator-based infrared sources: Analysis using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bantignies, J.L.; Fuchs, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Carr, G.L.; Dumas, P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared Microspectroscopy, using a globar source, is now widely employed in the industrial environment, for the analysis of various materials. Since synchrotron radiation is a much brighter source, an enhancement of an order of magnitude in lateral resolution can be achieved. Thus, the combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful tool enabling sample regions only few microns size to be studied. This opens up the potential for analyzing small particles. Some examples for hair, bitumen and polymer are presented.

  9. Spectral Analysis of Acceleration Data for Detection of Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyo Sung; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Jongshill; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kang, Joong Koo; Woo, Jihwan

    2017-01-01

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) can be underestimated and can also increase mortality rates. The monitoring devices used to detect GTCS events in daily life are very helpful for early intervention and precise estimation of seizure events. Several studies have introduced methods for GTCS detection using an accelerometer (ACM), electromyography, or electroencephalography. However, these studies need to be improved with respect to accuracy and user convenience. This study proposes the use of an ACM banded to the wrist and spectral analysis of ACM data to detect GTCS in daily life. The spectral weight function dependent on GTCS was used to compute a GTCS-correlated score that can effectively discriminate between GTCS and normal movement. Compared to the performance of the previous temporal method, which used a standard deviation method, the spectral analysis method resulted in better sensitivity and fewer false positive alerts. Finally, the spectral analysis method can be implemented in a GTCS monitoring device using an ACM and can provide early alerts to caregivers to prevent risks associated with GTCS. PMID:28264522

  10. Analysis of the mechanics and deformation characteristics of optical fiber acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-kai; Bo, Yu-ming; Zhou, Ben-mou; Wang, Jun; Huang, Ya-dong

    2016-10-01

    The optical fiber sensor holds many advantages such as smaller volume, lighter weight, higher sensitivity, and stronger anti-interference ability, etc. It can be applied to oil exploration to improve the exploration efficiency, since the underground petroleum distribution can be obtained by detecting and analyzing the echo signals. In this paper, the cantilever beam optical fiber sensor was mainly investigated. Specifically, the finite element analysis method is applied to the numerical analysis of the changes and relations of the optical fiber rail slot elongation on the surface of the PC material fiber winding plate along with the changes of time and power under the action of sine force. The analysis results show that, when the upper and lower quality blocks are under the action of sine force, the cantilever beam optical fiber sensor structure can basically produce synchronized deformation along with the force. And the optical fiber elongation length basically has a linear relationship with the sine force within the time ranges of 0.2 0.4 and 0.6 0.8, which would be beneficial for the subsequent signal acquisition and data processing.

  11. Epistasis underlying female sterility detected in hybrid breakdown in a Japonica-Indica cross of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    Epistasis is considered to be a primary genetic basis of hybrid breakdown. We found novel epistatic genes causing hybrid breakdown in an intraspecific cross of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). F2 progeny derived from a cross between a Japonica variety, Asominori, and an Indica variety, IR24, showed segregation of high sterility for seeds, even though the reciprocal F1 hybrids showed about 60% seed fertility. Backcross populations (BC3F2, BC3F3), obtained from repeated backcrossing with Asominori, showed the segregation of causal genes in a simple Mendelian fashion. Using these populations, we identified that this sterility was hybrid breakdown caused by interaction among three nuclear genes distributed on the both parental genomes. These new genes, designated as hsa1, hsa2, and hsa3, were found to be involved in female gamete development by histological examination. The Indica parent IR24 has a sterile allele, hsa1-IR, which was located at near RFLP marker G148 on chromosome 12, whereas the Japonica parent Asominori has two sterile alleles, hsa2-As on chromosome 8 (close to G104) and hsa3-As on chromosome 9 (close to RM285). Female gametes carrying the hsa1-IR, hsa2-As, and hsa3-As alleles aborted in hsa1-IR homozygous plant, leading to seed sterility and selective elimination of the specific allelic combination. This study provides direct evidence that hybrid breakdown is attributed to epistatic interaction of genes from both parents and suggests that complicated mechanisms has been developed for hybrid breakdown during the evolution of rice.

  12. SU-E-T-627: Failure Modes and Effect Analysis for Monthly Quality Assurance of Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, J; Xiao, Y; Wang, J; Peng, J; Lu, S; Hu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) on routine monthly Quality Assurance (QA) tests (physical tests part) of linear accelerator. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis method was performed for monthly QA procedures. A detailed process tree of monthly QA was created and potential failure modes were defined. Each failure mode may have many influencing factors. For each factor, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of probability of occurrence (O), the severity of effect (S), and detectability of the failure (D). The RPN scores are in a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating stronger correlation to a given influencing factor of a failure mode. Five medical physicists in our institution were responsible to discuss and to define the O, S, D values. Results: 15 possible failure modes were identified and all RPN scores of all influencing factors of these 15 failue modes were from 8 to 150, and the checklist of FMEA in monthly QA was drawn. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Conclusion: The influencing factors of RPN greater than 50 were considered as highly-correlated factors of a certain out-oftolerance monthly QA test. FMEA is a fast and flexible tool to develop an implement a quality management (QM) frame work of monthly QA, which improved the QA efficiency of our QA team. The FMEA work may incorporate more quantification and monitoring fuctions in future.

  13. Quantitative analysis of volatiles in edible oils following accelerated oxidation using broad spectrum isotope standards

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Sacks, Gavin L.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of food volatiles generated by processing are widely reported but comparisons across studies is challenging in part because most reports are inherently semi-quantitative for most analytes due to limited availability of chemical standards. We recently introduced a novel strategy for creation of broad spectrum isotopic standards for accurate quantitative food chemical analysis. Here we apply the principle to quantification of 25 volatiles in seven thermally oxidized edible oils. After extended oxidation, total volatiles of high n-3 oils (flax, fish, cod liver) were 120-170 mg/kg while low n-3 vegetable oils were <50 mg/kg. Separate experiments on thermal degradation of d5-ethyl linolenate indicate that off-aroma volatiles originate throughout the n-3 molecule and not solely the n-3 terminal end. These data represent the first report using broad-spectrum isotopically labeled standards for quantitative characterization of processing-induced volatile generation across related foodstuffs, and verify the origin of specific volatiles from parent n-3 fatty acids. PMID:25529686

  14. BALSA: integrated secondary analysis for whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, accelerated by GPU

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lap-Kei; Cheung, Jeanno; Liu, Chi-Man

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an integrated solution, called BALSA, for the secondary analysis of next generation sequencing data; it exploits the computational power of GPU and an intricate memory management to give a fast and accurate analysis. From raw reads to variants (including SNPs and Indels), BALSA, using just a single computing node with a commodity GPU board, takes 5.5 h to process 50-fold whole genome sequencing (∼750 million 100 bp paired-end reads), or just 25 min for 210-fold whole exome sequencing. BALSA’s speed is rooted at its parallel algorithms to effectively exploit a GPU to speed up processes like alignment, realignment and statistical testing. BALSA incorporates a 16-genotype model to support the calling of SNPs and Indels and achieves competitive variant calling accuracy and sensitivity when compared to the ensemble of six popular variant callers. BALSA also supports efficient identification of somatic SNVs and CNVs; experiments showed that BALSA recovers all the previously validated somatic SNVs and CNVs, and it is more sensitive for somatic Indel detection. BALSA outputs variants in VCF format. A pileup-like SNAPSHOT format, while maintaining the same fidelity as BAM in variant calling, enables efficient storage and indexing, and facilitates the App development of downstream analyses. BALSA is available at: http://sourceforge.net/p/balsa. PMID:24949238

  15. BALSA: integrated secondary analysis for whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, accelerated by GPU.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ruibang; Wong, Yiu-Lun; Law, Wai-Chun; Lee, Lap-Kei; Cheung, Jeanno; Liu, Chi-Man; Lam, Tak-Wah

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an integrated solution, called BALSA, for the secondary analysis of next generation sequencing data; it exploits the computational power of GPU and an intricate memory management to give a fast and accurate analysis. From raw reads to variants (including SNPs and Indels), BALSA, using just a single computing node with a commodity GPU board, takes 5.5 h to process 50-fold whole genome sequencing (∼750 million 100 bp paired-end reads), or just 25 min for 210-fold whole exome sequencing. BALSA's speed is rooted at its parallel algorithms to effectively exploit a GPU to speed up processes like alignment, realignment and statistical testing. BALSA incorporates a 16-genotype model to support the calling of SNPs and Indels and achieves competitive variant calling accuracy and sensitivity when compared to the ensemble of six popular variant callers. BALSA also supports efficient identification of somatic SNVs and CNVs; experiments showed that BALSA recovers all the previously validated somatic SNVs and CNVs, and it is more sensitive for somatic Indel detection. BALSA outputs variants in VCF format. A pileup-like SNAPSHOT format, while maintaining the same fidelity as BAM in variant calling, enables efficient storage and indexing, and facilitates the App development of downstream analyses. BALSA is available at: http://sourceforge.net/p/balsa.

  16. Quantitative analysis of volatiles in edible oils following accelerated oxidation using broad spectrum isotope standards.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Sacks, Gavin L; Brenna, J Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of food volatiles generated by processing are widely reported but comparisons across studies is challenging in part because most reports are inherently semi-quantitative for most analytes due to limited availability of chemical standards. We recently introduced a novel strategy for creation of broad spectrum isotopic standards for accurate quantitative food chemical analysis. Here we apply the principle to quantification of 25 volatiles in seven thermally oxidised edible oils. After extended oxidation, total volatiles of high n-3 oils (flax, fish, cod liver) were 120-170 mg/kg while low n-3 vegetable oils were <50mg/kg. Separate experiments on thermal degradation of d5-ethyl linolenate indicate that off-aroma volatiles originate throughout the n-3 molecule and not solely the n-3 terminal end. These data represent the first report using broad-spectrum isotopically labelled standards for quantitative characterisation of processing-induced volatile generation across related foodstuffs, and verify the origin of specific volatiles from parent n-3 fatty acids.

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis on Wearable Acceleration Sensors in Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Janidarmian, Majid; Roshan Fekr, Atena; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Sensor-based motion recognition integrates the emerging area of wearable sensors with novel machine learning techniques to make sense of low-level sensor data and provide rich contextual information in a real-life application. Although Human Activity Recognition (HAR) problem has been drawing the attention of researchers, it is still a subject of much debate due to the diverse nature of human activities and their tracking methods. Finding the best predictive model in this problem while considering different sources of heterogeneities can be very difficult to analyze theoretically, which stresses the need of an experimental study. Therefore, in this paper, we first create the most complete dataset, focusing on accelerometer sensors, with various sources of heterogeneities. We then conduct an extensive analysis on feature representations and classification techniques (the most comprehensive comparison yet with 293 classifiers) for activity recognition. Principal component analysis is applied to reduce the feature vector dimension while keeping essential information. The average classification accuracy of eight sensor positions is reported to be 96.44% ± 1.62% with 10-fold evaluation, whereas accuracy of 79.92% ± 9.68% is reached in the subject-independent evaluation. This study presents significant evidence that we can build predictive models for HAR problem under more realistic conditions, and still achieve highly accurate results. PMID:28272362

  18. Analysis of the orbit errors in the CERN accelerators using model simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Kleban, S.; Clearwater, S.; Scandale, W.; Pettersson, T.; Kugler, H.; Riche, A.; Chanel, M.; Martensson, E.; Lin, In-Ho

    1987-09-01

    This paper will describe the use of the PLUS program to find various types of machine and beam errors such as, quadrupole strength, dipole strength, beam position monitors (BPMs), energy profile, and beam launch. We refer to this procedure as the GOLD (Generic Orbit and Lattice Debugger) Method which is a general technique that can be applied to analysis of errors in storage rings and transport lines. One useful feature of the Method is that it analyzes segments of a machine at a time so that the application and efficiency is independent of the size of the overall machine. Because the techniques are the same for all the types of problems it solves, the user need learn only how to find one type of error in order to use the program.

  19. Accelerated convergence of neural network system identification algorithms via principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, David C.; Davis, Lawrence D.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1998-12-01

    While significant theoretical and experimental progress has been made in the development of neural network-based systems for the autonomous identification and control of space platforms, there remain important unresolved issues associated with the reliable prediction of convergence speed and the avoidance of inordinately slow convergence. To speed convergence of neural identifiers, we introduce the preprocessing of identifier inputs using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithms. Which automatically transform the neural identifier's external inputs so as to make the correlation matrix identity, resulting in enormous improvements in the convergence speed of the neural identifier. From a study of several such algorithms, we developed a new PCA approach which exhibits excellent convergence properties, insensitivity to noise and reliable accuracy.

  20. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  1. Accelerating the weighted histogram analysis method by direct inversion in the iterative subspace

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Lai, Chun-Liang; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) for free energy calculations is a valuable tool to produce free energy differences with the minimal errors. Given multiple simulations, WHAM obtains from the distribution overlaps the optimal statistical estimator of the density of states, from which the free energy differences can be computed. The WHAM equations are often solved by an iterative procedure. In this work, we use a well-known linear algebra algorithm which allows for more rapid convergence to the solution. We find that the computational complexity of the iterative solution to WHAM and the closely-related multiple Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method can be improved by using the method of direct inversion in the iterative subspace. We give examples from a lattice model, a simple liquid and an aqueous protein solution. PMID:27453632

  2. Comparing proportional hazards and accelerated failure time models for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Jesus; Ferreira, Eva; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2002-11-30

    This paper describes a method proposed for a censored linear regression model that can be used in the context of survival analysis. The method has the important characteristic of allowing estimation and inference without knowing the distribution of the duration variable. Moreover, it does not need the assumption of proportional hazards. Therefore, it can be an interesting alternative to the Cox proportional hazards models when this assumption does not hold. In addition, implementation and interpretation of the results is simple. In order to analyse the performance of this methodology, we apply it to two real examples and we carry out a simulation study. We present its results together with those obtained with the traditional Cox model and AFT parametric models. The new proposal seems to lead to more precise results.

  3. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  6. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  8. Accelerated fluctuation analysis by graphic cards and complex pattern formation in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Virnau, Peter; Paul, Wolfgang; Schneider, Johannes J.

    2009-09-01

    The compute unified device architecture is an almost conventional programming approach for managing computations on a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a data-parallel computing device. With a maximum number of 240 cores in combination with a high memory bandwidth, a recent GPU offers resources for computational physics. We apply this technology to methods of fluctuation analysis, which includes determination of the scaling behavior of a stochastic process and the equilibrium autocorrelation function. Additionally, the recently introduced pattern formation conformity (Preis T et al 2008 Europhys. Lett. 82 68005), which quantifies pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series, is calculated on a GPU and analyzed in detail. Results are obtained up to 84 times faster than on a current central processing unit core. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series of the German BUND future, we find significant pattern-based correlations on short time scales. Furthermore, an anti-persistent behavior can be found on short time scales. Additionally, we compare the recent GPU generation, which provides a theoretical peak performance of up to roughly 1012 floating point operations per second with the previous one. .

  9. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  10. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  11. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 °C, 65 °C, and 80 °C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  12. Arrhenius time-scaled least squares: a simple, robust approach to accelerated stability data analysis for bioproducts.

    PubMed

    Rauk, Adam P; Guo, Kevin; Hu, Yanling; Cahya, Suntara; Weiss, William F

    2014-08-01

    Defining a suitable product presentation with an acceptable stability profile over its intended shelf-life is one of the principal challenges in bioproduct development. Accelerated stability studies are routinely used as a tool to better understand long-term stability. Data analysis often employs an overall mass action kinetics description for the degradation and the Arrhenius relationship to capture the temperature dependence of the observed rate constant. To improve predictive accuracy and precision, the current work proposes a least-squares estimation approach with a single nonlinear covariate and uses a polynomial to describe the change in a product attribute with respect to time. The approach, which will be referred to as Arrhenius time-scaled (ATS) least squares, enables accurate, precise predictions to be achieved for degradation profiles commonly encountered during bioproduct development. A Monte Carlo study is conducted to compare the proposed approach with the common method of least-squares estimation on the logarithmic form of the Arrhenius equation and nonlinear estimation of a first-order model. The ATS least squares method accommodates a range of degradation profiles, provides a simple and intuitive approach for data presentation, and can be implemented with ease.

  13. Structural dynamics of the monoamine transporter homolog LeuT from accelerated conformational sampling and channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James R; Gedeon, Patrick C; Madura, Jeffry D

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial leucine transporter LeuT retains significant secondary structure similarities to the human monoamine transporters (MAT) such as the dopamine and serotonin reuptake proteins. The primary method of computational study of the MATs has been through the use of the crystallized LeuT structure. Different conformations of LeuT can give insight into mechanistic details of the MAT family. A conformational sampling performed through accelerated molecular dynamics simulations testing different combinations of the leucine substrate and bound sodium ions revealed seven distinct conformational clusters. Further analysis has been performed to target salt-bridge residues R30-D404, Y108-F253, and R5-D369 and transmembrane domains on both the seven isolated structures and the total trajectories. In addition, solvent accessibility of LeuT and its substrate binding pockets has been analyzed using a program for calculating channel radii. Occupation of the Na2 site stabilizes the outward conformation and should bind to the open outward conformation before the leucine and Na1 sodium while two possible pathways were found to be available for intracellular transport.

  14. Zebrafish scales respond differently to in vitro dynamic and static acceleration: analysis of interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kei-ichiro; Takahira, Koh; Inari, Masato; Satoh, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Kondo, Takashi; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Chen, Wenxi; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2013-09-01

    Zebrafish scales consist of bone-forming osteoblasts, bone-resorbing osteoclasts, and calcified bone matrix. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of the effects induced by dynamic and static acceleration, we investigated the scale osteoblast- and osteoclast-specific marker gene expression involving osteoblast-osteoclast communication molecules. Osteoblasts express RANKL, which binds to the osteoclast surface receptor, RANK, and stimulates bone resorption. OPG, on the other hand, is secreted by osteoblast as a decoy receptor for RANKL, prevents RANKL from binding to RANK and thus prevents bone resorption. Therefore, the RANK-RANKL-OPG pathway contributes to the regulation of osteoclastogenesis by osteoblasts. Semaphorin 4D, in contrast, is expressed on osteoclasts, and binding to its receptor Plexin-B1 on osteoblasts results in suppression of bone formation. In the present study, we found that both dynamic and static acceleration at 3.0×g decreased RANKL/OPG ratio and increased osteoblast-specific functional mRNA such as alkaline phosphatase, while static acceleration increased and dynamic acceleration decreased osteoclast-specific mRNA such as cathepsin K. Static acceleration increased semaphorin 4D mRNA expression, while dynamic acceleration had no effect. The results of the present study indicated that osteoclasts have predominant control over bone metabolism via semaphorin 4D expression induced by static acceleration at 3.0×g.

  15. The radiation field measurement and analysis outside the shielding of A 10 MeV electron irradiation accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jing; Li, Juexin; Xu, Bing; Li, Yuxiong

    2011-10-01

    Electron accelerators are employed widely for diverse purposes in the irradiation-processing industry, from sterilizing medical products to treating gemstones. Because accelerators offer high efficiency, high power, and require little preventative maintenance, they are becoming more and more popular than using the 60Co isotope approach. However, the electron accelerator exposes potential radiation hazards. To protect workers and the public from exposure to radiation, the radiation field around the electronic accelerator must be assessed, especially that outside the shielding. Thus, we measured the radiation dose at different positions outside the shielding of a 10-MeV electron accelerator using a new data-acquisition unit named Mini-DDL (Mini-Digital Data Logging). The measurements accurately reflect the accelerator's radiation status. In this paper, we present our findings, results and compare them with our theoretical calculations. We conclude that the measurements taken outside the irradiation hall are consistent with the findings from our calculations, except in the maze outside the door of the accelerator room. We discuss the reason for this discrepancy.

  16. Genetic basis of heterosis for growth-related traits in Arabidopsis investigated by testcross progenies of near-isogenic lines reveals a significant role of epistasis.

    PubMed

    Melchinger, Albrecht E; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Utz, H Friedrich; Muminovic, Jasmina; Wegenast, Thilo; Törjék, Otto; Altmann, Thomas; Kusterer, Barbara

    2007-11-01

    Epistasis seems to play a significant role in the manifestation of heterosis. However, the power of detecting epistatic interactions among quantitative trait loci (QTL) in segregating populations is low. We studied heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana hybrid C24 x Col-0 by testing near-isogenic lines (NILs) and their triple testcross (TTC) progenies. Our objectives were to (i) provide the theoretical basis for estimating different types of genetic effects with this experimental design, (ii) determine the extent of heterosis for seven growth-related traits, (iii) map the underlying QTL, and (iv) determine their gene action. Two substitution libraries, each consisting of 28 NILs and covering approximately 61 and 39% of the Arabidopsis genome, were assayed by 110 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. With our novel generation means approach 38 QTL were detected, many of which confirmed heterotic QTL detected previously in the same cross with TTC progenies of recombinant inbred lines. Furthermore, many of the QTL were common for different traits and in common with the 58 QTL detected by a method that compares triplets consisting of a NIL, its recurrent parent, and their F(1) cross. While the latter approach revealed mostly (75%) overdominant QTL, the former approach allowed separation of dominance and epistasis by analyzing all materials simultaneously and yielded substantial positive additive x additive effects besides directional dominance. Positive epistatic effects reduced heterosis for growth-related traits in our materials.

  17. A haplotype-based algorithm for multilocus linkage disequilibrium mapping of quantitative trait loci with epistasis.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Casella, George; Littell, Ramon C; Yang, Mark C K; Johnson, Julie A; Wu, Rongling

    2003-04-01

    For tightly linked loci, cosegregation may lead to nonrandom associations between alleles in a population. Because of its evolutionary relationship with linkage, this phenomenon is called linkage disequilibrium. Today, linkage disequilibrium-based mapping has become a major focus of recent genome research into mapping complex traits. In this article, we present a new statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) of additive, dominant, and epistatic effects in equilibrium natural populations. Our method is based on haplotype analysis of multilocus linkage disequilibrium and exhibits two significant advantages over current disequilibrium mapping methods. First, we have derived closed-form solutions for estimating the marker-QTL haplotype frequencies within the maximum-likelihood framework implemented by the EM algorithm. The allele frequencies of putative QTL and their linkage disequilibria with the markers are estimated by solving a system of regular equations. This procedure has significantly improved the computational efficiency and the precision of parameter estimation. Second, our method can detect marker-QTL disequilibria of different orders and QTL epistatic interactions of various kinds on the basis of a multilocus analysis. This can not only enhance the precision of parameter estimation, but also make it possible to perform whole-genome association studies. We carried out extensive simulation studies to examine the robustness and statistical performance of our method. The application of the new method was validated using a case study from humans, in which we successfully detected significant QTL affecting human body heights. Finally, we discuss the implications of our method for genome projects and its extension to a broader circumstance. The computer program for the method proposed in this article is available at the webpage http://www.ifasstat.ufl.edu/genome/~LD.

  18. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  19. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  20. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  1. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  2. Parallelism and Epistasis in Skeletal Evolution Identified through Use of Phylogenomic Mapping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Daane, Jacob M.; Rohner, Nicolas; Konstantinidis, Peter; Djuranovic, Sergej; Harris, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of genetic mechanisms underlying evolutionary change is critical to our understanding of natural diversity, but is presently limited by the lack of genetic and genomic resources for most species. Here, we present a new comparative genomic approach that can be applied to a broad taxonomic sampling of nonmodel species to investigate the genetic basis of evolutionary change. Using our analysis pipeline, we show that duplication and divergence of fgfr1a is correlated with the reduction of scales within fishes of the genus Phoxinellus. As a parallel genetic mechanism is observed in scale-reduction within independent lineages of cypriniforms, our finding exposes significant developmental constraint guiding morphological evolution. In addition, we identified fixed variation in fgf20a within Phoxinellus and demonstrated that combinatorial loss-of-function of fgfr1a and fgf20a within zebrafish phenocopies the evolved scalation pattern. Together, these findings reveal epistatic interactions between fgfr1a and fgf20a as a developmental mechanism regulating skeletal variation among fishes. PMID:26452532

  3. Epistasis contributes to the genetic buffering of plasma HDL cholesterol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Stressful environmental factors, such as a high-fat diet, can induce responses in the expression of genes that act to maintain physiological homeostasis. We observed variation in plasma concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol across inbred mouse strains in response to high dietary fat intake. Several strains, including C57BL/6J, have stable levels of plasma HDL independent of diet, whereas other strains, including DBA2/J, show marked changes in plasma HDL. To explore this phenomenon further, we used publicly available data from a C57BL/6J × DBA/2J intercross to identify genetic factors that associate with HDL under high-fat diet conditions. Our analysis identified an epistatic interaction that plays a role in the buffering of HDL levels in C57BL/6J mice, and we have identified Arl4d as a candidate gene that mediates this effect. Structural modeling further elucidates the interaction of genetic factors that contribute to the robustness of HDL in response to high-fat diet in the C57BL/6J strain. PMID:20858711

  4. Comprehensive analysis of PEGylated liposome-associated proteins relating to the accelerated blood clearance phenomenon by combination with shotgun analysis and conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Munehira; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Shimizu, Taro; Sagawa, Ikuko; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    PEGylated liposome, sterically stabilized by polyethylene glycol (PEG), results in reduced recognition of the liposome by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Recently, we reported regarding the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon that PEGylated liposome is cleared very rapidly from blood circulation upon repeated injection. Anti-PEG IgM production and subsequent complement activation were crucial in causing the ABC phenomenon. However, there still remains the possibility that unknown plasma factors might affect the fate of PEGylated liposome that is subjected to the ABC phenomenon. A label-free approach to shotgun analysis is a great tool for characterizing proteins in a biological system. In this study, therefore, a shotgun analysis was employed to identify plasma protein bound on PEGylated liposome after the ABC phenomenon was induced in the mouse model. The analysis revealed that immunoglobulin and complement components (C1 and C3) are the major proteins. Subsequent analysis with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting showed that the immunoglobulin was IgM and that the complement system was mainly activated via an anti-PEG IgM-mediated classical pathway. These results support our earlier assumptions-anti-PEG IgM and complement activation were the major causes of the ABC phenomenon. Our proposed analytical strategy would be expected to provide useful information for the development and design of the nanocarrier drug delivery system.

  5. Precision and accuracy in the quantitative analysis of biological samples by accelerator mass spectrometry: application in microdose absolute bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Li, Jing; Kasserra, Claudia; Song, Qi; Arjomand, Ali; Hesk, David; Chowdhury, Swapan K

    2011-07-15

    Determination of the pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of an experimental compound, SCH 900518, following a 89.7 nCi (100 μg) intravenous (iv) dose of (14)C-SCH 900518 2 h post 200 mg oral administration of nonradiolabeled SCH 900518 to six healthy male subjects has been described. The plasma concentration of SCH 900518 was measured using a validated LC-MS/MS system, and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used for quantitative plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentration determination. Calibration standards and quality controls were included for every batch of sample analysis by AMS to ensure acceptable quality of the assay. Plasma (14)C-SCH 900518 concentrations were derived from the regression function established from the calibration standards, rather than directly from isotopic ratios from AMS measurement. The precision and accuracy of quality controls and calibration standards met the requirements of bioanalytical guidance (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Center for Veterinary Medicine. Guidance for Industry: Bioanalytical Method Validation (ucm070107), May 2001. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceCompilanceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm070107.pdf ). The AMS measurement had a linear response range from 0.0159 to 9.07 dpm/mL for plasma (14)C-SCH 900158 concentrations. The CV and accuracy were 3.4-8.5% and 94-108% (82-119% for the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ)), respectively, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The absolute bioavailability was calculated from the dose-normalized area under the curve of iv and oral doses after the plasma concentrations were plotted vs the sampling time post oral dose. The mean absolute bioavailability of SCH 900518 was 40.8% (range 16.8-60.6%). The typical accuracy and standard deviation in AMS quantitative analysis of drugs from human plasma samples have been reported for the first time, and the impact of these

  6. Epistasis and inheritance of plant habit and fruit quality traits in ornamental pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Santos, R M C; do Rêgo, E R; Borém, A; Nascimento, M F; Nascimento, N F F; Finger, F L; Rêgo, M M

    2014-10-31

    Two accessions of ornamental pepper Capsicum annuum L., differing in most of the characters studied, were crossed, resulting in the F1 generation, and the F2 generation was obtained through self-fertilization of the F1 generation. The backcross generations RC1 and RC2 were obtained through crossing between F1 and the parents P1 and P2, respectively. Morpho-agronomic characterization was performed based on the 19 quantitative descriptors of Capsicum. The data obtained were subjected to generation analysis, in which the means and additive variance (σa(2)), variance due to dominance deviation (σd(2)), phenotypic variance (σf(2)), genetic variance (σg(2)) and environmental variance (σm(2)) were calculated. For the full model, we estimated the mean effects of all possible homozygotes, additives, dominants, and epistatics: additive-additive, additive-dominant, and dominant-dominant. For the additive-dominant model, we estimated the additive effects, dominant effects and mean effects of possible homozygotes. The character fruit dry matter had the lowest value for broad sense heritability (0.42), and the highest values were found for fresh matter and fruit weight, 0.91 and 0.92, respectively. The lowest value for narrow sense heritability was for the minor fruit diameter character (0.33), and the highest values were found for seed yield per fruit and fresh matter, 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. The additive-dominant model explained only the variation found in plant height, canopy width, stem length, corolla diameter, leaf width, and pedicel length, but in the other characters, the epistatic effects showed significant values.

  7. Two – three loci control scleral ossicle formation via epistasis in the cavefish Astyanax mexicanus

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Anastasia; Powers, Amanda K.; Gross, Joshua B.; O’Quin, Kelly E.

    2017-01-01

    The sclera is the protective outer layer of the eye. In fishes, birds, and reptiles, the sclera may be reinforced with additional bony elements called scleral ossicles. Teleost fish vary in the number and size of scleral ossicles; however, the genetic mechanisms responsible for this variation remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine the inheritance of scleral ossicles in the Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, which exhibits both a cave morph and a surface fish morph. As these morphs and their hybrids collectively exhibit zero, one, and two scleral ossicles, they represent a microcosm of teleost scleral ossicle diversity. Our previous research in F2 hybrids of cavefish from Pachón cave and surface fish from Texas suggested that three genes likely influence the formation of scleral ossicles in this group through an epistatic threshold model of inheritance, though our sample size was small. In this study, we expand our sample size using additional hybrids of Pachón cavefish and Mexican surface fish to (1) confirm the threshold model of inheritance, (2) refine the number of genes responsible for scleral ossicle formation, and (3) increase our power to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for this trait. To answer these three questions, we scored surface fish and cavefish F2 hybrids for the presence of zero, one, or two scleral ossicles. We then analyzed their distribution among the F2 hybrids using a chi-square (χ2) test, and used a genetic linkage map of over 100 microsatellite markers to identify QTL responsible for scleral ossicle number. We found that inheritance of scleral ossicles follows an epistatic threshold model of inheritance controlled by two genes, which contrasts the three-locus model estimated from our previous study. Finally, the combined analysis of hybrids from both crosses identified two strong QTL for scleral ossicle number on linkage groups 4.2 and 21, and a weaker QTL on linkage group 4.1. Scleral ossification remains a complex

  8. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  9. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  10. GPU-accelerated nonparametric kinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data from glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Han H; Ferl, Gregory Z; Ng, Chee M

    2013-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is often used to examine vascular function in malignant tumors and noninvasively monitor drug efficacy of antivascular therapies in clinical studies. However, complex numerical methods used to derive tumor physiological properties from DCE-MRI images can be time-consuming and computationally challenging. Recent advancement of computing technology in graphics processing unit (GPU) makes it possible to build an energy-efficient and high-power parallel computing platform for solving complex numerical problems. This study develops the first reported fast GPU-based method for nonparametric kinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data using clinical scans of glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®). In the method, contrast agent concentration-time profiles in arterial blood and tumor tissue are smoothed using a robust kernel-based regression algorithm in order to remove artifacts due to patient motion and then deconvolved to produce the impulse response function (IRF). The area under the curve (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) of the IRF are calculated using statistical moment analysis, and two tumor physiological properties that relate to vascular permeability, volume transfer constant between blood plasma and extravascular extracellular space (K(trans)) and fractional interstitial volume (ve) are estimated using the approximations AUC/MRT and AUC. The most significant feature in this method is the use of GPU-computing to analyze data from more than 60,000 voxels in each DCE-MRI image in parallel fashion. All analysis steps have been automated in a single program script that requires only blood and tumor data as the sole input. The GPU-accelerated method produces K(trans) and ve estimates that are comparable to results from previous studies but reduces computational time by more than 80-fold compared to a previously reported central processing unit-based nonparametric method. Furthermore, it is at

  11. Impact accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  12. Concomitant radiochemotherapy or accelerated radiotherapy: analysis of two randomized trials of the French Head and Neck Cancer Group (GORTEC).

    PubMed

    Bourhis, J; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M; Tortochaux, J; Alfonsi, M; Sire, C; Bardet, E; Rives, M; Bergerot, P; Rhein, B; Desprez, B

    2004-12-01

    In the early 1990s, when conventional radiotherapy (RT) was the standard of care in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), two main options were being tested to improve the efficacy and the therapeutic ratio of RT. The first approach evaluated the effect of adding chemotherapy (CT) simultaneously to RT (RT-CT), while the second approach assessed the effect of modified fractionated RT. To answer these two questions, in 1994, the French Group for Head and Neck Oncology Radiotherapy (GORTEC) initiated two randomized trials. A total of 494 patients were entered in these two parallel phase III multicenter trials comparing conventional RT (70 Gy in 35 fractions) either with concomitant RT-CT (226 patients; 70 Gy in 35 fractions with three cycles of a 4-day regimen comprising carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil [5FU]) or with very accelerated RT (268 patients) delivering 64 Gy in 3 weeks. The 5-year overall survival (OS), specific disease-free survival (DFS), and local-regional control rates were improved in favor of simultaneous RT-CT, whereas local-regional control was significantly improved with accelerated RT, along with a marginal effect on OS and DFS. This increased antitumor efficacy was in both cases associated with a marked increase in acute RT-induced toxicity, which was more pronounced with accelerated RT, whereas late effects were marginally increased with the addition of CT and not influenced by accelerated RT. We conclude that both concomitant RT-CT and accelerated RT improved tumor control rates, as compared to conventional RT, along with increased but manageable toxicity. The two regimens are currently being tested in an ongoing randomized study and also being compared to moderately accelerated RT and concomitant CT.

  13. Analysis of recombination QTLs, segregation distortion, and epistasis for fitness in maize multiple populations using ultra-high-density markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the maize genomic features would be useful for the study of genetic diversity and evolution and for maize breeding. Here, we used two maize nested association mapping (NAM) populations separately derived in China (CN-NAM) and the US (US-NAM) to explore the maize genomic features. The t...

  14. Analysis of genetic association and epistasis interactions between circadian clock genes and symptom dimensions of bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Pawlak, Joanna; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Zaremba, Dorota; Skibinska, Maria; Hauser, Joanna

    2014-07-01

    Bipolar affective disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by periodic changes in mood from depression to mania. Disruptions of biological rhythms increase risk of mood disorders. Because clinical representation of disease is heterogeneous, homogenous sets of patients are suggested to use in the association analyses. In our study, we aimed to apply previously computed structure of bipolar disorder symptom dimension for analyses of genetic association. We based quantitative trait on: main depression, sleep disturbances, appetite disturbances, excitement and psychotic dimensions consisted of OPCRIT checklist items. We genotyped 42 polymorphisms from circadian clock genes: PER3, ARNTL, CLOCK and TIMELSSS from 511 patients BD (n = 292 women and n = 219 men). As quantitative trait we used clinical dimensions, described above. Genetic associations between alleles and quantitative trait were performed using applied regression models applied in PLINK. In addition, we used the Kruskal-Wallis test to look for associations between genotypes and quantitative trait. During second stage of our analyses, we used multidimensional scaling (multifactor dimensionality reduction) for quantitative trait to compute pairwise epistatic interactions between circadian gene variants. We found association between ARNTL variant rs11022778 main depression (p = 0.00047) and appetite disturbances (p = 0.004). In epistatic interaction analyses, we observed two locus interactions between sleep disturbances (p = 0.007; rs11824092 of ARNTL and rs11932595 of CLOCK) as well as interactions of subdimension in main depression and ARNTL variants (p = 0.0011; rs3789327, rs10766075) and appetite disturbances in depression and ARNTL polymorphism (p = 7 × 10(-4); rs11022778, rs156243).

  15. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  16. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  17. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  18. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a multi-track'' simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  19. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a ``multi-track`` simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  20. SHORT ACCELERATION TIMES FROM SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-10

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  1. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  2. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  3. Critical Issues in Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Hosokai, T.

    2004-10-01

    Updated achievements and critical issues in plasma accelerators are summarized. As to laser plasma accelerators, we cover the results of plasma cathodes by U.Michigan, LBNL, LOA and U.Tokyo. Although many new results of accelerated electrons have been reported, the electrons do not yet form a bunch with narrow energy spread. Several injection schemes and measurements to verify ultrashort bunch (tens fs) with narrow energy spread, low emittance and many charges are planned. E-162 experiments by UCLA / USC / SLAC and a newly proposed experiment on density transition trapping are introduced for electron beam driven plasma accelerators. Their main purpose is realization of GeV plasma accelerator, but application to pump-and-probe analysis for investigation of ultrafast quantum phenomena is also promising.

  4. Damage Based Analysis (DBA): Theory, Derivation and Practical Application - Using Both an Acceleration and Pseudo-Velocity Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, Vince

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to give a brief overview of the theory behind the (DBA) method, an overview of the derivation and a practical application of the theory using the Python computer language. The Theory and Derivation will use both Acceleration and Pseudo Velocity methods to derive a series of equations for processing by Python. We will take the results and compare both Acceleration and Pseudo Velocity methods and discuss implementation of the Python functions. Also, we will discuss the efficiency of the methods and the amount of computer time required for the solution. In conclusion, (DBA) offers a powerful method to evaluate the amount of energy imparted into a system in the form of both Amplitude and Duration during qualification testing and flight environments. Many forms of steady state and transient vibratory motion can be characterized using this technique. (DBA) provides a more robust alternative to traditional methods such Power Spectral Density (PSD) using a Maximax approach.

  5. An Wearable Energy Expenditure Analysis System based on the 15-channel Whole-body Segment Acceleration Measurement.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongwon; Jung, M; Kang, Jaemin; Chan Kim, Hee

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of the amount of energy utilized during physical activity has generated considerable interests from various groups ranging from exercise physiologists to nutritionists and fitness center workers. To date, however, the existing energy expenditure estimation methods are not so reliable and compact. In this paper, we propose a new method for accurately and easily estimating energy expenditure during physical activity with a novel algorithm. This method involves acquiring acceleration signals through a 15-channel whole-body segment acceleration measurement system and then estimating the calories expended using a newly developed algorithm. The results of 3 subjects' experiments were compared with a commercially available mask type indirect calorimeter and a 9-axis accelerometry-based calorimeter. The results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a new and reliable way to estimate human energy expenditure during physical activity.

  6. Analysis of peripheral doses for base of tongue treatment by linear accelerator and helical TomoTherapy IMRT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian Richard; Lamba, Michael A S; Elson, Howard R

    2010-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral doses to various organs from a typical head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered by linear accelerator (linac) and helical TomoTherapy. Multiple human CT data sets were used to segment critical structures and organs at risk, fused and adjusted to an anthropomorphic phantom. Eighteen contours were designated for thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) placement. Following the RTOG IMRT Protocol 0522, treatment of the primary tumor and involved nodes (PTV70) and subclinical disease sites (PTV56) was planned utilizing IMRT to 70Gy and 56 Gy. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were produced for linac and TomoTherapy treatments. TLDs were placed and each treatment plan was delivered to the anthropomorphic phantom four times. Within 2.5 cm (one helical TomoTherapy field width) superior and inferior to the field edges, normal tissue doses were on average 45% lower using linear accelerator. Beyond 2.5 cm, the helical TomoTherapy normal tissue dose was an average of 52% lower. The majority of points proved to be statistically different using the Student's t-test with p > 0.05. Using one method of calculation, probability of a secondary malignancy was 5.88% for the linear accelerator and 4.08% for helical TomoTherapy. Helical TomoTherapy delivers more dose than a linac immediately above and below the treatment field, contributing to the higher peripheral doses adjacent to the field. At distances beyond one field width (where leakage is dominant), helical TomoTherapy doses are lower than linear accelerator doses.

  7. Systematic Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Brain Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Qin, Chunxia; Cao, Guoqiong; Xin, Wenfeng; Feng, Chengqiang; Zhang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, despite considerable research in this area, the comprehensive and systematic understanding of lncRNAs in AD is still limited. The emergence of RNA sequencing provides a predictor and has incomparable advantage compared with other methods, including microarray. In this study, we identified lncRNAs in a 7-month-old mouse brain through deep RNA sequencing using the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) models. A total of 599,985,802 clean reads and 23,334 lncRNA transcripts were obtained. Then, we identified 97 significantly upregulated and 114 significantly downregulated lncRNA transcripts from all cases in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1 mice. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that these significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were involved in regulating the development of AD from various angles, such as nerve growth factor term (GO: 1990089), mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, and AD pathway. Furthermore, the most probable AD-associated lncRNAs were predicted and listed in detail. Our study provided the systematic dissection of lncRNA profiling in SAMP8 mouse brain and accelerated the development of lncRNA biomarkers in AD. These attracting biomarkers could provide significant insights into AD therapy in the future. PMID:27483026

  8. Inertia Coupling Analysis of a Self-Decoupled Wheel Force Transducer under Multi-Axis Acceleration Fields

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lihang; Lin, Guoyu; Zhang, Weigong; Dai, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Wheel force transducer (WFT), which measures the three-axis forces and three-axis torques applied to the wheel, is an important instrument in the vehicle testing field and has been extremely promoted by researchers with great interests. The transducer, however, is typically mounted on the wheel of a moving vehicle, especially on a high speed car, when abruptly accelerating or braking, the mass/inertia of the transducer/wheel itself will have an extra effect on the sensor response so that the inertia/mass loads will also be detected and coupled into the signal outputs. The effect which is considered to be inertia coupling problem will decrease the sensor accuracy. In this paper, the inertia coupling of a universal WFT under multi-axis accelerations is investigated. According to the self-decoupling approach of the WFT, inertia load distribution is solved based on the principle of equivalent mass and rotary inertia, thus then inertia impact can be identified with the theoretical derivation. The verification is achieved by FEM simulation and experimental tests. Results show that strains in simulation agree well with the theoretical derivation. The relationship between the applied acceleration and inertia load for both wheel force and moment is the approximate linear, respectively. All the relative errors are less than 5% which are within acceptable and the inertia loads have the maximum impact on the signal output about 1.5% in the measurement range. PMID:25723492

  9. Simultaneous chemical fingerprint and quantitative analysis of Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiquan; Zhao, Weiquan; Gao, Fangyuan; Shen, Jingjing; Lv, Diya; Qi, Yunpeng; Fan, Guorong

    2015-05-01

    Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae (RSG) is a well-known herbal medicine with the homology of medicine and food. In this study, simultaneous chemical fingerprint and quantitative analysis of the bioactive flavonoid components of RSG were developed using accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. The operational parameters of accelerated solvent extraction including extraction solvent, extraction temperature, static extraction time, solid-to-liquid ratio, and extraction cycles were optimized. Hierarchical cluster analysis, similarity analysis, and principal component analysis were performed to evaluate the similarity and variation of the samples collected from several provinces in China. Subsequently, high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprints were established for the discrimination of 16 batches of RSG samples, and the major six flavonoids, namely, toxifolin, neoastilbin, astilbin, neoisoastilbin, isoastilbin, and engeletin were then quantitatively determined. The calibration curves for all the six analytes showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.999), and the limits of detection and quantification were less than 0.10 and 0.27 μg·mL(-1) , respectively. Therefore, the proposed extraction and determination methods were proved to be robust and reliable for the quality control of RSG.

  10. Will Progress in Science and Technology Avert or Accelerate Global Collapse? A Critical Analysis and Policy Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Huesemann, Joyce A.

    2008-12-01

    Industrial society will move towards collapse if its total environmental impact (I), expressed either in terms of energy and materials use or in terms of pollution, increases with time, i.e., dI/dt > 0. The traditional interpretation of the I=PAT equation reflects the optimistic belief that technological innovation, particularly improvements in eco-efficiency, will significantly reduce the technology (T) factor, and thereby result in a corresponding decline in impact (I). Unfortunately, this interpretation of the I=PAT equation ignores the effects of technical change on the other two factors: population (P) and per capita affluence (A). A more heuristic formulation of this equation is I=P(T)∙A(T)∙T in which the dependence of P and A on T is apparent. From historical evidence, it is clear that technological revolutions (tool-making, agricultural, and industrial) have been the primary driving forces behind successive population explosions, and that modern communication and transportation technologies have been employed to transform a large proportion of the world’s inhabitants into consumers of material- and energy-intensive products and services. In addition, factor analysis from neoclassical growth theory and the rebound effect provide evidence that science and technology have played a key role in contributing to rising living standards. While technological change has thus contributed to significant increases in both P and A, it has at the same time brought about considerable eco-efficiency improvements. Unfortunately, reductions in the T-factor have generally not been sufficiently rapid to compensate for the simultaneous increases in both P and A. As a result, total impact, in terms of energy production, mineral extraction, land-use and CO2 emissions, has in most cases increased with time, indicating that industrial society is nevertheless moving towards collapse. The belief that continued and even accelerated scientific research and technological innovation

  11. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  12. In vitro analysis of different properties of acrylic resins for ocular prosthesis submitted to accelerated aging with or without photopolymerized glaze.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Nagay, Bruna Egumi; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; Moreno, Amália; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a photopolymerized glaze on different properties of acrylic resin (AR) for ocular prostheses submitted to accelerated aging was investigated. Forty discs were divided into 4 groups: N1 AR without glaze (G1); colorless AR without glaze (G2); N1 AR with glaze (G3); and colorless AR with glaze (G4). All samples were polished with sandpaper (240, 600 and 800-grit). In G1 and G2, a 1200-grit sandpaper was also used. In G3 and G4, samples were coated with MegaSeal glaze. Property analysis of color stability, microhardness, roughness, and surface energy, and assays of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were performed before and after the accelerated aging (1008h). Data were submitted to the ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). Groups with glaze exhibited statistically higher color change and roughness after aging. The surface microhardness significantly decreased in groups with glaze and increased in groups without glaze. The surface energy increased after the aging, independent of the polishing procedure. All groups showed an increase of surface irregularities. Photopolymerized glaze is an inadequate surface treatment for AR for ocular prostheses and it affected the color stability, roughness, and microhardness. The accelerated aging interfered negatively with the properties of resins.

  13. A comparison of accelerated solvent extraction, Soxhlet extraction, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction for analysis of terpenoids and sterols in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinchao; Shao, Xueguang

    2005-11-01

    The performance of accelerated solvent extraction in the analysis of terpenoids and sterols in tobacco samples was investigated and compared with those of Soxhlet extraction and ultrasonically assisted extraction with respect to yield, extraction time, reproducibility and solvent consumption. The results indicate that although the highest yield was achieved by Soxhlet extraction, ASE appears to be a promising alternative to classical methods since it is faster and uses less solvent, especially when applied to the investigation of large batch tobacco samples. However, Soxhlet extraction is still the preferred method for analyzing sterols since it gives a higher extraction efficiency than other methods.

  14. Accelerated Infliximab Infusion: Safety, Factors Predicting Adverse Events, Patients’ Satisfaction and Cost Analysis. A Cohort Study in IBD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli, S.; Tricarico, D.; Demma, F.; Furneri, G.; Guglielmi, F. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Standard Infliximab infusion consists of a 2-hour intravenous administration. Recently, Infliximab shortened infusion has been included in the Infliximab label as possible maintenance regimen for patients tolerating Infliximab induction therapy. Aim To verify if accelerated 1-hour Infliximab infusions are as safe as standard administrations, in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Methods Seventy-four patients treated between September 2008 and November 2014 were evaluated. Patients were eligible for 1-hour infusion if they had no history of infusion reactions during the previous 2-hour infusions. Results Twenty-three patients received 2-hour infusions, 16 patients received 1-hour infusions, 35 patients received 2-hour infusions followed by 1-hour infusions. A total of 1,123 Infliximab infusions were administered. The proportion of patients experiencing infusion reaction was: 4% over the 1-hour infusions and 9% over the 2-hour (P = 0.318). Adverse reaction/infusion rate was 0.55% over the 1-hour infusions and 0.66% over the 2-hour (P = 0.835). In the logistic model, accelerated infusion was the only statistically significant predictor of infusion reaction risk reduction (-90%; P = 0.024). Mean satisfaction was 8/10 (±0.84) with 1-hour regimen and 6/10 (±0.56) with 2-hour infusions (P = 0.000). The mean total cost was reduced by 47% with the 1-hour regimen (133.54€ and 250.86€ for 1-hour and 2-hour infusions, respectively). Conclusions Accelerated Infliximab infusion does not increase the acute infusion reaction incidence. In patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the 1-hour regimen should be preferred to 2-hour protocol also due to positive effects on indirect costs and patient’s satisfaction. PMID:27851772

  15. Analysis of Orbit Prediction Sensitivity to Thermal Emissions Acceleration Modeling for High Area-to-mass Ratio Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelecy, T.; Jah, M.

    High area-to-mass ratio (A/m) inactive resident space objects (RSOs) in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) regime pose a hazard to active GEO RSOs. The combination of solar radiation pressure (SRP) and solar and lunar gravitational perturbations causes perturbations in the orbits of these RSOs. The high A/m nature of these RSOs results in greater sensitivity to SRP forces resulting in the perturbation of mean motion, inclination and eccentricity. The subsequent drift with respect to the Earth, combined with time varying orientation with respect to the sun and transitions into and out of Earth's shadow, results in many of these RSOs being "lost" after initial acquisition as they transition through periods of days to weeks out of view of observing sites. This work examines the sensitivity of the prediction accuracies to inadequate modeling of the thermal emissions component of the SRP acceleration in the force models. The simplest models treat the thermal emission term either implicitly, or as a term that is a function of a fixed surface temperature and area. In reality, the temperature can vary with time for inert objects (e.g. orbital debris) transitioning in to and out of Earth shadow. Additionally, the orientation dynamics result in thermal acceleration components that vary relative to the inertial reference frame, and in general, have components orthogonal to the sun-object line. The prediction uncertainties associated with thermal modeling, orientation dynamics and materials uncertainties are examined in terms of the SRP acceleration perturbations for a range of representative high A/m object characteristics. Results indicate that significant prediction errors result from inadequate accounting for the thermal emissions component when compared to the standard SRP models used. These errors need to be addressed in the orbit determination and prediction to allow for more accurate re-acquisition and tracking.

  16. Random forests for genomic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ishwaran, Hemant

    2012-06-01

    Random forests (RF) is a popular tree-based ensemble machine learning tool that is highly data adaptive, applies to "large p, small n" problems, and is able to account for correlation as well as interactions among features. This makes RF particularly appealing for high-dimensional genomic data analysis. In this article, we systematically review the applications and recent progresses of RF for genomic data, including prediction and classification, variable selection, pathway analysis, genetic association and epistasis detection, and unsupervised learning.

  17. Design and analysis of a piezoelectric material based touch screen with additional pressure and its acceleration measurement functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Cheng; Liu, Jia-Yi; Gao, Ren-Long; Chang, Jie; Li, Long-Tu

    2013-12-01

    Touch screens are becoming more and more prevalent in everyday environments due to their convenience and humanized operation. In this paper, a piezoelectric material based touch screen is developed and investigated. Piezoelectric ceramics arrayed under the touch panel at the edges or corners are used as tactile sensors to measure the touch positioning point similarly to conventional touch screens. However, additional touch pressure and its acceleration performance can also be obtained to obtain a higher-level human-machine interface. The piezoelectric ceramics can also be added to a traditional touch screen structure, or they can be used independently to construct a novel touch screen with a high light transmittance approach to a transparent glass. The piezoelectric ceramics were processed from PZT piezoelectric ceramic powder into a round or rectangular shape. According to the varied touch position and physical press strength of a finger, or even a gloved hand or fingernail, the piezoelectric tactile sensors will have different output voltage responses. By calculating the ratio of different piezoelectric tactile sensors’ responses and summing up all piezoelectric tactile sensors’ output voltages, the touch point position, touch pressure and touch force acceleration can be detected. A prototype of such a touch screen is manufactured and its position accuracy, touch pressure and response speed are measured in detail. The experimental results show that the prototype has many advantages such as high light transmittance, low energy cost and high durability.

  18. Thermal analysis of reactions in soda-lime silicate glass batches containing melting accelerants: II, multicomponent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kug Sun; Lee, Sang Won; Speyer, R.F. )

    1993-03-01

    The glass melting reactions in a multicomponent system (sand-soda ash-calcite-dolomite-feldspar) were studied using data from DTA, TGA, and XRD interactively. The first-formed liquid phase occurred at 700C from eutectic melting among CaCO[sub 3], Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3], and MgO. Further liquid phase formed at the CaCO[sub 3]-Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] eutectic at 785C and a fusion reaction among SiO[sub 2], CaO, and the molten phase at 812C. Reactions between molten soda ash and silica grains to form a sodium disilicate coating also occurred in this temperature range. The effects of reaction accelerant additions (Na[sub 2], SO[sub 4], NaNO[sub 3], NaCl) on batch fusion were analyzed. Sodium chloride was found to be the most effective melting accelerant due to the formation of a NaCl-Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] eutectic liquid phase at [approximately]636C, which effectively attacked the silica relic. CO[sub 2] gas release terminated [approximately]80C earlier with 1 wt% NaCl additions to the base glass.

  19. Characteristic impedance and capacitance analysis of Blumlein type pulse forming line of accelerator based on tape helix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang; Fan, Xuliang; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Jiahuai

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic dispersion theory and the classic telegraph equations were combined to calculate the important parameters of the helical Blumlein pulse forming line (BPFL) of accelerator based on tape helix. In the work band of the BPFL at several hundred ns range, electromagnetic dispersion characteristics were almost determined by the zeroth harmonic. In order to testify the dispersion theory of BPFL in this paper, filling dielectrics, such as de-ionized water, transformer oil, and air were employed in the helical BPFL, respectively. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, characteristic impedance, and pulse duration of the BPFL were calculated. Effects of dispersion on these parameters were analyzed. Circuit simulation and electromagnetic simulation were carried out to prove these parameters of BPFL filled with these three kinds of dielectrics, respectively. The accelerator system was set up, and experimental results also corresponded to the theoretical calculations. The average theoretical errors of impedances and pulse durations were 3.5% and 3.4%, respectively, which proved the electromagnetic dispersion analyses in this paper.

  20. Characteristic impedance and capacitance analysis of Blumlein type pulse forming line of accelerator based on tape helix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Liu Jinliang; Fan Xuliang; Zhang Hongbo; Wang Shiwen; Feng Jiahuai

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, the electromagnetic dispersion theory and the classic telegraph equations were combined to calculate the important parameters of the helical Blumlein pulse forming line (BPFL) of accelerator based on tape helix. In the work band of the BPFL at several hundred ns range, electromagnetic dispersion characteristics were almost determined by the zeroth harmonic. In order to testify the dispersion theory of BPFL in this paper, filling dielectrics, such as de-ionized water, transformer oil, and air were employed in the helical BPFL, respectively. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, characteristic impedance, and pulse duration of the BPFL were calculated. Effects of dispersion on these parameters were analyzed. Circuit simulation and electromagnetic simulation were carried out to prove these parameters of BPFL filled with these three kinds of dielectrics, respectively. The accelerator system was set up, and experimental results also corresponded to the theoretical calculations. The average theoretical errors of impedances and pulse durations were 3.5% and 3.4%, respectively, which proved the electromagnetic dispersion analyses in this paper.

  1. Stochastic Analysis and Forecasts of the Patterns of Speed, Acceleration, and Levels of Material Stock Accumulation in Society.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Tomer; Schandl, Heinz; Tanikawa, Hiroki

    2016-04-05

    The recent acceleration of urbanization and industrialization of many parts of the developing world, most notably in Asia, has resulted in a fast-increasing demand for and accumulation of construction materials in society. Despite the importance of physical stocks in society, the empirical assessment of total material stock of buildings and infrastructure and reasons for its growth have been underexplored in the sustainability literature. We propose an innovative approach for explaining material stock dynamics in society and create a country typology for stock accumulation trajectories using the ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) methodology, a stochastic approach commonly used in business studies and economics to inspect and forecast time series. This enables us to create scenarios for future demand and accumulation of building materials in society, including uncertainty estimates. We find that the so-far overlooked aspect of acceleration trends of material stock accumulation holds the key to explaining material stock growth, and that despite tremendous variability in country characteristics, stock accumulation is limited to only four archetypal growth patterns. The ability of nations to change their pattern will be a determining factor for global sustainability.

  2. An omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses can detect pure epistasis and genetic heterogeneity in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Setsirichok, Damrongrit; Tienboon, Phuwadej; Jaroonruang, Nattapong; Kittichaijaroen, Somkit; Wongseree, Waranyu; Piroonratana, Theera; Usavanarong, Touchpong; Limwongse, Chanin; Aporntewan, Chatchawit; Phadoongsidhi, Marong; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the ability of an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses (2LOmb) to detect pure epistasis in the presence of genetic heterogeneity. The performance of 2LOmb is evaluated in various simulation scenarios covering two independent causes of complex disease where each cause is governed by a purely epistatic interaction. Different scenarios are set up by varying the number of available single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in data, number of causative SNPs and ratio of case samples from two affected groups. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb outperforms multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) techniques in terms of a low number of output SNPs and a high number of correctly-identified causative SNPs. Moreover, 2LOmb is capable of identifying the number of independent interactions in tractable computational time and can be used in genome-wide association studies. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) data set, which is collected from a UK population by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After screening for SNPs that locate within or near genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T1D data set is reduced to 95,991 SNPs from 12,146 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T1D data set reveals that 12 SNPs, which can be divided into two independent sets, are associated with the disease. The first SNP set consists of three SNPs from MUC21 (mucin 21, cell surface associated), three SNPs from MUC22 (mucin 22), two SNPs from PSORS1C1 (psoriasis susceptibility 1 candidate 1) and one SNP from TCF19 (transcription factor 19). A four-locus interaction between these four genes is also detected. The second SNP set consists of three SNPs from ATAD1 (ATPase family, AAA domain containing 1). Overall, the findings indicate the detection of pure epistasis in the presence of genetic heterogeneity and provide an alternative explanation for the aetiology of T1D

  3. The Use of Integrated Electronic Data Capture and Analysis for Accelerator Construction and Commissioning: Pansophy from the SNS Towards the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Ozelis; V. Bookwalter; B. Madre; C. E. Reece

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab has extensively used a proprietary web-based system (Pansophy) that integrates commercial database, data analysis, document archiving and retrieval, and user interface software, as a coherent knowledge management product during the construction of the cryomodules for the SNS Superconducting Linac, providing elements of process and procedure control, data capture and review, and data mining and analysis. With near real-time and potentially global access to production data, process monitoring and performance analyses could be pursued in a timely manner, providing crucial feedback. The extensibility, portability, and accessibility of Pansophy via universally available software components provide the essential features needed in any information and project management system capable of meeting the needs of future accelerator construction efforts, requiring an unprecedented level of regional and international coordination and collaboration, to which Pansophy is well suited.

  4. Combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νμ→νe appearance in MINOS using accelerator and atmospheric neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2014-05-16

    We report on a new analysis of neutrino oscillations in MINOS using the complete set of accelerator and atmospheric data. The analysis combines the ν(μ) disappearance and ν(e) appearance data using the three-flavor formalism. We measure |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.28-2.46] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.35-0.65 (90% C.L.) in the normal hierarchy, and |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.32-2.53] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.34-0.67 (90% C.L.) in the inverted hierarchy. The data also constrain δ(CP), the θ(23} octant degeneracy and the mass hierarchy; we disfavor 36% (11%) of this three-parameter space at 68% (90%) C.L.

  5. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  6. ACCELERATION AND THE GIFTED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIBSON, ARTHUR R.; STEPHANS, THOMAS M.

    ACCELERATION OF PUPILS AND SUBJECTS IS CONSIDERED A MEANS OF EDUCATING THE ACADEMICALLY GIFTED STUDENT. FIVE INTRODUCTORY ARTICLES PROVIDE A FRAMEWORK FOR THINKING ABOUT ACCELERATION. FIVE PROJECT REPORTS OF ACCELERATED PROGRAMS IN OHIO ARE INCLUDED. ACCELERATION IS NOW BEING REGARDED MORE FAVORABLY THAN FORMERLY, BECAUSE METHODS HAVE BEEN…

  7. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  8. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  9. Development and application of compact and on-chip electron linear accelerators for dynamic tracking cancer therapy and DNA damage/repair analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Demachi, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Chhatkuli, R. B.; Tsuda, A.; Tanaka, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Kusano, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, N.; Tanabe, E.; Koyama, K.; Yoshida, M.; Fujimori, R.; Yasui, A.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing compact electron linear accelerators (hereafter linac) with high RF (Radio Frequency) frequency (9.3 GHz, wavelength 32.3 mm) of X-band and applying to medicine and non-destructive testing. Especially, potable 950 keV and 3.95 MeV linac X-ray sources have been developed for on-site transmission testing at several industrial plants and civil infrastructures including bridges. 6 MeV linac have been made for pinpoint X-ray dynamic tracking cancer therapy. The length of the accelerating tube is ∼600 mm. The electron beam size at the X-ray target is less than 1 mm and X-ray spot size at the cancer is less than 3 mm. Several hardware and software are under construction for dynamic tracking therapy for moving lung cancer. Moreover, as an ultimate compact linac, we are designing and manufacturing a laser dielectric linac of ∼1 MeV with Yr fiber laser (283 THz, wavelength 1.06 pm). Since the wavelength is 1.06 μm, the length of one accelerating strcture is tens pm and the electron beam size is in sub-micro meter. Since the sizes of cell and nuclear are about 10 and 1 μm, respectively, we plan to use this “On-chip” linac for radiation-induced DNA damage/repair analysis. We are thinking a system where DNA in a nucleus of cell is hit by ∼1 μm electron or X-ray beam and observe its repair by proteins and enzymes in live cells in-situ.

  10. Two-step accelerated mineral carbonation and decomposition analysis for the reduction of CO₂ emission in the eco-industrial parks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seok; Wang, Li Pang; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Fujita, Toyohisa

    2014-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions are a leading contributor to the negative effects of global warming. Globally, research has focused on effective means of reducing and mitigating CO₂ emissions. In this study, we examined the efficacy of eco-industrial parks (EIPs) and accelerated mineral carbonation techniques in reducing CO₂ emissions in South Korea. First, we used Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) analysis to determine the trends in carbon production and mitigation at the existing EIPs. We found that, although CO₂ was generated as byproducts and wastes of production at these EIPs, improved energy intensity effects occurred at all EIPs, and we strongly believe that EIPs are a strong alternative to traditional industrial complexes for reducing net carbon emissions. We also examined the optimal conditions for using accelerated mineral carbonation to dispose of hazardous fly ash produced through the incineration of municipal solid wastes at these EIPs. We determined that this technique most efficiently sequestered CO₂ when micro-bubbling, low flow rate inlet gas, and ammonia additives were employed.

  11. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of Actinides in Ground- and Seawater: An Innovative Method Allowing for the Simultaneous Analysis of U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm Isotopes below ppq Levels.

    PubMed

    Quinto, Francesca; Golser, Robin; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Schäfer, Thorsten; Steier, Peter; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-06-02

    (236)U, (237)Np, and Pu isotopes and (243)Am were determined in ground- and seawater samples at levels below ppq (fg/g) with a maximum sample size of 250 g. Such high sensitivity was possible by using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with extreme selectivity and recently improved efficiency and a significantly simplified separation chemistry. The use of nonisotopic tracers was investigated in order to allow for the determination of (237)Np and (243)Am, for which isotopic tracers either are rarely available or suffer from various isobaric mass interferences. In the present study, actinides were concentrated from the sample matrix via iron hydroxide coprecipitation and measured sequentially without previous chemical separation from each other. The analytical method was validated by the analysis of the Reference Material IAEA 443 and was applied to groundwater samples from the Colloid Formation and Migration (CFM) project at the deep underground rock laboratory of the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) and to natural water samples affected solely by global fallout. While the precision of the presented analytical method is somewhat limited by the use of nonisotopic spikes, the sensitivity allows for the determination of ∼10(5) atoms in a sample. This provides, e.g., the capability to study the long-term release and retention of actinide tracers in field experiments as well as the transport of actinides in a variety of environmental systems by tracing contamination from global fallout.

  12. CARAT-GxG: CUDA-Accelerated Regression Analysis Toolkit for Large-Scale Gene-Gene Interaction with GPU Computing System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungyoung; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2014-01-01

    In genome-wide association studies (GWAS), regression analysis has been most commonly used to establish an association between a phenotype and genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). However, most applications of regression analysis have been restricted to the investigation of single marker because of the large computational burden. Thus, there have been limited applications of regression analysis to multiple SNPs, including gene-gene interaction (GGI) in large-scale GWAS data. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose CARAT-GxG, a GPU computing system-oriented toolkit, for performing regression analysis with GGI using CUDA (compute unified device architecture). Compared to other methods, CARAT-GxG achieved almost 700-fold execution speed and delivered highly reliable results through our GPU-specific optimization techniques. In addition, it was possible to achieve almost-linear speed acceleration with the application of a GPU computing system, which is implemented by the TORQUE Resource Manager. We expect that CARAT-GxG will enable large-scale regression analysis with GGI for GWAS data.

  13. Mass transport perspective on an accelerated exclusion process: Analysis of augmented current and unit-velocity phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Klumpp, Stefan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-02-01

    In an accelerated exclusion process (AEP), each particle can “hop” to its adjacent site if empty as well as “kick” the frontmost particle when joining a cluster of size ℓ⩽ℓmax. With various choices of the interaction range, ℓmax, we find that the steady state of AEP can be found in a homogeneous phase with augmented currents (AC) or a segregated phase with holes moving at unit velocity (UV). Here we present a detailed study on the emergence of the novel phases, from two perspectives: the AEP and a mass transport process (MTP). In the latter picture, the system in the UV phase is composed of a condensate in coexistence with a fluid, while the transition from AC to UV can be regarded as condensation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, exact results for special cases, and analytic methods in a mean field approach (within the MTP), we focus on steady state currents and cluster sizes. Excellent agreement between data and theory is found, providing an insightful picture for understanding this model system.

  14. Analysis of the low gravity tolerance of Bridgman-Stockbarger crystal growth. I - Steady and impulse accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Ouazzani, Jalil; Rosenberger, Franz

    1989-01-01

    The effects of steady and impulse-type residual accelerations on dopant distributions during directional solidification in 2D and 3D 'generic' models of the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique are investigated using numerical methods. The calculations are based on the thermophysical properties of molten germanium doped with a low concentration of gallium. A Chebyshev collocation pseudospectral method is used for the solution of the governing momentum-, mass-, species-, and heat-transfer equations. Only convection caused by temperature gradients is considered. It is found that lateral nonuniformity in composition is very sensitive to the orientation of the steady component of the residual gravity vector and to the particular operating conditions under consideration. It is also found that laterally or radially averaged composition profiles are alone insufficient to describe the extent of residual convection in a spacecraft environment. The effects of impulse-type disturbances can be severe and can extend for times on the order of 1000 sec after the termination of the impulse.

  15. Mass transport perspective on an accelerated exclusion process: analysis of augmented current and unit-velocity phases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiajia; Klumpp, Stefan; Zia, R K P

    2013-02-01

    In an accelerated exclusion process (AEP), each particle can "hop" to its adjacent site if empty as well as "kick" the frontmost particle when joining a cluster of size ℓ≤ℓ(max). With various choices of the interaction range, ℓ(max), we find that the steady state of AEP can be found in a homogeneous phase with augmented currents (AC) or a segregated phase with holes moving at unit velocity (UV). Here we present a detailed study on the emergence of the novel phases, from two perspectives: the AEP and a mass transport process (MTP). In the latter picture, the system in the UV phase is composed of a condensate in coexistence with a fluid, while the transition from AC to UV can be regarded as condensation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, exact results for special cases, and analytic methods in a mean field approach (within the MTP), we focus on steady state currents and cluster sizes. Excellent agreement between data and theory is found, providing an insightful picture for understanding this model system.

  16. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Budach, W; Hehr, T; Budach, V; Belka, C; Dietz, K

    2006-01-01

    Background Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Methods Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Results Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). Conclusion RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU

  17. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  18. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  19. The new external ion beam analysis setup at the Demokritos Tandem accelerator and first applications in cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Bistekos, Euthimios; Georgiou, Lambros; Salomon, Joseph; Bogovac, Mladen; Aloupi-Siotis, Eleni; Paschalis, Vasilis; Aslani, Ioanna; Karabagia, Sofia; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Harissopulos, Sotirios; Kantarelou, Vasiliki; Karydas, Andreas-Germanos

    2011-03-01

    At the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG accelerator of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of N.C.S.R. "Demokritos", Athens, Greece, an external ion-beam set-up has been recently developed and installed. The aim of this development was to integrate the analytical capabilities of the PIXE, RBS and PIGE ion beam techniques in one experimental set-up, so that to attain a complete elemental and near surface structural characterization of samples in an almost non-destructive way and without any limitation concerning their size or conductive state. A careful 3D mechanical drawing optimized the set-up experimental parameters achieving probe dimensions at the millimeter range (1 mm 2) and fulfilling the special requirements imposed for optimum performance of the aforementioned techniques, including the possibility to use heavier, than protons, ion beams. For the digital pulse processing of the X-ray, γ-ray and charged particle detector signals, novel hardware and software tools were developed based on a custom FPGA configuration. The first applications were focused in the quality control of materials that have been intentionally contaminated with a particular tracer-element ("tagged" materials). The tagged materials which were developed and tested are technologically authentic replicas of ancient attic ceramics with black glazed decoration. Analytical diagnostic studies were carried out for a few representative paintings of contemporary Greek painters in order to identify and document materials/pigments and techniques and eventually to prevent trade of fakes. Finally, ancient glass beads were also examined with respect to the sodium concentration and its in-depth homogeneity.

  20. Analysis of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation caused by accelerated artificial aging and the effects of microstructure in stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas J.

    This investigation addresses the issue that yttria stabilized zirconia is being used as a dental biomaterial without substantial evidence of its long-term viability. Furthermore, stabilized zirconia (SZ) undergoes low temperature degradation (LTD), which can lead to roughening of the surface. A rougher exterior can lead to increased wear of the antagonist in the oral environment. Despite the LTD concerns, SZ is now widely used in restorative dentistry, including full contour crowns. A comparison of aging methods to determine the role of artificial aging on inducing the transformation has not been extensively studied. Therefore, simulations of the transformation process were investigated by comparing different methods of accelerated aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the temperature of aging treatment will not affect the time required to cause measurable monoclinic transformation of yttria stabilized zirconia. The transformation of SZ starts at the surface and progresses inward; however, it is unclear whether the progression is constant for different aging conditions. This investigation analyzed the depth of transformation as a function of aging conditions for stabilized zirconia in the top 5-6 mum from the surface. The rejected null hypothesis is that the transformation amount is constant throughout the first six micrometers from the surface. The effects of grain size on the amount of monoclinic transformation were also investigated. This study aimed to determine if the grain size of partially stabilized zirconia affects the amount of monoclinic transformation, surface roughness, and property degradation due to aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the grain size will not affect the amount of monoclinic transformation, thus have no effect on surface roughening or property degradation. The final part of this study addresses the wear of enamel when opposing zirconia by observing how grain size and aging affected the wear rate of an enamel antagonist

  1. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  2. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  3. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  4. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  5. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  6. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  7. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  8. An effective method of UV-oxidation of dissolved organic carbon in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuejun; Ge, Tiantian; Wang, Xuchen

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a very powerful tool to study the sources, transformation and cycling of carbon in the ocean. The technique, however, remains great challenges for complete and successful oxidation of sufficient DOC with low blanks for high precision carbon isotopic ratio analysis, largely due to the overwhelming proportion of salts and low DOC concentrations in the ocean. In this paper, we report an effective UV-Oxidation method for oxidizing DOC in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The UV-oxidation system and method show 95%±4% oxidation efficiency and high reproducibility for DOC in both river and seawater samples. The blanks associated with the method was also low (about 3 µg C) that is critical for 14C analysis. As a great advantage of the method, multiple water samples can be oxidized at the same time so it reduces the sample processing time substantially compared with other UV-oxidation method currently being used in other laboratories. We have used the system and method for 14C studies of DOC in rivers, estuaries, and oceanic environments and have received promise results.

  9. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  10. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  11. Imaging oxytocin × dopamine interactions: an epistasis effect of CD38 and COMT gene variants influences the impact of oxytocin on amygdala activation to social stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Carina; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin; Kirsch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although oxytocin (OT) has become a major target for the investigation of positive social processes, it can be assumed that it exerts its effects in concert with other neurotransmitters. One candidate for such an interaction is dopamine (DA). For both systems, genetic variants have been identified that influence the availability of the particular substance. A variant of the gene coding for the transmembrane protein CD38 (rs3796863), which is engaged in OT secretion, has been associated with OT plasma level. The common catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism is known to influence COMT activity and therefore the degradation of DA. The present study aimed to investigate OT × DA interactions in the context of an OT challenge study. Hence, we tested the influence of the above mentioned genetic variants and their interaction on the activation of different brain regions (amygdala, VTA, ventral striatum and fusiform gyrus) during the presentation of social stimuli. In a pharmacological cross-over design 55 participants were investigated under OT and placebo (PLA) by means of fMRI. Brain imaging results revealed no significant effects for VTA or ventral striatum. Regarding the fusiform gyrus, we could not find any effects apart from those already described in Sauer et al. (2012). Analyses of amygdala activation resulted in no gene main effect, no gene × substance interaction but a significant gene × gene × substance interaction. While under PLA the effect of CD38 on bilateral amygdala activation to social stimuli was modulated by the COMT genotype, no such epistasis effect was found under OT. Our results provide evidence for an OT × DA interaction during responses to social stimuli. We postulate that the effect of central OT secretion on amygdala response is modulated by the availability of DA. Therefore, for an understanding of the effect of social hormones on social behavior, interactions of OT with other transmitter systems have to be taken into

  12. Evidence for association and epistasis at the DAOA/G30 and D-amino acid oxidase loci in an Irish schizophrenia sample.

    PubMed

    Corvin, A; McGhee, K A; Murphy, K; Donohoe, G; Nangle, J M; Schwaiger, S; Kenny, N; Clarke, S; Meagher, D; Quinn, J; Scully, P; Baldwin, P; Browne, D; Walsh, C; Waddington, J L; Morris, D W; Gill, M

    2007-10-05

    The D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) signaling pathway has been implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. This may be mediated through modulation of NMDA function by DAO, which is in turn activated by DAO activator (DAOA, formerly G72). Chumakov et al. (2002); PNAS 99: 13675-13680, identifying the novel schizophrenia susceptibility gene DAOA/G30 and a number of independent studies have since reported evidence of association between the DAOA and DAO genes and schizophrenia. However, at least two studies have failed to replicate the epistatic interaction between these loci described in the original report and there have been differences in the associated alleles/haplotypes reported at each locus. In this study, we performed association and epistasis analyses of the DAOA/G30 and DAO loci in a sample of 373 cases with DSM-IV schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 812 controls from the Republic of Ireland. Corrected for the number of tests performed, we found evidence for association between markers at both genes and schizophrenia: DAOA/G30 (P = 0.005, OR = 1.34 (1.09, 1.65)) and DAO (P = 0.003, OR = 1.43 (1.12, 1.84). The data suggest that evidence for association at DAO (marker rs2111902) is more consistent than previously realized, particularly in Caucasian schizophrenia populations. We identified evidence for epistatic interaction between the associated SNPs at DAOA and DAO genes in contributing to schizophrenia risk (OR = 9.3 (1.4, 60.5). Based on these data, more systematic investigation of genes involved in DAO signaling is required.

  13. Identification of novel susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease on chromosomes 1p, 3q, and 4q: Evidence for epistasis between 1p and IBD1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Judy H.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Gold, Leslee H.; Fields, Carter T.; LaBuda, Michele C.; Rohal, Patrick M.; Pickles, Michael R.; Qin, Li; Fu, Yifan; Mann, Jasdeep S.; Kirschner, Barbara S.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Weber, James; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Bayless, Theodore M.; Brant, Steven R.

    1998-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, frequently disabling diseases of the intestines. Segregation analyses, twin concordance, and ethnic differences in familial risks have established that CD and UC are complex, non-Mendelian, related genetic disorders. We performed a genome-wide screen using 377 autosomal markers, on 297 CD, UC, or mixed relative pairs from 174 families, 37% Ashkenazim. We observed evidence for linkage at 3q for all families (multipoint logarithm of the odds score (MLod) = 2.29, P = 5.7 × 10−4), with greatest significance for non-Ashkenazim Caucasians (MLod = 3.39, P = 3.92 × 10−5), and at chromosome 1p (MLod = 2.65, P = 2.4 × 10−4) for all families. In a limited subset of mixed families (containing one member with CD and another with UC), evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 4q (MLod = 2.76, P = 1.9 × 10−4), especially among Ashkenazim. There was confirmatory evidence for a CD locus, overlapping IBD1, in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 16 (MLod = 1.69, P = 2.6 × 10−3), particularly among Ashkenazim (MLod = 1.51, P = 7.8 × 10−3); however, positive MLod scores were observed over a very broad region of chromosome 16. Furthermore, evidence for epistasis between IBD1 and chromosome 1p was observed. Thirteen additional loci demonstrated nominal (MLod > 1.0, P < 0.016) evidence for linkage. This screen provides strong evidence that there are several major susceptibility loci contributing to the genetic risk for CD and UC. PMID:9636179

  14. The common occurrence of epistasis in the determination of human pigmentation and its impact on DNA-based pigmentation phenotype prediction.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Maeda, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Skowron, Małgorzata; Kayser, Manfred; Branicki, Wojciech

    2014-07-01

    The role of epistatic effects in the determination of complex traits is often underlined but its significance in the prediction of pigmentation phenotypes has not been evaluated so far. The prediction of pigmentation from genetic data can be useful in forensic science to describe the physical appearance of an unknown offender, victim, or missing person who cannot be identified via conventional DNA profiling. Available forensic DNA prediction systems enable the reliable prediction of several eye and hair colour categories. However, there is still space for improvement. Here we verified the association of 38 candidate DNA polymorphisms from 13 genes and explored the extent to which interactions between them may be involved in human pigmentation and their impact on forensic DNA prediction in particular. The model-building set included 718 Polish samples and the model-verification set included 307 independent Polish samples and additional 72 samples from Japan. In total, 29 significant SNP-SNP interactions were found with 5 of them showing an effect on phenotype prediction. For predicting green eye colour, interactions between HERC2 rs12913832 and OCA2 rs1800407 as well as TYRP1 rs1408799 raised the prediction accuracy expressed by AUC from 0.667 to 0.697 and increased the prediction sensitivity by >3%. Interaction between MC1R 'R' variants and VDR rs731236 increased the sensitivity for light skin by >1% and by almost 3% for dark skin colour prediction. Interactions between VDR rs1544410 and TYR rs1042602 as well as between MC1R 'R' variants and HERC2 rs12913832 provided an increase in red/non-red hair prediction accuracy from an AUC of 0.902-0.930. Our results thus underline epistasis as a common phenomenon in human pigmentation genetics and demonstrate that considering SNP-SNP interactions in forensic DNA phenotyping has little impact on eye, hair and skin colour prediction.

  15. Impact of integrated health system changes, accelerated due to an earthquake, on emergency department attendances and acute admissions: a Bayesian change-point analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Philip J; Hamilton, Greg J; Deely, Joanne M; Ardagh, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart emergency department (ED) attendance and acute admission following a devastating earthquake in 2011 which lead to Canterbury's rapidly accelerated integrated health system transformations. Design Interrupted time series analysis, modelling using Bayesian change-point methods, of ED attendance and acute admission rates over the 2008–2014 period. Setting ED department within the Canterbury District Health Board; with comparison to two other district health boards unaffected by the earthquake within New Zealand. Participants Canterbury's health system services ∼500 000 people, with around 85 000 ED attendances and 37 000 acute admissions per annum. Main outcome measures De-seasoned standardised population ED attendance and acute admission rates overall, and stratified by age and sex, compared before and after the earthquake. Results Analyses revealed five global patterns: (1) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population attending the ED; (2) the growth rate of ED attendances per head of population did not change between the pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods; (3) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population admitted to hospital; (4) the growth rate of hospital admissions per head of the population declined between pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods and (5) the most dramatic reduction in hospital admissions growth after the earthquake occurred among those aged 65+ years. Extrapolating from the projected and fitted deseasoned rates for December 2014, ∼676 (16.8%) of 4035 projected hospital admissions were avoided. Conclusions While both necessarily and opportunistically accelerated, Canterbury's integrated health systems transformations have resulted in a dramatic and sustained reduction in ED attendances and acute hospital admissions. This natural intervention experiment, triggered by an earthquake, demonstrated that

  16. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  17. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  18. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  19. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  20. Acceleration profiles in elite Australian soccer.

    PubMed

    Varley, M C; Aughey, R J

    2013-01-01

    We quantified the acceleration and high-velocity running of elite Australian soccer players. We hypothesised that high-intensity activity would be underestimated when excluding acceleration during match analysis given its high metabolic demand and occurrence at low velocities. Player movements were observed from 29 players (forwards and central and wide defenders and midfielders) during domestic Australian competition using 5-Hz global positioning system. Effort occurrence were determined for high-velocity running, sprinting and maximal accelerations. The commencement and final velocity of maximal accelerations were also identified. Players undertook an 8~fold greater number of maximal accelerations than sprints per game (65±21 vs. 8±5). Of maximal accelerations ~98% commenced from a starting velocity lower than what would be considered high-velocity running while ~85% did not cross the high-velocity running threshold. The number of efforts performed in all categories were position dependent (P<0.001). Wide defenders performed more maximal accelerations (P<0.006) and central defenders and midfielders performed less sprints compared to all other positions (P<0.02). Maximal accelerations are frequently undertaken during a match often occurring at low velocities. Excluding maximal accelerations in match analysis research may underestimate the amount of high-intensity movements undertaken. Additionally positional differences in high-intensity movements should be accounted for when developing specific conditioning drills.

  1. Accelerated test plan for nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated test matrix is outlined that includes acceptance, baseline and post-cycling tests, chemical and physical analyses, and the data analysis procedures to be used in determining the feasibility of an accelerated test for sealed, nickel cadmium cells.

  2. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  3. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  4. Exploratory Data Analysis of Acceleration Signals to Select Light-Weight and Accurate Features for Real-Time Activity Recognition on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Adil Mehmood; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Lee, Seok-Won

    2013-01-01

    Smartphone-based activity recognition (SP-AR) recognizes users' activities using the embedded accelerometer sensor. Only a small number of previous works can be classified as online systems, i.e., the whole process (pre-processing, feature extraction, and classification) is performed on the device. Most of these online systems use either a high sampling rate (SR) or long data-window (DW) to achieve high accuracy, resulting in short battery life or delayed system response, respectively. This paper introduces a real-time/online SP-AR system that solves this problem. Exploratory data analysis was performed on acceleration signals of 6 activities, collected from 30 subjects, to show that these signals are generated by an autoregressive (AR) process, and an accurate AR-model in this case can be built using a low SR (20 Hz) and a small DW (3 s). The high within class variance resulting from placing the phone at different positions was reduced using kernel discriminant analysis to achieve position-independent recognition. Neural networks were used as classifiers. Unlike previous works, true subject-independent evaluation was performed, where 10 new subjects evaluated the system at their homes for 1 week. The results show that our features outperformed three commonly used features by 40% in terms of accuracy for the given SR and DW. PMID:24084108

  5. Cloning and analysis of a gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor that causes accelerated aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H; Kendall, K

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning and analysis of two overlapping DNA fragments from Streptomyces coelicolor that cause aerial mycelium to appear more rapidly than usual when introduced into Streptomyces lividans on a low-copy-number plasmid vector. Colonies of S. lividans TK64 harboring either clone produce visible aerial mycelia after only 48 h of growth, rather than the usual 72 to 96 h. From deletion and sequence analysis, this rapid aerial mycelium (Ram) phenotype appears to be due to a cluster of three genes that we have designated ramA, ramB, and ramR. Both ramA and ramB potentially encode 65-kDa proteins with homology to ATP-dependent membrane-translocating proteins. A chromosomal ramB disruption mutant of S. lividans was found to be severely defective in aerial mycelium formation. ramR could encode a 21-kDa protein with significant homology to the UhpA subset of bacterial two-component response regulator proteins. The overall organization and potential proteins encoded by the cloned DNA suggest that this is the S. coelicolor homolog of the amf gene cluster that has been shown to be important for aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus. However, despite the fact that the two regions probably have identical functions, there is relatively poor homology between the two gene clusters at the DNA sequence level. Images PMID:8206859

  6. A Novel Principal Component Analysis-Based Acceleration Scheme for LES-ODT: An A Priori Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echekki, Tarek; Mirgolbabaei, Hessan

    2012-11-01

    A parameterization of the composition space based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to represent the transport equations with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) solutions of a hybrid large-eddy simulation (LES) and ODT scheme. An a priori validation of the proposed approach is implemented based on stand-alone ODT solutions of the Sandia Flame F flame, which is characterized by different regimes of combustion starting with pilot stabilization, to extinction and reignition and self-stabilized combustion. The PCA analysis is carried out with a full set of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector as well as a subset of this vector. The subset is made up primarily of major species and temperature. The results show that the different regimes are reproduced using only three principal components for the thermo-chemical scalars based on the full and a subset of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector. Reproduction of the source term of the principal component represents a greater challenge. It is found that using the subset of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector both minor species and the first three principal components source terms are reasonably well predicted.

  7. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  8. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-silicate-hydrate gel

    SciTech Connect

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E.

    2015-04-21

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO₂ vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  9. An introduction to acceleration mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper discusses the acceleration of charged particles by electromagnetic fields, i.e., by fields that are produced by the motion of other charged particles driven by some power source. The mechanisms that are discussed include: Ponderamotive Forces, Acceleration, Plasma Beat Wave Acceleration, Inverse Free Electron Laser Acceleration, Inverse Cerenkov Acceleration, Gravity Acceleration, 2D Linac Acceleration and Conventional Iris Loaded Linac Structure Acceleration. (LSP)

  10. Patient-Specific Electric Field Simulations and Acceleration Measurements for Objective Analysis of Intraoperative Stimulation Tests in the Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Hemm, Simone; Pison, Daniela; Alonso, Fabiola; Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the fundamental mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Simulation of electric entities has previously been proposed for chronic DBS combined with subjective symptom evaluations, but not for intraoperative stimulation tests. The present paper introduces a method for an objective exploitation of intraoperative stimulation test data to identify the optimal implant position of the chronic DBS lead by relating the electric field (EF) simulations to the patient-specific anatomy and the clinical effects quantified by accelerometry. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, it was applied to five patients with essential tremor bilaterally implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM and its neighborhood structures were preoperatively outlined in 3D on white matter attenuated inversion recovery MR images. Quantitative intraoperative clinical assessments were performed using accelerometry. EF simulations (n = 272) for intraoperative stimulation test data performed along two trajectories per side were set-up using the finite element method for 143 stimulation test positions. The resulting EF isosurface of 0.2 V/mm was superimposed to the outlined anatomical structures. The percentage of volume of each structure's overlap was calculated and related to the corresponding clinical improvement. The proposed concept has been successfully applied to the five patients. For higher clinical improvements, not only the VIM but as well other neighboring structures were covered by the EF isosurfaces. The percentage of the volumes of the VIM, of the nucleus intermediate lateral of the thalamus and the prelemniscal radiations within the prerubral field of Forel increased for clinical improvements higher than 50% compared to improvements lower than 50%. The presented new concept allows a detailed and objective analysis of a high amount of intraoperative data to identify the optimal stimulation target. First

  11. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV Using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Flight certification is dependent on the reliability analysis to quantify the risk of stress rupture failure in existing flight vessels. Full certification of this reliability model would require a statistically significant number of lifetime tests to be performed and is impractical given the cost and limited flight hardware for certification testing purposes. One approach to confirm the reliability model is to perform a stress rupture test on a flight COPV. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49 (Dupont)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the database and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio model is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one "nine," that is, reducing the predicted probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several vessels would be necessary.

  12. Schooling in Times of Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddeberg, Magdalena; Hornberg, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies are characterised by forms of acceleration, which influence social processes. Sociologist Hartmut Rosa has systematised temporal structures by focusing on three categories of social acceleration: technical acceleration, acceleration of social change, and acceleration of the pace of life. All three processes of acceleration are…

  13. Uniformly accelerated black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    2001-09-01

    The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

  14. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  15. Patient-Specific Electric Field Simulations and Acceleration Measurements for Objective Analysis of Intraoperative Stimulation Tests in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Hemm, Simone; Pison, Daniela; Alonso, Fabiola; Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the fundamental mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Simulation of electric entities has previously been proposed for chronic DBS combined with subjective symptom evaluations, but not for intraoperative stimulation tests. The present paper introduces a method for an objective exploitation of intraoperative stimulation test data to identify the optimal implant position of the chronic DBS lead by relating the electric field (EF) simulations to the patient-specific anatomy and the clinical effects quantified by accelerometry. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, it was applied to five patients with essential tremor bilaterally implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM and its neighborhood structures were preoperatively outlined in 3D on white matter attenuated inversion recovery MR images. Quantitative intraoperative clinical assessments were performed using accelerometry. EF simulations (n = 272) for intraoperative stimulation test data performed along two trajectories per side were set-up using the finite element method for 143 stimulation test positions. The resulting EF isosurface of 0.2 V/mm was superimposed to the outlined anatomical structures. The percentage of volume of each structure’s overlap was calculated and related to the corresponding clinical improvement. The proposed concept has been successfully applied to the five patients. For higher clinical improvements, not only the VIM but as well other neighboring structures were covered by the EF isosurfaces. The percentage of the volumes of the VIM, of the nucleus intermediate lateral of the thalamus and the prelemniscal radiations within the prerubral field of Forel increased for clinical improvements higher than 50% compared to improvements lower than 50%. The presented new concept allows a detailed and objective analysis of a high amount of intraoperative data to identify the optimal stimulation target

  16. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics in accelerator physics: radio frequency pulse compression and power transport; computational methods for the computer analysis of microwave components; persistent wakefields associated with waveguide damping of higher order modes; and photonic band gap cavities.

  17. Acceleration Environment of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Kelly, Eric; Keller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment on the International Space Station has been accomplished by two accelerometer systems since 2001. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System records the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. Measurement of the vibratory/transient regime, comprised of vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances, has been accomplished by the Space Acceleration Measurement System-II. Until the arrival of the Columbus Orbital Facility and the Japanese Experiment Module, the location of these sensors, and therefore, the measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment, has been limited to within the United States Laboratory. Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a vibratory acceleration measurement system called the Microgravity Measurement Apparatus which will be deployed within the Japanese Experiment Module to make distributed measurements of the Japanese Experiment Module's vibratory acceleration environment. Two Space Acceleration Measurement System sensors from the United States Laboratory will be re-deployed to support vibratory acceleration data measurement within the Columbus Orbital Facility. The additional measurement opportunities resulting from the arrival of these new laboratories allows Principal Investigators with facilities located in these International Space Station research laboratories to obtain microgravity acceleration data in support of their sensitive experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project, at NASA Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland, Ohio, has supported acceleration measurement systems and the microgravity scientific community through the processing, characterization, distribution, and archival of the microgravity acceleration data obtained from the International Space Station acceleration measurement systems. This paper summarizes the PIMS capabilities available

  18. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  19. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  20. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  1. The foxhole accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Claus, J.

    1992-07-17

    This report examines some properties of a new type of open accelerating structure. It consists of a series of rectangular cavities, which we call foxholes, joined by a beam channel. The power for accelerating the particles comes from an external radiation source and enters the cavities through their open upper surfaces. Analytic and computer calculations are presented showing that the foxhole is a suitable structure for accelerating relativistic electrons.

  2. Accelerated Stem Growth Rates and Improved Fiber Properties of Loblolly Pine: Functional Analysis Of CyclinD from Pinus taeda

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Cairney, School of Biology and Institute of Paper Science and Technology @ Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. Gary Peter, University of Florida; Dr. Ulrika Egertsdotter, Dept. of Forestry, Virgina Tech; Dr. Armin Wagner, New Zealand Forest Research Institute Ltd.

    2005-11-30

    A sustained supply of low-cost, high quality raw materials is essential for the future success of the U.S. forest products industry. To maximize stem (trunk) growth, a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell divisions within the cambial meristem is essential. We hypothesize that auxin levels within the cambial meristem regulate cyclin gene expression and this in turn controls cell cycle progression as occurs in all eukaryotic cells. Work with model plant species has shown that ectopic overexpression of cyclins promotes cell division thereby increasing root growth > five times. We intended to test whether ectopic overexpression of cambial cyclins in the cambial zone of loblolly pine also promotes cell division rates that enhance stem growth rates. Results generated in model annual angiosperm systems cannot be reliably extrapolated to perennial gymnosperms, thus while the generation and development of transgenic pine is time consuming, this is the necessary approach for meaningful data. We succeeded in isolating a cyclin D gene and Clustal analysis to the Arabidopsis cyclin D gene family indicates that it is more closely related to cyclin D2 than D1 or D3 Using this gene as a probe we observed a small stimulation of cyclin D expression in somatic embryo culture upon addition of auxin. We hypothesized that trees with more cells in the vascular cambial and expansion zones will have higher cyclin mRNA levels. We demonstrated that in trees under compressive stress where the rates of cambial divisions are increased on the underside of the stem relative to the top or opposite side, there was a 20 fold increase in the level of PtcyclinD1 mRNA on the compressed side of the stem relative to the opposite. This suggests that higher secondary growth rates correlate with PtcyclinD1 expression. We showed that larger diameter trees show more growth during each year and that the increased growth in loblolly pine trees correlates with more cell

  3. Accelerated solvent extraction by using an 'in-line' clean-up approach for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in organic honey.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Luca Maria; Labella, Giuseppe Federico; Panseri, Sara; Britti, Domenico; Galbiati, Fabrizio; Villa, Roberto; Arioli, Francesco

    2017-02-22

    The worldwide loss of honeybee colonies may be due to their exposure to several contaminants (i.e., pesticides); such contamination may also have impacts on consumers' health. Therefore, it is essential to develop quick and new methods to detect several pesticide residues in honey samples. In this study, the effectiveness of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was compared with QuEChERS methods for the analysis of 53 pesticides in organic honey by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Two simple and rapid ASE methods with 'in-line' clean-up were optimised and then compared with QuEChERS. Hexane-ethyl acetate (Hex:EtAc) and Florisil were chosen as extraction solvent and retainer for the first ASE method respectively; acetonitrile and a primary-secondary amine phase (ACN-PSA) were selected for the second ASE method. The methods were validated according to the European Union SANTE/11945/2015 guidelines. The validation parameters showed that QuEChERS and ASE with PSA as retainer had better repeatability than ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil. In particular, QuEChERS and ASE (ACN-PSA) showed good recovery, according to the SANTE criteria, for the majority of investigated pesticides. Conversely, when ASE with Hex:EtAc and Florisil was used as the retainer, several compounds showed recoveries lower than the acceptable value of 70%. The ASE in-line method was finally applied to evaluate pesticide concentration in organic honey samples.

  4. Gene-Gene Interaction Analysis for the Accelerated Failure Time Model Using a Unified Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungyeoun; Son, Donghee; Yu, Wenbao; Park, Taesung

    2016-12-01

    Although a large number of genetic variants have been identified to be associated with common diseases through genome-wide association studies, there still exits limitations in explaining the missing heritability. One approach to solving this missing heritability problem is to investigate gene-gene interactions, rather than a single-locus approach. For gene-gene interaction analysis, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method has been widely applied, since the constructive induction algorithm of MDR efficiently reduces high-order dimensions into one dimension by classifying multi-level genotypes into high- and low-risk groups. The MDR method has been extended to various phenotypes and has been improved to provide a significance test for gene-gene interactions. In this paper, we propose a simple method, called accelerated failure time (AFT) UM-MDR, in which the idea of a unified model-based MDR is extended to the survival phenotype by incorporating AFT-MDR into the classification step. The proposed AFT UM-MDR method is compared with AFT-MDR through simulation studies, and a short discussion is given.

  5. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  6. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  7. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  8. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  9. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  10. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  11. FFAGS for rapid acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Carol J. Johnstone and Shane Koscielniak

    2002-09-30

    When large transverse and longitudinal emittances are to be transported through a circular machine, extremely rapid acceleration holds the advantage that the beam becomes immune to nonlinear resonances because there is insufficient time for amplitudes to build up. Uncooled muon beams exhibit large emittances and require fast acceleration to avoid decay losses and would benefit from this style of acceleration. The approach here employs a fixed-field alternating gradient or FFAG magnet structure and a fixed frequency acceleration system. Acceptance is enhanced by the use only of linear lattice elements, and fixed-frequency rf enables the use of cavities with large shunt resistance and quality factor.

  12. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  13. Genome-Wide Scoring of Positive and Negative Epistasis through Decomposition of Quantitative Genetic Interaction Fitness Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lindroos, Anna; Kanerva, Mirella; Aittokallio, Tero

    2010-01-01

    Recent technological developments in genetic screening approaches have offered the means to start exploring quantitative genotype-phenotype relationships on a large-scale. What remains unclear is the extent to which the quantitative genetic interaction datasets can distinguish the broad spectrum of interaction classes, as compared to existing information on mutation pairs associated with both positive and negative interactions, and whether the scoring of varying degrees of such epistatic effects could be improved by computational means. To address these questions, we introduce here a computational approach for improving the quantitative discrimination power encoded in the genetic interaction screening data. Our matrix approximation model decomposes the original double-mutant fitness matrix into separate components, representing variability across the array and query mutants, which can be utilized for estimating and correcting the single-mutant fitness effects, respectively. When applied to three large-scale quantitative interaction datasets in yeast, we could improve the accuracy of scoring various interaction classes beyond that obtained with the original fitness data, especially in synthetic genetic array (SGA) and in genetic interaction mapping (GIM) datasets. In addition to the known pairs of interactions used in the evaluation of the computational approach, a number of novel interaction pairs were also predicted, along with underlying biological mechanisms, which remained undetected by the original datasets. It was shown that the optimal choice of the scoring function depends heavily on the screening approach and on the interaction class under analysis. Moreover, a simple preprocessing of the fitness matrix could further enhance the discrimination power of the epistatic miniarray profiling (E-MAP) dataset. These systematic evaluation results provide in-depth information on the optimal analysis of the future, large-scale screening experiments. In general, the

  14. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  15. Microgravity acceleration measurement and environment characterization science (17-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is a general purpose instrumentation system designed to measure the accelerations onboard the Shuttle Orbiter and Shuttle/Spacelab vehicles. These measurements are used to support microgravity experiments and investigation into the microgravity environment of the vehicle. Acceleration measurements can be made at locations remote from the SAMS main instrumentation unit by the use of up to three remote triaxial sensor heads. The prime objective for SAMS on the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission will be to measure the accelerations experienced by the Fluid Experiment System (FES). The SAMS acceleration measurements for FES will be complemented by low level, low frequency acceleration measurements made by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) installed on the shuttle. Secondary objectives for SAMS will be to measure accelerations at several specific locations to enable the acceleration transfer function of the Spacelab module to be analyzed. This analysis effort will be in conjunction with similar measurements analyses on other Spacelab missions.

  16. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  17. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  18. ATHENA: A knowledge-based hybrid backpropagation-grammatical evolution neural network algorithm for discovering epistasis among quantitative trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Growing interest and burgeoning technology for discovering genetic mechanisms that influence disease processes have ushered in a flood of genetic association studies over the last decade, yet little heritability in highly studied complex traits has been explained by genetic variation. Non-additive gene-gene interactions, which are not often explored, are thought to be one source of this "missing" heritability. Methods Stochastic methods employing evolutionary algorithms have demonstrated promise in being able to detect and model gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that influence human traits. Here we demonstrate modifications to a neural network algorithm in ATHENA (the Analysis Tool for Heritable and Environmental Network Associations) resulting in clear performance improvements for discovering gene-gene interactions that influence human traits. We employed an alternative tree-based crossover, backpropagation for locally fitting neural network weights, and incorporation of domain knowledge obtainable from publicly accessible biological databases for initializing the search for gene-gene interactions. We tested these modifications in silico using simulated datasets. Results We show that the alternative tree-based crossover modification resulted in a modest increase in the sensitivity of the ATHENA algorithm for discovering gene-gene interactions. The performance increase was highly statistically significant when backpropagation was used to locally fit NN weights. We also demonstrate that using domain knowledge to initialize the search for gene-gene interactions results in a large performance increase, especially when the search space is larger than the search coverage. Conclusions We show that a hybrid optimization procedure, alternative crossover strategies, and incorporation of domain knowledge from publicly available biological databases can result in marked increases in sensitivity and performance of the ATHENA algorithm for detecting and

  19. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2006-02-01

    The December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should accelerate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest if it is to avoid skidding. Interestingly enough, two solutions were proffered by readers.2 The purpose of this note is to compare and contrast the two approaches. Further experimental investigation of various turning strategies using a remote-controlled car and overhead video analysis could make for an interesting student project.

  20. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.