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Sample records for accelerating incompressible flow

  1. A GPU-accelerated flow solver for incompressible two-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codyer, Stephen; Raessi, Mehdi; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical solver for incompressible, immiscible, two-phase fluid flows that is accelerated by using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the projection method, which involves solving a pressure Poisson problem at each time step. A second-order discretization of the Poisson problem leads to a sparse matrix with five and seven diagonals for two- and three-dimensional simulations, respectively. Running a serial linear algebra solver on a single CPU can take 50-99.9% of the total simulation time to solve the above system for pressure. To remove this bottleneck, we utilized the large parallelization capabilities of GPUs; we developed a linear algebra solver based on the conjugate gradient iterative method (CGIM) by using CUDA 4.0 libraries and compared its performance with CUSP, an open-source, GPU library for linear algebra. Compared to running the CGIM solver on a single CPU core, for a 2D case, our GPU solver yields speedups of up to 88x in solver time and 81x overall time on a single GPU card. In 3D cases, the speedups are up to 81x (solver) and 15x (overall). Speedup is faster at higher grid resolutions and our GPU solver outperforms CUSP. Current work examines the acceleration versus a parallel CGIM CPU solver.

  2. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  3. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1995-01-01

    A unified approach for solving incompressible flows has been investigated in this study. The numerical CTVD (Centered Total Variation Diminishing) scheme used in this study was successfully developed by Sanders and Li for compressible flows, especially for the high speed. The CTVD scheme possesses better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that the CTVD scheme can equally well apply to solve incompressible flows. Because of the mathematical difference between the governing equations for incompressible and compressible flows, the scheme can not directly apply to the incompressible flows. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudo-compressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of the algorithm to incompressible flows thus becomes feasible. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows comprise continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the physical and numerical boundary conditions are properly implemented by the characteristic boundary conditions. Accordingly, a CFD code has been developed for this research and is currently under testing. Flow past a circular cylinder was chosen for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code. The code has shown some promising results.

  4. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    An unified approach for solving both compressible and incompressible flows was investigated in this study. The difference in CFD code development between incompressible and compressible flows is due to the mathematical characteristics. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudocompressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of a compressible flow code to solve incompressible flows becomes feasible. Among numerical algorithms developed for compressible flows, the Centered Total Variation Diminishing (CTVD) schemes possess better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that CTVD schemes can equally well solve incompressible flows. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows include the continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the boundary conditions including physical and numerical boundary conditions must be properly specified to obtain accurate solution. The CFD code for this research is currently in progress. Flow past a circular cylinder will be used for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code before applying this code to more specific applications.

  5. Computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    Incompressible Navier-Stokes solution methods and their applications to three-dimensional flows are discussed. A brief review of existing methods is given followed by a detailed description of recent progress on development of three-dimensional generalized flow solvers. Emphasis is placed on primitive variable formulations which are most promising and flexible for general three-dimensional computations of viscous incompressible flows. Both steady- and unsteady-solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Finally, examples of real world applications of these flow solvers are given.

  6. Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The details: a) Need stable numerical methods; b) Round off error can be considerable; c) Not convinced modes are correct for incompressible flow. Nonetheless, can derive compact and accurate reduced-order models. Can be used to generate actuator models or full flow-field models

  7. Computational Challenges of Viscous Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Kim, Chang Sung

    2004-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, numerical methods and simulation tools for incompressible flows have been advanced as a subset of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) discipline. Although incompressible flows are encountered in many areas of engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to the rather stringent requirements for predicting aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, while flow devices involving low-speed or incompressible flow could be reasonably well designed without resorting to accurate numerical simulations. As flow devices are required to be more sophisticated and highly efficient CFD took become increasingly important in fluid engineering for incompressible and low-speed flow. This paper reviews some of the successes made possible by advances in computational technologies during the same period, and discusses some of the current challenges faced in computing incompressible flows.

  8. Successes and Challenges of Incompressible Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2003-01-01

    During the past thirty years, numerical methods and simulation tools for incompressible flows have been advanced as a subset of CFD discipline. Even though incompressible flows are encountered in many areas of engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to rather stringent requirements for predicting aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, while flow devices involving low speed or incompressible flow could be reasonably well designed without resorting to accurate numerical simulations. As flow devices are required to be more sophisticated and highly efficient, CFD tools become indispensable in fluid engineering for incompressible and low speed flow. This paper is intended to review some of the successes made possible by advances in computational technologies during the same period, and discuss some of the current challenges.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  10. Potential flow and forces for incompressible viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien-Cheng

    1992-06-01

    Forces on a finite body in an incompressible viscous flow are shown to be contributed by a potential flow and fluid elements of nonzero vorticity in a revealing formulation. The present study indicates that the potential flow pay also a geometric role in determining the contribution of the fluid elements. Consideration is given to a solid body moving through a fluid, fluid accelerating past a solid body and a solid body which oscillates in a uniform stream. The effects of induced-mass and inertial forces appear naturally in the formulation and are separated from the contribution due to the surface vorticity and that due to the vorticity within the flow. Physical significance of the present analysis for vortical flows about a finite body is illustrated by examples, e.g., flow past a circular cylinder or an ellipsoid of revolution.

  11. Computing Incompressible Flows With Free Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kothe, D.

    1994-01-01

    RIPPLE computer program models transient, two-dimensional flows of incompressible fluids with surface tension on free surfaces of general shape. Surface tension modeled as volume force derived from continuum-surface-force model, giving RIPPLE both robustness and accuracy in modeling surface-tension effects at free surface. Also models wall adhesion effects. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Equilibria with incompressible flows from symmetry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr; Throumoulopoulos, G. N. E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr

    2015-08-15

    We identify and study new nonlinear axisymmetric equilibria with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction satisfying a generalized Grad Shafranov equation by extending the symmetry analysis presented by Cicogna and Pegoraro [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022520 (2015)]. In particular, we construct a typical tokamak D-shaped equilibrium with peaked toroidal current density, monotonically varying safety factor, and sheared electric field.

  13. Maximal mixing by incompressible fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seis, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We consider a model for mixing binary viscous fluids under an incompressible flow. We prove the impossibility of perfect mixing in finite time for flows with finite viscous dissipation. As measures of mixedness we consider a Monge-Kantorovich-Rubinstein transportation distance and, more classically, the H-1 norm. We derive rigorous a priori lower bounds on these mixing norms which show that mixing cannot proceed faster than exponentially in time. The rate of the exponential decay is uniform in the initial data.

  14. On the propagation of acceleration waves in incompressible hyperelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültop, T.

    2003-07-01

    The conditions for the propagation of acceleration waves (sound waves) in incompressible elastic media undergoing finite deformation are investigated. The incompressible hyperelastic solid media is considered in accordance with the general constitutive theory of materials subject to internal mechanical constraints. The equation of motion of acceleration waves is obtained using the theory of singular surfaces. A general comparison is made between the magnitudes of the propagation speeds of waves in incompressible and unconstrained solid media by the use of Mandel's inequalities. The magnitudes of the speeds of propagation of acceleration waves in the incompressible hyperelastic material classes of neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, and St. Venant-Kirchhoff solids are determined. Comparisons are made of the specific results concerning the magnitudes of wave propagation speeds making use of the corresponding material parameters.

  15. Triangular spectral elements for incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, C.; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the use of triangular elements in the spectral element method for direct simulation of incompressible flow. Triangles provide much greater geometric flexibility than quadrilateral elements and are better conditioned and more accurate when small angles arise. We employ a family of tensor product algorithms for triangles, allowing triangular elements to be handled with comparable arithmetic complexity to quadrilateral elements. The triangular discretizations are applied and validated on the Poisson equation. These discretizations are then applied to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a laminar channel flow solution is given. These new triangular spectral elements can be combined with standard quadrilateral elements, yielding a general and flexible high order method for complex geometries in two dimensions.

  16. High-End Computing for Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the First MIT Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics (June 12-14, 2001) is to bring together industry and academia (and government) to nurture the next generation in computational mechanics. The objective of the current talk, 'High-End Computing for Incompressible Flows', is to discuss some of the current issues in large scale computing for mission-oriented tasks.

  17. Multigrid Approach to Incompressible Viscous Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible viscous driven-cavity flows are computed for Reynolds numbers on the range 100-20,000 using a loosely coupled, implicit, second-order centrally-different scheme. Mesh sequencing and three-level V-cycle multigrid error smoothing are incorporated into the symmetric Gauss-Seidel time-integration algorithm. Parametrics on the numerical parameters are performed, achieving reductions in solution times by more than 60 percent with the full multigrid approach. Details of the circulation patterns are investigated in cavities of 2-to-1, 1-to-1, and 1-to-2 depth to width ratios.

  18. Skin-Friction Measurements in Incompressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donald W.; Walker, John H.

    1959-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to measure the local surface-shear stress and the average skin-friction coefficient in Incompressible flow for a turbulent boundary layer on a smooth flat plate having zero pressure gradient. Data were obtained for a range of Reynolds numbers from 1 million to 45 million. The local surface-shear stress was measured by a floating-element skin-friction balance and also by a calibrated total head tube located on the surface of the test wall. The average skin-friction coefficient was obtained from boundary-layer velocity profiles.

  19. Preconditioning and the limit to the incompressible flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.; Fiterman, A.; Vanleer, B.

    1993-01-01

    The use of preconditioning methods to accelerate the convergence to a steady state for both the incompressible and compressible fluid dynamic equations are considered. The relation between them for both the continuous problem and the finite difference approximation is also considered. The analysis relies on the inviscid equations. The preconditioning consists of a matrix multiplying the time derivatives. Hence, the steady state of the preconditioned system is the same as the steady state of the original system. For finite difference methods the preconditioning can change and improve the steady state solutions. An application to flow around an airfoil is presented.

  20. Pseudo-compressibility methods for the incompressible flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Arnone, A.

    1993-01-01

    Preconditioning methods to accelerate convergence to a steady state for the incompressible fluid dynamics equations are considered. The analysis relies on the inviscid equations. The preconditioning consists of a matrix multiplying the time derivatives. Thus the steady state of the preconditioned system is the same as the steady state of the original system. The method is compared to other types of pseudo-compressibility. For finite difference methods preconditioning can change and improve the steady state solutions. An application to viscous flow around a cascade with a non-periodic mesh is presented.

  1. Supercomputing Aspects for Simulating Incompressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kris, Cetin C.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to support the design of liquid rocket systems for the Advanced Space Transportation System. Since the space launch systems in the near future are likely to rely on liquid rocket engines, increasing the efficiency and reliability of the engine components is an important task. One of the major problems in the liquid rocket engine is to understand fluid dynamics of fuel and oxidizer flows from the fuel tank to plume. Understanding the flow through the entire turbo-pump geometry through numerical simulation will be of significant value toward design. One of the milestones of this effort is to develop, apply and demonstrate the capability and accuracy of 3D CFD methods as efficient design analysis tools on high performance computer platforms. The development of the Message Passage Interface (MPI) and Multi Level Parallel (MLP) versions of the INS3D code is currently underway. The serial version of INS3D code is a multidimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on overset grid technology, INS3D-MPI is based on the explicit massage-passing interface across processors and is primarily suited for distributed memory systems. INS3D-MLP is based on multi-level parallel method and is suitable for distributed-shared memory systems. For the entire turbo-pump simulations, moving boundary capability and efficient time-accurate integration methods are built in the flow solver, To handle the geometric complexity and moving boundary problems, an overset grid scheme is incorporated with the solver so that new connectivity data will be obtained at each time step. The Chimera overlapped grid scheme allows subdomains move relative to each other, and provides a great flexibility when the boundary movement creates large displacements. Two numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are outlined for obtaining time-accurate solutions of the incompressible Navier

  2. Efficient solutions of two-dimensional incompressible steady viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. H.; Napolitano, M.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, efficient, and robust numerical technique is provided for solving two dimensional incompressible steady viscous flows at moderate to high Reynolds numbers. The proposed approach employs an incremental multigrid method and an extrapolation procedure based on minimum residual concepts to accelerate the convergence rate of a robust block-line-Gauss-Seidel solver for the vorticity-stream function Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for the driven cavity flow problem using uniform and nonuniform grids and for the flow past a backward facing step in a channel. For this second problem, mesh refinement and Richardson extrapolation are used to obtain useful benchmark solutions in the full range of Reynolds numbers at which steady laminar flow is established.

  3. Incompressible flow in stepped labyrinth seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Chi, D.

    1985-01-01

    A steped labyrinth seal was experimentally investigated to determine the effects of pressure ratio, shaft speed, number of teeth, and tooth/step location upon the leakage through the seal for incompressible flow. The dependence of the flow coefficient upon the number of throttles and pressure ratio are similar to those for straight-through labyrinth seals. It can be noted that the axial location of the throttle with respect to the step had a special effect upon the flow coefficient. That is, the dependency of the flow coefficient upon rotation rate and the number of throttles changes with axial location. It was found that the minimum flow coefficient was obtained when the seal teeth were centered on the step surface. Axial pressure distribution measurements show that when the teeth are centered on the step, the pressure drop from cavity to cavity is almost uniform. It is speculated that the obtaining of this uniform pressure gradient is the cause for the enhanced performance of the stepped labyrinth seal when operated in that configuration.

  4. A vectorized solution for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, N. R.; Thompson, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain solutions to the unsteady Reynolds-averaged incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates on a vector processor. The governing equations are in nonconservative form with the velocity and pressure as dependent variables. Two momentum equations and the Poisson equation for pressure form a set of three governing equations for three flow field unknowns: u, v, and p. The governing equations and boundary conditions are expressed in terms of boundary-conforming curvilinear coordinates, and a checkerboard SOR iteration is used to solve the governing equations. Several possible sequences for a checkerboard SOR iteration are investigated for finding the best overall convergence rate. The efficiency and capability of the present algorithm was assessed using the example of an 18 percent thick NACA 66(3)018 airfoil at zero degree angle of attack for chord Reynolds number range 1000-40,000.

  5. AN IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD FOR COMPLEX INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An immersed boundary method for time-dependant, three- dimensional, incompressible flows is presented in this paper. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using a low-diffusion flux splitting method for the inviscid fluxes and a second order central differenc...

  6. HELENA code with incompressible parallel plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throumoulopoulos, George; Poulipoulis, George; Konz, Christian; EFDA ITM-TF Team

    2015-11-01

    It has been established that plasma rotation in connection to both zonal and equilibrium flow can play a role in the transitions to the advanced confinement regimes in tokamaks, as the L-H transition and the formation of Internal Transport Barriers. For incompressible rotation the equilibrium is governed by a generalized Grad-Shafranov (GGS) equation and a decoupled Bernoulli-type equation for the pressure. For parallel flow the GGS equation can be transformed to one identical in form with the usual Grad-Shafranov equation. In the present study on the basis of the latter equation we have extended HELENA, an equilibrium fixed boundary solver integrated in the ITM-TF modeling infrastructure. The extended code solves the GGS equation for a variety of the two free-surface-function terms involved for arbitrary Afvén Mach functions. We have constructed diverted-boundary equilibria pertinent to ITER and examined their characteristics, in particular as concerns the impact of rotation. It turns out that the rotation affects noticeably the pressure and toroidal current density with the impact on the current density being stronger in the parallel direction than in the toroidal one. Also, the linear stability of the equilibria constructed is examined This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfuion Consortium and has received funding from the National Programme for the Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, Hellenic Republic.

  7. Acoustic waves superimposed on incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The use of incompressible approximations in deriving solutions to the Lighthill wave equation was investigated for problems where an analytical solution could be found. A particular model problem involves the determination of the sound field of a spherical oscillating bubble in an ideal fluid. It is found that use of incompressible boundary conditions leads to good approximations in the important region of high acoustic wave number.

  8. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  9. General Equation Set Solver for Compressible and Incompressible Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachines for propulsion applications operate with many different working fluids and flow conditions. The flow may be incompressible, such as in the liquid hydrogen pump in a rocket engine, or supersonic, such as in the turbine which may drive the hydrogen pump. Separate codes have traditionally been used for incompressible and compressible flow solvers. The General Equation Set (GES) method can be used to solve both incompressible and compressible flows, and it is not restricted to perfect gases, as are many compressible-flow turbomachinery solvers. An unsteady GES turbomachinery flow solver has been developed and applied to both air and water flows through turbines. It has been shown to be an excellent alternative to maintaining two separate codes.

  10. A monolithic mass tracking formulation for bubbles in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aanjaneya, Mridul Patkar, Saket Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-08-15

    We devise a novel method for treating bubbles in incompressible flow that relies on the conservative advection of bubble mass and an associated equation of state in order to determine pressure boundary conditions inside each bubble. We show that executing this algorithm in a traditional manner leads to stability issues similar to those seen for partitioned methods for solid–fluid coupling. Therefore, we reformulate the problem monolithically. This is accomplished by first proposing a new fully monolithic approach to coupling incompressible flow to fully nonlinear compressible flow including the effects of shocks and rarefactions, and then subsequently making a number of simplifying assumptions on the air flow removing not only the nonlinearities but also the spatial variations of both the density and the pressure. The resulting algorithm is quite robust, has been shown to converge to known solutions for test problems, and has been shown to be quite effective on more realistic problems including those with multiple bubbles, merging and pinching, etc. Notably, this approach departs from a standard two-phase incompressible flow model where the air flow preserves its volume despite potentially large forces and pressure differentials in the surrounding incompressible fluid that should change its volume. Our bubbles readily change volume according to an isothermal equation of state.

  11. Minimal surfaces, incompressible flows and the geometric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J. C.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the Berry phase may be associated with an incompressible flow issuing through a minimal surface. An example based on the linear Jahn-Teller effect is given and found to be related to a Clifford torus rather than the usual magnetic monopole in S 3.

  12. Incompressible and anelastic flow simulations on numerically generated grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Keller, T. L.; Wurtele, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    In the numerical simulation of incompressible and anelastic flows, it is necessary to solve an elliptic equation at each time step. When the boundaries of such flows are nonrectangular, it may be advantageous to solve the equations on a new, numerically generated coordinate grid, in which the property of orthogonality has been preserved. Flow equations in general curvilinear coordinates maintaining the conservative form are given for both anelastic models using the momentum equations, and for incompressible models, using the vorticity equation. The general problem of grid-generation in two dimensions is presented, and a quasi-conformal transformation technique is discussed in detail. Some examples of grids generated by this technique are exhibited. Three examples of the flow of a stratified fluid over obstacles are presented, in which the grid-generation permits some new results to be obtained.

  13. Stability of axisymmetric swirl flows of viscous incompressible fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktershev, S. P.; Kuibin, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    A new method of solution to the problem of stability of the swirl flow of viscous incompressible fluid is developed. The method based on expansion of the required function into power series of radial coordinate allows an avoidance of difficulties related to numerical integration of the system of differential equations with a singular point. Stability of the Poiseuille flow in a rotating pipe is considered as an example.

  14. Conservative properties of finite difference schemes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinishi, Youhei

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to construct accurate finite difference schemes for incompressible unsteady flow simulations such as LES (large-eddy simulation) or DNS (direct numerical simulation). In this report, conservation properties of the continuity, momentum, and kinetic energy equations for incompressible flow are specified as analytical requirements for a proper set of discretized equations. Existing finite difference schemes in staggered grid systems are checked for satisfaction of the requirements. Proper higher order accurate finite difference schemes in a staggered grid system are then proposed. Plane channel flow is simulated using the proposed fourth order accurate finite difference scheme and the results compared with those of the second order accurate Harlow and Welch algorithm.

  15. Local mesh refinement for incompressible fluid flow with free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaka, H.; Kajiwara, H.; Ogura, K.

    1995-09-01

    A new local mesh refinement (LMR) technique has been developed and applied to incompressible fluid flows with free surface boundaries. The LMR method embeds patches of fine grid in arbitrary regions of interest. Hence, more accurate solutions can be obtained with a lower number of computational cells. This method is very suitable for the simulation of free surface movements because free surface flow problems generally require a finer computational grid to obtain adequate results. By using this technique, one can place finer grids only near the surfaces, and therefore greatly reduce the total number of cells and computational costs. This paper introduces LMR3D, a three-dimensional incompressible flow analysis code. Numerical examples calculated with the code demonstrate well the advantages of the LMR method.

  16. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to contribute to the optimized design of fan bypass systems in advanced turbofan engines. Increasing the engine bypass ratios have provided a major boost in engine performance improvement over the last fifty years. An engine with high bypass ratio (11-16:1) such as the Advanced Ducted Propulsion (ADP) is being developed and is expected to provide an additional 25% improvement in overall efficiency over the early turbofans. Such significant improvements in overall efficiency would reduce the cost per seat mile, which is a major government and Industry challenge for the 21th century. The research is part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program that involves a NASA, U.S. Industry and FAA partnership with the goal of a safe and highly productive global air transportation system. The immediate objective of the study is to perform numerical simulation of duct-strut interactions to elucidate the loss mechanisms associated with this configuration that is typical of advanced turbofan engines such as ADP. However, at present experimental data for a duct-strut configuration are not available. Thus, as a first step a wing-body junction flow would be studied and is the specific objective of the present study. At the outset it is to be recognized that while duct-strut interaction flow is similar to that of wing-body junction flows, there are some differences owing to the presence of a wall at both ends of the strut. Likewise, some differences are due to the sheared inflow (as opposed to a uniform inflow) velocity profile. It is however expected that some features of a wing-body junction flow would persist. Next, some of the salient aspects of the complex flow near a wing-body junction, as revealed by various studies reported in the literature will be reviewed. One of the principle characteristics of the juncture flow, is the presence of the mean flow components in a plane perpendicular to the direction of the oncoming free

  17. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to contribute to the optimized design of fan bypass systems in advanced turbofan engines. Increasing the engine bypass ratios have provided a major boost in engine performance improvement over the last fifty years. An engine with high bypass ratio (11-16:1) such as the Advanced Ducted Propulsion (ADP) is being developed and is expected to provide an additional 25% improvement in overall efficiency over the early turbofans. Such significant improvements in overall efficiency would reduce the cost per seat mile, which is a major government and Industry challenge for the 21th century. The research is part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program that involves a NASA, U.S. Industry and FAA partnership with the goal of a safe and highly productive global air transportation system. The immediate objective of the study is to perform numerical simulation of duct-strut interactions to elucidate the loss mechanisms associated with this configuration that is typical of advanced turbofan engines such as ADP. However, at present experimental data for a duct-strut configuration are not available. Thus, as a first step a wing-body junction flow would be studied and is the specific objective of the present study. At the outset it is to be recognized that while duct-strut interaction flow is similar to that of wing-body junction flows, there are some differences owing to the presence of a wall at both ends of the strut. Likewise, some differences are due to the sheared inflow (as opposed to a uniform inflow) velocity profile. It is however expected that some features of a wing-body junction flow would persist. Next, some of the salient aspects of the complex flow near a wing-body junction, as revealed by various studies reported in the literature will be reviewed. One of the principle characteristics of the juncture flow, is the presence of the mean flow components in a plane perpendicular to the direction of the oncoming free

  18. Consistent lattice Boltzmann methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangqi; Yang, Shiliang; Zeng, Zhong; Yin, Linmao; Zhao, Ya; Chew, Jia Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this work, consistent lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows are developed based on two efficient axisymmetric LB models available in the literature. In accord with their respective original models, the proposed axisymmetric models evolve within the framework of the standard LB method and the source terms contain no gradient calculations. Moreover, the incompressibility conditions are realized with the Hermite expansion, thus the compressibility errors arising in the existing models are expected to be reduced by the proposed incompressible models. In addition, an extra relaxation parameter is added to the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator to suppress the effect of the ghost variable and thus the numerical stability of the present models is significantly improved. Theoretical analyses, based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion and the equivalent moment system, are performed to derive the macroscopic equations from the LB models and the resulting truncation terms (i.e., the compressibility errors) are investigated. In addition, numerical validations are carried out based on four well-acknowledged benchmark tests and the accuracy and applicability of the proposed incompressible axisymmetric LB models are verified. PMID:27627407

  19. Consistent lattice Boltzmann methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangqi; Yang, Shiliang; Zeng, Zhong; Yin, Linmao; Zhao, Ya; Chew, Jia Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this work, consistent lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods for incompressible axisymmetric flows are developed based on two efficient axisymmetric LB models available in the literature. In accord with their respective original models, the proposed axisymmetric models evolve within the framework of the standard LB method and the source terms contain no gradient calculations. Moreover, the incompressibility conditions are realized with the Hermite expansion, thus the compressibility errors arising in the existing models are expected to be reduced by the proposed incompressible models. In addition, an extra relaxation parameter is added to the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator to suppress the effect of the ghost variable and thus the numerical stability of the present models is significantly improved. Theoretical analyses, based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion and the equivalent moment system, are performed to derive the macroscopic equations from the LB models and the resulting truncation terms (i.e., the compressibility errors) are investigated. In addition, numerical validations are carried out based on four well-acknowledged benchmark tests and the accuracy and applicability of the proposed incompressible axisymmetric LB models are verified.

  20. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  1. Optimized profiles for incompressible flow metering nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, R.; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Lou, D. Y. S.; Spindler, M.

    1988-04-01

    The Euler-Lagrange equation was used to minimize shear stress in designing a flow-metering nozzle. The flow field in the nozzle was computed by solving the momentum equation in integral form. The profile of the nozzle was obtained by minimizing the shear losses in the converging section of the nozzle. Following computation of the profile, a metering nozzle was designed, constructed, and subsequently tested to evaluate the validity of the analysis. The nozzle was designed for a pipe diameter of 15.24 cm (6 in.) and a throat diameter of 9.266 cm (3.648 in.). The test results indicated a marked increase in the value of the discharge coefficient when it is compared with that for the ASME standard nozzle. The computed pressure distribution is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. RIPPLE - A new model for incompressible flows with free surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kothe, D. B.; Mjolsness, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A new free surface flow model, RIPPLE, is summarized. RIPPLE obtains finite difference solutions for incompressible flow problems having strong surface tension forces at free surfaces of arbitrarily complex topology. The key innovation is the continuum surface force model which represents surface tension as a (strongly) localized volume force. Other features include a higher-order momentum advection model, a volume-of-fluid free surface treatment, and an efficient two-step projection solution method. RIPPLE's unique capabilities are illustrated with two example problems: low-gravity jet-induced tank flow, and the collision and coalescence of two cylindrical rods.

  3. Incompressible viscous flow simulations of the NFAC wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champney, Joelle Milene

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of an existing 3-D incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver, INS3D, are extended and improved to solve turbulent flows through the incorporation of zero- and two-equation turbulence models. The two-equation model equations are solved in their high Reynolds number form and utilize wall functions in the treatment of solid wall boundary conditions. The implicit approximate factorization scheme is modified to improve the stability of the two-equation solver. Applications to the 3-D viscous flow inside the 80 by 120 feet open return wind tunnel of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) are discussed and described.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Flows with Moving Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medale, Marc; Jaeger, Marc

    1997-03-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the 2D simulation of free surface flows or, more generally speaking, moving interface ones. The bulk fluids on both sides of the interface are taken into account in simulating the incompressible laminar flow state. In the case of heat transfer the whole system, i.e. walls as well as possible obstacles, is considered. This model is based on finite element analysis with an Eulerian approach and an unstructured fixed mesh. A special technique to localize the interface allows its temporal evolution through this mesh. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the model.

  5. STREMR: Numerical model for depth-averaged incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Bernard

    1993-09-01

    The STREMR computer code is a two-dimensional model for depth-averaged incompressible flow. It accommodates irregular boundaries and nonuniform bathymetry, and it includes empirical corrections for turbulence and secondary flow. Although STREMR uses a rigid-lid surface approximation, the resulting pressure is equivalent to the displacement of a free surface. Thus, the code can be used to model free-surface flow wherever the local Froude number is 0.5 or less. STREMR uses a finite-volume scheme to discretize and solve the governing equations for primary flow, secondary flow, and turbulence energy and dissipation rate. The turbulence equations are taken from the standard k-Epsilon turbulence model, and the equation for secondary flow is developed herein. Appendices to this report summarize the principal equations, as well as the procedures used for their discrete solution.

  6. Viscous Incompressible Flow Computations for 3-D Steady and Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of viscous incompressible flow computations for three-dimensional steady and unsteady flows. Details are given on the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as an engineering tool, solution methods for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, numerical and physical characteristics of the primitive variable approach, and the role of CFD in the past and in current engineering and research applications.

  7. Incompressible Navier-Stokes computations of rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high-pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. Flow analyses at 80-, 100-, and 120-percent of design conditions are presented.

  8. High order parallel numerical schemes for solving incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Avi; Milner, Edward J.; Liou, May-Fun; Belch, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of parallel computers for numerically solving flow fields has gained much importance in recent years. This paper introduces a new high order numerical scheme for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) specifically designed for parallel computational environments. A distributed MIMD system gives the flexibility of treating different elements of the governing equations with totally different numerical schemes in different regions of the flow field. The parallel decomposition of the governing operator to be solved is the primary parallel split. The primary parallel split was studied using a hypercube like architecture having clusters of shared memory processors at each node. The approach is demonstrated using examples of simple steady state incompressible flows. Future studies should investigate the secondary split because, depending on the numerical scheme that each of the processors applies and the nature of the flow in the specific subdomain, it may be possible for a processor to seek better, or higher order, schemes for its particular subcase.

  9. Pressure boundary conditions for incompressible flow using unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.R.; Murthy, J.Y.

    1997-10-01

    A large variety of industrial problems require the specification of pressure boundary conditions. In many industrial pipe flows, for example, the mass flow rate is not known a priori; the flow is driven by a specified pressure difference between inlet and outlet. This article presents a numerical method for computing incompressible flows with given pressure boundary conditions. Unstructured meshes composed of arbitrary polyhedra are considered in a cell-centered, co-located pressure-velocity formulation. The SIMPLE algorithm of Patankar and Spalding is extended to develop correction equations for boundary static pressure and boundary mass flux through an added-dissipation scheme. The procedure is validated against published benchmarks and shown to perform satisfactorily.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor modes in constant-density incompressible fluids accelerated by radiation pressure. [astrophysical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the behavior of linear perturbations in an incompressible fluid undergoing acceleration by radiation pressure, with reference to processes occurring in quasars, supernovae, and planetary nebulae. It is shown that, contrary to prior expectation, fluids accelerated by radiation pressure, are not always unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Some are, in fact, unstable, but the nature of the instability is qualitatively different.

  11. A multilevel approximate projections for incompressible flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.H.

    1994-12-31

    An adaptive-mesh projection algorithm for unsteady, variable-density, incompressible flow at high Reynolds number has been developed in the Applied Mathematics Group at LLNL. A grid-based refinement scheme combines the theoretical efficiencies of adaptive methods with the computational advantages of uniform grids, while a second-order Godunov method provides a robust and accurate treatment of advection in the presence of discontinuities without excessive dissipation. This paper focuses on the work of the present author concerning the approximate projection itself, which involves the numerical inversion of the operator {del} {center_dot} (1/{rho}){del} on various subsets of the adaptive grid hierarchy.

  12. New discretization and solution techniques for incompressible viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Several topics arising in the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are considered. Specifically, the question of choosing finite element velocity/pressure spaces is addressed, particularly from the viewpoint of achieving stable discretizations leading to convergent pressure approximations. The role of artificial viscosity in viscous flow calculations is studied, emphasizing work by several researchers for the anisotropic case. The last section treats the problem of solving the nonlinear systems of equations which arise from the discretization. Time marching methods and classical iterative techniques, as well as some modifications are mentioned.

  13. A boundary element method for steady incompressible thermoviscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A boundary element formulation is presented for moderate Reynolds number, steady, incompressible, thermoviscous flows. The governing integral equations are written exclusively in terms of velocities and temperatures, thus eliminating the need for the computation of any gradients. Furthermore, with the introduction of reference velocities and temperatures, volume modeling can often be confined to only a small portion of the problem domain, typically near obstacles or walls. The numerical implementation includes higher order elements, adaptive integration and multiregion capability. Both the integral formulation and implementation are discussed in detail. Several examples illustrate the high level of accuracy that is obtainable with the current method.

  14. Nested Cartesian grid method in incompressible viscous fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yih-Ferng; Mittal, Rajat; Sau, Amalendu; Hwang, Robert R.

    2010-09-01

    In this work, the local grid refinement procedure is focused by using a nested Cartesian grid formulation. The method is developed for simulating unsteady viscous incompressible flows with complex immersed boundaries. A finite-volume formulation based on globally second-order accurate central-difference schemes is adopted here in conjunction with a two-step fractional-step procedure. The key aspects that needed to be considered in developing such a nested grid solver are proper imposition of interface conditions on the nested-block boundaries, and accurate discretization of the governing equations in cells that are with block-interface as a control-surface. The interpolation procedure adopted in the study allows systematic development of a discretization scheme that preserves global second-order spatial accuracy of the underlying solver, and as a result high efficiency/accuracy nested grid discretization method is developed. Herein the proposed nested grid method has been widely tested through effective simulation of four different classes of unsteady incompressible viscous flows, thereby demonstrating its performance in the solution of various complex flow-structure interactions. The numerical examples include a lid-driven cavity flow and Pearson vortex problems, flow past a circular cylinder symmetrically installed in a channel, flow past an elliptic cylinder at an angle of attack, and flow past two tandem circular cylinders of unequal diameters. For the numerical simulations of flows past bluff bodies an immersed boundary (IB) method has been implemented in which the solid object is represented by a distributed body force in the Navier-Stokes equations. The main advantages of the implemented immersed boundary method are that the simulations could be performed on a regular Cartesian grid and applied to multiple nested-block (Cartesian) structured grids without any difficulty. Through the numerical experiments the strength of the solver in effectively

  15. Implicit/Multigrid Algorithms for Incompressible Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Rausch, Russ D.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.

    1997-01-01

    An implicit code for computing inviscid and viscous incompressible flows on unstructured grids is described. The foundation of the code is a backward Euler time discretization for which the linear system is approximately solved at each time step with either a point implicit method or a preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) technique. For the GMRES calculations, several techniques are investigated for forming the matrix-vector product. Convergence acceleration is achieved through a multigrid scheme that uses non-nested coarse grids that are generated using a technique described in the present paper. Convergence characteristics are investigated and results are compared with an exact solution for the inviscid flow over a four-element airfoil. Viscous results, which are compared with experimental data, include the turbulent flow over a NACA 4412 airfoil, a three-element airfoil for which Mach number effects are investigated, and three-dimensional flow over a wing with a partial-span flap.

  16. Nested Grid Iteration for Incompressible Viscous Flow and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, B.; Lipnikov, K.; Carey, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the use of one-way cascadic multigrid strategies (CMG) in the solution of incompressible viscous flow using the finite element method. First we describe the basic CMG approach for representative elliptic boundary value problems and summarize the theoretical error estimates from approximation theory, desired smoother properties, and arithmetic complexity of the method. The extension of these error and complexity estimates to adaptive grids is also given. Then we present the mathematical formulation and the finite element approximation scheme for the class of fluid-thermal problems of interest. In supporting numerical experiments, we examine performance of the algorithm on both serial and distributed parallel systems. We carry out comparison studies with a standard BCG solution strategy on the fine level grid and study diagonal treatments for the zero pressure block.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of three-phase incompressible flows.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Shi, B C; Chai, Z H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on multicomponent phase-field theory we intend to develop an efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating three-phase incompressible flows. In this model, two LB equations are used to capture the interfaces among three different fluids, and another LB equation is adopted to solve the flow field, where a new distribution function for the forcing term is delicately designed. Different from previous multiphase LB models, the interfacial force is not used in the computation of fluid velocity, which is more reasonable from the perspective of the multiscale analysis. As a result, the computation of fluid velocity can be much simpler. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that the present model can recover exactly the physical formulations for the three-phase system. Numerical simulations of extensive examples including two circular interfaces, ternary spinodal decomposition, spreading of a liquid lens, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are conducted to test the model. It is found that the present model can capture accurate interfaces among three different fluids, which is attributed to its algebraical and dynamical consistency properties with the two-component model. Furthermore, the numerical results of three-phase flows agree well with the theoretical results or some available data, which demonstrates that the present LB model is a reliable and efficient method for simulating three-phase flow problems. PMID:26871191

  18. Incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations in pump flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-07-01

    Flow through pump components, such as the SSME-HPFTP Impeller and an advanced rocket pump impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside an 11-inch SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump impeller, and an advanced rocket pump impeller. Numerical results of SSME-HPFTP impeller flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the advanced pump impeller, the effects of exit and shroud cavities are investigated. Flow analyses at design conditions will be presented.

  19. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Calculations in Pump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as the SSME-HPFTP Impeller and an advanced rocket pump impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside an 11-inch SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump impeller, and an advanced rocket pump impeller. Numerical results of SSME-HPFTP impeller flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the advanced pump impeller, the effects of exit and shroud cavities are investigated. Flow analyses at design conditions will be presented.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of three-phase incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Shi, B. C.; Chai, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on multicomponent phase-field theory we intend to develop an efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating three-phase incompressible flows. In this model, two LB equations are used to capture the interfaces among three different fluids, and another LB equation is adopted to solve the flow field, where a new distribution function for the forcing term is delicately designed. Different from previous multiphase LB models, the interfacial force is not used in the computation of fluid velocity, which is more reasonable from the perspective of the multiscale analysis. As a result, the computation of fluid velocity can be much simpler. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that the present model can recover exactly the physical formulations for the three-phase system. Numerical simulations of extensive examples including two circular interfaces, ternary spinodal decomposition, spreading of a liquid lens, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are conducted to test the model. It is found that the present model can capture accurate interfaces among three different fluids, which is attributed to its algebraical and dynamical consistency properties with the two-component model. Furthermore, the numerical results of three-phase flows agree well with the theoretical results or some available data, which demonstrates that the present LB model is a reliable and efficient method for simulating three-phase flow problems.

  1. A multilevel adaptive projection method for unsteady incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Louis H.

    1993-01-01

    There are two main requirements for practical simulation of unsteady flow at high Reynolds number: the algorithm must accurately propagate discontinuous flow fields without excessive artificial viscosity, and it must have some adaptive capability to concentrate computational effort where it is most needed. We satisfy the first of these requirements with a second-order Godunov method similar to those used for high-speed flows with shocks, and the second with a grid-based refinement scheme which avoids some of the drawbacks associated with unstructured meshes. These two features of our algorithm place certain constraints on the projection method used to enforce incompressibility. Velocities are cell-based, leading to a Laplacian stencil for the projection which decouples adjacent grid points. We discuss features of the multigrid and multilevel iteration schemes required for solution of the resulting decoupled problem. Variable-density flows require use of a modified projection operator--we have found a multigrid method for this modified projection that successfully handles density jumps of thousands to one. Numerical results are shown for the 2D adaptive and 3D variable-density algorithms.

  2. Three-dimensional incompressible flow calculations with alternative discretization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamidis, Panos; Assanis, Dennis N.

    1993-08-01

    A finite-volume calculation procedure for steady, incompressible, elliptic flows in complex geometries is presented. The methodology uses generalized body-fitted coordinates to model the shape of the boundary accurately. All variables are stored at the centroids of the elements, thus achieving simplicity and low cost of computations. Turbulence is modeled by using the standard two-equation k-epsilon model. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance and accuracy of flow calculations under different discretization schemes in the light of experimental results. The discretization schemes that are incorporated in the code include the classical hybrid scheme, the third-order QUICK scheme, and a fifth-order upwind scheme. Benchmark tests are performed for laminar and turbulent flows in 90 deg curved ducts of square and circular cross sections. Flaw solutions obtained using the classical hybrid scheme are compared with solutions obtained with the higher-order schemes. The results show that accurate solutions can be efficiently obtained on grids of moderate size by using high-order-accuracy schemes. Overall, the potential of the methodology for calculating real-life engineering flows is demonstrated.

  3. Computation of incompressible viscous flows through turbopump components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon

    1993-02-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use a one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the fuel pump impeller, the effect of downstream boundary conditions is investigated. Flow analyses at 80 percent, 100 percent, and 120 percent of design conditions are presented.

  4. Adjoint operator approach to shape design for internal incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabuk, H.; Sung, C.-H.; Modi, V.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of determining the profile of a channel or duct that provides the maximum static pressure rise is solved. Incompressible, laminar flow governed by the steady state Navier-Stokes equations is assumed. Recent advances in computational resources and algorithms have made it possible to solve the direct problem of determining such a flow through a body of known geometry. It is possible to obtain a set of adjoint equations, the solution to which permits the calculation of the direction and relative magnitude of change in the diffuser profile that leads to a higher pressure rise. The solution to the adjoint problem can be shown to represent an artificially constructed flow. This interpretation provides a means to construct numerical solutions to the adjoint equations that do not compromise the fully viscous nature of the problem. The algorithmic and computational aspects of solving the adjoint equations are addressed. The form of these set of equations is similar but not identical to the Navier-Stokes equations. In particular some issues related to boundary conditions and stability are discussed.

  5. Consistent and conservative framework for incompressible multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Mark; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for convection that handles discontinuities with second order accuracy and maintains conservation to machine precision. We use this method in the context of an incompressible gas-liquid flow to transport the phase interface, momentum, and scalars. Using the same methodology for all the variables ensures discretely consistent transport, which is necessary for robust and accurate simulations of turbulent atomizing flows with high-density ratios. The method achieves conservative transport by computing consistent fluxes on a refined mesh, which ensures all conserved quantities are fluxed with the same discretization. Additionally, the method seamlessly couples semi-Lagrangian fluxes used near the interface with finite difference fluxes used away from the interface. The semi-Lagrangian fluxes are three-dimensional, un-split, and conservatively handle discontinuities. Careful construction of the fluxes ensures they are divergence-free and no gaps or overlaps form between neighbors. We have tested and used the scheme for many cases and demonstrate a simulation of an atomizing liquid jet.

  6. Implicit lower-upper/approximate-factorization schemes for incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Briley, W.R.; Neerarambam, S.S.; Whitfield, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    A lower-upper/approximate-factorization (LU/AF) scheme is developed for the incompressible Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. The LU/AF scheme contains an iteration parameter that can be adjusted to improve iterative convergence rate. The LU/AF scheme is to be used in conjunction with linearized implicit approximations and artificial compressibility to compute steady solutions, and within sub-iterations to compute unsteady solutions. Formulations based on time linearization with and without sub-iteration and on Newton linearization are developed using spatial difference operators. The spatial approximation used includes upwind differencing based on Roe`s approximate Riemann solver and van Leer`s MUSCL scheme, with numerically computed implicit flux linearizations. Simple one-dimensional diffusion and advection/diffusion problems are first studied analytically to provide insight for development of the Navier-Stokes algorithm. The optimal values of both time step and LU/AF parameter are determined for a test problem consisting of two-dimensional flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil, with a highly stretched grid. The optimal parameter provides a consistent improvement in convergence rate for four test cases having different grids and Reynolds numbers and, also, for an inviscid case. The scheme can be easily extended to three dimensions and adapted for compressible flows. 24 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Mixing of spherical bubbles with time-dependent radius in incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente; Garaboa-Paz, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The motion of contracting and expanding bubbles in an incompressible chaotic flow is analyzed in terms of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents. The viscous forces acting on the bubble surface depend not only on the relative acceleration but also on the time dependence of the bubble volume, which is modeled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The effect of bubble coalescence on the coherent structures that develop in the flow is studied using a simplified bubble merger model. Contraction and expansion of the bubbles is favored in the vicinity of the coherent structures. Time evolution of coalescence bubbles follows a Lévy distribution with an exponent that depends on the initial distance between bubbles. Mixing patterns were found to depend heavily on merging and on the time-dependent volume of the bubbles.

  8. The exact calculation of quadrupole sources for some incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of the acoustic analogy of Lighthill to the acoustic and aerodynamic problems associated with moving bodies. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation, which is an interpretation of the acoustic analogy for sound generation by moving bodies, manipulates the source terms into surface and volume sources. Quite often in practice the volume sources, or quadrupoles, are neglected for various reasons. Recently, Farassat, Long and others have attempted to use the FW-H equation with the quadrupole source and neglected to solve for the surface pressure on the body. The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of the quadrupole source to the acoustic pressure and body surface pressure for some problems for which the exact solution is known. The inviscid, incompressible, 2-D flow, calculated using the velocity potential, is used to calculate the individual contributions of the various surface and volume source terms in the FW-H equation. The relative importance of each of the sources is then assessed.

  9. Accurate and robust methods for variable density incompressible flows with discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Puckett, E.G.

    1996-09-01

    We are interested in the solution of incompressible flows which are characterized by large density variations, interfacial physics, arbitrary material topologies and strong vortical content. The issues present in constant density incompressible flow are exacerbated by the presence of density discontinuities. A much greater premium requirement is placed the positivity of computed quantities The mechanism of baroclinc vorticity generation exists ({gradient}p x {gradient}p) to further complicate the physics.

  10. An explicit Runge-Kutta method for 3D turbulent incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Chao-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Hung, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve for the steady-state solution of the 3D incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The approach is based on the cell-center, central-difference, finite-volume formulation and an explicit one-step, multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme. The Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model is used. Techniques to accelerate the rate of convergence to a steady-state solution include the preconditioned method, the local time stepping, and the implicit residual smoothing. Improvements in computational efficiency have been demonstrated in several areas. This numerical procedure has been used to simulate the turbulent horseshoe vortex flow around an airfoil/flat-plate juncture.

  11. Preconditioned High-order WENO Scheme for Incompressible Viscous Flows Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z. S.; Zhang, J. B.; Li, C. X.

    2011-09-01

    A high-order accurate and highly-efficient finite difference algorithm for numerical simulation of the incompressible viscous flows has been developed. This algorithm is based on the pseudo-compressibility formulation, which combines the preconditioning technique for accelerating the time marching for stiff hyperbolic equations. Third-, fifth- and seventh-order accurate WENO schemes are used to discrete the inviscid fluxes and fourth- and sixth-order central schemes are employed for the viscous fluxes and metric terms. Implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) time marching procedure is performed for temporal discretization. The accuracy and the efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated for several numerical test cases.

  12. Three-dimensional nonlinear ideal MHD equilibria with field-aligned incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moawad, S. M.; Ibrahim, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The equilibrium properties of three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated. Incompressible and compressible flows are considered. The governing equations are taken in a steady state such that the magnetic field is parallel to the plasma flow. Equations of stationary equilibrium for both of incompressible and compressible MHD flows are derived and described in a mathematical mode. For incompressible MHD flows, Alfvénic and non-Alfvénic flows with constant and variable magnetofluid density are investigated. For Alfvénic incompressible flows, the general three-dimensional solutions are determined with the aid of two potential functions of the velocity field. For non-Alfvénic incompressible flows, the stationary equilibrium equations are reduced to two differential constraints on the potential functions, flow velocity, magnetofluid density, and the static pressure. Some examples which may be of some relevance to axisymmetric confinement systems are presented. For compressible MHD flows, equations of the stationary equilibrium are derived with the aid of a single potential function of the velocity field. The existence of three-dimensional solutions for these MHD flows is investigated. Several classes of three-dimensional exact solutions for several cases of nonlinear equilibrium equations are presented.

  13. An efficient algorithm for incompressible N-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present an efficient algorithm within the phase field framework for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids, with possibly very different physical properties such as densities, viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The algorithm employs a physical formulation for the N-phase system that honors the conservations of mass and momentum and the second law of thermodynamics. We present a method for uniquely determining the mixing energy density coefficients involved in the N-phase model based on the pairwise surface tensions among the N fluids. Our numerical algorithm has several attractive properties that make it computationally very efficient: (i) it has completely de-coupled the computations for different flow variables, and has also completely de-coupled the computations for the (N-1) phase field functions; (ii) the algorithm only requires the solution of linear algebraic systems after discretization, and no nonlinear algebraic solve is needed; (iii) for each flow variable the linear algebraic system involves only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices, which can be pre-computed during pre-processing, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the N-phase mixture; (iv) within a time step the semi-discretized system involves only individual de-coupled Helmholtz-type (including Poisson) equations, despite the strongly-coupled phase-field system of fourth spatial order at the continuum level; (v) the algorithm is suitable for large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts among the N fluids. Extensive numerical experiments have been presented for several problems involving multiple fluid phases, large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts. In particular, we compare our simulations with the de Gennes theory, and demonstrate that our method produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases. We also demonstrate the significant and sometimes dramatic effects of the

  14. An efficient algorithm for incompressible N-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present an efficient algorithm within the phase field framework for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids, with possibly very different physical properties such as densities, viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The algorithm employs a physical formulation for the N-phase system that honors the conservations of mass and momentum and the second law of thermodynamics. We present a method for uniquely determining the mixing energy density coefficients involved in the N-phase model based on the pairwise surface tensions among the N fluids. Our numerical algorithm has several attractive properties that make it computationally very efficient: (i) it has completely de-coupled the computations for different flow variables, and has also completely de-coupled the computations for the (N−1) phase field functions; (ii) the algorithm only requires the solution of linear algebraic systems after discretization, and no nonlinear algebraic solve is needed; (iii) for each flow variable the linear algebraic system involves only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices, which can be pre-computed during pre-processing, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the N-phase mixture; (iv) within a time step the semi-discretized system involves only individual de-coupled Helmholtz-type (including Poisson) equations, despite the strongly-coupled phase–field system of fourth spatial order at the continuum level; (v) the algorithm is suitable for large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts among the N fluids. Extensive numerical experiments have been presented for several problems involving multiple fluid phases, large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts. In particular, we compare our simulations with the de Gennes theory, and demonstrate that our method produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases. We also demonstrate the significant and sometimes dramatic effects of the

  15. An a-posteriori finite element error estimator for adaptive grid computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, an a-posteriori error estimator is presented and employed for solving viscous incompressible flow problems. In an effort to detect local flow features, such as vortices and separation, and to resolve flow details precisely, a velocity angle error estimator e theta which is based on the spatial derivative of velocity direction fields is designed and constructed. The a-posteriori error estimator corresponds to the antisymmetric part of the deformation-rate-tensor, and it is sensitive to the second derivative of the velocity angle field. Rationality discussions reveal that the velocity angle error estimator is a curvature error estimator, and its value reflects the accuracy of streamline curves. It is also found that the velocity angle error estimator contains the nonlinear convective term of the Navier-Stokes equations, and it identifies and computes the direction difference when the convective acceleration direction and the flow velocity direction have a disparity. Through benchmarking computed variables with the analytic solution of Kovasznay flow or the finest grid of cavity flow, it is demonstrated that the velocity angle error estimator has a better performance than the strain error estimator. The benchmarking work also shows that the computed profile obtained by using etheta can achieve the best matching outcome with the true theta field, and that it is asymptotic to the true theta variation field, with a promise of fewer unknowns. Unstructured grids are adapted by employing local cell division as well as unrefinement of transition cells. Using element class and node class can efficiently construct a hierarchical data structure which provides cell and node inter-reference at each adaptive level. Employing element pointers and node pointers can dynamically maintain the connection of adjacent elements and adjacent nodes, and thus avoids time-consuming search processes. The adaptive scheme is applied to viscous incompressible flow at different

  16. A General Approach to Time Periodic Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissert, Matthias; Hieber, Matthias; Nguyen, Thieu Huy

    2016-06-01

    This article develops a general approach to time periodic incompressible fluid flow problems and semilinear evolution equations. It yields, on the one hand, a unified approach to various classical problems in incompressible fluid flow and, on the other hand, gives new results for periodic solutions to the Navier-Stokes-Oseen flow, the Navier-Stokes flow past rotating obstacles, and, in the geophysical setting, for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and various diffusion equations with rough coefficients. The method is based on a combination of interpolation and topological arguments, as well as on the smoothing properties of the linearized equation.

  17. A VERSATILE SHARP INTERFACE IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD FOR INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS WITH COMPLEX BOUNDARIES

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, R.; Dong, H.; Bozkurttas, M.; Najjar, F.M.; Vargas, A.; von Loebbecke, A.

    2010-01-01

    A sharp interface immersed boundary method for simulating incompressible viscous flow past three-dimensional immersed bodies is described. The method employs a multi-dimensional ghost-cell methodology to satisfy the boundary conditions on the immersed boundary and the method is designed to handle highly complex three-dimensional, stationary, moving and/or deforming bodies. The complex immersed surfaces are represented by grids consisting of unstructured triangular elements; while the flow is computed on non-uniform Cartesian grids. The paper describes the salient features of the methodology with special emphasis on the immersed boundary treatment for stationary and moving boundaries. Simulations of a number of canonical two- and three-dimensional flows are used to verify the accuracy and fidelity of the solver over a range of Reynolds numbers. Flow past suddenly accelerated bodies are used to validate the solver for moving boundary problems. Finally two cases inspired from biology with highly complex three-dimensional bodies are simulated in order to demonstrate the versatility of the method. PMID:20216919

  18. The solution of the two-dimensional incompressible flow equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Morgan

    1993-05-01

    A numerical method for calculating two-dimensional turbulent incompressible flow on unstructured triangular meshes is developed. A primitive variable formulation is used. The Helmholtz pressure equation algorithm is used to enforce the velocity continuity relation for incompressible flow. A careful treatment of the pressure dissipation model is presented. A standard k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions is used to provide closure for the governing equations. A backward-facing step turbulent flow is calculated using an unstructured triangular mesh, and the results are compared to experimental and computational data.

  19. Front Speed Enhancement by Incompressible Flows in Three or Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Smaily, Mohammad; Kirsch, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    We study, in dimensions N ≥ 3, the family of first integrals of an incompressible flow: these are functions whose level surfaces are tangential to the streamlines of the advective incompressible field. One main motivation for this study comes from earlier results proving that the existence of nontrivial first integrals of an incompressible flow q is the main key that leads to a "linear speed up" by a large advection of pulsating traveling fronts solving a reaction-advection-diffusion equation in a periodic heterogeneous framework. The family of first integrals is not well understood in dimensions N ≥ 3 due to the randomness of the trajectories of q and this is in contrast with the case N = 2. By looking at the domain of propagation as a union of different components produced by the advective field, we provide more information about first integrals and we give a class of incompressible flows which exhibit "ergodic components" of positive Lebesgue measure (and hence are not shear flows) and which, under certain sharp geometric conditions, speed up the KPP fronts linearly with respect to the large amplitude. In the proofs, we establish a link between incompressibility, ergodicity, first integrals and the dimension to give a sharp condition about the asymptotic behavior of the minimal KPP speed in terms of the configuration of ergodic components.

  20. Approximate factorization with an elliptic pressure solver for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, R. S.; Thompson, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional curvilinear coordinates are used to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in conjunction with approximate factorization for the solution of the momentum equation and the successive overrelaxation by lines method for the solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure. The combined algorithm, although not fully explicit, is marginally stable at Reynolds numbers lower than 10,000 and time increments of 0.01. Pressure distributions calculated for attack angles of zero and 6 deg are of the same shape as the experimental curves, but are shifted to one side.

  1. Multi-material incompressible flow simulation using the moment-of-fluid method

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, R V; Schofield, S P; Lowrie, R B; Swartz, B K; Christon, M A; Dyadechko, V

    2009-01-01

    The Moment-of-Fluid interface reconstruction technique is implemented in a second order accurate, unstructured finite element variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. For flows with multiple materials, MOF significantly outperforms existing first and second order interface reconstruction techniques. For two material flows, the performance of MOF is similar to other interface reconstruction techniques. For strongly driven bouyant flows, the errors in the flow solution dominate and all the interface reconstruction techniques perform similarly.

  2. Paraelectric gas flow accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Daniel M. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Roth, J. Reece (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A substrate is configured with first and second sets of electrodes, where the second set of electrodes is positioned asymmetrically between the first set of electrodes. When a RF voltage is applied to the electrodes sufficient to generate a discharge plasma (e.g., a one-atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma) in the gas adjacent to the substrate, the asymmetry in the electrode configuration results in force being applied to the active species in the plasma and in turn to the neutral background gas. Depending on the relative orientation of the electrodes to the gas, the present invention can be used to accelerate or decelerate the gas. The present invention has many potential applications, including increasing or decreasing aerodynamic drag or turbulence, and controlling the flow of active and/or neutral species for such uses as flow separation, altering heat flow, plasma cleaning, sterilization, deposition, etching, or alteration in wettability, printability, and/or adhesion.

  3. Design method for the flow field and drag of bodies of revolution in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    A design method has been developed for determining the flow field, pressure distribution, boundary layer separation point, and drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in incompressible flow. The approach taken is the classical coupling of potential and boundary solutions to obtain the flow field about the body. The potential solution is obtained by modeling the body with an axial distribution of source/sink elements whose strengths vary linearly along their length. The laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions are obtained from conventional solutions of the momentum integral equation. An approximate method is used to estimate the boundary layer transition point on the body. An empirical base pressure correlation is used to determine the base drag. Body surface pressure distributions and drag predictions are compared with experimental measurements.

  4. Projection methods for incompressible flow problems with WENO finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Frutos, Javier; John, Volker; Novo, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite difference schemes have been recommended in a competitive study of discretizations for scalar evolutionary convection-diffusion equations [20]. This paper explores the applicability of these schemes for the simulation of incompressible flows. To this end, WENO schemes are used in several non-incremental and incremental projection methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Velocity and pressure are discretized on the same grid. A pressure stabilization Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) type of stabilization is introduced in the incremental schemes to account for the violation of the discrete inf-sup condition. Algorithmic aspects of the proposed schemes are discussed. The schemes are studied on several examples with different features. It is shown that the WENO finite difference idea can be transferred to the simulation of incompressible flows. Some shortcomings of the methods, which are due to the splitting in projection schemes, become also obvious.

  5. A comparison of two incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithms for unsteady internal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study of two different incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithms for solving an unsteady, incompressible, internal flow problem is performed. The first algorithm uses an artificial compressibility method coupled with upwind differencing and a line relaxation scheme. The second algorithm uses a fractional step method with a staggered grid, finite volume approach. Unsteady, viscous, incompressible, internal flow through a channel with a constriction is computed using the first algorithm. A grid resolution study and parameter studies on the artificial compressibility coefficient and the maximum allowable residual of the continuity equation are performed. The periodicity of the solution is examined and several periodic data sets are generated using the first algorithm. These computational results are compared with previously published results computed using the second algorithm and experimental data.

  6. Equation-free/Galerkin-free POD-assisted computation of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirisup, Sirod; Karniadakis, George Em; Xiu, Dongbin; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2005-08-01

    We present a Galerkin-free, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-assisted computational methodology for numerical simulations of the long-term dynamics of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The approach is based on the "equation-free" framework: we use short, appropriate initialized bursts of full direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations to observe, estimate, and accelerate, through "projective integration", the evolution of the flow dynamics. The main assumption is that the long-term dynamics of the flow lie on a low-dimensional, attracting, and invariant manifold, which can be parametrized, not necessarily spanned, by a few POD basis functions. We start with a discussion of the consistency and accuracy of the approach, and then illustrate it through numerical examples: two-dimensional periodic and quasi-periodic flows past a circular cylinder. We demonstrate that the approach can successfully resolve complex flow dynamics at a reduced computational cost and that it can capture the long-term asymptotic state of the flow in cases where traditional Galerkin-POD models fail. The approach trades the overhead involved in developing POD-Galerkin and POD-nonlinear Galerkin codes, for the repeated (yet short, and on demand) use of an existing full DNS simulator. Moreover, since in this approach the POD modes are used to observe rather than span the true system dynamics, the computation is much less sensitive than POD-Galerkin to values of the system parameters (e.g., the Reynolds number) and the particular simulation data ensemble used to obtain the POD basis functions.

  7. A pre-conditioned implicit direct forcing based immersed boundary method for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Pan, Xiaomin; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    A novel immersed boundary (IB) method based on an implicit direct forcing (IDF) scheme is developed for incompressible viscous flows. The key idea for the present IDF method is to use a block LU decomposition technique in momentum equations with Taylor series expansion to construct the implicit IB forcing in a recurrence form, which imposes more accurate no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surface. To accelerate the IB forcing convergence during the iterative procedure, a pre-conditioner matrix is introduced in the recurrence formulation of the IB forcing. A Jacobi-type parameter is determined in the pre-conditioner matrix by minimizing the Frobenius norm of the matrix function representing the difference between the IB forcing solution matrix and the pre-conditioner matrix. In addition, the pre-conditioning parameter is restricted due to the numerical stability in the recurrence formulation. Consequently, the present pre-conditioned IDF (PIDF) enables accurate calculation of the IB forcing within a few iterations. We perform numerical simulations of two-dimensional flows around a circular cylinder and three-dimensional flows around a sphere for low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The result shows that PIDF yields a better imposition of no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surfaces for low Reynolds number with a fairly larger time step than IB methods with different direct forcing schemes due to the implicit treatment of the diffusion term for determining the IB forcing. Finally, we demonstrate the robustness of the present PIDF scheme by numerical simulations of flow around a circular array of cylinders, flows around a falling sphere, and two sedimenting spheres in gravity.

  8. Towards entropy detection of anomalous mass and momentum exchange in incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naterer, G. F.; Rinn, D.

    2002-08-01

    An entropy-based approach is presented for assessment of computational accuracy in incompressible flow problems. It is shown that computational entropy can serve as an effective parameter in detecting erroneous or anomalous predictions of mass and momentum transport in the flow field. In the present paper, the fluid flow equations and second law of thermodynamics are discretized by a Galerkin finite-element method with linear, isoparametric triangular elements. It is shown that a weighted entropy residual is closely related to truncation error; this relationship is examined in an application problem involving incompressible flow through a converging channel. In particular, regions exhibiting anomalous flow behaviour, such as under-predicted velocities, appear together with analogous trends in the weighted entropy residual. It is anticipated that entropy-based error detection can provide important steps towards improved accuracy in computational fluid flow. Copyright

  9. Progress in incompressible Navier-Stokes computations for propulsion flows and its dual-use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1995-01-01

    Development of an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure was performed for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine pump components and for the mechanical heart assist devices. The solution procedure for the propulsion systems is applicable to incompressible Navier-Stokes flows in a steadily rotating frame of reference for any general complex configurations. The computer codes were tested on different complex configurations such as liquid rocket engine inducer and impellers. As a spin-off technology from the turbopump component simulations, the flow analysis for an axial heart pump was conducted. The baseline Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) design was improved by adding an inducer geometry by adapting from the liquid rocket engine pump. The time-accurate mode of the incompressible Navier-Stokes code was validated with flapping foil experiment by using different domain decomposition methods. In the flapping foil experiment, two upstream NACA 0025 foils perform high-frequency synchronized motion and generate unsteady flow conditions for a downstream larger stationary foil. Fairly good agreement was obtained between unsteady experimental data and numerical results from two different moving boundary procedures. Incompressible Navier-Stokes code (INS3D) has been extended for heat transfer applications. The temperature equation was written for both forced and natural convection phenomena. Flow in a square duct case was used for the validation of the code in both natural and forced convection.

  10. On the rotation and skew-symmetric forms for incompressible flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of numerical simulations of transition and turbulence in incompressible flow are presented to compare the commonly used rotation form with the skew-symmetric (and other) forms of the nonlinear terms. The results indicate that the rotation form is much less accurate than the other forms for spectral algorithms which include aliasing errors. For de-aliased methods the difference is minimal.

  11. Numerical simulation of the incompressible internal flow through a tilting disk valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Dee; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the incompressible viscous flow through a prosthetic tilting disk heart valve is presented in order to demonstrate the current capability to model unsteady flows with moving boundaries. Both steady and unsteady flow calculations are performed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in three-dimensional generalized curvilinear coordinates. In order to handle the moving boundary problems, the chimera grid embedding scheme which decomposes a complex computational domain into several simple subdomains is used. An algebraic turbulence model for internal flows is incorporated to reach the physiological values of Reynolds number. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical results and experimental measurements. It is found that the tilting disk valve causes large regions of separated flow, and regions of high shear.

  12. An anisotropic flow law for incompressible polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Luca; Hutter, Kolumban

    2005-11-01

    New and explicit anisotropic constitutive equations between the stretching and deviatoric stress tensors for the two- and three-dimensional cases of incompressible polycrystalline materials are presented. The anisotropy is assumed to be driven by an Orientation Distribution Function (ODF). The polycrystal is composed of transversally isotropic crystallites, the lattice orientation of which can be characterized by a single unit vector. The proposed constitutive equations are valid for any frame of reference and for every state of deformation. The basic assumption of this method is that the principle directions of the stretching and of the stress deviator are the same in the isotropic as well as in the anisotropic case. This means that the proposed constitutive laws are able to model the effects of anisotropy only via a change of the fluidity due to a change of the ODF. Such an assumption is justified to guarantee that, besides knowledge of the parameters involved in the isotropic constitutive equation, the anisotropic material response is completely characterized by only one additional parameter, a type of enhancement factor. Explicit comparisons with experimental data are conducted for Ih ice.

  13. Incompressible viscous flow computations for the pump components and the artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference, three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation to calculate the flow through turbopump components is utilized. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Both steady and unsteady flow calculations can be performed using the current algorithm. In this work, the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames by using the steady-state formulation in order to simulate the flow through a turbopump inducer. Eddy viscosity is computed by using an algebraic mixing-length turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found between the two. Included in the appendix is a paper on incompressible viscous flow through artificial heart devices with moving boundaries. Time-accurate calculations, such as impeller and diffusor interaction, will be reported in future work.

  14. On the origins of vortex shedding in two-dimensional incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2016-04-01

    An exegesis of a novel mechanism leading to vortex splitting and subsequent shedding that is valid for two-dimensional incompressible, inviscid or viscous, and external or internal or wall-bounded flows, is detailed in this research. The mechanism, termed the vortex shedding mechanism (VSM) is simple and intuitive, requiring only two coincident conditions in the flow: (1) the existence of a location with zero momentum and (2) the presence of a net force having a positive divergence. Numerical solutions of several model problems illustrate causality of the VSM. Moreover, the VSM criteria is proved to be a necessary and sufficient condition for a vortex splitting event in any two-dimensional, incompressible flow. The VSM is shown to exist in several canonical problems including the external flow past a circular cylinder. Suppression of the von Kármán vortex street is demonstrated for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 400 by mitigating the VSM.

  15. On a modification of GLS stabilized FEM for solving incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, P.; Novotný, J.; Ístek, J.

    2006-07-01

    We deal with 2D flows of incompressible viscous fluids with high Reynolds numbers. Galerkin Least Squares technique of stabilization of the finite element method is studied and its modification is described. We present a number of numerical results obtained by the developed method, showing its contribution to solving flows with high Reynolds numbers. Several recommendations and remarks are included. We are interested in positive as well as negative aspects of stabilization, which cannot be divorced.

  16. Direct pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ovaysi, Saeed; Piri, Mohammad

    2010-09-20

    We present a dynamic particle-based model for direct pore-level modeling of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution micro-CT images of rock samples. It is based on moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability for flow in porous media problems. Using the micro-CT image of a rock sample, the entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is discretized into particles. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are then solved for each particle using the MPS summations. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. An algorithm to split and merge fluid particles is also introduced. To handle the computational load, we present a parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters. The accuracy of the model is validated against the analytical, numerical, and experimental data available in the literature. The validated model is then used to simulate both unsteady- and steady-state flow of an incompressible fluid directly in a representative elementary volume (REV) size micro-CT image of a naturally-occurring sandstone with 3.398 {mu}m resolution. We analyze the quality and consistency of the predicted flow behavior and calculate absolute permeability using the steady-state flow rate.

  17. Computation of incompressible flow around the DARPA SUBOFF bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Joseph J.; Coleman, Roderick M.; Haussling, Henry J.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the application of the DTNS flow solvers, both axisymmetric (DTNSA) and three-dimensional (DTNS3D) versions, and the NUGGET grid generation code to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SUBOFF bodies.

  18. Numerical simulation methods of incompressible flows and an application to the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. L. C.; Kwak, D.; Rogers, S. E.; Yang, R.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Incompressible Navier-Stokes solution methods are discussed with an emphasis on the pseudocompressibility method. A steady-state flow solver based on the pseudocompressibility approach is then described. This flow-solver code was used to analyze the internal flow in the Space Shuttle main engine hot-gas manifold. Salient features associated with this three-dimensional realistic flow simulation are discussed. Numerical solutions relevant to the current engine analysis and the redesign effort are discussed along with experimental results. This example demonstrates the potential of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool for aerospace applications.

  19. A theoretical method for the analysis and design of axisymmetric bodies. [flow distribution and incompressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, T. D.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for the computation of the flow field about an axisymmetric body operating in a viscous, incompressible fluid. A potential flow method was used to determine the inviscid flow field and to yield the boundary conditions for the boundary layer solutions. Boundary layer effects in the forces of displacement thickness and empirically modeled separation streamlines are accounted for in subsequent potential flow solutions. This procedure is repeated until the solutions converge. An empirical method was used to determine base drag allowing configuration drag to be computed.

  20. Explicit formulations of gas-kinetic flux solver for simulation of incompressible and compressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Shu, C.; Teo, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a gas-kinetic flux solver (GKFS) is presented for the simulation of incompressible and compressible viscous flows. In this solver, the finite volume method is applied to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations. The inviscid and viscous fluxes at the interface are obtained simultaneously via the gas-kinetic scheme, which locally reconstruct the solution for the continuous Boltzmann equation. Different from the conventional gas-kinetic BGK scheme [1], a simple way is presented in this work to evaluate the non-equilibrium distribution function, which is calculated by the difference of equilibrium distribution functions at the cell interface and its surrounding points. As a consequence, explicit formulations for computing the conservative flow variables and fluxes are simply derived. In particular, three specific schemes are proposed and validated via several incompressible and compressible test examples. Numerical results show that all three schemes can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible flows. On the other hand, Scheme III is much more stable and consistent in simulation of compressible flows.

  1. Distribution of incompressible flow within interdigitated channels and porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Robert J.; Zhu, Huayang

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a general model with which to evaluate flow uniformity and pressure drop within interdigitated-channel structures, especially in the context of redox flow batteries. The governing equations are cast in dimensionless variables, leading to a set of characteristic dimensionless parameter groups. The systems of governing equations are solved computationally, with the results presented graphically. Because the results are general, the underlying model itself is not needed to apply the quantitative design guidelines. However, the paper presents and discusses all the information required to recreate the model as needed.

  2. 2D Mixed Convection Thermal Incompressible Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Blanca; Nicolas, Alfredo

    2005-11-01

    Mixed convection thermal incomprressible viscous fluid flows in rectangular cavities are presented. These kind of flows may be governed by the time-dependent Boussinesq approximation in terms of the stream function-vorticity variables formulation. The results are obtained with a simple numerical scheme based mainly on a fixed point iterative process applied to the non-linear system of elliptic equations that is obtained after a second order time discretization. Numerical experiments are reported for the problem of a cavity with fluid boundary motion on the top. Some results correspond to validation examples and others, to the best of our knowledge, correspond to new results. To show that the new results are correct, a mesh size and time independence studies are carried out, and the acceptable errors are measured point-wise. For the optimal mesh size and time step the final times when the steady state is reached, as solution from the unsteady problem, are reported; it should be seen that they are larger than the ones for natural convection which, physically speaking, show the agreement that mixed convection flows are more active than those of natural convection due to the fluid boundary motion on the top of the cavity. The flow parameters are: the Reynolds number, the Grashof number and the aspect ratio.

  3. Higher-Order Compact Schemes for Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert V.; Demuren, Ayodeji O.; Carpenter, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A higher order accurate numerical procedure has been developed for solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for 2D or 3D fluid flow problems. It is based on low-storage Runge-Kutta schemes for temporal discretization and fourth and sixth order compact finite-difference schemes for spatial discretization. The particular difficulty of satisfying the divergence-free velocity field required in incompressible fluid flow is resolved by solving a Poisson equation for pressure. It is demonstrated that for consistent global accuracy, it is necessary to employ the same order of accuracy in the discretization of the Poisson equation. Special care is also required to achieve the formal temporal accuracy of the Runge-Kutta schemes. The accuracy of the present procedure is demonstrated by application to several pertinent benchmark problems.

  4. Steady incompressible potential flow around lifting bodies immersed in a fluid. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiuchiolo, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    The refinement was investigated of a method for evaluating the pressure distribution on a body surface of arbitrary shape in incompressible flow. The solution was obtained in terms of the velocity potential, through numerical approximations which require the use of a high speed digital computer. The box method and the modal method are described in detail, and were applied to a very thin, rectangular wing in incompressible, steady flow. The box method is found to be more practical as it is applicable to more general geometries (the modal method requires a new set of functions for each geometry), and requires less computer time (fifty percent of that required by the modal method for the same problem).

  5. A nested iterative scheme for computation of incompressible flows in long domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Sathe, Sunil

    2008-12-01

    We present an effective preconditioning technique for solving the nonsymmetric linear systems encountered in computation of incompressible flows in long domains. The application category we focus on is arterial fluid mechanics. These linear systems are solved using a nested iterative scheme with an outer Richardson scheme and an inner iteration that is handled via a Krylov subspace method. Test computations that demonstrate the robustness of our nested scheme are presented.

  6. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  7. Velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Meir, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this work we discuss some aspects of the velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows. We describe reasonable boundary conditions that should be imposed on the vorticity and a compatibility condition that the vorticity must satisfy. This formulation may give rise to efficient numerical algorithms for approximating solutions of the Stokes problem, which in turn yields an iterative method for approximating solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. VOF Method for Simulation of Multiphase Incompressible Flows with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. P.; Ni, M. J.; Ma, H. Y.

    2011-09-01

    A volume-of-fluid method for simulation of incompressible multiphase flows with phase change is studied. We have simulated a series of processes of the vapor bubble deformation in a three-dimensional film boiling using volume of fluid (VOF) method, which include the generation, detachment and rising deformation of the bubble. Our numerical results show that the VOF method is a useful method to handle complex deformation of the liquid-vapor interface during film boiling.

  9. Fully consistent CFD methods for incompressible flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, D. K.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, N. N.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays collocated grid based CFD methods are one of the most efficient tools for computations of the flows past wind turbines. To ensure the robustness of the methods they require special attention to the well-known problem of pressure-velocity coupling. Many commercial codes to ensure the pressure-velocity coupling on collocated grids use the so-called momentum interpolation method of Rhie and Chow [1]. As known, the method and some of its widely spread modifications result in solutions, which are dependent of time step at convergence. In this paper the magnitude of the dependence is shown to contribute about 0.5% into the total error in a typical turbulent flow computation. Nevertheless if coarse grids are used, the standard interpolation methods result in much higher non-consistent behavior. To overcome the problem, a recently developed interpolation method, which is independent of time step, is used. It is shown that in comparison to other time step independent method, the method may enhance the convergence rate of the SIMPLEC algorithm up to 25 %. The method is verified using turbulent flow computations around a NACA 64618 airfoil and the roll-up of a shear layer, which may appear in wind turbine wake.

  10. Conditions at the downstream boundary for simulations of viscous incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The proper specification of boundary conditions at artificial boundaries for the simulation of time-dependent fluid flows has long been a matter of controversy. A general theory of asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves is applied to the design of simple, accurate conditions at downstream boundary for incompressible flows. For Reynolds numbers far enough below the critical value for linear stability, a scaling is introduced which greatly simplifies the construction of the asymptotic conditions. Numerical experiments with the nonlinear dynamics of vortical disturbances to plane Poiseuille flow are presented which illustrate the accuracy of our approach. The consequences of directly applying the scalings to the equations are also considered.

  11. Incompressible viscous flow computations for the pump components and the artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1992-01-01

    A finite difference, three dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation to calculate the flow through turbopump components is utilized. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Both steady and unsteady flow calculations can be performed using the current algorithm. Here, equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames by using the steady state formulation in order to simulate the flow through a turbopump inducer. Eddy viscosity is computed by using an algebraic mixing-length turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found between the two.

  12. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  13. Large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional, time-dependent primitive equations of motion were numerically integrated for the case of turbulent channel flow. A partially implicit numerical method was developed. An important feature of this scheme is that the equation of continuity is solved directly. The residual field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model, while the large-scale field was obtained directly from the solution of the governing equations. An important portion of the initial velocity field was obtained from the solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The pseudospectral method was used for numerical differentiation in the horizontal directions, and second-order finite-difference schemes were used in the direction normal to the walls. The large eddy simulation technique is capable of reproducing some of the important features of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The resolvable portions of the root-mean square wall pressure fluctuations, pressure velocity-gradient correlations, and velocity pressure-gradient correlations are documented.

  14. Notes on Newton-Krylov based Incompressible Flow Projection Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Nourgaliev; Mark Christon; J. Bakosi

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present document is to formulate Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov algorithm for approximate projection method used in Hydra-TH code. Hydra-TH is developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under the auspices of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL) for thermal-hydraulics applications ranging from grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) to multiphase flow subcooled boiling. Currently, Hydra-TH is based on the semi-implicit projection method, which provides an excellent platform for simulation of transient single-phase thermalhydraulics problems. This algorithm however is not efficient when applied for very slow or steady-state problems, as well as for highly nonlinear multiphase problems relevant to nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics with boiling and condensation. These applications require fully-implicit tightly-coupling algorithms. The major technical contribution of the present report is the formulation of fully-implicit projection algorithm which will fulfill this purpose. This includes the definition of non-linear residuals used for GMRES-based linear iterations, as well as physics-based preconditioning techniques.

  15. A Riemannian geometric mapping technique for identifying incompressible equivalents to subsonic potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Brian Joseph

    This research develops a technique for the solution of incompressible equivalents to planar steady subsonic potential flows. Riemannian geometric formalism is used to develop a gauge transformation of the length measure followed by a curvilinear coordinate transformation to map the given subsonic flow into a canonical Laplacian flow with the same boundary conditions. The effect of the transformation is to distort both the immersed profile shape and the domain interior nonuniformly as a function of local flow properties. The method represents the full nonlinear generalization of the classical methods of Prandtl-Glauert and Karman-Tsien. Unlike the classical methods which are "corrections," this method gives exact results in the sense that the inverse mapping produces the subsonic full potential solution over the original airfoil, up to numerical accuracy. The motivation for this research was provided by an observed analogy between linear potential flow and the special theory of relativity that emerges from the invariance of the d'Alembert wave equation under Lorentz transformations. This analogy is well known in an operational sense, being leveraged widely in linear unsteady aerodynamics and acoustics, stemming largely from the work of Kussner. Whereas elements of the special theory can be invoked for compressibility effects that are linear and global in nature, the question posed in this work was whether other mathematical techniques from the realm of relativity theory could be used to similar advantage for effects that are nonlinear and local. This line of thought led to a transformation leveraging Riemannian geometric methods common to the general theory of relativity. A gauge transformation is used to geometrize compressibility through the metric tensor of the underlying space to produce an equivalent incompressible flow that lives not on a plane but on a curved surface. In this sense, forces owing to compressibility can be ascribed to the geometry of space in

  16. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  17. Study of spatial growth of disturbances in an Incompressible Double Shear Layer flow configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Hareshram; Jacobs, Gustaaf

    2014-11-01

    The spatial growth of disturbance within the linear instability regime in an incompressible 2D double shear layer flow configuration is studied by performing a Direct Numerical Simulation. The motivation of this study is to characterize the effect of the presence of an additional shear layer on the spatial growth of a shear layer instability. Initially, a DNS of an incompressible single shear layer is performed and the spatial growth rate of various disturbance frequency modes are validated with Linear Stability Analysis. The addtional shear layer is found to impact the spatial growth rates of the different disturbances and the frequency of the mode with the maximum growth rate is found to be shifted.

  18. Flow-Induced Vibration of Flexible Hydrofoils in Incompressible, Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Young, Yin Lu

    2014-11-01

    Flexible lifting bodies can be used to enhance the energy-efficiency and maneuverability of propulsion devices compared to their rigid counterparts. To take advantage of advances in materials and active/passive control techniques, an improved understanding of the fluid-structure interaction physics is needed. This numerical study focuses on flexible hydrofoil in incompressible, turbulent flows. The spanwise bending and twisting of a rectangular, cantilevered hydrofoil was modeled as 2DOF equations of motion coupled with the unsteady RANS equation. The results, which have been validated with experimental measurements, showed that the natural frequencies are lower in water compared to those in air due to the added mass effect, and the natural frequencies vary slightly with speed and angle of attack due to hydrodynamic bend-twist coupling and viscous effects. Lock-in of the vortex shedding frequencies with the natural frequencies was observed, along with modification of the wake patterns due to hydrodynamic bend-twist coupling. The hydrodynamic damping was found to be much greater than structural damping, and depends on the relative velocity, angle of attack, as well as structural stiffness and density, and can lead to destabilizing condition of structure in particular cases.

  19. Stochastic finite difference lattice Boltzmann method for steady incompressible viscous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.C.; So, R.M.C.; Leung, W.W.F.

    2010-08-20

    With the advent of state-of-the-art computers and their rapid availability, the time is ripe for the development of efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to reduce the complexity of numerical models used to simulate complicated systems with incomplete knowledge and data. The spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) which is one of the widely used UQ methods, regards uncertainty as generating a new dimension and the solution as dependent on this dimension. A convergent expansion along the new dimension is then sought in terms of the polynomial chaos system, and the coefficients in this representation are determined through a Galerkin approach. This approach provides an accurate representation even when only a small number of terms are used in the spectral expansion; consequently, saving in computational resource can be realized compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) scheme. Recent development of a finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that provides a convenient algorithm for setting the boundary condition allows the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, with and without external body forces to be simulated with ease. Also, the inherent compressibility effect in the conventional lattice Boltzmann method, which might produce significant errors in some incompressible flow simulations, is eliminated. As such, the FDLBM together with an efficient UQ method can be used to treat incompressible flows with built in uncertainty, such as blood flow in stenosed arteries. The objective of this paper is to develop a stochastic numerical solver for steady incompressible viscous flows by combining the FDLBM with a SSFEM. Validation against MC solutions of channel/Couette, driven cavity, and sudden expansion flows are carried out.

  20. A Quantitative Comparison of Leading-edge Vortices in Incompressible and Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2002-01-01

    When requiring quantitative data on delta-wing vortices for design purposes, low-speed results have often been extrapolated to configurations intended for supersonic operation. This practice stems from a lack of database owing to difficulties that plague measurement techniques in high-speed flows. In the present paper an attempt is made to examine this practice by comparing quantitative data on the nearwake properties of such vortices in incompressible and supersonic flows. The incompressible flow data are obtained in experiments conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Detailed flow-field properties, including vorticity and turbulence characteristics, obtained by hot-wire and pressure probe surveys are documented. These data are compared, wherever possible, with available data from a past work for a Mach 2.49 flow for the same wing geometry and angles-of-attack. The results indicate that quantitative similarities exist in the distributions of total pressure and swirl velocity. However, the streamwise velocity of the core exhibits different trends. The axial flow characteristics of the vortices in the two regimes are examined, and a candidate theory is discussed.

  1. A pressure based method for the solution of viscous incompressible turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, Garth Victor; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique was developed for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical technique, derived from a pressure substitution method (PSM), overcomes many of the deficiencies of the pressure correction method. This technique allows for the direct solution of the actual pressure in the form of a Poisson equation which is derived from the pressure weighted substitution of the full momentum equations into the continuity equation. Two dimensional internal flows are computed with this method. The prediction of cascade performance is presented. The extention of the pressure correction method for the solution of three dimensional flows is also presented.

  2. Incompressible flow computations based on the vorticity-stream function and velocity-pressure formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.; Ganjoo, D. K.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element procedures and computations based on the velocity-pressure and vorticity-stream function formulations of incompressible flows are presented. Two new multistep velocity-pressure formulations are proposed and compared with the vorticity-stream function and one-step formulations. The example problems chosen are the standing vortex problem and flow past a circular cylinder. Benchmark quality computations are performed for the cylinder problem. The numerical results indicate that the vorticity-stream function formulation and one of the two new multistep formulations involve much less numerical dissipation than the one-step formulation.

  3. Theoretical investigation of maintaining the boundary layer of revolution laminar using suction slits in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiede, P.

    1978-01-01

    The transition of the laminar boundary layer into the turbulent state, which results in an increased drag, can be avoided by sucking of the boundary layer particles near the wall. The technically-interesting case of sucking the particles using individual slits is investigated for bodies of revolution in incompressible flow. The results of the variational calculations show that there is an optimum suction height, where the slot separations are maximum. Combined with favorable shaping of the body, it is possible to keep the boundary layer over bodies of revolution laminar at high Reynolds numbers using relatively few suction slits and small amounts of suction flow.

  4. Frequency-selection mechanism in incompressible open-cavity flows via reflected instability waves.

    PubMed

    Tuerke, F; Sciamarella, D; Pastur, L R; Lusseyran, F; Artana, G

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative perspective on nonharmonic mode coexistence, commonly found in the shear layer spectrum of open-cavity flows. Modes obtained by a local linear stability analysis of perturbations to a two-dimensional, incompressible, and inviscid sheared flow over a cavity of finite length and depth were conditioned by a so-called coincidence condition first proposed by Kulikowskii [J. Appl. Math. Mech. 30, 180 (1966)] which takes into account instability wave reflection within the cavity. The analysis yields a set of discrete, nonharmonic frequencies, which compare well with experimental results [Phys. Fluids 20, 114101 (2008); Exp. Fluids 50, 905 (2010)]. PMID:25679706

  5. A three-dimensional incompressible flow simulation method and its application to the Space Shuttle main engine. II Turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. L. C.; Rosen, R.; Dao, S. C.; Kwak, D.

    1985-01-01

    An implicit finite difference code cast in general curvilinear coordinates is further developed for three-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows. The code is based on the method of pseudocompressibility and utilizes the Beam and Warming implicit approximate factorization algorithm to achieve computational efficiency. A multiple-zone method is further extended to include composite-grids to overcome the excessive computer memory required for solving turbulent flows in complex three-dimensional geometries. A simple turbulence model is proposed for internal flows. The code is being used for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) internal flow analyses.

  6. Computation of incompressible viscous flows through artificial heart devices with moving boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Rogers, Stuart; Kwak, Dochan; Chang, I.-DEE

    1991-01-01

    The extension of computational fluid dynamics techniques to artificial heart flow simulations is illustrated. Unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in 3-D generalized curvilinear coordinates are solved iteratively at each physical time step until the incompressibility condition is satisfied. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The efficiency and robustness of the time accurate formulation of the algorithm are tested by computing the flow through model geometries. A channel flow with a moving indentation is computed and validated with experimental measurements and other numerical solutions. In order to handle the geometric complexity and the moving boundary problems, a zonal method and an overlapping grid embedding scheme are used, respectively. Steady state solutions for the flow through a tilting disk heart valve was compared against experimental measurements. Good agreement was obtained. The flow computation during the valve opening and closing is carried out to illustrate the moving boundary capability.

  7. A parallel overset-curvilinear-immersed boundary framework for simulating complex 3D incompressible flows

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Le, Trung; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-01-01

    We develop an overset-curvilinear immersed boundary (overset-CURVIB) method in a general non-inertial frame of reference to simulate a wide range of challenging biological flow problems. The method incorporates overset-curvilinear grids to efficiently handle multi-connected geometries and increase the resolution locally near immersed boundaries. Complex bodies undergoing arbitrarily large deformations may be embedded within the overset-curvilinear background grid and treated as sharp interfaces using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational Physics, 2007). The incompressible flow equations are formulated in a general non-inertial frame of reference to enhance the overall versatility and efficiency of the numerical approach. Efficient search algorithms to identify areas requiring blanking, donor cells, and interpolation coefficients for constructing the boundary conditions at grid interfaces of the overset grid are developed and implemented using efficient parallel computing communication strategies to transfer information among sub-domains. The governing equations are discretized using a second-order accurate finite-volume approach and integrated in time via an efficient fractional-step method. Various strategies for ensuring globally conservative interpolation at grid interfaces suitable for incompressible flow fractional step methods are implemented and evaluated. The method is verified and validated against experimental data, and its capabilities are demonstrated by simulating the flow past multiple aquatic swimmers and the systolic flow in an anatomic left ventricle with a mechanical heart valve implanted in the aortic position. PMID:23833331

  8. A fast lattice Green's function method for solving viscous incompressible flows on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, Sebastian; Colonius, Tim

    2016-07-01

    A computationally efficient method for solving three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible flows on unbounded domains is presented. The method formally discretizes the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an unbounded staggered Cartesian grid. Operations are limited to a finite computational domain through a lattice Green's function technique. This technique obtains solutions to inhomogeneous difference equations through the discrete convolution of source terms with the fundamental solutions of the discrete operators. The differential algebraic equations describing the temporal evolution of the discrete momentum equation and incompressibility constraint are numerically solved by combining an integrating factor technique for the viscous term and a half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme for the convective term. A projection method that exploits the mimetic and commutativity properties of the discrete operators is used to efficiently solve the system of equations that arises in each stage of the time integration scheme. Linear complexity, fast computation rates, and parallel scalability are achieved using recently developed fast multipole methods for difference equations. The accuracy and physical fidelity of solutions are verified through numerical simulations of vortex rings.

  9. A fast lattice Green's function method for solving viscous incompressible flows on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, Sebastian; Colonius, Tim

    2015-11-01

    A novel, parallel, computationally efficient immersed boundary method for solving three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible flows on unbounded domains is presented. The method formally discretizes the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an infinite staggered Cartesian grid. Operations are limited to a finite computational domain through a lattice Green's function technique. This technique obtains solutions to inhomogeneous difference equations through the discrete convolution of source terms with the fundamental solutions of the discrete operators. The differential algebraic equations describing the temporal evolution of the discrete momentum equation, incompressibility constraint, and the no-slip constraint are numerically solved by combining an integrating factor technique for the viscous term and a half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme for the convective term. A nested projection that exploits the mimetic and commutativity properties of the discrete operators is used to efficiently solve the system of equations that arises in each stage of the time integration scheme. Linear complexity, fast computation rate, and parallel scalability are achieved using recently developed fast multipole methods for difference equations. Results for three-dimensional test problems are presented, and the performance and scaling of the present implementation are discussed.

  10. Lift due to thickness for low aspect ratio wings in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, S. S.; Plotkin, A.

    1985-01-01

    The problem under consideration is a numerical study of the effects of thickness on lift for low aspect ratio wings in steady incompressible inviscid flow at moderate angles of attack. At these angles of attack the flow separates along the leading edge giving rise to a lift substantially higher than that computed by classical attached flow potential theory. The problem is treated as a perturbation expansion in a small thickness parameter. The lifting elements of the flow are modeled using a nonlinear vortex lattice method which replaces the leading and trailing edge vortex sheets by segmented straight vortex filaments. The thickness elements of the flow are modeled with a mean plane source distribution and a modification to the wing boundary conditions. Results are obtained for wings with biconvex and NACA 0012 sections which compare well with available experimental data. The important observation that the effect of thickness is to decrease the lift is made.

  11. An efficient and robust algorithm for two dimensional time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations - High Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for unsteady two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations. This algorithm is based on the fourth order partial differential equation for incompressible fluid flow which uses the streamfunction as the only dependent variable. The algorithm is second order accurate in both time and space. It uses a multigrid solver at each time step. It is extremely efficient with respect to the use of both CPU time and physical memory. It is extremely robust with respect to Reynolds number.

  12. An efficient and robust algorithm for two dimensional time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: High Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for unsteady two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations. This algorithm is based on the fourth order partial differential equation for incompressible fluid flow which uses the streamfunction as the only dependent variable. The algorithm is second order accurate in both time and space. It uses a multigrid solver at each time step. It is extremely efficient with respect to the use of both CPU time and physical memory. It is extremely robust with respect to Reynolds number.

  13. Cauchy's almost forgotten Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equation for 3D incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel; Villone, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Two prized papers, one by Augustin Cauchy in 1815, presented to the French Academy and the other by Hermann Hankel in 1861, presented to Göttingen University, contain major discoveries on vorticity dynamics whose impact is now quickly increasing. Cauchy found a Lagrangian formulation of 3D ideal incompressible flow in terms of three invariants that generalize to three dimensions the now well-known law of conservation of vorticity along fluid particle trajectories for two-dimensional flow. This has very recently been used to prove analyticity in time of fluid particle trajectories for 3D incompressible Euler flow and can be extended to compressible flow, in particular to cosmological dark matter. Hankel showed that Cauchy's formulation gives a very simple Lagrangian derivation of the Helmholtz vorticity-flux invariants and, in the middle of the proof, derived an intermediate result which is the conservation of the circulation of the velocity around a closed contour moving with the fluid. This circulation theorem was to be rediscovered independently by William Thomson (Kelvin) in 1869. Cauchy's invariants were only occasionally cited in the 19th century - besides Hankel, foremost by George Stokes and Maurice Lévy - and even less so in the 20th until they were rediscovered via Emmy Noether's theorem in the late 1960, but reattributed to Cauchy only at the end of the 20th century by Russian scientists.

  14. Towards a segregated time spectral solution method for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabine, Baumbach

    2016-06-01

    Considering the growth of interest in understanding flow phenomena in rotational machines, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool to reach this goal. Especially unsteady simulations are becoming a focus of interest. Nevertheless, unsteady simulations require huge computational times and ressources, thus it is necessary to investigate other methods to find more appropriate approaches to model time-periodic cases. For time-periodic flows the time spectral method (TSM) presents an interesting alternative to the regular time marching solvers. The TSM is well-known for computation of compressible time-periodic flows, but applications to incompressible cases are limited. This paper presents an extension of the TSM to incompressible flows. While there have been previous implementations using pressure correction method with an explicit treatment of time coupling, here an implicit treatment is chosen. To increase efficiency and employ a more robust coupling of the individual time instances the momentum equations are solved in block-coupled fashion. The pressure correction term is solved segregatedly. To consider cases with dynamic mesh motion an arbitrary lagrange Euler (ALE) formulation is also used in the solver. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated using a basic 2D aerodynamic test case and the results are compared to traditional time-stepping approaches.

  15. Energy stable, collocated high order schemes for incompressible flows on distorted grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Julius

    2012-09-01

    An energy preserving finite difference scheme for incompressible, constant density flows is presented. It is building on the idea of the skew-symmetric rewriting of the non-linear transport term. In contrast to former schemes collocated grids can be used, while exactly preserving the energy conservation and still avoiding the odd-even decoupling of the Laplacian. High order derivatives can be utilized. A formulation for curvilinear grids is discussed and strict skew-symmetry and perfect conservation is found for arbitrary transformations in two dimensions and quite general, but not fully general transformations in three dimensions.

  16. A Multiblock Approach for Calculating Incompressible Fluid Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Whitfield, David L.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1997-01-01

    A multiblock approach is presented for solving two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows on unstructured grids. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a vertex-centered, finite-volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work introduces a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements while not increasing the CPU time. Results presented in this work shows that the current multiblock algorithm requires 70% less memory than the single block algorithm.

  17. A Poisson equation formulation for pressure calculations in penalty finite element models for viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, J. L.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The calculation of pressures when the penalty-function approximation is used in finite-element solutions of laminar incompressible flows is addressed. A Poisson equation for the pressure is formulated that involves third derivatives of the velocity field. The second derivatives appearing in the weak formulation of the Poisson equation are calculated from the C0 velocity approximation using a least-squares method. The present scheme is shown to be efficient, free of spurious oscillations, and accurate. Examples of applications are given and compared with results obtained using mixed formulations.

  18. Wave Number Selection for Incompressible Parallel Jet Flows Periodic in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1997-01-01

    The temporal instability of a spatially periodic parallel flow of an incompressible inviscid fluid for various jet velocity profiles is studied numerically using Floquet Analysis. The transition matrix at the end of a period is evaluated by direct numerical integration. For verification, a method based on approximating a continuous function by a series of step functions was used. Unstable solutions were found only over a limited range of wave numbers and have a band type structure. The results obtained are analogous to the behavior observed in systems exhibiting complexity at the edge of order and chaos.

  19. NACHOS 2: A finite element computer program for incompressible flow problems. Part 1: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartling, D. K.

    1987-04-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, NACHOS 2, is presented in detail. The NACHOS 2 code is designed for the two-dimensional analysis of viscous incompressible fluid flows, including the effects of heat transfer and/or other transport processes. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulations and the associated numerical methods used in the NACHOS 2 code are also outlined. Instructions for use of the program are documented in SAND-86-1817; examples of problems analyzed by the code are provided in SAND-86-1818.

  20. Approximate indicial lift function for tapered, swept wings in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M. J.; Wells, W. R.; Keskar, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate indicial lift function associated with circulation was developed for tapered, swept wings in incompressible flow. The function is derived by representing the wings with a simple vortex system. The results from the derived equations compare well with the limited available results from more rigorous and complex methods. The equations, as derived, are not very convenient for calculating the dynamic response of aircraft, parameter extraction, or for determining frequency-response curves for wings. Therefore, an expression is developed to convert the indicial response function to an exponential form which is more convenient for these purposes.

  1. Mechanical picture of the linear transient growth of vortical perturbations in incompressible smooth shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagelishvili, George; Hau, Jan-Niklas; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The linear dynamics of perturbations in smooth shear flows covers the transient exchange of energies between (1) the perturbations and the basic flow and (2) different perturbations modes. Canonically, the linear exchange of energies between the perturbations and the basic flow can be described in terms of the Orr and the lift-up mechanisms, correspondingly for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations. In this paper the mechanical basis of the linear transient dynamics is introduced and analyzed for incompressible plane constant shear flows, where we consider the dynamics of virtual fluid particles in the framework of plane perturbations (i.e., perturbations with plane surfaces of constant phase) for the 2D and 3D case. It is shown that (1) the formation of a pressure perturbation field is the result of countermoving neighboring sets of incompressible fluid particles in the flow, (2) the keystone of the energy exchange mechanism between the basic flow and perturbations is the collision of fluid particles with the planes of constant pressure in accordance with the classical theory of elastic collision of particles with a rigid wall, making the pressure field the key player in this process, (3) the interplay of the collision process and the shear flow kinematics describes the transient growth of plane perturbations and captures the physics of the growth, and (4) the proposed mechanical picture allows us to reconstruct the linearized Euler equations in spectral space with a time-dependent shearwise wave number, the linearized Euler equations for Kelvin modes. This confirms the rigor of the presented analysis, which, moreover, yields a natural generalization of the proposed mechanical picture of the transient growth to the well-established linear phenomenon of vortex-wave-mode coupling.

  2. A numerical resolution study of high order essentially non-oscillatory schemes applied to incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinan, E.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1992-01-01

    High order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes, originally designed for compressible flow and in general for hyperbolic conservation laws, are applied to incompressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with periodic boundary conditions. The projection to divergence-free velocity fields is achieved by fourth order central differences through Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) and a mild high-order filtering. The objective of this work is to assess the resolution of ENO schemes for large scale features of the flow when a coarse grid is used and small scale features of the flow, such as shears and roll-ups, are not fully resolved. It is found that high-order ENO schemes remain stable under such situations and quantities related to large-scale features, such as the total circulation around the roll-up region, are adequately resolved.

  3. An Implicit Immersed Boundary Method for Low Reynolds Number Incompressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Wook; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2013-11-01

    We develop a new formulation of immersed boundary (IB) method based on direct forcing for incompressible viscous flows. The new algorithm for the present IB method is derived using a block LU decomposition and Taylor series expansion, and the direct forcing for imposing no-slip condition on the IB surface is calculated in an iterative procedure. We perform simulations of two-dimensional flows around a circular cylinder and three-dimensional flows over a sphere for low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The result shows that present method yield a better imposition of no-slip condition on IB surface for low Reynolds number with a fairly larger time step than other IB methods based on direct forcing. Supported by EDISON (2011-0029561) program of NRF.

  4. A GPU-accelerated semi-implicit ADI method for incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sanghyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Utility of the computational power of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is elaborated for solutions of both incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-implicit ADI finite-volume method for integration of the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations, which are discretized on a structured arbitrary grid, is parallelized for GPU computations using CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). In the semi-implicit ADI finite-volume method, the nonlinear convection terms and the linear diffusion terms are integrated in time using a combination of an explicit scheme and an ADI scheme. Inversion of multiple tri-diagonal matrices is found to be the major challenge in GPU computations of the present method. Some of the algorithms for solving tri-diagonal matrices on GPUs are evaluated and optimized for GPU-acceleration of the present semi-implicit ADI computations of incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning Grant NRF-2014R1A2A1A11049599.

  5. Viscid-inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical method is suggested for the study of the viscid inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges with arbitrary angles. It is shown that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem, and the pressure can only be established from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as the boundary layer buildup, turbulent jet mixing, and recompression are individually analyzed and attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary layer concept. The interaction between the viscous and inviscid streams is properly displayed by the fact that the aforementioned discrete parameters needed for the inviscid flow are determined by the viscous flow condition at the point of reattachment. It is found that the reattachment point behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the recompressive viscous flow processes, and this behavior is exploited for the establishment of the overall flow field. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge, and the geometry of the wake are determined as functions of the wedge angle.

  6. Visualization of three-dimensional incompressible flows by quasi-two-dimensional divergence-free projections in arbitrary flow regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfgat, Alexander Yu.

    2016-02-01

    A visualization of three-dimensional incompressible flows by divergence-free quasi-two-dimensional projections of the velocity field onto three coordinate planes is revisited. An alternative and more general way to compute the projections is proposed. The approach is based on the Chorin projection combined with a SIMPLE-like iteration. Compared to the previous methodology based on divergence-free Galerkin-Chebyshev bases, this technique, formulated in general curvilinear coordinates, is applicable to any flow region and allows for faster computations. To illustrate this visualization method, examples in Cartesian and spherical coordinates, as well as post-processing of experimental 3D-PTV data, are presented.

  7. Flow and Drag Formulas for Simple Quadrics. [pressure drag and flow equations for an ellipsoid in incompressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure distribution and resistance found by theory and experiment for simple quadrics fixed in an infinite uniform stream of practically incompressible fluid are calculated. The experimental values pertain to air and some liquids, especially water; the theoretical refer sometimes to perfect, again to viscid fluids. Formulas for the velocity at all points of the flow field are given. Pressure and pressure drag are discussed for a sphere, a round cylinder, the elliptic cylinder, the prolate and oblate spheroid, and the circular disk. The velocity and pressure in an oblique flow are examined.

  8. Visualization of three-dimensional incompressible flows by quasi-two-dimensional divergence-free projections in arbitrary flow regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfgat, Alexander Yu.

    2016-08-01

    A visualization of three-dimensional incompressible flows by divergence-free quasi-two-dimensional projections of the velocity field onto three coordinate planes is revisited. An alternative and more general way to compute the projections is proposed. The approach is based on the Chorin projection combined with a SIMPLE-like iteration. Compared to the previous methodology based on divergence-free Galerkin-Chebyshev bases, this technique, formulated in general curvilinear coordinates, is applicable to any flow region and allows for faster computations. To illustrate this visualization method, examples in Cartesian and spherical coordinates, as well as post-processing of experimental 3D-PTV data, are presented.

  9. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm employs the method of pseudo compressibility and utilizes an upwind differencing scheme for the convective fluxes, and an implicit line-relaxation scheme. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared; a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  10. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over single and multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. L.; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    Incompressible viscous turbulent flows over single- and multiple-element airfoils are numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm uses the method of pseudocompressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation scheme to study high-lift take-off and landing configurations and to compute lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil. The approach used for multiple-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface-pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  11. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The computer code uses the method of pseudo-compressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation solution algorithm. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying the high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack, up to stall, is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time (on a CRAY YMP) per element in the airfoil configuration.

  12. Incompressible SPH Model for Simulating Violent Free-Surface Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroszczyk, Ryszard

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the problem of transient gravitational wave propagation in a viscous incompressible fluid is considered, with a focus on flows with fast-moving free surfaces. The governing equations of the problem are solved by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method (SPH). In order to impose the incompressibility constraint on the fluid motion, the so-called projection method is applied in which the discrete SPH equations are integrated in time by using a fractional-step technique. Numerical performance of the proposed model has been assessed by comparing its results with experimental data and with results obtained by a standard (weakly compressible) version of the SPH approach. For this purpose, a plane dam-break flow problem is simulated, in order to investigate the formation and propagation of a wave generated by a sudden collapse of a water column initially contained in a rectangular tank, as well as the impact of such a wave on a rigid vertical wall. The results of simulations show the evolution of the free surface of water, the variation of velocity and pressure fields in the fluid, and the time history of pressures exerted by an impacting wave on a wall.

  13. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  14. Gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method for incompressible two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fu; Shi-Yu, Wu; Kai-Xin, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by inconveniences of present hybrid methods, a gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method (GAHM) is presented for incompressible two-phase flow. A front tracking method (FTM) is used as the skeleton of the GAHM for low mass loss and resources. Smooth eulerian level set values are calculated from the FTM interface, and are used for a local interface reconstruction. The reconstruction avoids marker particle redistribution and enables an automatic treatment of interfacial topology change. The cubic Hermit interpolation is employed in all steps of the GAHM to capture subgrid structures within a single spacial cell. The performance of the GAHM is carefully evaluated in a benchmark test. Results show significant improvements of mass loss, clear subgrid structures, highly accurate derivatives (normals and curvatures) and low cost. The GAHM is further coupled with an incompressible multiphase flow solver, Super CE/SE, for more complex and practical applications. The updated solver is evaluated through comparison with an early droplet research. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10972010, 11028206, 11371069, 11372052, 11402029, and 11472060), the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP), China (Grant No. 2014B0201030), and the Defense Industrial Technology Development Program of China (Grant No. B1520132012).

  15. Identification of whistling ability of a single hole orifice from an incompressible flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, Romain; Moussou, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pure tone noise from orifices in pipe result from vortex shedding with lock-in. Acoustic amplification at the orifice is coupled to resonant condition to create self-sustained oscillations. One key feature of this phenomenon is hence the ability of an orifice to amplify acoustic waves in a given range of frequencies. Here a numerical investigation of the linear response of an orifice is undertaken, with the support of experimental data for validation. The study deals with a sharp edge orifice. Its diameter equals to 0.015 m and its thickness to 0.005 m. The pipe diameter is 0.030 m. An air flow with a Mach number 0.026 and a Reynolds number 18000 in the main pipe is present. At such a low Mach number; the fluid behavior can reasonably be described as locally incompressible. The incompressible Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved with the help of a finite volume fluid mechanics software. The orifice is submitted to an average flow velocity, with superimposed small harmonic perturbations. The harmonic response of the orifice is the difference between the upstream and downstream pressures, and a straightforward calculation brings out the acoustic impedance of the orifice. Comparison with experiments shows that the main physical features of the whistling phenomenon are reasonably reproduced. (authors)

  16. An adaptive level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka and Osher, a numerical method using the level set approach was formulated for solving incompressible two-phase flow with surface tension. In the level set approach, the interface is represented as the zero level set of a smooth function; this has the effect of replacing the advection of density, which has steep gradients at the interface, with the advection of the level set function, which is smooth. In addition, the interface can merge or break up with no special treatment. The authors maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface in order to robustly compute flows with high density ratios and stiff surface tension effects. In this work, they couple the level set scheme to an adaptive projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in order to achieve higher resolution of the interface with a minimum of additional expense. They present two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional results of air bubble and water drop computations.

  17. An overlapping Schwarz method for spectral element simulation of three-dimensional incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.F.; Miller, N.I.; Tufo, H.M.

    1998-10-29

    As the sound speed is infinite for incompressible flows, computation of the pressure constitutes the stiffest component in the time advancement of unsteady simulations. For complex geometries, efficient solution is dependent upon the availability of fast solvers for sparse linear systems. In this paper we develop a Schwarz preconditioner for the spectral element method using overlapping subdomains for the pressure. These local subdomain problems are derived from tensor products of one-dimensional finite element discretizations and admit use of fast diagonalization methods based upon matrix-matrix products. In addition, we use a coarse grid projection operator whose solution is computed via a fast parallel direct solver. The combination of overlapping Schwarz preconditioning and fast coarse grid solver provides as much as a fourfold reduction in simulation time over previously employed methods based upon deflation for parallel solution of multi-million grid point flow problems.

  18. Effect of shaft rotation on the incompressible flow in a labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demko, J. A.; Morrison, G. L.; Rhode, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The incompressible flow in a labyrinth seal at low leakage rates was computationally and experimentally investigated over a wide range of seal rotation rates. QUICK differencing was employed in the finite difference code to reduce the effects of false diffusion. The use of measured inlet boundary conditions for the axial and swirl velocity components and for the turbulent kinetic energy resulted in good agreement between velocity predictions and hot-film measurements. It was found that when the rotation rate is increased beyond a certain point, a second recirculation zone forms inside the seal cavity, altering the flow field in the cavity and resulting in a substantial increase in the pressure drop across it.

  19. Instability of plane-parallel flow of incompressible liquid over a saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T. P.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Baydina, D. T.; Kolchanova, E. A.; Tsiberkin, K. B.

    2016-07-01

    The linear stability of plane-parallel flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a saturated porous layer is studied to model the instability of water flow in a river over aquatic plants. The saturated porous layer is bounded from below by a rigid plate and the pure fluid layer has a free, undeformable upper boundary. A small inclination of the layers is imposed to simulate the riverbed slope. The layers are inclined at a small angle to the horizon. The problem is studied within two models: the Brinkman model with the boundary conditions by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker at the interface, and the Darcy-Forchheimer model with the conditions by Beavers and Joseph. The neutral curves and critical Reynolds numbers are calculated for various porous layer permeabilities and relative thicknesses of the porous layer. The results obtained within the two models are compared and analyzed.

  20. Instability of plane-parallel flow of incompressible liquid over a saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Lyubimova, T P; Lyubimov, D V; Baydina, D T; Kolchanova, E A; Tsiberkin, K B

    2016-07-01

    The linear stability of plane-parallel flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a saturated porous layer is studied to model the instability of water flow in a river over aquatic plants. The saturated porous layer is bounded from below by a rigid plate and the pure fluid layer has a free, undeformable upper boundary. A small inclination of the layers is imposed to simulate the riverbed slope. The layers are inclined at a small angle to the horizon. The problem is studied within two models: the Brinkman model with the boundary conditions by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker at the interface, and the Darcy-Forchheimer model with the conditions by Beavers and Joseph. The neutral curves and critical Reynolds numbers are calculated for various porous layer permeabilities and relative thicknesses of the porous layer. The results obtained within the two models are compared and analyzed. PMID:27575214

  1. A computer code for three-dimensional incompressible flows using nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    In this report, a numerical method for solving the equations of motion of three-dimensional incompressible flows in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate (BFC) systems has been developed. The equations of motion are transformed to a generalized curvilinear coordinate system from which the transformed equations are discretized using finite difference approximations in the transformed domain. The hybrid scheme is used to approximate the convection terms in the governing equations. Solutions of the finite difference equations are obtained iteratively by using a pressure-velocity correction algorithm (SIMPLE-C). Numerical examples of two- and three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent flow problems are employed to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the present computer code. The user's guide and computer program listing of the present code are also included.

  2. A High Order Discontinuous Galerkin Method for 2D Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jia-Guo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a high order discontinuous Galerkin method for two dimensional incompressible flow in vorticity streamfunction formulation. The momentum equation is treated explicitly, utilizing the efficiency of the discontinuous Galerkin method The streamfunction is obtained by a standard Poisson solver using continuous finite elements. There is a natural matching between these two finite element spaces, since the normal component of the velocity field is continuous across element boundaries. This allows for a correct upwinding gluing in the discontinuous Galerkin framework, while still maintaining total energy conservation with no numerical dissipation and total enstrophy stability The method is suitable for inviscid or high Reynolds number flows. Optimal error estimates are proven and verified by numerical experiments.

  3. Parallel solution of high-order numerical schemes for solving incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, Edward J.; Lin, Avi; Liou, May-Fun; Blech, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel numerical scheme for solving incompressible steady-state flows is presented. The algorithm uses a finite-difference approach to solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The algorithms are scalable and expandable. They may be used with only two processors or with as many processors as are available. The code is general and expandable. Any size grid may be used. Four processors of the NASA LeRC Hypercluster were used to solve for steady-state flow in a driven square cavity. The Hypercluster was configured in a distributed-memory, hypercube-like architecture. By using a 50-by-50 finite-difference solution grid, an efficiency of 74 percent (a speedup of 2.96) was obtained.

  4. A Hybrid Nodal Method for Time-Dependent Incompressible Flow in Two-Dimensional Arbitrary Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Toreja, A J; Uddin, R

    2002-10-21

    A hybrid nodal-integral/finite-analytic method (NI-FAM) is developed for time-dependent, incompressible flow in two-dimensional arbitrary geometries. In this hybrid approach, the computational domain is divided into parallelepiped and wedge-shaped space-time nodes (cells). The conventional nodal integral method (NIM) is applied to the interfaces between adjacent parallelepiped nodes (cells), while a finite analytic approach is applied to the interfaces between parallelepiped and wedge-shaped nodes (cells). In this paper, the hybrid method is formally developed and an application of the NI-FAM to fluid flow in an enclosed cavity is presented. Results are compared with those obtained using a commercial computational fluid dynamics code.

  5. Flow accelerated organic coating degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qixin

    Applying organic coatings is a common and the most cost effective way to protect metallic objects and structures from corrosion. Water entry into coating-metal interface is usually the main cause for the deterioration of organic coatings, which leads to coating delamination and underfilm corrosion. Recently, flowing fluids over sample surface have received attention due to their capability to accelerate material degradation. A plethora of works has focused on the flow induced metal corrosion, while few studies have investigated the flow accelerated organic coating degradation. Flowing fluids above coating surface affect corrosion by enhancing the water transport and abrading the surface due to fluid shear. Hence, it is of great importance to understand the influence of flowing fluids on the degradation of corrosion protective organic coatings. In this study, a pigmented marine coating and several clear coatings were exposed to the laminar flow and stationary immersion. The laminar flow was pressure driven and confined in a flow channel. A 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution and pure water was employed as the working fluid with a variety of flow rates. The corrosion protective properties of organic coatings were monitored inline by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. Equivalent circuit models were employed to interpret the EIS spectra. The time evolution of coating resistance and capacitance obtained from the model was studied to demonstrate the coating degradation. Thickness, gloss, and other topography characterizations were conducted to facilitate the assessment of the corrosion. The working fluids were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and conductivity measurement. The influence of flow rate, fluid shear, fluid composition, and other effects in the coating degradation were investigated. We conclude that flowing fluid on the coating surface accelerates the transport of water, oxygen, and ions into the coating, as

  6. Dipole method for incompressible flows and its test calculation of time evolution of a dipolar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yuko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2006-11-01

    A new numerical method to calculate an incompressible flow, a dipole method, is proposed. In the dipole method, a flow field is represented by superposition of many dipolar vortices, and these dipolar vortices are replaced ``dipole elements.'' The dipole elements move in fluid. Each dipole element is characterized by two variables, dipole moment and core radius. The dipole moment is a vector quantity whose direction is the same as the axis of the dipolar vortex. The core radius is an effective radius of rotational flow region of the dipolar vortex. These variables, changed with time, are determined by the momentum conservation law where the flow around the dipolar vortex is assumed to be irrotational. This dipole element has a self-induced velocity. Time evolutions of a dipolar vortex in two cases of background flows are simulated, the first case is a strain flow, and the second one is a rotational flow of the Rankin's vortex. The results of the dipole method are compared to numerical simulations using the vortex method with the same initial condition.

  7. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  8. New Finite Difference Methods Based on IIM for Inextensible Interfaces in Incompressible Flows

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilin; Lai, Ming-Chih

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, new finite difference methods based on the augmented immersed interface method (IIM) are proposed for simulating an inextensible moving interface in an incompressible two-dimensional flow. The mathematical models arise from studying the deformation of red blood cells in mathematical biology. The governing equations are incompressible Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations with an unknown surface tension, which should be determined in such a way that the surface divergence of the velocity is zero along the interface. Thus, the area enclosed by the interface and the total length of the interface should be conserved during the evolution process. Because of the nonlinear and coupling nature of the problem, direct discretization by applying the immersed boundary or immersed interface method yields complex nonlinear systems to be solved. In our new methods, we treat the unknown surface tension as an augmented variable so that the augmented IIM can be applied. Since finding the unknown surface tension is essentially an inverse problem that is sensitive to perturbations, our regularization strategy is to introduce a controlled tangential force along the interface, which leads to a least squares problem. For Stokes equations, the forward solver at one time level involves solving three Poisson equations with an interface. For Navier-Stokes equations, we propose a modified projection method that can enforce the pressure jump condition corresponding directly to the unknown surface tension. Several numerical experiments show good agreement with other results in the literature and reveal some interesting phenomena. PMID:23795308

  9. A new approach to wall modeling in LES of incompressible flow via function enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krank, Benjamin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach to wall modeling for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations including flows of moderate and large Reynolds numbers is presented. The basic idea is that a problem-tailored function space allows prediction of turbulent boundary layer gradients with very coarse meshes. The proposed function space consists of a standard polynomial function space plus an enrichment, which is constructed using Spalding's law-of-the-wall. The enrichment function is not enforced but "allowed" in a consistent way and the overall methodology is much more general and also enables other enrichment functions. The proposed method is closely related to detached-eddy simulation as near-wall turbulence is modeled statistically and large eddies are resolved in the bulk flow. Interpreted in terms of a three-scale separation within the variational multiscale method, the standard scale resolves large eddies and the enrichment scale represents boundary layer turbulence in an averaged sense. The potential of the scheme is shown applying it to turbulent channel flow of friction Reynolds numbers from Reτ = 590 and up to 5,000, flow over periodic constrictions at the Reynolds numbers ReH = 10 , 595 and 19,000 as well as backward-facing step flow at Reh = 5 , 000, all with extremely coarse meshes. Excellent agreement with experimental and DNS data is observed with the first grid point located at up to y1+ = 500 and especially under adverse pressure gradients as well as in separated flows.

  10. Instabilities of time-periodic, incompressible, inviscid flow in ellipsoidal domains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biello, Joseph A.; Saldanha, Kenneth I.; Lebovitz, Norman R.

    1999-11-01

    We consider the linear stability of exact, temporally periodic solutions of the Euler equations of incompressible, inviscid flow in an ellipsoidal domain. The problem of linear stability is reduced, without approximation, to a hierarchy of finite-dimensional Floquet problems governing fluid-dynamical perturbations of differing spatial scales and symmetries. We study two of these Floquet problems in detail, emphasizing parameter regimes of special physical significance. One of these regimes includes periodic flows differing only slightly from steady flows. Another includes long-period flows representing the nonlinear outcome of an instability of steady flows. In both cases much of the parameter space corresponds to instability, excepting a region adjacent to the spherical configuration. In the second case, even if the ellipsoid departs only moderately from a sphere, there are filamentary regions of instability in the parameter space. We relate this and other features of our results to properties of reversible and Hamiltonian systems, and compare our results with related studies of periodic flows.

  11. Fully elliptic incompressible flow calculations on regular grid by a new pressure substitution method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, G. V.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1990-01-01

    A new method is presented for the solution of incompressible flow in generalized coordinates. This method is based on the substitution of the pressure weighted form of the momentum equations into the continuity equation. The algorithm is rigorously derived and a Fourier analysis is used to assess its suitability to act as an error smoother. Linear stability analysis results indicate that the performance of the new pressure substitution method (PSM) and the pressure correction method (PCM) is about the same at low Reynolds numbers, with no significant pressure gradient. At high Reynolds numbers the PSM shows much faster convergence. Likewise prediction of various flows indicate that the PSM has better accuracy for high Reynolds number flows with significant pressure gradients. Since most practical aerodynamic flows have significant pressure gradients, the PSM seems to be attractive for such flows. Solutions for both laminar and turbulent flow are compared with the experimental data. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is used to resolve the turbulent flowfield.

  12. Active unsteady aerodynamic suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, thereby addressing the important need for centrifugal compressor rotating stall and surge control. In this model, the precursor to to instability is a weak rotating potential velocity perturbation in the inlet flow field that eventually develops into a finite disturbance. To suppress the growth of this potential disturbance, a rotating control vortical velocity disturbance is introduced into the impeller inlet flow. The effectiveness of this control is analyzed by matching the perturbation pressure in the compressor inlet and exit flow fields with a model for the unsteady behavior of the compressor. To demonstrate instability control, this model is then used to predict the control effectiveness for centrifugal compressor geometries based on a low speed research centrifugal compressor. These results indicate that reductions of 10 to 15 percent in the mean inlet flow coefficient at instability are possible with control waveforms of half the magnitude of the total disturbance at the inlet.

  13. MHD Couette flow of viscous incompressible fluid with Hall current and suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Afroja; Dola, Tanni Alam; Alam, Md. Mahmud

    2016-07-01

    An electrically conducting viscous incompressible fluid bounded by two parallel non-conducting plates has been investigated in the presence of Hall current. The fluid motion is uniform at the upper plate and the uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the plate. The lower plate is stationary while upper plate moves with a constant velocity. The governing equations have been non-dimensionalzed by using usual transformations. The obtained governing non-linear coupled partial differential equations have been solved by using implicit finite difference technique. The numerical solutions are obtained for momentum and energy equations. The influence of various interesting parameters on the flow has been analyzed and discussed through graph in details. The values of Nusselt number and Skin-Friction for different physical parameters are also elucidated in the form of graph.

  14. Effects of mistuning on bending-torsion flutter and response of a cascade in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kaza, K.R.V.; Kielb, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of blade mistuning on the aeroelastic stability and response of a cascade in incompressible flow is reported. The aerodynamic, inertial, and structural coupling between the bending and torsional motions of each blade and the aerodynamic coupling between the blades are included in the formulation. A digital computer program was developed to conduct parametric studies. Results indicate that the mistuning has a beneficial effect on the coupled bending-torsion and uncoupled torsion flutter. The effect of mistuning on forced response, however, may be either beneficial or adverse, depending on the engine order of the forcing function. Additionally, the results illustrate that it may be feasible to utilize mistuning as a passive control to increase flutter speed while maintaining forced response at an acceptable level.

  15. A vortex point method for calculating inviscid incompressible flows around rotary wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canatloube, B.; Huberson, S.

    1985-05-01

    An integral method is presented for calculating incompressible inviscid unsteady flow around thin bodies in arbitrary motion, i.e., rotor blades in motion with respect to one another. Because an integral method is used, discretization is limited to the solid boundaries and the vortices. Boundary conditions are treated in terms of equation for the slipstream on the walls, the vorticity vector, a volume integral for the vorticity and a first-order Fredholm integral. The Helmholtz equation governs the evolution of vorticity, which forms a sheet of doublets. The pressure jumps on the blades are covered by the unsteady Bernoulli equation. Applications of the method to helicopter rotors, medium- and high-aspect ratio propellers and low-aspect ratio nautical propellers are demonstrated.

  16. Simulation of three-dimensional incompressible flows with a vortex-in-cell method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couet, B.; Buneman, O.; Leonard, A.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for the numerical simulation of three-dimensional incompressible flows is described. The vortex-in-cell (VIC) method presented traces the motion of the vortex filaments in the velocity field which these filaments create. The velocity field is not calculated directly by the Biot-Savart law of interaction but by creating a mesh-record of the vorticity field, then integrating a Poisson's equation via the fast Fourier transform to generate a mesh-record of the velocity field. The computed scales of motion are assumed to be essentially inviscid. Viscous of subgrid-scale effects are incorporated into a filtering procedure in wave vector space. Results of tracing a periodic array of single vortex rings are compared with a Green's function calculation. The agreement is very good.

  17. Multiscale numerical methods for passive advection-diffusion in incompressible turbulent flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoonsang; Engquist, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    We propose a seamless multiscale method which approximates the macroscopic behavior of the passive advection-diffusion equations with steady incompressible velocity fields with multi-spatial scales. The method uses decompositions of the velocity fields in the Fourier space, which are similar to the decomposition in large eddy simulations. It also uses a hierarchy of local domains with different resolutions as in multigrid methods. The effective diffusivity from finer scale is used for the next coarser level computation and this process is repeated up to the coarsest scale of interest. The grids are only in local domains whose sizes decrease depending on the resolution level so that the overall computational complexity increases linearly as the number of different resolution grids increases. The method captures interactions between finer and coarser scales but has to sacrifice some of interactions between different scales. The proposed method is numerically tested with 2D examples including a successful approximation to a continuous spectrum flow.

  18. The capturing of free surfaces in incompressible multi-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dartzi; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2000-05-01

    By treating it as a contact discontinuity in the density field, a free surface between two immiscible fluids can be automatically captured by the enforcement of conservation laws. A surface-capturing method of this kind requires no special tracking or fitting treatment for the free surface, thereby offering the advantage of algorithm simplicity over the surface-tracking or the surface-fitting method. A surface-capturing method based on a new multi-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation is developed. It is applied to a variety of free-surface flows, including the Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem, the ship waves around a Wigley hull and a model bubble-rising problem to demonstrate the validity and versatility of the present method. Copyright

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Incompressible Pipe Flow Using a B-Spline Spectral Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loulou, Patrick; Moser, Robert D.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical method based on b-spline polynomials was developed to study incompressible flows in cylindrical geometries. A b-spline method has the advantages of possessing spectral accuracy and the flexibility of standard finite element methods. Using this method it was possible to ensure regularity of the solution near the origin, i.e. smoothness and boundedness. Because b-splines have compact support, it is also possible to remove b-splines near the center to alleviate the constraint placed on the time step by an overly fine grid. Using the natural periodicity in the azimuthal direction and approximating the streamwise direction as periodic, so-called time evolving flow, greatly reduced the cost and complexity of the computations. A direct numerical simulation of pipe flow was carried out using the method described above at a Reynolds number of 5600 based on diameter and bulk velocity. General knowledge of pipe flow and the availability of experimental measurements make pipe flow the ideal test case with which to validate the numerical method. Results indicated that high flatness levels of the radial component of velocity in the near wall region are physical; regions of high radial velocity were detected and appear to be related to high speed streaks in the boundary layer. Budgets of Reynolds stress transport equations showed close similarity with those of channel flow. However contrary to channel flow, the log layer of pipe flow is not homogeneous for the present Reynolds number. A topological method based on a classification of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor was used. Plotting iso-surfaces of the discriminant of the invariants proved to be a good method for identifying vortical eddies in the flow field.

  20. A fast pressure-correction method for incompressible two-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael S.; Ferrante, Antonino

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new pressure-correction method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows with large density and viscosity ratios. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation, which can be solved with an FFT-based, fast Poisson solver. This reduction is achieved by splitting the variable density pressure gradient term in the governing equations. The validity of this splitting is demonstrated from our numerical tests, and it is explained from a physical viewpoint. In this paper, the new pressure-correction method is coupled with a mass-conserving volume-of-fluid method to capture the motion of the interface between the two fluids but, in general, it could be coupled with other interface advection methods such as level-set, phase-field, or front-tracking. First, we verified the new pressure-correction method using the capillary wave test-case up to density and viscosity ratios of 10,000. Then, we validated the method by simulating the motion of a falling water droplet in air and comparing the droplet terminal velocity with an experimental value. Next, the method is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time independent of the VoF method, and it conserves mass, momentum, and kinetic energy in the inviscid limit. Also, we show that for solving the two-fluid Navier-Stokes equations, the method is 10-40 times faster than the standard pressure-correction method, which uses multigrid to solve the variable coefficient Poisson equation. Finally, we show that the method is capable of performing fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence with thousands of droplets using a computational mesh of 10243 points.

  1. On the downstream boundary conditions for the vorticity-stream function formulation of two-dimensional incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1991-01-01

    Downstream boundary conditions equivalent to the homogeneous form of the natural boundary conditions associated with the velocity-pressure formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are derived for the vorticity-stream function formulation of two-dimensional incompressible flows. Of particular interest are the zero normal and shear stress conditions at a downstream boundary.

  2. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  3. A Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model implementation in a discontinuous Galerkin solver for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellini, Andrea; D'Alessandro, Valerio; Bassi, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    In this paper the artificial compressibility flux Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been extended to deal with the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. DG implementations of the RANS and SA equations for compressible flows have already been reported in the literature, including the description of limiting or stabilization techniques adopted in order to prevent the turbulent viscosity ν˜ from becoming negative. In this paper we introduce an SA model implementation that deals with negative ν˜ values by modifying the source and diffusion terms in the SA model equation only when the working variable or one of the model closure functions become negative. This results in an efficient high-order implementation where either stabilization terms or even additional equations are avoided. We remark that the proposed implementation is not DG specific and it is well suited for any numerical discretization of the RANS-SA governing equations. The reliability, robustness and accuracy of the proposed implementation have been assessed by computing several high Reynolds number turbulent test cases: the flow over a flat plate (Re=107), the flow past a backward-facing step (Re=37400) and the flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at different angles of attack (α=0°, 10°, 15°) and Reynolds numbers (Re=2.88×106,6×106).

  4. Parallel FEM LES with one-equation subgrid-scale model for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Xiang; Liu, Chun-Ho; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2010-01-01

    This article develops a parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) with a one-equation subgrid-scale (SGS) model based on the Galerkin finite element method and three-dimensional (3D) brick elements. The governing filtered Navier-Stokes equations were solved by a second-order accurate fractional-step method, which decomposed the implicit velocity-pressure coupling in incompressible flow and segregated the solution to the advection and diffusion terms. The transport equation for the SGS turbulent kinetic energy was solved to calculate the SGS processes. This FEM LES model was applied to study the turbulence of the benchmark open channel flow at a Reynolds number Reτ = 180 (based on the friction velocity and channel height) using different model constants and grid resolutions. By comparing the turbulence statistics calculated by the current model with those obtained from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments in literature, an optimum set of model constants for the current FEM LES model was established. The budgets of turbulent kinetic energy and vertical Reynolds stress were then analysed for the open channel flow. Finally, the flow structures were visualised to further reveal some important characteristics. It was demonstrated that the current model with the optimum model constants can predict well the organised structure near the wall and free surface, and can be further applied to other fundamental and engineering applications.

  5. An adaptive discretization of incompressible flow using a multitude of moving Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, R. Elliot; Qiu, Linhai; Yu, Yue; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel method for discretizing the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on a multitude of moving and overlapping Cartesian grids each with an independently chosen cell size to address adaptivity. Advection is handled with first and second order accurate semi-Lagrangian schemes in order to alleviate any time step restriction associated with small grid cell sizes. Likewise, an implicit temporal discretization is used for the parabolic terms including Navier-Stokes viscosity which we address separately through the development of a method for solving the heat diffusion equations. The most intricate aspect of any such discretization is the method used in order to solve the elliptic equation for the Navier-Stokes pressure or that resulting from the temporal discretization of parabolic terms. We address this by first removing any degrees of freedom which duplicately cover spatial regions due to overlapping grids, and then providing a discretization for the remaining degrees of freedom adjacent to these regions. We observe that a robust second order accurate symmetric positive definite readily preconditioned discretization can be obtained by constructing a local Voronoi region on the fly for each degree of freedom in question in order to obtain both its stencil (logically connected neighbors) and stencil weights. Internal curved boundaries such as at solid interfaces are handled using a simple immersed boundary approach which is directly applied to the Voronoi mesh in both the viscosity and pressure solves. We independently demonstrate each aspect of our approach on test problems in order to show efficacy and convergence before finally addressing a number of common test cases for incompressible flow with stationary and moving solid bodies.

  6. A monolithic FEM-multigrid solver for non-isothermal incompressible flow on general meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanik, H.; Hron, J.; Ouazzi, A.; Turek, S.

    2009-06-01

    We present special numerical simulation methods for non-isothermal incompressible viscous fluids which are based on LBB-stable FEM discretization techniques together with monolithic multigrid solvers. For time discretization, we apply the fully implicit Crank-Nicolson scheme of 2nd order accuracy while we utilize the high order Q2P1 finite element pair for discretization in space which can be applied on general meshes together with local grid refinement strategies including hanging nodes. To treat the nonlinearities in each time step as well as for direct steady approaches, the resulting discrete systems are solved via a Newton method based on divided differences to calculate explicitly the Jacobian matrices. In each nonlinear step, the coupled linear subproblems are solved simultaneously for all quantities by means of a monolithic multigrid method with local multilevel pressure Schur complement smoothers of Vanka type. For validation and evaluation of the presented methodology, we perform the MIT benchmark 2001 [M.A. Christon, P.M. Gresho, S.B. Sutton, Computational predictability of natural convection flows in enclosures, in: First MIT Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics, vol. 40, Elsevier, 2001, pp. 1465-1468] of natural convection flow in enclosures to compare our results with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Additionally, we simulate problems with temperature and shear dependent viscosity and analyze the effect of an additional dissipation term inside the energy equation. Moreover, we discuss how these FEM-multigrid techniques can be extended to monolithic approaches for viscoelastic flow problems.

  7. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  8. Effects of Adverse Pressure Gradient on the Incompressible Reattaching Flow Over a Rearward-Facing Step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, Donald M.

    1980-01-01

    The turbulent, incompressible reattaching flow over a rearward-facing step has been studied by many researchers over the years. One of the principal quantities determined in these experiments has been the distance from the step to the point (or region) where the separated shear layer reattaches to the surface (x(r)). The values for x(r)/h, where h is the step height, have covered a wider range than can reasonably be attributed to experimental technique or inaccuracy. Often the reason for a largely different value of x(r)/h can be attributed to an incompletely developed turbulent layer, or a transitional or laminar boundary layer. However, for the majority of experiments where the boundary layer is believed to be fully developed and turbulent, x(r)/h still varies several step heights; generally, 5 1/2 approximately < x(r)/h approximately < 7 1/2. This observed variation has usually been attributed to such variables as l/h (step length to height, h/delta (step height to initial boundary-layer thickness), R(e)(theta)), or the experimental technique for determining reattachment location. However, there are so many different combinations of variables in the previous experiments that it was not possible to sort out the effects of particular conditions on the location of reattachment. In the present experiment velocity profiles have been measured in and around the region of separated flow. Results show a large influence of adverse pressure gradient on the reattaching flow over a rearward-facing step that has not been reported previously. Further, the many previous experiments for fully developed, turbulent flow in parallel-walled channels have shown a range of reattachment location that has not been explained by differences in initial flow conditions. Although these initial flow conditions might contribute to the observed variation of reattachment location, it appears that the pressure gradient effect can explain most of that variation.

  9. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  10. A unified approach for numerical simulation of viscous compressible and incompressible flows over adiabatic and isothermal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Soliman, M.; White, S.

    1992-01-01

    A new formulation (including the choice of variables, their non-dimensionalization, and the form of the artificial viscosity) is proposed for the numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for compressible and incompressible flows with heat transfer. With the present approach, the same code can be used for constant as well as variable density flows. The changes of the density due to pressure and temperature variations are identified and it is shown that the low Mach number approximation is a special case. At zero Mach number, the density changes due to the temperature variation are accounted for, mainly through a body force term in the momentum equation. It is also shown that the Boussinesq approximation of the buoyancy effects in an incompressible flow is a special case. To demonstrate the new capability, three examples are tested. Flows in driven cavities with adiabatic and isothermal walls are simulated with the same code as well as incompressible and supersonic flows over a wall with and without a groove. Finally, viscous flow simulations of an oblique shock reflection from a flat plate are shown to be in good agreement with the solutions available in literature.

  11. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  12. Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media as turbulent mixing in six-dimensional incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalda, Jaan; Kree, Mihkel

    2015-11-01

    Using the approximation of geometrical optics, light propagation in media with fluctuating coefficient of refraction can be described as Hamiltonian dynamics of wave vectors in 6-dimensional phase space where the spatial coordinates are complemented by the respective wave vector components. Hence, according to the Liouville's theorem, the dynamics of the wave front can be described as mixing in an incompressible 6D velocity field. As the wave energy is transferred along the ray trajectories, the energy density fluctuations follow the dilution of the wave front. We use the theory of turbulent mixing to show that the intensity-distribution of speckles (regions of high energy density) follows a power law, and to derive the scaling exponents. If the velocity field were isotropic, these exponents would be determined by the dimensionality of the flow. However, there is a strong anisotropy of the field due to the asymmetry between the spatial and wave vector coordinates. Also, the effective dimensionality of the flow is reduced by one due to the energy (wave frequency) conservation law: any ray trajectory is bound to a five-dimensional manifold within the 6D phase space. Implications of the anisotropy, and of the effective reduction of the dimensionality are studied numerically The research was supported by the European Union Regional Development Fund (Centre of Excellence TK124: ``Centre for Nonlinear Studies'').

  13. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2016-02-01

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, some form of solution verification has been attempted to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  14. Parallel finite element simulations of incompressible viscous fluid flow by domain decomposition with Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Christian A.; Heniche, Mourad; Glowinski, Roland; Tanguy, Philippe A.

    2010-07-01

    A parallel approach to solve three-dimensional viscous incompressible fluid flow problems using discontinuous pressure finite elements and a Lagrange multiplier technique is presented. The strategy is based on non-overlapping domain decomposition methods, and Lagrange multipliers are used to enforce continuity at the boundaries between subdomains. The novelty of the work is the coupled approach for solving the velocity-pressure-Lagrange multiplier algebraic system of the discrete Navier-Stokes equations by a distributed memory parallel ILU (0) preconditioned Krylov method. A penalty function on the interface constraints equations is introduced to avoid the failure of the ILU factorization algorithm. To ensure portability of the code, a message based memory distributed model with MPI is employed. The method has been tested over different benchmark cases such as the lid-driven cavity and pipe flow with unstructured tetrahedral grids. It is found that the partition algorithm and the order of the physical variables are central to parallelization performance. A speed-up in the range of 5-13 is obtained with 16 processors. Finally, the algorithm is tested over an industrial case using up to 128 processors. In considering the literature, the obtained speed-ups on distributed and shared memory computers are found very competitive.

  15. Detached Eddy Simulations of Incompressible Turbulent Flows Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, G M

    2001-08-01

    An explicit Galerkin finite-element formulation of the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) 1 - equation turbulent transport model was implemented into the incompressible flow module of a parallel, multi-domain, Galerkin finite-element, multi-physics code, using both a RANS formulation and a DES formulation. DES is a new technique for simulating/modeling turbulence using a hybrid RANSkES formulation. The turbulent viscosity is constructed from an intermediate viscosity obtained from the transport equation which is spatially discretized using Q1 elements and integrated in time via forward Euler time integration. Three simulations of plane channel flow on a RANS-type grid, using different turbulence models, were conducted in order to validate the implementation of the SA model: SA-RANS, SA-DES and Smagorinksy (without wall correction). Very good agreement was observed between the SA-RANS results and theory, namely the Log Law of the Wall (LLW), especially in the viscous sublayer region and, to a lesser extent, in the log-layer region. The results obtained using the SA-DES model did not agree as well with the LLW, and it is believed that this poor agreement can be attributed to using a DES model on a RANS grid, namely using an incorrect length-scale. It was observed that near the wall, the SA-DES model acted as an RANS model, and away from the wall it acted as an LES model.

  16. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  17. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in themore » simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.« less

  18. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for high Reynolds number incompressible turbulent flow. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    The full Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible turbulent flow must be solved to accurately represent all flow phenomena which occur in a high Reynolds number incompressible flow. A two layer algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model is used to represent the Reynolds stress in the primitive variable formulation. The development of the boundary-fitted coordinate systems makes the numerical solution of these equations feasible for arbitrarily shaped bodies. The nondimensional time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, including the turbulence mode, are represented by finite difference approximations in the transformed plane. The resulting coupled system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved using a point successive over relaxation iteration. The test case considered was a NACA 64A010 airfoil section at an angle of attack of two degrees and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000.

  19. Three-dimensional linear stability analysis of incompressible viscous flows using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yan; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1999-09-01

    The linear stability of incompressible flows is investigated on the basis of the finite element method. The two-dimensional base flows computed numerically over a range of Reynolds numbers are perturbed with three-dimensional disturbances. The three-dimensionality in the flow associated with the secondary instability is identified precisely. First, by using linear stability theory and normal mode analysis, the partial differential equations governing the evolution of perturbation are derived from the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with slight compressibility. In terms of the mixed finite element discretization, in which six-node quadratic Lagrange triangular elements with quadratic interpolation for velocities (P2) and three-node linear Lagrange triangular elements for pressure (P1) are employed, a non-singular generalized eigenproblem is formulated from these equations, whose solution gives the dispersion relation between complex growth rate and wave number. Then, the stabilities of two cases, i.e. the lid-driven cavity flow and flow past a circular cylinder, are examined. These studies determine accurately stability curves to identify the critical Reynolds number and the critical wavelength of the neutral mode by means of the Krylov subspace method and discuss the mechanism of instability. For the cavity flow, the estimated critical results are Rec=920.277+/-0.010 for the Reynolds number and kc=7.40+/-0.02 for the wave number. These results are in good agreement with the observation of Aidun et al. and are more accurate than those by the finite difference method. This instability in the cavity is associated with absolute instability [Huerre and Monkewitz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 22, 473-537 (1990)]. The Taylor-Göertler-like vortices in the cavity are verified by means of the reconstruction of three-dimensional flows. As for the flow past a circular cylinder, the primary instability result shows that the flow has only two-dimensional characteristics at the

  20. A stable partitioned FSI algorithm for incompressible flow and deforming beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Henshaw, W. D.; Banks, J. W.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Main, A.

    2016-05-01

    An added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm is described for solving fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems coupling incompressible flows with thin elastic structures undergoing finite deformations. The new AMP scheme is fully second-order accurate and stable, without sub-time-step iterations, even for very light structures when added-mass effects are strong. The fluid, governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is solved in velocity-pressure form using a fractional-step method; large deformations are treated with a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian approach on deforming composite grids. The motion of the thin structure is governed by a generalized Euler-Bernoulli beam model, and these equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame using two approaches, one based on finite differences and the other on finite elements. The key AMP interface condition is a generalized Robin (mixed) condition on the fluid pressure. This condition, which is derived at a continuous level, has no adjustable parameters and is applied at the discrete level to couple the partitioned domain solvers. Special treatment of the AMP condition is required to couple the finite-element beam solver with the finite-difference-based fluid solver, and two coupling approaches are described. A normal-mode stability analysis is performed for a linearized model problem involving a beam separating two fluid domains, and it is shown that the AMP scheme is stable independent of the ratio of the mass of the fluid to that of the structure. A traditional partitioned (TP) scheme using a Dirichlet-Neumann coupling for the same model problem is shown to be unconditionally unstable if the added mass of the fluid is too large. A series of benchmark problems of increasing complexity are considered to illustrate the behavior of the AMP algorithm, and to compare the behavior with that of the TP scheme. The results of all these benchmark problems verify the stability and accuracy of the AMP scheme. Results for one

  1. Anti-diffusion method for interface steepening in two-phase incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, K. K.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method for obtaining sharp interfaces in two-phase incompressible flows by an anti-diffusion correction, that is applicable in a straight-forward fashion for the improvement of two-phase flow solution schemes typically employed in practical applications. The underlying discretization is based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface-capturing method on unstructured meshes. The key idea is to steepen the interface, independently of the underlying volume-fraction transport equation, by solving a diffusion equation with reverse time, i.e. an anti-diffusion equation, after each advection time step of the volume fraction. As the solution of the anti-diffusion equation requires regularization, a limiter based on the directional derivative is developed for calculating the gradient of the volume fraction. This limiter ensures the boundedness of the volume fraction. In order to control the amount of anti-diffusion introduced by the correction algorithm we propose a suitable stopping criterion for interface steepening. The formulation of the limiter and the algorithm for solving the anti-diffusion equation are applicable to 3-dimensional unstructured meshes. Validation computations are performed for passive advection of an interface, for 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional rising-bubbles, and for a rising drop in a periodically constricted channel. The results demonstrate that sharp interfaces can be recovered reliably. They show that the accuracy is similar to or even better than that of level-set methods using comparable discretizations for the flow and the level-set evolution. Also, we observe a good agreement with experimental results for the rising drop where proper interface evolution requires accurate mass conservation.

  2. A convective-like energy-stable open boundary condition for simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new energy-stable open boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows with outflow/open boundaries. This open boundary condition ensures the energy stability of the system, even when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow boundary. Under certain situations it can be reduced to a form that can be analogized to the usual convective boundary condition. One prominent feature of this boundary condition is that it provides a control over the velocity on the outflow/open boundary. This is not available with the other energy-stable open boundary conditions from previous works. Our numerical algorithm treats the proposed open boundary condition based on a rotational velocity-correction type strategy. It gives rise to a Robin-type condition for the discrete pressure and a Robin-type condition for the discrete velocity on the outflow/open boundary, respectively at the pressure and the velocity sub-steps. We present extensive numerical experiments on a canonical wake flow and a jet flow in open domain to test the effectiveness and performance of the method developed herein. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data as well as with other previous simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the current method. Long-time simulations are performed for a range of Reynolds numbers, at which strong vortices and backflows occur at the outflow/open boundaries. The results show that our method is effective in overcoming the backflow instability, and that it allows for the vortices to discharge from the domain in a fairly natural fashion even at high Reynolds numbers.

  3. Additional interfacial force in lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Gao, Y J; He, Y L

    2012-02-01

    The existing lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows are mostly constructed with two distribution functions: one is the order parameter distribution function, which is used to track the interface between different phases, and the other is the pressure distribution function for solving the velocity field. In this paper, it is shown that in these models the recovered momentum equation is inconsistent with the target one: an additional force is included in the recovered momentum equation. The additional force has the following features. First, it is proportional to the macroscopic velocity. Second, it is zero in every single-phase region but is nonzero in the interface. Therefore it can be interpreted as an interfacial force. To investigate the effects of the additional interfacial force, numerical simulations are carried out for the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, droplet splashing on a thin liquid film, and the evolution of a falling droplet under gravity. Numerical results demonstrate that, with the increase of the velocity or the Reynolds number, the additional interfacial force will gradually have an important influence on the interface and affect the numerical accuracy. PMID:22463354

  4. A parallel second-order adaptive mesh algorithm for incompressible flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Pau, George S H; Almgren, Ann S; Bell, John B; Lijewski, Michael J

    2009-11-28

    In this paper, we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multi-phase, incompressible flow in porous media. We assume a multi-phase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting, the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data at different levels are then synchronized. The single-grid algorithm is described briefly, but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behaviour of the method. PMID:19840985

  5. Thermodynamically Consistent Physical Formulation and an Efficient Numerical Algorithm for Incompressible N-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Suchuan

    2015-11-01

    This talk focuses on simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N>=2) immiscible incompressible fluids with given densities, dynamic viscosities and pairwise surface tensions. We present an N-phase formulation within the phase field framework that is thermodynamically consistent, in the sense that the formulation satisfies the conservations of mass/momentum, the second law of thermodynamics and Galilean invariance. We also present an efficient algorithm for numerically simulating the N-phase system. The algorithm has overcome the issues caused by the variable coefficient matrices associated with the variable mixture density/viscosity and the couplings among the (N-1) phase field variables and the flow variables. We compare simulation results with the Langmuir-de Gennes theory to demonstrate that the presented method produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases. Numerical experiments will be presented for several problems involving multiple fluid phases, large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts to demonstrate the capabilities of the method for studying the interactions among multiple types of fluid interfaces. Support from NSF and ONR is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multiphase, incompressible flows in porous media. We assume a multiphase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence-free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids areadvanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data atdifferent levels are then synchronized. The single grid algorithm is described briefly,but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behavior of the method.

  7. A velocity-correction projection method based immersed boundary method for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shanggui

    2014-11-01

    In the present work we propose a novel direct forcing immersed boundary method based on the velocity-correction projection method of [J.L. Guermond, J. Shen, Velocity-correction projection methods for incompressible flows, SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 41 (1)(2003) 112]. The principal idea of immersed boundary method is to correct the velocity in the vicinity of the immersed object by using an artificial force to mimic the presence of the physical boundaries. Therefore, velocity-correction projection method is preferred to its pressure-correction counterpart in the present work. Since the velocity-correct projection method is considered as a dual class of pressure-correction method, the proposed method here can also be interpreted in the way that first the pressure is predicted by treating the viscous term explicitly without the consideration of the immersed boundary, and the solenoidal velocity is used to determine the volume force on the Lagrangian points, then the non-slip boundary condition is enforced by correcting the velocity with the implicit viscous term. To demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method, several numerical simulations are performed and compared with the results in the literature. China Scholarship Council.

  8. Mathematical modelling of a steady flow of a heat conductive incompressible fluid through the cascade of profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustupa, T.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical model of a steady flow of a heat-conductive incompressible viscous fluid through a spatially periodic plane profile cascade. The corresponding boundary value problem is reduced to one spatial period. We prove the existence of a weak solution of a coupled problem, with various boundary conditions on the parts of the boundary. Particularly, the condition on the outflow is a variant of the so called "do nothing" boundary condition.

  9. Method of Estimating the Incompressible-flow Pressure Distribution of Compressor Blade Sections at Design Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R; Yacobi, Laura A

    1953-01-01

    A method was devised for estimating the incompressible-flow pressure distribution over compressor blade sections at design angle of attack. The theoretical incremental velocities due to camber and thickness of the section as an isolated airfoil are assumed proportional to the average passage velocity and are modified by empirically determined interference factors. Comparisons were made between estimated and test pressure distributions of NACA 65-series sections for typical conditions. Good agreement was obtained.

  10. Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow driven by time-varying accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Lawrie, Andrew; Muthuraman, Karthik; UNC-LMFA Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We report on numerical simulations of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow subject to variable acceleration histories. The acceleration profiles were inspired by experiments and theoretical studies, and include an impulsive acceleration, accel-decel profiles, as well as a constant drive as the baseline case. The simulations were performed using the MOBILE software, a variable-density, incompressible fluid flow code. The advection algorithm employs a 3rd-order, monotonicity-preserving upwind scheme, allowing the definition of sharp interfaces in the flow, while pressure convergence is accelerated by the use of a multi-grid scheme. The simulations are initialized with two classes of perturbations: narrow-band, short-wavelength modes and broadband with long-wavelength modes. The effect of initial amplitudes on the perturbations is investigated under the variable drive conditions. The acceleration profiles are capable of producing stages of ``demixing,'' useful in validating turbulence models of RTI.

  11. Lagrangian coherent structures and transport in two-dimensional incompressible flows with oceanographic and atmospheric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypina, Irina I.

    The Lagrangian dynamics of two-dimensional incompressible fluid flows is considered, with emphasis on transport processes in atmospheric and oceanic flows. The dynamical-systems-based approach is adopted; the Lagrangian motion in such systems is studied with the aid of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theory, and results relating to stable and unstable manifolds and lobe dynamics. Some nontrivial extensions of well-known results are discussed, and some extensions of the theory are developed. In problems for which the flow field consists of a steady background on which a time-dependent perturbation is superimposed, it is shown that transport barriers arise naturally and play a critical role in transport processes. Theoretical results are applied to the study of transport in measured and simulated oceanographic and atmospheric flows. Two particular problems are considered. First, we study the Lagrangian dynamics of the zonal jet at the perimeter of the Antarctic Stratospheric Polar Vortex during late winter/early spring within which lies the "ozone hole". In this system, a robust transport barrier is found near the core of a zonal jet under typical conditions, which is responsible for trapping of the ozone-depleted air within the ozone hole. The existence of such a barrier is predicted theoretically and tested numerically with use of a dynamically-motivated analytically-prescribed model. The second, oceanographic, application considered is the study of the surface transport in the Adriatic Sea. The surface flow in the Adriatic is characterized by a robust three-gyre background circulation pattern. Motivated by this observation, the Lagrangian dynamics of a perturbed three-gyre system is studied, with emphasis on intergyre transport and the role of transport barriers. It is shown that a qualitative change in transport properties, accompanied by a qualitative change in the structure of stable and unstable manifolds occurs in the perturbed three-gyre system when the

  12. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Robert James

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q-2Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied: the turbulence energy dissipation rate (epsilon), the turbulence frequency (omega) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the k-tau transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow. Attempts to extend the formulation beyond the flat channel were not successful due to oscillatory

  13. Incompressible-compressible flows with a transient discontinuous interface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-03-01

    A new two-phase incompressible-compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed where the interface is discontinuous in density. This is applied to water-air problems with a large density difference. The incompressible phase requires surface pressure from the compressible phase and the compressible phase requires surface velocity from the incompressible phase. Compressible SPH is used for the air phase (with the isothermal stiffened ideal gas equation of state for low Mach numbers) and divergence-free (projection based) incompressible SPH is used for the water phase, with the addition of Fickian shifting to produce sufficiently homogeneous particle distributions to enable stable, accurate, converged solutions without noise in the pressure field. Shifting is a purely numerical particle regularisation device. The interface remains a true material discontinuity at a high density ratio with continuous pressure and velocity at the interface. This approach with the physics of compressibility and incompressibility represented is novel within SPH and is validated against semi-analytical results for a two-phase elongating and oscillating water drop, analytical results for low amplitude inviscid standing waves, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a dam break problem with high interface distortion and impact on a vertical wall where experimental and other numerical results are available.

  14. Verification, validation, and implementation of numerical methods and models for OpenFOAM 2.0 for incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Eric D.

    A comprehensive survey of available numerical methods and models was performed on the open source computational fluid dynamics solver OpenFOAM version 2.0 for incompressible turbulent bluff body flows. Numerical methods are illuminated using source code for side-by-side comparison. For validation, the accuracy of flow predictions over a sphere in the subcritical regime and delta wing with sharp leading edge is assessed. Solutions show mostly good agreement with experimental data and data obtained from commercial software. A demonstration of the numerical implementation of a dynamic hybrid RANS/LES framework is also presented, including results from test studies.

  15. A general panel method for the analysis and design of arbitrary configurations in incompressible flows. [boundary value problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    A method for solving the linear integral equations of incompressible potential flow in three dimensions is presented. Both analysis (Neumann) and design (Dirichlet) boundary conditions are treated in a unified approach to the general flow problem. The method is an influence coefficient scheme which employs source and doublet panels as boundary surfaces. Curved panels possessing singularity strengths, which vary as polynomials are used, and all influence coefficients are derived in closed form. These and other features combine to produce an efficient scheme which is not only versatile but eminently suited to the practical realities of a user-oriented environment. A wide variety of numerical results demonstrating the method is presented.

  16. A survey of grid-free methods for the simulation of 3-D incompressible flows in bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Gharakhani, A.

    1997-09-01

    The state-of-the-art in Lagrangian methods for the grid-free simulation of three-dimensional, incompressible, high Reynolds number, internal and/or external flows is surveyed. Specifically, vortex and velicity (or impulse) element methods are introduced. The relative merits of various available techniques and the outstanding challenges in simulating the processes of convection and diffusion, as well as in satisfying the wall boundary conditions are discussed individually. Issues regarding the stretch and solenoidality of vorticity are also discussed. A potentially successful algorithm for simulating the flow around a parachute is proposed as well.

  17. Incompressible laminar flow through hollow fibers: a general study by means of a two-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsi, Iacopo; Farina, Angiolo; Fasano, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    We study the laminar flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid in a hollow fiber, whose walls are porous. We write the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in the inner channel and Darcy's law for the flow in the fiber, coupling them by means of the Beavers-Joseph condition which accounts for the (possible) slip at the membrane surface. Then, we introduce a small parameter {\\varepsilon ≪ 1} (the ratio between the radius and the length of the fiber) and expand all relevant quantities in powers of ɛ. Averaging over the fiber cross section, we find the velocity profiles for the longitudinal flow and for the cross-flow, and eventually, we determine the explicit expression of the permeability of the system. This work is also preliminary to the study of more complex systems comprising a large number of identical fibers (e.g., ultrafiltration modules and dialysis).

  18. Comparative Analysis of Natural Convection Flows Simulated by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Differentially-Heated Square Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aurélia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2009-01-01

    This report illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated body force, velocity, and divergence of velocity distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present. The results show that the use of

  19. Dynamical equations for the vector potential and the velocity potential in incompressible irrotational Euler flows: a refined Bernoulli theorem.

    PubMed

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We consider incompressible Euler flows in terms of the stream function in two dimensions and the vector potential in three dimensions. We pay special attention to the case with singular distributions of the vorticity, e.g., point vortices in two dimensions. An explicit equation governing the velocity potentials is derived in two steps. (i) Starting from the equation for the stream function [Ohkitani, Nonlinearity 21, T255 (2009)NONLE50951-771510.1088/0951-7715/21/12/T02], which is valid for smooth flows as well, we derive an equation for the complex velocity potential. (ii) Taking a real part of this equation, we find a dynamical equation for the velocity potential, which may be regarded as a refinement of Bernoulli theorem. In three-dimensional incompressible flows, we first derive dynamical equations for the vector potentials which are valid for smooth fields and then recast them in hypercomplex form. The equation for the velocity potential is identified as its real part and is valid, for example, flows with vortex layers. As an application, the Kelvin-Helmholtz problem has been worked out on the basis the current formalism. A connection to the Navier-Stokes regularity problem is addressed as a physical application of the equations for the vector potentials for smooth fields. PMID:26465559

  20. On the use of turbulence models for the simulation of incompressible viscous flow past airfoils at high-lift static and dynamic incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmineau, E.; Piquet, J.; Queutey, P.

    The incompressible viscous turbulent flow past airfoils is numerically simulated by solving the incompressible Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations (RANSE). We use a physical method, for the reconstruction of fluxes in the mass and momentum balance discrete equations. Different turbulent models are tested over several cases; namely, the flow past the popular NACA 4412 airfoil, near maximum lift conditions, the flow past an AS-240 airfoil, at two incidences. The numerical simulation of the flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil in high amplitude pitching oscillation is finally considered.

  1. Symmetry breaking and preliminary results about a Hopf bifurcation for incompressible viscous flow in an expansion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaini, A.; Glowinski, R.; Čanić, S.

    2016-01-01

    This computational study shows, for the first time, a clear transition to two-dimensional Hopf bifurcation for laminar incompressible flows in symmetric plane expansion channels. Due to the well-known extreme sensitivity of this study on computational mesh, the critical Reynolds numbers for both the known symmetry-breaking (pitchfork) bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation were investigated for several layers of mesh refinement. It is found that under-refined meshes lead to an overestimation of the critical Reynolds number for the symmetry breaking and an underestimation of the critical Reynolds number for the Hopf bifurcation.

  2. Development of a discrete gas-kinetic scheme for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Yang, L M; Shu, C; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a discrete gas-kinetic scheme (DGKS) is presented for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows. This scheme is developed from the circular function-based GKS, which was recently proposed by Shu and his co-workers [L. M. Yang, C. Shu, and J. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 611 (2014)]. For the circular function-based GKS, the integrals for conservation forms of moments in the infinity domain for the Maxwellian function-based GKS are simplified to those integrals along the circle. As a result, the explicit formulations of conservative variables and fluxes are derived. However, these explicit formulations of circular function-based GKS for viscous flows are still complicated, which may not be easy for the application by new users. By using certain discrete points to represent the circle in the phase velocity space, the complicated formulations can be replaced by a simple solution process. The basic requirement is that the conservation forms of moments for the circular function-based GKS can be accurately satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. In this work, it is shown that integral quadrature by four discrete points on the circle, which forms the D2Q4 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integrals. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible and compressible viscous flows with roughly the same computational cost as that needed by the Roe scheme. PMID:27078488

  3. A Priori Estimates for Free Boundary Problem of Incompressible Inviscid Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chengchun; Luo, Tao

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we prove the a priori estimates of Sobolev norms for a free boundary problem of the incompressible inviscid magnetohydrodynamics equations in all physical spatial dimensions n = 2 and 3 by adopting a geometrical point of view used in Christodoulou and Lindblad (Commun Pure Appl Math 53:1536-1602, 2000), and estimating quantities such as the second fundamental form and the velocity of the free surface. We identify the well-posedness condition that the outer normal derivative of the total pressure including the fluid and magnetic pressures is negative on the free boundary, which is similar to the physical condition (Taylor sign condition) for the incompressible Euler equations of fluids.

  4. On an Inviscid Model for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Nonlocal Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian G.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a diffuse interface model which describes the motion of an ideal incompressible mixture of two immiscible fluids with nonlocal interaction in two-dimensional bounded domains. This model consists of the Euler equation coupled with a convective nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard equation. We establish the existence of globally defined weak solutions as well as well-posedness results for strong/classical solutions.

  5. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  6. An efficient, interface-preserving level set redistancing algorithm and its application to interfacial incompressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M. . Dept. of Mathematics); Fatemi, E.

    1999-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka, and Osher, a numerical scheme was presented for computing incompressible air-water flows using the level set method. Crucial to the above method was a new iteration method for maintaining the level set function as the signed distance from the zero level set. In this paper the authors implement a constraint along with higher order difference schemes in order to make the iteration method more accurate and efficient. Accuracy is measured in terms of the new computed signed distance function and the original level set function having the same zero level set. The authors apply the redistancing scheme to incompressible flows with noticeably better resolved results at reduced cost. They validate the results with experiment and theory. They show that the distance level set scheme with the added constraint competes well with available interface tracking schemes for basic advection of an interface. They perform basic accuracy checks and more stringent tests involving complicated interfacial structures. As with all level set schemes, the method is easy to implement.

  7. On Possible Similarity Solutions for Three-Dimensional Incompressible Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows Over Developable Surfaces and with Proportional Mainstream Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Arthur G.

    1958-01-01

    Analysis is presented on the possible similarity solutions of the three-dimensional, laminar, incompressible, boundary-layer equations referred to orthogonal, curvilinear coordinate systems. Requirements of the existence of similarity solutions are obtained for the following: flow over developable surface and flow over non-developable surfaces with proportional mainstream velocity components.

  8. On the Global Regularity of the Two-Dimensional Density Patch for Inhomogeneous Incompressible Viscous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xian; Zhang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Regarding P.-L. Lions' open question in Oxford Lecture Series in Mathematics and its Applications, Vol. 3 (1996) concerning the propagation of regularity for the density patch, we establish the global existence of solutions to the two-dimensional inhomogeneous incompressible Navier-Stokes system with initial density given by {(1 - η){1}_{{Ω}0} + {1}_{{Ω}0c}} for some small enough constant {η} and some {W^{k+2,p}} domain {Ω0}, with initial vorticity belonging to {L1 \\cap Lp} and with appropriate tangential regularities. Furthermore, we prove that the regularity of the domain {Ω_0} is preserved by time evolution.

  9. Combustion accelerated swirling flows in high confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Roman; Dugue, Jacques

    Nine cold flows, 15 well-mixed flames, and eight type II diffusion flames of coke-oven gas are measured in the present study of the effect of combustion on the properties of swirl-induced internal recirculation zones (IRZ) formed in the vicinity of swirl-stabilized burners. Formulae for calculating the effective swirl number are presented. Attention is given to experiments in which initial swirling cold flows are combustion-accelerated; the position and degree of acceleration are systematically varied. The experimental results obtained deepen current understanding of the effects of combustion on swirling flows.

  10. Organized modes and the three-dimensional transition to turbulence in the incompressible flow around a NACA0012 wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarau, Y.; Braza, M.; Ventikos, Y.; Faghani, D.; Tzabiras, G.

    2003-12-01

    The transition to turbulence in the incompressible flow around a NACA0012 wing at high incidence is studied by DNS in the Reynolds number range 800 10000. Two main routes are identified for the two-dimensional transition mechanisms: that to aperiodicity beyond the von Kármán mode via a period-doubling scenario and the development of a shear-layer instability, forced by the fundamental oscillation of the separation point downstream of the leading edge. The evolution of the global parameters as well as the variation law of the shear-layer instability wavelength are quantified. The history of the three-dimensional transition mechanisms from a nominally two-dimensional flow structure is identified beyond the first bifurcation, as well as the preferred spanwise wavelengths.

  11. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  12. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006); J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007)]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube. PMID:25353880

  13. Comparison of Natural Convection Flows Under VHTR Type Conditions Modeled by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aur´elia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2010-06-01

    This manuscript illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated specific force quantities and velocity and temperature distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present.

  14. Study of dealiasing schemes in pseudo-spectral methods for Large-Eddy Simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margairaz, Fabien; Giometto, Marco; Parlange, Marc; Calaf, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The performance of dealiasing schemes and their computational cost on a pseudo-spectral code are analyzed. Dealiasing is required to limit the error that occurs when two discretized variables are multiplied, polluting the accuracy of the result. In this work three different dealiasing methods are explored: the 2/3 rule, the 3/2 rule, and a high order Fourier smoothing based method. We compare the cost of the traditionally accepted 3/2 rule (Canuto et al., 1988), where an expansion of the computational domain to a larger grid is required, to the cost of the other two techniques that do not require this expansion. This analysis is performed in the framework of Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of incompressible flows using the constant Smagorinsky sub-grid model with a wall damping function and a wall model based on the log-law. A highly efficient LES code parallelized using a 2D pencil decomposition has been developed. The code employs the traditional pseudo-spectral approach to integrate the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Several simulations of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer using different degrees of numerical resolution are considered. Results show a net difference in computational cost between the different techniques without relevant changes in statistics.

  15. Development of a discrete gas-kinetic scheme for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a discrete gas-kinetic scheme (DGKS) is presented for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows. This scheme is developed from the circular function-based GKS, which was recently proposed by Shu and his co-workers [L. M. Yang, C. Shu, and J. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 611 (2014), 10.1016/j.jcp.2014.06.033]. For the circular function-based GKS, the integrals for conservation forms of moments in the infinity domain for the Maxwellian function-based GKS are simplified to those integrals along the circle. As a result, the explicit formulations of conservative variables and fluxes are derived. However, these explicit formulations of circular function-based GKS for viscous flows are still complicated, which may not be easy for the application by new users. By using certain discrete points to represent the circle in the phase velocity space, the complicated formulations can be replaced by a simple solution process. The basic requirement is that the conservation forms of moments for the circular function-based GKS can be accurately satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. In this work, it is shown that integral quadrature by four discrete points on the circle, which forms the D2Q4 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integrals. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible and compressible viscous flows with roughly the same computational cost as that needed by the Roe scheme.

  16. An analysis of a new stable partitioned algorithm for FSI problems. Part I: Incompressible flow and elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2014-07-01

    Stable partitioned algorithms for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems are developed and analyzed in this two-part paper. Part I describes an algorithm for incompressible flow coupled with compressible elastic solids, while Part II discusses an algorithm for incompressible flow coupled with structural shells. Importantly, these new added-mass partitioned (AMP) schemes are stable and retain full accuracy with no sub-iterations per time step, even in the presence of strong added-mass effects (e.g. for light solids). The numerical approach described here for bulk compressible solids extends the scheme of Banks et al. [1,2] for inviscid compressible flow, and uses Robin (mixed) boundary conditions with the fluid and solid solvers at the interface. The basic AMP Robin conditions, involving a linear combination of velocity and stress, are determined from the outgoing solid characteristic relation normal to the fluid-solid interface combined with the matching conditions on the velocity and traction. Two alternative forms of the AMP conditions are then derived depending on whether the fluid equations are advanced with a fractional-step method or not. The stability and accuracy of the AMP algorithm is evaluated for linearized FSI model problems; the full nonlinear case being left for future consideration. A normal mode analysis is performed to show that the new AMP algorithm is stable for any ratio of the solid and fluid densities, including the case of very light solids when added-mass effects are large. In contrast, it is shown that a traditional partitioned algorithm involving a Dirichlet-Neumann coupling for the same FSI problem is formally unconditionally unstable for any ratio of densities. Exact traveling wave solutions are derived for the FSI model problems, and these solutions are used to verify the stability and accuracy of the corresponding numerical results obtained from the AMP algorithm for the cases of light, medium and heavy solids.

  17. Convergence acceleration of viscous flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-grid convergence acceleration technique introduced for application to the solution of the Euler equations by means of Lax-Wendroff algorithms is extended to treat compressible viscous flow. Computational results are presented for the solution of the thin-layer version of the Navier-Stokes equations using the explicit MacCormack algorithm, accelerated by a convective coarse-grid scheme. Extensions and generalizations are mentioned.

  18. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Dong, S.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  19. An efficient second-order projection method for viscous incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. B.; Howell, L. H.; Colella, P.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper we describe a second-order projection method for the time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The method is a second-order fractional step scheme in which one first solves diffusion-convection equations to determine intermediate velocities which are then projected onto the space of divergence-free vector fields. The diffusion-convection step uses a specialized second-order Godunov method for differencing the nonlinear convective terms that is conservative and free-stream preserving and provides a robust treatment of the nonlinearities at high Reynolds number. The projection is based on cell-centered centered difference approximations to divergence and gradient operators with the resulting linear system solved using a multigrid relaxation scheme. We apply the method to vortex spindown in a box to validate the numerical convergence of the method and to measure its overall performance.

  20. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  1. The construction and use of divergence free vector expansions for incompressible fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mhuiris, N. M. G.

    1986-01-01

    For incompressible fluids the law of mass conservation reduces to a constraint on the velocity vector, namely that it be divergence free. This constraint has long been a source of great difficulty to the numericist seeking to discretize the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. A spectral method is discussed which overcomes this difficulty. Its efficacy is demonstrated on some simple problems. The velocity is approximated by a finite sum of divergence free vectors, each of which satisfies the same boundary conditions as the velocity. Projecting the governing equation onto the space of inviscid vector fields eliminates the pressure term and produces a set of ordinary differential equations that must be solved for the coefficents in the velocity. The pressure can then be recovered if it is needed.

  2. Three-Dimensional Incompressible Navier-Stokes Flow Computations about Complete Configurations Using a Multiblock Unstructured Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Hyams, Daniel G.; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Gaither, J. Adam; Marcum, David L.; Whitfield, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A multiblock unstructured grid approach is presented for solving three-dimensional incompressible inviscid and viscous turbulent flows about complete configurations. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a node-based, finite volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work employs a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements by a factor of 5 over the single-grid algorithm while maintaining a similar convergence behavior. The numerical accuracy of solutions is assessed by comparing with the experimental data for a submarine with stem appendages and a high-lift configuration.

  3. Theoretical span load distributions and rolling moments for sideslipping wings of arbitrary plan form in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M J

    1956-01-01

    A method of computing span loads and the resulting rolling moments for sideslipping wings of arbitrary plan form in incompressible flow is derived. The method requires that the span load at zero sideslip be known for the wing under consideration. Because this information is available for a variety of wings, this requirement should not seriously restrict the application of the present method. The basic method derived herein requires a mechanical differentiation and integration to obtain the rolling moment for the general wing in sideslip. For wings having straight leading and trailing edges over each semispan, the rolling moment due to sideslip is given by a simple equation in terms of plan-form parameters and the lateral center of pressure of the lift due to angle of attack. Calculated span loads and rolling-moment parameters are compared with experimental values. The comparison indicates good agreement between calculations and available experimental data.

  4. An Improved Momentum-Exchanged Immersed Boundary-Based Lattice Boltzmann Method for Incompressible Viscous Thermal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mufeng; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    An improved momentum-exchanged immersed boundary-based lattice Boltzmann method (MEIB-LBM) for incompressible viscous thermal flows is presented here. MEIB-LBM was first proposed by Niu et al, which has been shown later that the non-slip boundary condition is not satisfied. Wang. et al. and Hu. et al overcome this drawback by iterative method. But it needs to give an appropriate relaxation parameter. In this work, we come back to the intrinsic feature of LBM, which uses the density distribution function as a dependent variable to evolve the flow field, and uses the density distribution function correction at the neighboring Euler mesh points to satisfy the non-slip boundary condition on the immersed boundary. The same idea can also be applied to the thermal flows with fluid-structure interference. The merits of present improvements for the original MEIB-LBM are that the intrinsic feature of LBM is kept and the flow penetration across the immersed boundaries is avoided. To validate the present method, examples, including forced convection over a stationary heated circular cylinder for heat flux condition, and natural convection with a suspended circle particle in viscous fluid, are simulated. The streamlines, isothermal contours, the drag coefficients and Nusselt numbers are calculated and compared to the benchmark results to demonstrate the effective of the present method.

  5. Approximate factorization for incompressible flow. Ph.D. Thesis; [Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    For computational solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the approximate factorization (AF) algorithm is used to solve the vectorized momentum equation in delta form based on the pressure calculated in the previous time step. The newly calculated velocities are substituted into the pressure equation (obtained from a linear combination of the continuity and momentum equation), which is then solved by means of line SOR. Computational results are presented for the NACA 66 sub 3 018 airfoil at Reynolds numbers of 1000 and 40,000 and attack angles of 0 and 6 degrees. Comparison with wind tunnel data for Re = 40,000 indicates good qualitative agreement between measured and calculated pressure distributions. Quantitative agreement is only fair, however, with the calculations somewhat displaced from the measurements. Furthermore, the computed velocity profiles are unrealistically thick around the airfoil, due to the excessive amount of artificial viscosity needed for stability. Based on the performance of the algorithm with regard to stability, it is concluded that AF/SOR is suitable for calculations at Reynolds numbers less than 10,000. Speedwise, the method is faster than point SOR by at least a factor of two.

  6. Turbulent jet patterns in accelerating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1981-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments, and a semi-empirical model of a single turbulent jet injected perpendicularly to a different density cross flow are presented. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flow. It uses an entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The results show trajectories and spreading rates, and are typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, Froude number and density ratio. Agreement between test and calculated results is encouraging, but tend to be poorer with increasing momentum ratio.

  7. Vorticity vector-potential method for 3D viscous incompressible flows in time-dependent curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Xie, Xilin

    2016-05-01

    E and Liu [J. Comput. Phys. 138 (1997) 57-82] put forward a finite difference method for 3D viscous incompressible flows in the vorticity-vector potential formulation on non-staggered grids. In this paper, we will extend this method to the case of flows in the presence of a deformable surface. By use of two kinds of surface differential operators, the implementation of boundary conditions on a plane is generalized to a curved smooth surface with given velocity distribution, whether this be an inflow/outflow interface or a curved wall. To deal with the irregular and varying physical domain, time-dependent curvilinear coordinates are constructed and the corresponding tensor analysis is adopted in deriving the component form of the governing equations. Therefore, the equations can be discretized and solved in a regular and fixed parametric domain. Numerical results are presented for a 3D lid-driven cavity with a deforming surface and a 3D duct flow with a deforming boundary. A new way to validate numerical simulations is proposed based on an expression for the rate-of-strain tensor on a deformable surface.

  8. Gas-liquid Two Phase Flow Modelling of Incompressible Fluid and Experimental Validation Studies in Vertical Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. X.; Shen, X.; Yin, Y. J.; Guo, Z.; Wang, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, Gas-liquid two phase flow mathematic models of incompressible fluid were proposed to explore the feature of fluid under certain centrifugal force in vertical centrifugal casting (VCC). Modified projection-level-set method was introduced to solve the mathematic models. To validate the simulation results, two methods were used in this study. In the first method, the simulation result of basic VCC flow process was compared with its analytic solution. The relationship between the numerical solution and deterministic analytic solution was presented to verify the correctness of numerical algorithms. In the second method, systematic water simulation experiments were developed. In this initial experiment, special experimental vertical centrifugal device and casting shapes were designed to describe typical mold-filling processes in VCC. High speed camera system and data collection devices were used to capture flow shape during the mold-filling process. Moreover, fluid characteristic at different rotation speed (from 40rpm, 60rpmand 80rpm) was discussed to provide comparative resource for simulation results. As compared with the simulation results, the proposed mathematical models could be proven and the experimental design could help us advance the accuracy of simulation and further studies for VCC.

  9. A novel data reduction technique for single slanted hot-wire measurements used to study incompressible compressor tip leakage flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2016-03-01

    The single slanted hot-wire technique has been used extensively as a method for measuring three velocity components in turbomachinery applications. The cross-flow orientation of probes with respect to the mean flow in rotating machinery results in detrimental prong interference effects when using multi-wire probes. As a result, the single slanted hot-wire technique is often preferred. Typical data reduction techniques solve a set of nonlinear equations determined by curve fits to calibration data. A new method is proposed which utilizes a look-up table method applied to a simulated triple-wire sensor with application to turbomachinery environments having subsonic, incompressible flows. Specific discussion regarding corrections for temperature and density changes present in a multistage compressor application is included, and additional consideration is given to the experimental error which accompanies each data reduction process. Hot-wire data collected from a three-stage research compressor with two rotor tip clearances are used to compare the look-up table technique with the traditional nonlinear equation method. The look-up table approach yields velocity errors of less than 5 % for test conditions deviating by more than 20 °C from calibration conditions (on par with the nonlinear solver method), while requiring less than 10 % of the computational processing time.

  10. Software Design for Particles in Incompressible flow, non-subcycled case

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel; Martin, Dan; Colella, Phil

    2005-02-08

    To implement an AMR incompressible Navier-Stokes with particles algorithm, we have decided to use a non-subcycled algorithm to simplify the implementation of the particle drag forcing term. This requires a fairly broad redesign of the software from what was presented in [1], since we will no longer be using the AMR/AMR Level base classes to manage the AMR hierarchy. The new classes map on to the functionality of the classes in the original design in a fairly straightforward way, as illustrated in Table 1. The new PAmrNS class takes on the functionality of the Particle AMRNS class in the earlier implementation, along with the functionality of the AMR and Amr Level classes in the Chombo AMR Time Dependent library. The new Amr Projector class replaces the original CC Projector class, while the new AMR Particle Projector class replaces the original Particle Projector class. A basic diagram of the class relationships between the AMRINS-particles classes is depicted in Figure 1. The PAmrNS class will manage the AMR hierarchy and the non-subcycled advance. The non-subcycled advance is much simpler than the subcycled case, both in terms of algorithmic complexity (no need for synchronization projections, etc) and in terms of software implementation. The AMR Particle Projector will do the particle projection originally implemented in the Particle Projector class on an AMR hierarchy, including all image particle effects. The rest of the implementation (Drag Particle, etc) will be the same as in the original software design. Since much of the functionality and internal storage in the CC Projector class in the original AMRINS code is devoted to subcycling-related functionality, the Amr CC Projector is a stripped-down version of the CC Projector which only contains the functionality needed to do the multilevel cell-centered and face-centered projections.

  11. Periodic boundary conditions for long-time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a generalization of the Kraynik-Reinelt (KR) boundary conditions for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. In the simulation of steady, homogeneous flows with periodic boundary conditions, the simulation box deforms with the flow, and it is possible for image particles to become arbitrarily close, causing a breakdown in the simulation. The KR boundary conditions avoid this problem for planar elongational flow and general planar mixed flow [T. A. Hunt, S. Bernardi, and B. D. Todd, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154116 (2010)] through careful choice of the initial simulation box and by periodically remapping the simulation box in a way that conserves image locations. In this work, the ideas are extended to a large class of three-dimensional flows by using multiple remappings for the simulation box. The simulation box geometry is no longer time-periodic (which was shown to be impossible for uniaxial and biaxial stretching flows in the original work by Kraynik and Reinelt [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 18, 1045 (1992)]. The presented algorithm applies to all flows with nondefective flow matrices, and in particular, to uniaxial and biaxial flows.

  12. Development of generalized pressure velocity coupling scheme for the analysis of compressible and incompressible combusting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Wu, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this investigation has been to develop an algorithm (or algorithms) for the improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of the computer fluid dynamics (CFD) models to study the fundamental physics of combustion chamber flows, which are necessary ultimately for the design of propulsion systems such as SSME and STME. During this three year study (May 19, 1978 - May 18, 1992), a unique algorithm was developed for all speed flows. This newly developed algorithm basically consists of two pressure-based algorithms (i.e. PISOC and MFICE). This PISOC is a non-iterative scheme and the FICE is an iterative scheme where PISOC has the characteristic advantages on low and high speed flows and the modified FICE has shown its efficiency and accuracy to compute the flows in the transonic region. A new algorithm is born from a combination of these two algorithms. This newly developed algorithm has general application in both time-accurate and steady state flows, and also was tested extensively for various flow conditions, such as turbulent flows, chemically reacting flows, and multiphase flows.

  13. Development of generalized pressure velocity coupling scheme for the analysis of compressible and incompressible combusting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Wu, S. T.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this investigation has been to develop an algorithm (or algorithms) for the improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of the computer fluid dynamics (CFD) models to study the fundamental physics of combustion chamber flows, which are necessary ultimately for the design of propulsion systems such as SSME and STME. During this three year study (May 19, 1978 - May 18, 1992), a unique algorithm was developed for all speed flows. This newly developed algorithm basically consists of two pressure-based algorithms (i.e. PISOC and MFICE). This PISOC is a non-iterative scheme and the FICE is an iterative scheme where PISOC has the characteristic advantages on low and high speed flows and the modified FICE has shown its efficiency and accuracy to compute the flows in the transonic region. A new algorithm is born from a combination of these two algorithms. This newly developed algorithm has general application in both time-accurate and steady state flows, and also was tested extensively for various flow conditions, such as turbulent flows, chemically reacting flows, and multiphase flows.

  14. On the nonlinear stability of the unsteady, viscous flow of an incompressible fluid in a curved pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortis, Trudi A.; Hall, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The stability of the flow of an incompressible, viscous fluid through a pipe of circular cross-section curved about a central axis is investigated in a weakly nonlinear regime. A sinusoidal pressure gradient with zero mean is imposed, acting along the pipe. A WKBJ perturbation solution is constructed, taking into account the need for an inner solution in the vicinity of the outer bend, which is obtained by identifying the saddle point of the Taylor number in the complex plane of the cross-sectional angle co-ordinate. The equation governing the nonlinear evolution of the leading order vortex amplitude is thus determined. The stability analysis of this flow to periodic disturbances leads to a partial differential system dependent on three variables, and since the differential operators in this system are periodic in time, Floquet theory may be applied to reduce this system to a coupled infinite system of ordinary differential equations, together with homogeneous uncoupled boundary conditions. The eigenvalues of this system are calculated numerically to predict a critical Taylor number consistent with the analysis of Papageorgiou. A discussion of how nonlinear effects alter the linear stability analysis is also given, and the nature of the instability determined.

  15. An unstructured mesh arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian unsteady incompressible flow solver and its application to insect flight aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohui; Cao, Yuanwei; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an unstructured mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) incompressible flow solver is developed to investigate the aerodynamics of insect hovering flight. The proposed finite-volume ALE Navier-Stokes solver is based on the artificial compressibility method (ACM) with a high-resolution method of characteristics-based scheme on unstructured grids. The present ALE model is validated and assessed through flow passing over an oscillating cylinder. Good agreements with experimental results and other numerical solutions are obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and the capability of the present model. The lift generation mechanisms of 2D wing in hovering motion, including wake capture, delayed stall, rapid pitch, as well as clap and fling are then studied and illustrated using the current ALE model. Moreover, the optimized angular amplitude in symmetry model, 45°, is firstly reported in details using averaged lift and the energy power method. Besides, the lift generation of complete cyclic clap and fling motion, which is simulated by few researchers using the ALE method due to large deformation, is studied and clarified for the first time. The present ALE model is found to be a useful tool to investigate lift force generation mechanism for insect wing flight.

  16. The Krylov accelerated SIMPLE(R) method for flow problems in industrial furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuik, C.; Saghir, A.; Boerstoel, G. P.

    2000-08-01

    Numerical modeling of the melting and combustion process is an important tool in gaining understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena that occur in a gas- or oil-fired glass-melting furnace. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the gas flow in the furnace. The discrete Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the SIMPLE(R) pressure-correction method. In these applications, many SIMPLE(R) iterations are necessary to obtain an accurate solution. In this paper, Krylov accelerated versions are proposed: GCR-SIMPLE(R). The properties of these methods are investigated for a simple two-dimensional flow. Thereafter, the efficiencies of the methods are compared for three-dimensional flows in industrial glass-melting furnaces. Copyright

  17. A parallelized multidomain compact solver for incompressible turbulent flows in cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguic, Romain; Viazzo, Stéphane; Poncet, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    We present an efficient parallelized multidomain algorithm for solving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical geometries. The numerical method is based on fourth-order compact schemes in the two non-homogeneous directions and Fourier series expansion in the azimuthal direction. The temporal scheme is a second-order semi-implicit projection scheme leading to the solution of five Helmholtz/Poisson equations. To handle the singularity appearing at the axis in cylindrical coordinates, while being able to have a thinner or conversely a coarser mesh in this zone, parity conditions are imposed at r = 0 for each flow variable and azimuthal Fourier mode. To simulate flows in irregularly shaped cylindrical geometries and benefit from a hybrid OpenMP/MPI parallelization, an accurate perfectly free-divergence multidomain method based on the influence matrix technique is proposed. First, the accuracy of the present solver is checked by comparison with analytical solutions and the scalability is then evaluated. Simulations using the present code are then compared to reliable experimental and numerical results of the literature showing good quantitative agreements in the cases of the axisymmetric and 3D unsteady vortex breakdowns in a cylinder and turbulent pipe flow. Finally to show the capability of the algorithm to deal with more complex flows relevant of turbomachineries, the turbulent flow inside a simplified stage of High-Pressure compressor is considered.

  18. A method to calculate finite-time Lyapunov exponents for inertial particles in incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaboa-Paz, D.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to improve the calculus of finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) applied to describe the transport of inertial particles in a fluid flow. To this aim, the deformation tensor is modified to take into account that the stretching rate between particles separated by a certain distance is influenced by the initial velocity of the particles. Thus, the inertial FTLEs (iFTLEs) are defined in terms of the maximum stretching between infinitesimally close trajectories that have different initial velocities. The advantages of this improvement, if compared to the standard method (Shadden et al., 2005), are discussed for the double-gyre flow and the meandering jet flow. The new method allows one to identify the initial velocity that inertial particles must have in order to maximize their dispersion.

  19. An Assessment of Artificial Compressibility and Pressure Projection Methods for Incompressible Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, C.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Performance of the two commonly used numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are compared. These formulations are selected primarily because they are designed for three-dimensional applications. The computational procedures are compared by obtaining steady state solutions of a wake vortex and unsteady solutions of a curved duct flow. For steady computations, artificial compressibility was very efficient in terms of computing time and robustness. For an unsteady flow which requires small physical time step, pressure projection method was found to be computationally more efficient than an artificial compressibility method. This comparison is intended to give some basis for selecting a method or a flow solution code for large three-dimensional applications where computing resources become a critical issue.

  20. On the far-field stream function condition for two-dimensional incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, Jong-Youb; Chang, Keun-Shik

    1990-01-01

    The present demonstration of the usefulness of the integral series expansion of the stream function as a far-field computational boundary condition shows the method to require only a 10-percent/time-step increase in computational effort over alternative boundary conditions, in the case of implementation of unsteady problems using a direct elliptic solver. So long as the vorticity was encompassed within the computational domain, the method proved sufficiently accurate to yield virtually identical results for two widely different domains. While the integral-series condition yielded the best results for periodic flow, the Neumann condition gave comparable accuracy with less computation time for the steady-flow case despite its inability to treat periodic flow with vortex shedding.

  1. A spectral element method for the simulation of unsteady incompressible flows with heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karniadakis, George E.; Patera, Anthony T.

    1986-01-01

    The spectral element method is a high-order finite element technique for solution of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations. In the isoparametric spectral element discretization, the domain is broken up into general brick elements, and the dependent and independent variables represented as high-order tensor-product Lagrangian interpolants through Chebyshev collocation points. The nonlinear and convective terms in the governing equations are treated with explicit collocation, while the pressure and diffusive contributions are handled implicitly using variational projection operators. The method is applied to flow past a cylinder, flow in grooved channels, and natural convection in an enclosure.

  2. Contribution to the study of three-dimensional separation in turbulent incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanetz, Bruno

    1990-01-01

    An ellipsoid cylinder of revolution model consisting of half an ellipsoid with a cylindrical extension is considered. Pressure measurements at the wall made it possible to obtain a precise description of wall flow for a wide range of velocities (from 10 to 90 m/s) and angles of attack (from 0 to 40 deg). Oil-streak patterns were used for visualization of separation and transition lines. A discussion on the topology of flow patterns based on the experimental data and the work of Legendre is given. An oblate ellipsoid cylinder model whose front section is half an oblate ellipsoid and whose rear section is a cylindrical extension is considered. The surrounding flow for fixed velocity (50 m/s) and angle of attack (30 deg), was investigated with a 5-hole pressure probe and a three-direction laser Doppler velocimeter. Detailed information about the mean and turbulent values of the external field on the upper surface in the region where vortex structures originate and develop is derived. Pressure, velocity and vorticity fields reveal the vortex structure. The analysis based on mean values is completed by a detailed examination of results on turbulent flow.

  3. Three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solvers for incompressible flows past arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, G. B.; Piquet, J.; Queutey, P.; Visonneau, M.

    1991-05-01

    The computation of the three-dimensional viscous flow past several geometries is investigated. An iterative technique resting on the fully elliptic mode is applied to the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations written in a nonorthogonal curvilinear body-fitted coordinate system. Results of the computation are compared with available experiments.

  4. Ideal and incompressible fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneill, M. E.; Chorlton, F.

    An introductory treatment of fluid mechanics theory, emphasizing mathematical methods and techniques, is given. Basic mathematical techniques of flow analysis are outlined in connection with viscous and inviscid flows, compressible and incompressible flows, and ideal flows. Among the specific flow problems addressed are: the kinematics of fluids in motion; equations of motion in boundary layer flows; and the stream functions for two-dimensional flows. Methods for analyzing wave motion in rectangular and cylindrical tanks are also described.

  5. A coupled Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows through moving porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepona, Marianna; Favier, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose a numerical framework to simulate fluid flows in interaction with moving porous media of complex geometry. It is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method including porous effects via a Brinkman-Forchheimer-Darcy force model coupled to the Immersed Boundary method to handle complex geometries and moving structures. The coupling algorithm is described in detail and it is validated on well-established literature test cases for both stationary and moving porous configurations. The proposed method is easy to implement and efficient in terms of CPU cost and memory management compared to alternative methods which can be used to deal with moving immersed porous media, e.g. re-meshing at each time step or use of a moving/chimera mesh. An overall good agreement was obtained with reference results, opening the way to the numerical simulation of moving porous media for flow control applications.

  6. Numerical investigation of incompressible fluid flow and heat transfer around a rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouakkaz, R.; Talbi, K.; Khelil, Y.; Salhi, F.; Belghar, N.; Ouazizi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The heat transfer and air flow around an unconfined heated rotating circular cylinder is investigated numerically for varying rotation rates ( α = 0-6) in the Reynolds number range of 20-200. The numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based commercial computational fluid dynamics solver FLUENT. The successive changes in the flow pattern are studied as a function of the rotation rate. Suppression of vortex shedding occurs as the rotation rate increases ( α > 2). A second kind of instability appears for higher rotation speed where a series of counter-clockwise vortices is shed in the upper shear layer. The rotation attenuates the secondary instability and increases the critical Reynolds number for the appearance of this instability. Besides, time-averaged (lift and drag coefficients and Nusselt number) results are obtained and compared with the literature data. A good agreement has been obtained for both the local and averaged values.

  7. Improved turbulence models based on large eddy simulation of homogeneous, incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardino, J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    The physical bases of large eddy simulation and subgrid modeling are studied. A subgrid scale similarity model is developed that can account for system rotation. Large eddy simulations of homogeneous shear flows with system rotation were carried out. Apparently contradictory experimental results were explained. The main effect of rotation is to increase the transverse length scales in the rotation direction, and thereby decrease the rates of dissipation. Experimental results are shown to be affected by conditions at the turbulence producing grid, which make the initial states a function of the rotation rate. A two equation model is proposed that accounts for effects of rotation and shows good agreement with experimental results. In addition, a Reynolds stress model is developed that represents the turbulence structure of homogeneous shear flows very well and can account also for the effects of system rotation.

  8. Contribution to the study of vortex flow in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Philippe

    Vortices can have large effects on the performance of aircraft flying at high angles of attack and missiles equipped with highly swept control surfaces. A theoretical study was conducted to develop a calculation method for predicting vortex flows. Different models used to determine how the vortex approaches breakdown were compared. These methods are based on the assumption of axisymmetry and on a conventional statistical treatment of the turbulence using closure in one point. The computations and experimental results were compared. An experimental study was conducted in a wind tunnel to qualify the influence of turbulence in the development of an unburst vortex. An arrangement producing a wing tip vortex was used. The internal structure of the vortex exhibited a velocity maximum in its center which decreased longitudinally. The external velocity field is represented by a potential vortex. The existence of lateral flow movements induced low frequency fluctuations which are superimposed on the turbulence.

  9. Comments on the present state of second-order closure models for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order closure models account for history and nonlocal effects of the mean velocity gradients on the Reynolds stress tensor. Turbulent flows involving body forces or curvature, Reynolds stress relaxational effects, and counter-gradient transport are usually better described. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: (1) the Reynolds stress transport equation; (2) issues in second-order closure modeling; and (3) near wall models.

  10. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Solvers in Primative Variables and their Applications to Steady and Unsteady Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress made in incompressible Navier-Stokes simulation procedures and their application to problems of engineering interest. Discussions are focused on the methods designed for complex geometry applications in three dimensions, and thus are limited to primitive variable formulation. A summary of efforts in flow solver development is given followed by numerical studies of a few example problems of current interest. Both steady and unsteady solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Solvers discussed here are based on a structured-grid approach using either a finite -difference or a finite-volume frame work. As a grand-challenge application of these solvers, an unsteady turbopump flow simulation procedure has been developed which utilizes high performance computing platforms. In the paper, the progress toward the complete simulation capability of the turbo-pump for a liquid rocket engine is reported. The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for evaluation of two parallel computing algorithms that have been implemented in the INS3D code. The relative motion of the grid systems for the rotorstator interaction was obtained using overact grid techniques. Unsteady computations for the SSME turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.5 million grid points, are carried out on SCSI Origin 3000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) that is based on an axial blood pump. Computational, and clinical analysis of this device are presented.

  11. An investigation of Newton-Krylov algorithms for solving incompressible and low Mach number compressible fluid flow and heat transfer problems using finite volume discretization

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    Fully coupled, Newton-Krylov algorithms are investigated for solving strongly coupled, nonlinear systems of partial differential equations arising in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Primitive variable forms of the steady incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations that describe the flow of a laminar Newtonian fluid in two-dimensions are specifically considered. Numerical solutions are obtained by first integrating over discrete finite volumes that compose the computational mesh. The resulting system of nonlinear algebraic equations are linearized using Newton`s method. Preconditioned Krylov subspace based iterative algorithms then solve these linear systems on each Newton iteration. Selected Krylov algorithms include the Arnoldi-based Generalized Minimal RESidual (GMRES) algorithm, and the Lanczos-based Conjugate Gradients Squared (CGS), Bi-CGSTAB, and Transpose-Free Quasi-Minimal Residual (TFQMR) algorithms. Both Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization and domain-based additive and multiplicative Schwarz preconditioning strategies are studied. Numerical techniques such as mesh sequencing, adaptive damping, pseudo-transient relaxation, and parameter continuation are used to improve the solution efficiency, while algorithm implementation is simplified using a numerical Jacobian evaluation. The capabilities of standard Newton-Krylov algorithms are demonstrated via solutions to both incompressible and compressible flow problems. Incompressible flow problems include natural convection in an enclosed cavity, and mixed/forced convection past a backward facing step.

  12. Assessment of stretched vortex subgrid-scale models for LES of incompressible inhomogeneous turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Dinesh A; Frankel, Steven H

    2013-09-20

    The physical space version of the stretched vortex subgrid scale model [Phys. Fluids 12, 1810 (2000)] is tested in large eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent lid driven cubic cavity flow. LES is carried out using a higher order finite-difference method [J. Comput. Phys. 229, 8802 (2010)]. The effects of different vortex orientation models and subgrid turbulence spectrums are assessed through comparisons of the LES predictions against direct numerical simulations (DNS) [Phys. Fluids 12, 1363 (2000)]. Three Reynolds numbers 12000, 18000, and 22000 are studied. Good agreement with the DNS data for the mean and fluctuating quantities is observed. PMID:24187423

  13. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  14. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  15. Acceleration feature points of unsteady shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Jens; Reininghaus, Jan; Hotz, Ingrid; Hege, Hans-Christian; Noack, Bernd R.; Daviller, Guillaume; Comte, Pierre; Morzyúski, Marek

    2012-11-01

    We generalize velocity topology with centers (vortices) and saddle points in a Galilean-invariant manner. In particular, a computationally robust (derivative-free) framework for their extraction of two-dimensional unsteady flows is presented. The key enabler is the definition of feature points based on the acceleration magnitude. The extracted feature points are tracked over time resulting in corresponding trajectories. Using homological persistence and lifetime of features, a spatiotemporal importance measure for vortex core lines is introduced that enables a hierarchical filtering. As example, homological persistence is shown to discriminate between hydrodynamic and aeroacoustic flow structures. Our framework is applied to analytic examples as well as simulations of a cylinder wake, of a two-dimensional mixing layer and of a jet. Partially supported by the ANR Chair of Excellence TUCOROM and the German Research Foundation.

  16. The momentum transfer of incompressible turbulent separated flow due to cavities with steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. E.; Norton, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted using a plate test bed having a turbulent boundary layer to determine the momentum transfer to the faces of step/cavity combinations on the plate. Experimental data were obtained from configurations including an isolated configuration and an array of blocks in tile patterns. A momentum transfer correlation model of pressure forces on an isolated step/cavity was developed with experimental results to relate flow and geometry parameters. Results of the experiments reveal that isolated step/cavity excrecences do not have a unique and unifying parameter group due in part to cavity depth effects and in part to width parameter scale effects. Drag predictions for tile patterns by a kinetic pressure empirical method predict experimental results well. Trends were not, however, predicted by a method of variable roughness density phenomenology.

  17. Boundary Asymptotic Analysis for an Incompressible Viscous Flow: Navier Wall Laws

    SciTech Connect

    El Jarroudi, M.; Brillard, A.

    2008-06-15

    We consider a new way of establishing Navier wall laws. Considering a bounded domain {omega} of R{sup N}, N=2,3, surrounded by a thin layer {sigma}{sub {epsilon}}, along a part {gamma}{sub 2} of its boundary {partial_derivative}{omega}, we consider a Navier-Stokes flow in {omega} union {partial_derivative}{omega} union {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} with Reynolds' number of order 1/{epsilon} in {sigma}{sub {epsilon}}. Using {gamma}-convergence arguments, we describe the asymptotic behaviour of the solution of this problem and get a general Navier law involving a matrix of Borel measures having the same support contained in the interface {gamma}{sub 2}. We then consider two special cases where we characterize this matrix of measures. As a further application, we consider an optimal control problem within this context.

  18. Acceleration and Focusing of Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Martin E.

    The acceleration of flowing plasmas is a fundamental problem that is useful in a wide variety of technological applications. We consider the problem from the perspective of plasma propulsion. Gridded ion thrusters and Hall thrusters are the most commonly used devices to create flowing plasma for space propulsion, but both suffer from fundamental limitations. Gridded ion sources create good quality beams in terms of energy spread and spatial divergence, but the Child-Langmuir law in the non-neutral acceleration region limits the maximum achievable current density. Hall thrusters avoid this limitation by accelerating ions in quasi-neutral plasma but, as a result, produce plumes with high spatial divergence and large energy spread. In addition the more complicated magnetized plasma in the Hall Thruster produces oscillations that can reduce the efficiency of the thruster by increasing electron transport to the anode. We present investigations of three techniques to address the fundamental limitations on the performance of each thruster. First, we propose a method to increase the time-averaged current density (and thus thrust density) produced by a gridded ion source above the Child-Langmuir limit by introducing time-varying boundary conditions. Next, we use an electrostatic plasma lens to focus the Hall thruster plume, and finally we develop a technique to suppress a prominent oscillation that degrades the performance of Hall thrusters. The technique to loosen the constraints on current density from gridded ion thrusters actually applies much more broadly to any space charge limited flow. We investigate the technique with a numerical simulation and by proving a theoretical upper bound. While we ultimately conclude that the approach is not suitable for space propulsion, our results proved useful in another area, providing a benchmark for research into the spontaneously time-dependent current that arises in microdiodes. Next, we experimentally demonstrate a novel

  19. Hot-wire calibration in a nonisothermal incompressible pressure variant flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Eaton, Frank D.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; McCrae, Kimberley A.

    1999-08-01

    The calibration procedure for a hot-wire anemometer system operating in a non-isothermal pressure-variant flow field is presented. Sensing of atmospheric velocity and temperature fluctuations from an altitude-variant platform using hot- wire anemometry equipment operating in both constant- temperature and constant-current modes requires calibration for velocity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure variations. Calibration tests to provide the range of velocity, temperature and pressure variations anticipated during Air Force Research Lab, Directed Energy Directorate- sponsored kite/tethered-balloon experiments were conducted and the result of these tests presented. The calibration tests were performed by placing the kite/tethered-balloon sensor package on a vehicle and driving from Kirtland AFB, NM to the top of Sandia Crest, a 10678 ft mountain range to the east of Albuquerque, NM. By varying the velocity of the van and conducting the test at different times of the day, variations in velocity, temperature and pressure within the range of those encountered during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments were obtained. The method of collapsing the calibration data is presented. Problems associated with collecting hot-wire anemometry data in a non-laboratory environment are discussed. Example data sets of temperature and velocity collected during the kite/tethered-balloon experiments are presented.

  20. Incompressible Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    1992-02-13

    NACHOS2 is a finite element program designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, incompressible viscous fluid flow problems. The basic flows considered may be isothermal, nonisothermal, or may involve other physical processes, such as mass transport. Both steady and transient flows may be analyzed. The class of problems treated are those described by the two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) incompressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations. An energy transport equation is included in the formulation for problems inmore » which heat transfer effects are important. Two auxiliary transport equations can be added to describe other physical processes,e.g. mass transfer, chemical reactions. Among the specific types of flow problems treated are: isothermal flow; forced, free, or mixed convection; conjugate heat transfer; flow in saturated porous media with or without heat transfer; and inelastic, non-Newtonian flows with or without heat transfer. Other problem classes are possible depending on the specific definitions applied to the auxiliary transport equations.« less

  1. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  2. Behaviour of a rimmed elliptical inclusion in 2D slow incompressible viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    The shape preferred orientation of natural populations of inclusions (or "porphyroclasts") is often inconsistent with predictions from established analytical theory for inclusions with coherent boundaries (e.g., Pennacchioni et al. 2001). A totally incoherent or slipping interface can explain observed stable back-rotated (or antithetic) orientations but not the observed cut-off axial ratio, below which inclusions still rotate. However, this behaviour is reproduced by a rimmed inclusion with a rim viscosity that is not infinitely weak but still weaker than the matrix (e.g., Schmid and Podladchikov 2005; Johnson et al. 2009). In this study, finite-element numerical modelling (FEM) is employed to investigate this system in 2D over a very wide parameter space, from a viscosity ratio (relative to the matrix) of the inclusion from 106 to 1, the rim from 10-6 to 1, the axial ratio from 1.00025 to 20, and the rim thickness from 5% to 20%. Theoretical consideration of a concentric elliptical inclusion and ellipse reduces the number of scalar values to be determined to fully characterize the system to two: one for the rate of stretch of the inclusion and one for the rate of rotation. From these two values, the rotation and stretching rate can be calculated for any orientation and 2D background flow field. For effectively rigid particles, the cut-off axial ratio between rotation and stabilization is determined by the remaining two parameters, namely the rim viscosity and the thickness, with low rim viscosity or thick rims promoting stabilization. The shape fabric of a population of particles in a high strain shear zone, presented as a typical Rf/φ plot, can be forward modelled using an initial value Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) approach. Because the rim does not remain elliptical to high strain, this method cannot accurately model the behaviour of individual inclusions. However, a statistical approach, allowing variation in rim viscosity, which is also a proxy for

  3. Mass transfer effects on an unsteady MHD free convective flow of an incompressible viscous dissipative fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar Reddy, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical solution of mass transfer effects on an unsteady free convection flow of an incompressible electrically conducting viscous dissipative fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate under the influence of a uniform magnetic field considered normal to the plate has been obtained. The non-dimensional governing equations for this investigation are solved numerically by using the Ritz finite element method. The effects of flow parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration fields are presented through the graphs and numerical data for the skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented in tables and then discussed.

  4. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions. PMID:26986440

  5. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions.

  6. Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional fully dynamic parallel particle-based model for direct pore-level simulation of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model was developed from scratch and is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution microtomography images of naturally occurring or man-made porous systems. It reads the images as input where the position of the solid walls are given. The entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is then discretized using particles. The model is based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) technique. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. It takes into account viscous pressure drop in addition to the gravity forces. It conserves mass and can automatically detect any false connectivity with fluid particles in the neighboring pores and throats. It includes a sophisticated algorithm to automatically split and merge particles to maintain hydraulic connectivity of extremely narrow conduits. Furthermore, it uses novel methods to handle particle inconsistencies and open boundaries. To handle the computational load, we present a fully parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters and exhibits excellent scalability. The model is used to simulate unsteady-state flow problems under different conditions starting from straight noncircular capillary tubes with different cross-sectional shapes, i.e., circular/elliptical, square/rectangular and triangular cross-sections. We compare the predicted dimensionless hydraulic conductances with the data available in the literature and observe an excellent agreement. We then test the scalability of our parallel model with two samples of an artificial sandstone, samples A and B, with different volumes and different distributions (non-uniform and uniform) of solid particles among the processors. An excellent linear scalability is

  7. Accelerated unsteady flow line integral convolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanping; Moorhead, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    Unsteady flow line integral convolution (UFLIC) is a texture synthesis technique for visualizing unsteady flows with high temporal-spatial coherence. Unfortunately, UFLIC requires considerable time to generate each frame due to the huge amount of pathline integration that is computed for particle value scattering. This paper presents Accelerated UFLIC (AUFLIC) for near interactive (1 frame/second) visualization with 160,000 particles per frame. AUFLIC reuses pathlines in the value scattering process to reduce computationally expensive pathline integration. A flow-driven seeding strategy is employed to distribute seeds such that only a few of them need pathline integration while most seeds are placed along the pathlines advected at earlier times by other seeds upstream and, therefore, the known pathlines can be reused for fast value scattering. To maintain a dense scattering coverage to convey high temporal-spatial coherence while keeping the expense of pathline integration low, a dynamic seeding controller is designed to decide whether to advect, copy, or reuse a pathline. At a negligible memory cost, AUFLIC is 9 times faster than UFLIC with comparable image quality. PMID:15747635

  8. Acceleration efficiency in line-driven flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the physics of flow driving by line scattering of a continuum radiation source to determine the degree to which such line scattering can heat as well as accelerate the flow. Within the framework of the Sobolev theory for line transfer, we argue that the finite thermal width of the line scattering profile can lead to a significant 'Doppler heating' via photon frequency redistribution within a Sobolev resonance layer. Quantitative computation of this heating shows, however, that it is largely canceled by a corresponding cooling by the diffuse radiation. The resulting reduction in net Doppler heating or cooling means that the overall effect is only of limited importance in the energy balance of line-driven stellar winds. Through simple scaling relations, we compare the effect to other competing heating or cooling terms, including the ion-drag frictional heating recently discussed by Springmann and Pauldrach. We also provide a physical explanation of the unexpected cooling effect, and comment that its near cancellation of the anticipated heating provides another example of the tendency for ideal Sobolev theory to apply to a higher order than expected.

  9. Centrifugal acceleration modes for incompressible fluid in the leakage annulus between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for calculating complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the fluid resonances and is used to analyze the perturbed flow in the leakage path between a shrouded-pump impeller and its housing. The eigenvalues obtained are consistent with the forced-response curves. First- and second-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to lateral excitations, and first-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to axial excitation.

  10. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  11. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  12. Nonlinear Krylov acceleration of reacting flow codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, R.; Smith, P.; Pernice, M.

    1996-12-31

    We are working on computational simulations of three-dimensional reactive flows in applications encompassing a broad range of chemical engineering problems. Examples of such processes are coal (pulverized and fluidized bed) and gas combustion, petroleum processing (cracking), and metallurgical operations such as smelting. These simulations involve an interplay of various physical and chemical factors such as fluid dynamics with turbulence, convective and radiative heat transfer, multiphase effects such as fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions, and chemical reaction. The governing equations resulting from modeling these processes are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled, thereby rendering their solution by traditional iterative methods (such as nonlinear line Gauss-Seidel methods) very difficult and sometimes impossible. Hence we are exploring the use of nonlinear Krylov techniques (such as CMRES and Bi-CGSTAB) to accelerate and stabilize the existing solver. This strategy allows us to take advantage of the problem-definition capabilities of the existing solver. The overall approach amounts to using the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) method and its variants as nonlinear preconditioners for the nonlinear Krylov method. We have also adapted a backtracking approach for inexact Newton methods to damp the Newton step in the nonlinear Krylov method. This will be a report on work in progress. Preliminary results with nonlinear GMRES have been very encouraging: in many cases the number of line Gauss-Seidel sweeps has been reduced by about a factor of 5, and increased robustness of the underlying solver has also been observed.

  13. A new incompressible Navier-Stokes method with general hybrid meshes and its application to flow/structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hyung Taek

    2005-12-01

    A new incompressible Navier-Stokes method is developed for unstructured general hybrid meshes which contain all four types of elements in a single computational domain, namely tetrahedra, pyramids, prisms, and hexahedra. Various types of general hybrid meshes are utilized and appropriate numerical flux computation schemes are presented. The artificial compressibility method with a dual time-stepping scheme is used for the time-accurate solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is also presented in the dual time-stepping form and is solved in a strongly coupled manner with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The developed scheme is applied to the study of the inflow turbulence effect on the hydrodynamic forces exerted on a circular cylinder. In order to accommodate possible structural and mesh motion, the method is extended to the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference. The geometric conservation law is satisfied with the proposed ALE scheme in moving mesh simulations. The developed ALE scheme is applied to the vortex induced vibration of a cylinder. A strong coupling of fluid and structure interaction based on the predictor-corrector method is presented. The superior stability property of the strong coupling is demonstrated by a comparison with the weak coupling. Finally, the developed methods are parallelized for distributed memory machines using partitioned general hybrid meshes and an efficient parallel communication scheme to minimize CPU time.

  14. Numerical simulations of reactive flows in ram accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Landsberg, A. M.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E. S.; Boris, J. P.

    1992-10-01

    Reactive flows around accelerating projectiles in ram accelerators are numerically simulated using a newly developed code for time-dependent flows in noninertial frames. Two different modes of operations, the thermally choked mode and the superdetonative mode have been investigated. The simulations show that, in both modes, a significant acceleration (up to 10(exp 5) g) can be achieved with projectiles of different shapes in various hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures. However, the flow field is highly transient and the thrust on the projectile is unsteady. In the thermally choked mode, the unsteadiness is caused by the rapid acceleration of the projectile and large-scale, vortical flow structures generated in or near the recirculation region behind the projectile. In the superdetonative mode, the unsteadiness is mainly caused by the accelerating projectile.

  15. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  16. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  17. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  18. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, A.; Cantwell, C. D.; Moxey, D.; Serson, D.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  19. Simulation of the flow field of a ram accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetrisno, Moeljo; Imlay, Scott T.

    1991-06-01

    An effort is made to achieve a more complete numerical model than heretofore available for analysis and performance prediction regarding ram-accelerator projectiles, using the finite-rate chemistry code HANA. Results are presented from such analyses of a ram accelerator projectile operating in both the thermally-choked mode and the transdetonative mode. The flow field about the projectile, the complex oblique shock system, and the flow properties in the combusting region are detailed. The code uses a novel diagonal implicit solution algorithm which eliminates the expense of inverting the large block matrices arising in chemically reacting flows.

  20. EXAMINATION OF THE PCICE METHOD IN THE NEARLY INCOMPRESSIBLE, AS WELL AS STRICTLY INCOMPRESSIBLE, LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry; Richard C. Martineau

    2007-04-01

    The conservative-form, pressure-based PCICE numerical method (Martineau and Berry, 2004) (Berry, 2006), recently developed for computing transient fluid flows of all speeds from very low to very high (with strong shocks), is simplified and generalized. Though the method automatically treats a continuous transition of compressibility, three distinct, limiting compressibility regimes are formally defined for purposes of discussion and comparison with traditional methods – the strictly incompressible limit, the nearly incompressible limit, and the f ully compressible limit. The PCICE method’s behavior is examined in each limiting regime. In the strictly incompressible limit the PCICE algorithm reduces to the traditional MAC-type method with velocity divergence driving the pressure Poisson equation. In the nearly incompressible limit the PCICE algorithm is found to reduce to a generalization of traditional incompressible methods, i.e. to one in which not only the velocity divergence effect, but also the density gradient effect is included as a driving function in the pressure Poisson equation. This nearly incompressible regime has received little attention, and it appears that in the past, strictly incompressible methods may have been conveniently applied to flows in this regime at the expense of ignoring a potentially important coupling mechanism. This could be significant in many important flows; for example, in natural convection flows resulting from high heat flux. In the f ully compressible limit or regime, the algorithm is found to reduce to an expression equivalent to density-based methods for high-speed flow.

  1. A consistent and conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part III: On a staggered mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ming-Jiu; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The consistent and conservative scheme developed on a rectangular collocated mesh [M.-J. Ni, R. Munipalli, N.B. Morley, P. Huang, M.A. Abdou, A current density conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part I: on a rectangular collocated grid system, Journal of Computational Physics 227 (2007) 174-204] and on an arbitrary collocated mesh [M.-J. Ni, R. Munipalli, P. Huang, N.B. Morley, M.A. Abdou, A current density conservative scheme for incompressible MHD flows at a low magnetic Reynolds number. Part II: on an arbitrary collocated mesh, Journal of Computational Physics 227 (2007) 205-228] has been extended and specially designed for calculation of the Lorentz force on a staggered grid system (Part III) by solving the electrical potential equation for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) at a low magnetic Reynolds number. In a staggered mesh, pressure ( p) and electrical potential ( φ) are located in the cell center, while velocities and current fluxes are located on the cell faces of a main control volume. The scheme numerically meets the physical conservation laws, charge conservation law and momentum conservation law. Physically, the Lorentz force conserves the momentum when the magnetic field is constant or spatial coordinate independent. The calculation of current density fluxes on cell faces is conducted using a scheme consistent with the discretization for solution of the electrical potential Poisson equation, which can ensure the calculated current density conserves the charge. A divergence formula of the Lorentz force is used to calculate the Lorentz force at the cell center of a main control volume, which can numerically conserve the momentum at constant or spatial coordinate independent magnetic field. The calculated cell-center Lorentz forces are then interpolated to the cell faces, which are used to obtain the corresponding velocity fluxes by solving the momentum equations. The "conservative" is an important property of

  2. A Fully Conservative and Entropy Preserving Cut-Cell Method for Incompressible Viscous Flows on Staggered Cartesian Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Bay, Yong Yi

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of complex geometries in Computational Fluid Dynamics applications is a challenging endeavor, which immersed boundary and cut-cell techniques can significantly simplify by alleviating the meshing process required by body-fitted meshes. These methods also introduce new challenges, in that the formulation of accurate and well-posed discrete operators is not trivial. A cut-cell method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is proposed for staggered Cartesian grids. In both scalar and vector cases, the emphasis is set on the structure of the discrete operators, designed to mimic the properties of the continuous ones while retaining a nearest-neighbor stencil. For convective transport, different forms are proposed (divergence, advective and skew-symmetric), and shown to be equivalent when the discrete continuity equation is satisfied. This ensures mass, momentum and kinetic energy conservation. For diffusive transport, conservative and symmetric operators are proposed for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Symmetry ensures the existence of a sink term (viscous dissipation) in the discrete kinetic energy budget, which is beneficial for stability. The accuracy of method is finally assessed in standard test cases.

  3. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  4. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002)]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number. PMID:26565362

  5. Breakup of Droplets in an Accelerating Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. A.; Coultas, T. A.

    1966-01-01

    A study of droplet breakup phenomena by an accelerating gas flow is described. The phenomena are similar to what propellant droplets experience when exposed to accelerating combustion gas flow in a rocket engine combustion zone. Groups of several dozen droplets in the 100-10 750-micron-diameter range were injected into a flowing inert gas in a transparent rectangular nozzle. Motion photography of the behavior of the droplets at various locations in the accelerating gas flow has supplied quantitative and qualitative data on the breakup phenomena which occur under conditions similar to those found in large rocket engine combustors. A blowgun injection device, used to inject very small amounts of liquid at velocities of several hundred feet per second into a moving gas stream, is described. The injection device was used to inject small amounts of liquid RP-1 and water into the gas stream at a velocity essentially equal to the gas velocity where the group of droplets was allowed to stabilize its formation in a constant area section before entering the convergent section of the transparent nozzle. Favorable comparison with the work of previous investigators who have used nonaccelerating gas flow is found with the data obtained from this study with accelerating gas flow. The criterion for the conditions of minimum severity required to produce shear-type droplet breakup in an accelerating gas flow is found to agree well with the criterion previously established at Rocketdyne for breakup in nonaccelerating flow. An extension of the theory of capillary surface wave effects during droplet breakup is also presented. Capillary surface waves propagating in the surface of the droplet, according to classical hydrodynamical laws, are considered. The waves propagate tangentially over the surface of the droplet from the forward stagnation point to the major diameter. Consideration of the effects of relative gas velocity on the amplitude growth of these waves allows conclusions to be

  6. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    DOEpatents

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  7. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  8. Changes in mesenteric, renal, and aortic flows with +Gx acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. L.; Erickson, H. H.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in man and dogs have indicated that the splanchnic bed might contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration. Eight mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented with Doppler flow probes around the superior mesenteric (SMA) and renal arteries (RA) as well as the terminal aorta (TA). A solid-state pressure transducer was placed in the aorta distal to the flow probe. Using alpha-chloralose anesthesia following a 2-4 week recovery period, the animals were subjected to 120 sec at levels of 5, 10 and 15 +Gx acceleration on a 7.6-m radius centrifuge. The results indicate that both an active component and a mechanical component contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration.

  9. First-Order Particle Acceleration in Magnetically-driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  10. Application of an Upwind High Resolution Finite-Differencing Scheme and Multigrid Method in Steady-State Incompressible Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Cheng I.; Guo, Yan-Hu; Liu, C.- H.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis and design of a submarine propulsor requires the ability to predict the characteristics of both laminar and turbulent flows to a higher degree of accuracy. This report presents results of certain benchmark computations based on an upwind, high-resolution, finite-differencing Navier-Stokes solver. The purpose of the computations is to evaluate the ability, the accuracy and the performance of the solver in the simulation of detailed features of viscous flows. Features of interest include flow separation and reattachment, surface pressure and skin friction distributions. Those features are particularly relevant to the propulsor analysis. Test cases with a wide range of Reynolds numbers are selected; therefore, the effects of the convective and the diffusive terms of the solver can be evaluated separately. Test cases include flows over bluff bodies, such as circular cylinders and spheres, at various low Reynolds numbers, flows over a flat plate with and without turbulence effects, and turbulent flows over axisymmetric bodies with and without propulsor effects. Finally, to enhance the iterative solution procedure, a full approximation scheme V-cycle multigrid method is implemented. Preliminary results indicate that the method significantly reduces the computational effort.

  11. Studies of pressure-velocity coupling schemes for analysis of incompressible and compressible flows. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory Wayne

    1987-01-01

    Two pressure-velocity coupling schemes, both of which solve the fully implicit discretized equations governing the flow of fluids were examined, and the capability of performing large Reynolds number, low Mach number compressible flow calculations were assessed. The semi-implicit iterative SIMPLE algorithm is extended to handle transient compressible flow calculations. This extension takes into account a strong coupling between the pressure and temperature through a correction procedure, based on the equations of state. Results obtained from the extended SIMPLE algorithm are then compared to similar results obtained from the non-iterative PISO algorithm. Both time-dependent and steady state calculations were performed using an axisymmetric 2:1 pipe expansion geometry and laminar flow conditions corresponding to Reynolds number of 1000 and Mach number of 2.0. For calculations simulating a time-dependent compression/expansion process, both schemes exhibit transient features in excellent agreement with each other, and moreover, the PISO method shows a significant computational time reduction of 60 percent over the SIMPLE scheme, regardless of the time step size or grid size employed. The effects of numerical diffusion are shown to be significant in these calculations. For steady state compressible flows, however, the SIMPLE algorithm displays increasing computational efficiency over the PISO method as the time step sizes employed to reach steady state conditions are decreased.

  12. A Diffuse Interface Method with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Simulation of Incompressible Multi-Phase Flows with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.; Ding, Hang

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse Interface (DI) methods are employed widely for the numerical simulation of two-phase flows, even with moving contact lines. In a DI method, the interface thickness should be as thin as possible to simulate spreading phenomena under realistic flow conditions, so a fine grid is required, beyond the reach of current methods that employ a uniform grid. Here we have integrated a DI method based on a uniform mesh, to a block-based adaptive mesh refinement method, so that only the regions near the interface are resolved by a fine mesh. The performance of the present method is tested by simulations including drop deformation in shear flow, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and drop spreading on a flat surface, et al. The results show that the present method can give accurate results with much smaller computational cost, compared to the original DI method based on a uniform mesh. Based on the present method, simulation of drop spreading is carried out with Cahn number of 0.001 and the contact line region is well resolved. The flow field near the contact line, the contact line speed as well as the apparent contact angle are investigated in detail and compared with previous analytical work.

  13. Splanchnic blood flow and plus or minus Gx acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. L.; Erickson, H.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data show that there is a neurogenic response to acceleration stress in the front to back direction and that this response is intensified during higher accelerative forces. The afferent limb of this response is unknown but possibilities are suggested. The integrated response at high acceleration levels might serve to conserve oxygen during the stress time. The effector limb is the constriction of less critical vascular beds to preserve blood flow to the heart and brain. The concomitant increase in vagal activity causes a slowing down of the heart.

  14. Dilution Jets in Accelerated Cross Flows. Degree awarded May 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, Abraham; Greber, Isaac; Riddlebaugh, Stephen M. (Technical Monitor)

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments were designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio, and the densimetric Froude number. When injection velocities are large or densities are small, the Froude number becomes very large and hence, unimportant. Therefore, the Froude number is generally significant in describing liquid experiments but is unimportant for the gas experiments in the combustor. Agreement between test and calculated results is encouraging but tends to become poorer with increasing momentum ratio. The temperature measurements are presented primarily in the form of consecutive normalized temperature profiles. Some interpolated isothermal contours are also shown. The single jet trajectories are consistently found to be swept towards the inner wall of the bend, whether injection is from the outer or the inner wall. This behavior is explained by a drifting effect which consists of a transverse velocity component across the combustor due to the developing nature of the flow along it. Plots of lateral temperature distributions of the jet indicate that under

  15. Fully coupled solution of the equations for incompressible recirculating flows using a penalty-function finite-difference formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, M. E.; Patankar, S. V.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes two new solution algorithms for steady recirculating flows that use a penalty formulation to eliminate the pressure from the finite difference form of the governing equations. One algorithm uses successive substitution to linearize the equations, while the other employs the Newton-Raphson linearization. In both cases, the equations are solved in a fully coupled manner using a sparse matrix form of LU decomposition. The D'Yakonov iteration is used to avoid unnecessary factorizations of the coefficient matrix, significantly improving the computational efficiency. The Newton-Raphson linearization leads to faster convergence, but the execution times of the two methods are comparable. The algorithms converge rapidly and are robust to changes in grid size and Reynolds number. In a number of laminar two-dimensional flows, the new methods proved to be two to ten times faster than some conventional iterative methods.

  16. SANDRAG: a computer code for predicting drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    A design method is presented for calculating the flow field and drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in compressible flow. The body pressure distribution, viscous shear stress, and boundary layer separation point are calculated by a combination of a potential flow method and boundary layer techniques. The potential solution is obtained by modeling the body with an axial distribution of source/sink elements whose strengths vary linearly along their length. Both the laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions use momentum integral techniques which have been modified to account for the effects of surface roughness. An existing technique for estimating the location of transition was also modified to include surface roughness. Empirical correlations are developed to estimate the base pressure coefficient on a wide variety of geometries. Body surface pressure distributions and drag predictions are compared with experimental data for artillery projectiles, conical, and flared bodies. Very good agreement between the present method and experiment is obtained. 30 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Recovery of subgrid-scale kinetic energy in large-eddy simulations of incompressible wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yifeng; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2009-11-01

    A method is presented for recovering the subgrid-scale kinetic energy in large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded flows. The formulation is based on extending the one-dimensional energy spectra obtained in LES using the filtered one-dimensional energy spectra derived from the theoretical formulations of Pao (1965) or Meyers and Meneveau (2008) for the three-dimensional energy spectrum in isotropic turbulence. To allow for application of these formulations to wall-bounded flows, the LES spectra are re-normalized into an isotropic space. Once the SGS kinetic energy is recovered, the individual components of turbulence intensities are computed using the formulation of Winckelmans et al. (2002). The entire procedure is applied as a post-processing step and can be combined with any SGS model. In tests performed using filtered DNS databases of turbulent channel flow at a Reτ 570, the method recovered the SGS kinetic energy with errors of less than 10% and the total kinetic energy with errors of less than 1%. In application to LES data obtained using the Dynamic Smagorinsky Model, the individual components of turbulence intensities were recovered with an accuracy comparable to that with which the filtered statistics were predicted in LES.

  18. Second-Law Analysis of the Peristaltic Flow of an Incompressible Viscous Fluid in a Curved Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narla, V. K.; Prasad, K. M.; Ramana Murthy, J. V.

    2016-03-01

    The present investigation extends a consideration of peristaltic flow in curved channels through the second-law analysis. The lubrication approximation is employed to linearize the momentum, energy, and entropy generation rate equations. The stream function and temperature distribution are used to calculate the entropy generation number and the Bejan number. It is shown that the entropy generation rate in a peristaltic pump increases with the occlusion parameter. The entropy generation increases at the upper wall and decreases near the lower wall of the peristaltic channel as the curvature parameter increases. A curved surface acts as a strong source of entropy generation.

  19. Numerical simulations of the superdetonative ram accelerator combusting flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soetrisno, Moeljo; Imlay, Scott T.; Roberts, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of projectile canting and fins on the ram accelerator combusting flowfield and the possible cause of the ram accelerator unstart are investigated by performing axisymmetric, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional calculations. Calculations are performed using the INCA code for solving Navier-Stokes equations and a guasi-global combustion model of Westbrook and Dryer (1981, 1984), which includes N2 and nine reacting species (CH4, CO, CO2, H2, H, O2, O, OH, and H2O), which are allowed to undergo a 12-step reaction. It is found that, without canting, interactions between the fins, boundary layers, and combustion fronts are insufficient to unstart the projectile at superdetonative velocities. With canting, the projectile will unstart at flow conditions where it appears to accelerate without canting. Unstart occurs at some critical canting angle. It is also found that three-dimensionality plays an important role in the overall combustion process.

  20. The influence of free-stream turbulence on separation of turbulent boundary layers in incompressible, two-dimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Barnett, R. Joel; Fisher, Carl E.; Koukousakis, Costas E.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if free-stream turbulence scale affects separation of turbulent boundary layers. In consideration of possible interrelation between scale and intensity of turbulence, the latter characteristic also was varied and its role was evaluated. Flow over a 2-dimensional airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel was studied with the aid of hot-wire anemometry, liquid-film flow visualization, a Preston tube, and static pressure measurements. Profiles of velocity, relative turbulence intensity, and integral scale in the boundary layer were measured. Detachment boundary was determined for various angles of attack and free-stream turbulence. The free-stream turbulence intensity and scale were found to spread into the entire turbulent boundary layer, but the effect decreased as the airfoil surface was approached. When the changes in stream turbulence were such that the boundary layer velocity profiles were unchanged, detachment location was not significantly affected by the variations of intensity and scale. Pressure distribution remained the key factor in determining detachment location.

  1. Droplet breakup in accelerating gas flows. Part 1: Primary atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zajac, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of an accelerating gas flow on the atomization characteristics of liquid sprays was conducted. The sprays were produced by impinging two liquid jets. The liquid was molten wax, while the gas was nitrogen. The use of molten wax allowed for a quantitative measure of the resulting dropsize distribution. The effects of the accelerating gas flow on the formation of the spray were examined. The results of this study indicate that the parameters that most affect the resulting dropsize are the injector parameters of orifice diameter and injection velocity, the maximum gas velocity, and the distance from the injector face at which the maximum gas velocity is attained. Empirical correlations for both the mass median dropsize and the dropsize distribution are presented. These correlations can be readily incorporated into existing computer codes for the purpose of calculating rocket engine combustion performance.

  2. Convergence acceleration of viscous and inviscid hypersonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.; Cheung, S.; Flores, J.

    1989-01-01

    The convergence of inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow calculations using a two-dimensional flux-splitting code is accelerated by applying a Richardson-type overrelaxation method. Successful results are presented for various cases; and a 50 percent savings in computer time is usually achieved. An analytical formula for the overrelaxation factor is derived, and the performance of this scheme is confirmed numerically. Moreover, application of this overrelaxation scheme produces a favorable preconditioning for Wynn's epsilon-algorithm. Both techniques have been extended to viscous three-dimensional flows and applied to accelerate the convergence of the compressible Navier-Stokes code. A savings of 40 percent in computer time is achieved in this case.

  3. Nonpremixed Combustion in an Accelerating Transonic Flow Undergoing Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Felix

    2005-11-01

    The flow through a turbine passage is modelled by a mixing layer with fuel and oxidizer streams flowing through a channel with imposed streamwise pressure gradients due to varying cross- sectional area. Due to the strong favorable pressure gradients, the flow accelerates from low subsonic to low supersonic speed and at the same time undergoes transition from laminar flow to turbulence. In this study, we focus on the transitional stage of this unsteady, accelerating, reacting, and compressible mixing layer. The full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with multiple reacting species equations and chemical reactions are solved numerically. No turbulence model is employed since the transitional flow is fully deterministic. Inlet perturbations determined from linear stability analysis are introduced at the inlet to excite the mixing layer. The production of both positive and negative vorticity due to the exothermic chemical reactions is identified, and the interactions between regions of unlike vorticity are characterized. The instability produces a strain field that results in the tearing of the flame. The effects of the streamwise pressure gradient and the amplitude of the inlet disturbances on the flame structures are investigated. Grid- and domain- independencies are performed to ensure the accuracy of the numerical solutions.

  4. Incompressible limit of solutions of multidimensional steady compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G.; Huang, Feimin; Wang, Tian-Yi; Xiang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A compactness framework is formulated for the incompressible limit of approximate solutions with weak uniform bounds with respect to the adiabatic exponent for the steady Euler equations for compressible fluids in any dimension. One of our main observations is that the compactness can be achieved by using only natural weak estimates for the mass conservation and the vorticity. Another observation is that the incompressibility of the limit for the homentropic Euler flow is directly from the continuity equation, while the incompressibility of the limit for the full Euler flow is from a combination of all the Euler equations. As direct applications of the compactness framework, we establish two incompressible limit theorems for multidimensional steady Euler flows through infinitely long nozzles, which lead to two new existence theorems for the corresponding problems for multidimensional steady incompressible Euler equations.

  5. Influence of Local Flow Field on Flow Accelerated Corrosion Downstream from an Orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Nagaya, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) rate downstream from an orifice was measured in a high-temperature water test loop to evaluate the effects of flow field on FAC. Orifice flow was also measured using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and simulated by steady RANS simulation and large eddy simulation (LES). The LDV measurements indicated the flow structure did not depend on the flow velocity in the range of Re = 2.3×104 to 1.2×105. Flow fields predicted by RANS and LES agreed well with LDV data. Measured FAC rate was higher downstream than upstream from the orifice and the maximum appeared at 2D (D: pipe diameter) downstream. The shape of the profile of the root mean square (RMS) wall shear stress predicted by LES had relatively good agreement with the shape of the profile of FAC rate. This result indicates that the effects of flow field on FAC can be evaluated using the calculated wall shear stress.

  6. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  7. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  8. Molecular confinement accelerates deformation of entangled polymers during squeeze flow.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Harry D; King, William P; Pethica, John B; Cross, Graham L W

    2008-10-31

    The squeezing of polymers in narrow gaps is important for the dynamics of nanostructure fabrication by nanoimprint embossing and the operation of polymer boundary lubricants. We measured stress versus strain behavior while squeezing entangled polystyrene films to large strains. In confined conditions where films were prepared to a thickness less than the size of the bulk macromolecule, resistance to deformation was markedly reduced for both solid-glass forging and liquid-melt molding. For melt flow, we further observed a complete inversion of conventional polymer viscosity scaling with molecular weight. Our results show that squeeze flow is accelerated at small scales by an unexpected influence of film thickness in polymer materials. PMID:18832609

  9. Lithium mass flow control for high power Lorentz Force Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodys, Andrea D.; Emsellem, Gregory; Cassady, Leonard D.; Polk, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2001-02-01

    A lithium feeding system has been developed to measure and control propellant flow for 30-200 kW Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LiLFAs). The new, mechanically actuated, liquid lithium feed system has been designed and tested as a central component of a campaign to obtain basic data and establish scaling laws and performance relations for these thrusters. Calibration data are presented which demonstrate reliable and controllable feed of liquid lithium to the vaporizer hollow cathode of the thruster at flow rates between 10 and 120 mg/s. The ability to thermally track the liquid lithium through the system by the use of external temperature measurements is demonstrated. In addition, recent developments are presented in the establishment and successful testing of a lithium handling facility and safety procedures allowing for the in-house loading of the feed system and the neutralization, cleaning and disposal of up to 300 g of lithium. .

  10. GPU Accelerated Numerical Simulation of Viscous Flow Down a Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gygax, Remo; Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yuri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations are an effective tool in natural risk analysis. They are useful to determine the propagation and the runout distance of gravity driven movements such as debris flows or landslides. To evaluate these processes an approach on analogue laboratory experiments and a GPU accelerated numerical simulation of the flow of a viscous liquid down an inclined slope is considered. The physical processes underlying large gravity driven flows share certain aspects with the propagation of debris mass in a rockslide and the spreading of water waves. Several studies have shown that the numerical implementation of the physical processes of viscous flow produce a good fit with the observation of experiments in laboratory in both a quantitative and a qualitative way. When considering a process that is this far explored we can concentrate on its numerical transcription and the application of the code in a GPU accelerated environment to obtain a 3D simulation. The objective of providing a numerical solution in high resolution by NVIDIA-CUDA GPU parallel processing is to increase the speed of the simulation and the accuracy on the prediction. The main goal is to write an easily adaptable and as short as possible code on the widely used platform MATLAB, which will be translated to C-CUDA to achieve higher resolution and processing speed while running on a NVIDIA graphics card cluster. The numerical model, based on the finite difference scheme, is compared to analogue laboratory experiments. This way our numerical model parameters are adjusted to reproduce the effective movements observed by high-speed camera acquisitions during the laboratory experiments.

  11. Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, D; Cook, A

    2007-01-09

    We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

  12. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, George S.; Pierce, Paul E.

    1990-01-01

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  13. Disturbed flow and flow accelerated corrosion in oil and gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Efird, K.D.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of fluid flow on corrosion of steel in oil and gas environments involves a complex interaction of physical and chemical parameters. The basic requirement for any corrosion to occur is the existence of liquid water contacting the pipe wall, which is primarily controlled by the flow regime. The effect of flow on corrosion, or flow accelerated corrosion, is defined by the mass transfer and wall shear stress parameters existing in the water phase that contacts the pipe wall. While existing fluid flow equations for mass transfer and wall shear stress relate to equilibrium conditions, disturbed flow introduces non-equilibrium, steady state conditions not addressed by these equations, and corrosion testing in equilibrium conditions cannot be effectively related to corrosion in disturbed flow. The problem in relating flow effects to corrosion is that steel corrosion failures in oil and gas environments are normally associated with disturbed flow conditions as a result of weld beads, preexisting pits, bends, flanges, valves, tubing connections, etc. Steady state mass transfer and wall shear stress relationships to steel corrosion and corrosion testing are required for their application to corrosion of steel under disturbed flow conditions. A procedure is described to relate the results of a corrosion test directly to corrosion in an operation system where disturbed flow conditions are expected, or must be considered.

  14. CFD Application to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Feeder Bends

    SciTech Connect

    Pietralik, John M.; Smith, Bruce A.W.

    2006-07-01

    Feeder piping in CANDU{sup R} plants experiences a thinning degradation mechanism called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). The piping is made of carbon steel and has high water flow speeds. Although the water chemistry is highly alkaline with room-temperature pH in a range of 10.0-10.5, the piping has FAC rates exceeding 0.1 mm/year in some locations, e.g., in bends. One of the most important parameters affecting the FAC rate is the mass transfer coefficient for convective mass transport of ferrous ions. The ions are created at the pipe wall as a result of corrosion, diffuse through the oxide layer, and are transported from the oxide-layer/water interface to the bulk water by mass transport. Consequently, the local flow characteristics contribute to the highly turbulent convective mass transfer. Plant data and laboratory experiments indicate that the mass transfer step dominates FAC under feeder conditions. In this study, the flow and mass transfer in a feeder bend under operating conditions were simulated using the Fluent{sup TM} computer code. Because the flow speed is very high, with the Reynolds numbers in a range of several millions, and because the geometry is complex, experiments in a 1:1 scale were conducted with the main objective to validate flow simulations. The experiments measured pressure at several key locations and visualized the flow. The flow and mass transfer models were validated using available friction-factor and mass transfer correlations and literature experiments on mass transfer in a bend. The validation showed that the turbulence model that best predicts the experiments is the realizable k-{epsilon} model. Other two-equation turbulence models, as well as one-equation models and Reynolds stress models were tried. The near-wall treatment used the non-equilibrium wall functions. The wall functions were modified for surface roughness when necessary. A comparison of the local mass transfer coefficient with measured FAC rate in plant specimens

  15. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic flow of a micropolar fluid due to constant accelerated disk with no slip conditions in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, F.; Hayat, T.

    2012-05-01

    The unsteady MHD flow of an incompressible micropolar fluid have been considered. The fluid is filling the semi-infinite space z>0 which is in contact with an infinite porous rotating disk at z = 0. The common angular velocity of the disk and fluid at infinity is Ω. The fluid is electrically conducting in presence of an applied constant magnetic field B0. Initially the disk and the fluid are rotating about the z/-axis and at time t = 0, suddenly the disk starts rotating about the z-axis and moving with uniform acceleration, while the fluid at infinity continue to rotate about z/-axis with same angular velocity Ω. The axes of rotation of both the disk and that of the fluid at infinity are assumed to be in the plane x = 0, and distance between axes is l. The governing problem is solved numerically using Newton's method. Numerical results explaining the effects of various parameters associated with the flow are discussed graphically.

  16. Strongly Accelerated Margination of Active Particles in Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic nanoparticles and other stiff objects injected into a blood vessel filled with red blood cells are known to marginate toward the vessel walls. By means of hydrodynamic lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we show that active particles can strongly accelerate their margination by moving against the flow direction: particles located initially in the channel center migrate much faster to their final position near the wall than in the nonactive case. We explain our findings by an enhanced rate of collisions between the stiff particles and the deformable red blood cells. Our results imply that a significantly faster margination can be achieved either technically by the application of an external magnetic field (if the particles are magnetic) or biologically by self-propulsion (if the particles are, e.g., swimming bacteria). PMID:26789773

  17. Droplet breakup in accelerating gas flows. Part 2: Secondary atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zajac, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the effects of an accelerating gas flow on the atomization characteristics of liquid sprays was conducted. The sprays were produced by impinging two liquid jets. The liquid was molten wax and the gas was nitrogen. The use of molten wax allowed for a quantitative measure of the resulting dropsize distribution. The results of this study, indicate that a significant amount of droplet breakup will occur as a result of the action of the gas on the liquid droplets. Empirical correlations are presented in terms of parameters that were found to affect the mass median dropsize most significantly, the orifice diameter, the liquid injection velocity, and the maximum gas velocity. An empirical correlation for the normalized dropsize distribution is also presented. These correlations are in a form that may be incorporated readily into existing combustion model computer codes for the purpose of calculating rocket engine combustion performance.

  18. Taylor Instability of Incompressible Liquids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fermi, E.; von Neumann, J.

    1955-11-01

    A discussion is presented in simplified form of the problem of the growth of an initial ripple on the surface of an incompressible liquid in the presence of an acceleration, g, directed from the outside into the liquid. The model is that of a heavy liquid occupying at t = 0 the half space above the plane z = 0, and a rectangular wave profile is assumed. The theory is found to represent correctly one feature of experimental results, namely the fact that the half wave of the heavy liquid into the vacuum becomes rapidly narrower while the half wave pushing into the heavy liquid becomes more and more blunt. The theory fails to account for the experimental results according to which the front of the wave pushing into the heavy liquid moves with constant velocity. The case of instability at the boundary of 2 fluids of different densities is also explored. Similar results are obtained except that the acceleration of the heavy liquid into the light liquid is reduced.

  19. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  20. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  1. Flow-accelerated corrosion in power plants. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.; Dooley, B.

    1998-07-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are common in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Undetected, FAC will cause leaks and ruptures. Consequently, FAC has become a major issue, particularly for nuclear plants. Although major failures are rare, the consequences can be severe. In 1986, four men in the area of an FAC-induced pipe rupture were killed. Fossil plants too, are subject to FAC. In 1995, a failure at a fossil-fired plant caused two fatalities. In addition to concerns about personnel safety, FAC failures can pose challenges to plant safety. Regulatory agencies have therefore required nuclear utilities to institute formal programs to address FAC. Finally, a major FAC failure (like the one that happened in 1997 at a US nuclear power plant) can force a plant to shutdown and purchase replacement power at a price approaching a million dollars per day depending upon the MWe rating of the plant. A great deal of time and money has been spent to develop the technology to predict, detect, and mitigate FAC in order to prevent catastrophic failures. Over time, substantial progress has been made towards understanding and preventing FAC. The results of these efforts include dozens of papers, reports, calculations, and manuals, as well as computer programs and other tools. This book is written to provide a detailed treatment of the entire subject in a single document. Any complex issue requires balancing know-how, the risk of decision making, and a pragmatic engineering solution. This book addresses these by carrying out the necessary R and D and engineering along with plant knowledge to cover all quadrants of Chexal`s four quadrant known-unknown diagram, as seen in Figure i.

  2. Dilution jets in accelerated cross flows. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments are designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio and the densimetric Froude number.

  3. Radioactive microsphere study of cerebral blood flow under acceleration. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlees, K.J.; Yoder, J.E.; Toth, D.M.; Oloff, C.M.; Karl, A.

    1980-11-01

    A study using radioactive microspheres for the investigation of cerebral blood flow during acceleration is described. Details of a technique for the blunt dissection of cerebral tissues are included. Results of flow studies at 3 and 5 G sub z acceleration stress indicate there is no selective regional preservation of cerebral tissue. (Author)

  4. Predicting the impact of chromium on flow-accelerated corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Goyette, L.F.; Horowitz, J.S.; Ruscak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Many experiments have been performed to understand the mechanism of FAC. For approximately twenty years, it has ben widely recognized that the presence of small amounts of chromium will reduce the rate of FAC. This effect was quantified in the eighties by research performed in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The results of this research has been incorporated into the computer-based tools used by utility engineers to deal with this issue. For some time, plant data from Diablo Canyon has suggested that the existing correlations relating the concentration of chromium to the rate of FAC are conservative. Laboratory examinations have supported this observation. It appears that the existing correlations fail to capture a change in mechanism from a FAC process with linear kinetics to a general corrosion process with parabolic kinetics. This change in mechanism occurs at a chromium level of approximately 0.1%, within the allowable alloy range of typical carbon steel (ASTM/ASME A106 Grade B) used in power piping in most domestic plants. It has been difficult to obtain plant data that has sufficient chromium to develop a new correlation. Data from Diablo Canyon and the Dukovany Power Plant in the Czech Republic will be used to develop a new chromium correlation for predicting FAC rate.

  5. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Spyrou, N. K.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. In fact, polytropic processes in a DM fluid have been most successfully used in modeling dark galactic haloes, thus significantly improving the velocity dispersion profiles of galaxies. Motivated by such results, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluidlike properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, together with all the other physical characteristics, we also take the energy of this fluid's internal motions into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy, needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total energy density parameter is exactly unity. The polytropic cosmological model, depends on only one free parameter, the corresponding (polytropic) exponent, Γ. We find this model particularly interesting, because for Γ ≤ 0.541, without the need for either any exotic DE or the cosmological constant, the conventional pressure becomes negative enough so that the Universe accelerates its expansion at cosmological redshifts below a transition value. In fact, several physical reasons, e.g., the cosmological requirement for cold DM (CDM) and a positive velocity-of-sound square, impose further constraints on the value of Γ, which is eventually settled down to the range -0.089 < Γ ≤ 0. This cosmological model does not suffer either from the age problem or from the

  6. Accelerated ions from pulsed-power-driven fast plasma flow in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezaki, Taichi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2016-06-01

    To understand the interaction between fast plasma flow and perpendicular magnetic field, we have investigated the behavior of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by a laboratory-scale experiment using a pulsed-power discharge. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a tapered cone plasma focus device is about 30 km/s, and the magnetic Reynolds number is estimated to be 8.8. After flow through the perpendicular magnetic field, the accelerated ions are measured by an ion collector. To clarify the behavior of the accelerated ions and the electromagnetic fields, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell method have been carried out. The results show that the behavior of the accelerated ions corresponds qualitatively to the experimental results. Faster ions in the plasma flow are accelerated by the induced electromagnetic fields modulated with the plasma flow.

  7. A finite element analysis of the exact nonlinear formulation of a lifting surface in steady incompressible flow, with the evaluation of the correct wake geometry. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, E. O.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of steady incompressible flow for lifting surfaces is considered. An integral equation is solved relating the values of the potential discontinuity on the lifting surface and its wake to the values of the normal derivative of the potential which are known from the boundary conditions. The lifting surface and the wake are divided into small quadrilateral surface elements. The values of the potential discontinuity and the normal derivative of the potential are assumed to be constant within each lifting surface element and equal to their values at the centroids of the lifting surface elements. This yields a set of linear algebraic equations. An iteration procedure is used to obtain the wake geometry: the velocities at the corner points of the wake elements are calculated and the wake streamlines are aligned to be parallel to the velocity vector. The procedure is repeated until convergence is attained.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Niederhaus, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and eventually become a turbulent flow. It is closely related to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the instability of a planar interface undergoing constant acceleration, such as caused by the suspension of a heavy fluid over a lighter one in the earth's gravitational field. Like the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, RM instability is a fundamental hydrodynamic instability which exhibits many of the nonlinear complexities that transform simple initial conditions into a complex turbulent flow. Furthermore, the simplicity of RM instability (in that it requires very few defining parameters), and the fact that it can be generated in a closed container, makes it an excellent test bed to study nonlinear stability theory as well as turbulent transport in a heterogeneous system. However, the fact that RM instability involves fluids of unequal densities which experience negligible gravitational force, except during the impulsive acceleration, requires RM instability experiments to be carried out under conditions of microgravity. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids with an initial sinusoidal perturbation. The impulsive acceleration is generated by bouncing a rectangular tank containing two different density liquids off a retractable vertical spring. The initial perturbation is produced prior to release by oscillating the tank in the horizontal direction to produce a standing wave. The instability evolves in microgravity as the tank travels up and then down the vertical rails of a drop tower until hitting a shock absorber at the bottom. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) is employed to visualize the flow. PLIF images are captured by a video camera that travels

  9. Theoretical treatment of fluid flow for accelerating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Irvy M. A.; Roohani, Hamed; Forsberg, Karl; Eliasson, Peter; Skews, Beric W.; Nordström, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Most computational fluid dynamics simulations are, at present, performed in a body-fixed frame, for aeronautical purposes. With the advent of sharp manoeuvre, which may lead to transient effects originating in the acceleration of the centre of mass, there is a need to have a consistent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrarily moving frame. These expressions should be in a form that allows terms to be transformed between non-inertial and inertial frames and includes gravity, viscous terms, and linear and angular acceleration. Since no effects of body acceleration appear in the inertial frame Navier-Stokes equations themselves, but only in their boundary conditions, it is useful to investigate acceleration source terms in the non-inertial frame. In this paper, a derivation of the energy equation is provided in addition to the continuity and momentum equations previously published. Relevant dimensionless constants are derived which can be used to obtain an indication of the relative significance of acceleration effects. The necessity for using computational fluid dynamics to capture nonlinear effects remains, and various implementation schemes for accelerating bodies are discussed. This theoretical treatment is intended to provide a foundation for interpretation of aerodynamic effects observed in manoeuvre, particularly for accelerating missiles.

  10. Nearly incompressible fluids: hydrodynamics and large scale inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hunana, P; Zank, G P; Shaikh, D

    2006-08-01

    A system of hydrodynamic equations in the presence of large-scale inhomogeneities for a high plasma beta solar wind is derived. The theory is derived under the assumption of low turbulent Mach number and is developed for the flows where the usual incompressible description is not satisfactory and a full compressible treatment is too complex for any analytical studies. When the effects of compressibility are incorporated only weakly, a new description, referred to as "nearly incompressible hydrodynamics," is obtained. The nearly incompressible theory, was originally applied to homogeneous flows. However, large-scale gradients in density, pressure, temperature, etc., are typical in the solar wind and it was unclear how inhomogeneities would affect the usual incompressible and nearly incompressible descriptions. In the homogeneous case, the lowest order expansion of the fully compressible equations leads to the usual incompressible equations, followed at higher orders by the nearly incompressible equations, as introduced by Zank and Matthaeus. With this work we show that the inclusion of large-scale inhomogeneities (in this case time-independent and radially symmetric background solar wind) modifies the leading-order incompressible description of solar wind flow. We find, for example, that the divergence of velocity fluctuations is nonsolenoidal and that density fluctuations can be described to leading order as a passive scalar. Locally (for small lengthscales), this system of equations converges to the usual incompressible equations and we therefore use the term "locally incompressible" to describe the equations. This term should be distinguished from the term "nearly incompressible," which is reserved for higher-order corrections. Furthermore, we find that density fluctuations scale with Mach number linearly, in contrast to the original homogeneous nearly incompressible theory, in which density fluctuations scale with the square of Mach number. Inhomogeneous nearly

  11. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  12. Local expansion flows of galaxies: quantifying acceleration effect of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.

    2013-08-01

    The nearest expansion flow of galaxies observed around the Local group is studied as an archetypical example of the newly discovered local expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies in the nearby Universe. The flow is accelerating due to the antigravity produced by the universal dark energy background. We introduce a new acceleration measure of the flow which is the dimensionless ``acceleration parameter" Q (x) = x - x-2 depending on the normalized distance x only. The parameter is zero at the zero-gravity distance x = 1, and Q(x) ∝ x, when x ≫ 1. At the distance x = 3, the parameter Q = 2.9. Since the expansion flows have a self-similar structure in normalized variables, we expect that the result is valid as well for all the other expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies on the spatial scales from ˜ 1 to ˜ 10 Mpc everywhere in the Universe.

  13. Dynamics of plasma flow formation in a pulsed accelerator operating at a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimbetov, F. B.; Zhukeshov, A. M.; Amrenova, A. U.

    2007-01-01

    Features in the dynamics of plasma flow formation at a constant pressure in a pulsed coaxial accelerator have been studied. The temperature and density of electrons in a plasma bunch have been determined using a probe technique.

  14. Volume conservation issues in incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Prapanch; Tomar, Gaurav

    2015-09-01

    A divergence-free velocity field is usually sought in numerical simulations of incompressible fluids. We show that the particle methods that compute a divergence-free velocity field to achieve incompressibility suffer from a volume conservation issue when a finite time-step position update scheme is used. Further, we propose a deformation gradient based approach to arrive at a velocity field that reduces the volume conservation issues in free surface flows and maintains density uniformity in internal flows while retaining the simplicity of first order time updates.

  15. Suppression of an unwanted flow of charged particles in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu.; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the construction of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation several changes were made. This allowed us to suppress the unwanted flow of charged particles in the accelerator, to improve its high-voltage stability, and to increase the proton beam current from 1.6 mA to 5 mA.

  16. Perturbation theory and numerical modelling of weakly and moderately nonlinear incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    A study of incompressible two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability by means of high-order Eulerian perturbation theory and numerical simulations is reported. Nonlinear corrections to Richtmyer's impulsive formula for the bubble and spike growth rates have been calculated analytically for arbitrary Atwood number and an explicit formula has been obtained for it in the Boussinesq limit. Conditions for early-time acceleration and deceleration of the bubble and the spike have been derived. In our simulations we have solved 2D unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for immiscible incompressible fluids using the finite volume fractional step flow solver NGA developed by, coupled to the level set based interface solver LIT,. The impact of small amounts of viscosity and surface tension on the RMI flow dynamics is studied numerically. Simulation results are compared to the theory to demonstrate successful code verification and highlight the influence of the theory's ideal inviscid flow assumption. Theoretical time histories of the interface curvature at the bubble and spike tip and the profiles of vertical and horizontal velocities have been favorably compared to simulation results, which converge to the theoretical predictions as the Reynolds and Weber numbers are increased. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  17. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadore, Francesco; Bernardini, Matteo; Botti, Michela

    2013-02-01

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier-Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  18. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadore, Francesco; Botti, Michela

    2013-02-15

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  19. Modelling roughness and acceleration effects with application to the flow in a hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Nicolle, J.; Piomelli, U.; Giroux, A.-M.

    2014-03-01

    This study reports the numerical predictions of flows over turbine blades, which include flow acceleration and deceleration. Two issues are addressed: (1) accurately predicting roughness effects, and (2) evaluating the performance of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations on moderately accelerating flows. For the present turbine surfaces, it is found that roughness correlations based on roughness surface slope better predict the roughness effects than both the correlations based on the moments of roughness height statistics and the IEC standard approach. It is shown that RANS simulations reproduce the flow evolution over rough-wall accelerating turbulent boundary layers, although, on a smooth wall, they fail to capture strong non-equilibrium flow behaviours. Finally, a hydraulic turbine simulation is performed to show the significant roughness impact on the total losses.

  20. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  1. Intermittent Lagrangian velocities and accelerations in three-dimensional porous medium flow.

    PubMed

    Holzner, M; Morales, V L; Willmann, M; Dentz, M

    2015-07-01

    Intermittency of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration is a key to understanding transport in complex systems ranging from fluid turbulence to flow in porous media. High-resolution optical particle tracking in a three-dimensional (3D) porous medium provides detailed 3D information on Lagrangian velocities and accelerations. We find sharp transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity, superlinear evolution of particle dispersion, and double-peak behavior in the propagators. The velocity distribution is quantified in terms of pore geometry and flow connectivity, which forms the basis for a continuous-time random-walk model that sheds light on the observed Lagrangian flow and transport behaviors. PMID:26274277

  2. Intermittent Lagrangian velocities and accelerations in three-dimensional porous medium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, M.; Morales, V. L.; Willmann, M.; Dentz, M.

    2015-07-01

    Intermittency of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration is a key to understanding transport in complex systems ranging from fluid turbulence to flow in porous media. High-resolution optical particle tracking in a three-dimensional (3D) porous medium provides detailed 3D information on Lagrangian velocities and accelerations. We find sharp transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity, superlinear evolution of particle dispersion, and double-peak behavior in the propagators. The velocity distribution is quantified in terms of pore geometry and flow connectivity, which forms the basis for a continuous-time random-walk model that sheds light on the observed Lagrangian flow and transport behaviors.

  3. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  4. Ultrasonic observation of blood disturbance in a stenosed tube: effects of flow acceleration and turbulence downstream.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Choi, Min Joo; Shung, K Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is known to be highly dependent on hemodynamic parameters such as shear rate, flow turbulence and flow acceleration under pulsatile flow. The effects of all three hemodynamic parameters on RBC aggregation and echogenicity of porcine whole blood were investigated downstream of an eccentric stenosis in a mock flow loop using B-mode images with Doppler spectrograms of a commercial ultrasonic system. A hyperechoic parabolic profile appeared downstream during flow acceleration, yielding another piece of evidence suggesting that the enhancement of rouleaux formation may be caused by flow acceleration. It was also found that echogenicity increased locally at a distance of three tube diameters downstream from the stenosis. The local increase of echogenicity is thought to be mainly due to flow turbulence. The hypoechoic "black hole" was also seen at the center of the tube downstream of the stenosis where blood flow was disturbed, and this may be caused by the compound effect of flow turbulence and shear rate. PMID:17900794

  5. Calculation of a three-dimensional flow of a viscous incompressible liquid in the neighborhood of a shallow well on a flat surface

    SciTech Connect

    Isaev, S.A.; Kharchenko, V.B.; Chudnovskii, Ya.P.

    1995-06-01

    A three-dimensional flow in the neighborhood of a shallow well on a plane was simulated numerically on the basis of a solution of the Reynolds equations written in curvilinear nonorthogonal coordinates and closed by a two-parametric dissipative model of turbulence.

  6. MHD flows in the channels of plasma accelerators with a longitudinal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Zhdanova, N. S.

    2008-12-15

    Plasma flows caused by the interaction of the discharge current with the azimuthal magnetic self-field in coaxial channels (nozzles) of plasma accelerators are strongly affected by the longitudinal field produced by external conductors. A two-dimensional MHD model of flows in channels in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. Depending on the ratio between the characteristic values of the longitudinal and azimuthal field components, one of three types of flow is established in the channel: super-Alfven, sub-Alfven, or combined. The properties of different types of flows are analyzed. The acceleration process in sub-Alfven flows differs qualitatively from that in regimes without a longitudinal field in transitions between the kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy components.

  7. MHD flows in the channels of plasma accelerators with a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Zhdanova, N. S.

    2008-12-01

    Plasma flows caused by the interaction of the discharge current with the azimuthal magnetic self-field in coaxial channels (nozzles) of plasma accelerators are strongly affected by the longitudinal field produced by external conductors. A two-dimensional MHD model of flows in channels in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. Depending on the ratio between the characteristic values of the longitudinal and azimuthal field components, one of three types of flow is established in the channel: super-Alfvén, sub-Alfvén, or combined. The properties of different types of flows are analyzed. The acceleration process in sub-Alfvén flows differs qualitatively from that in regimes without a longitudinal field in transitions between the kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy components.

  8. Monodisperse granular flows in viscous dispersions in a centrifugal acceleration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Granular flows are encountered in geophysical flows and innumerable industrial applications with particulate materials. When mixed with a fluid, a complex network of interactions between the particle- and fluid-phase develops, resulting in a compound material with a yet unclear physical behaviour. In the study of granular suspensions mixed with a viscous dispersion, the scaling of the stress-strain characteristics of the fluid phase needs to account for the level of inertia developed in experiments. However, the required model dimensions and amount of material becomes a main limitation for their study. In recent years, centrifuge modelling has been presented as an alternative for the study of particle-fluid flows in a reduced scaled model in an augmented acceleration field. By formulating simple scaling principles proportional to the equivalent acceleration Ng in the model, the resultant flows share many similarities with field events. In this work we study the scaling principles of the fluid phase and its effects on the flow of granular suspensions. We focus on the dense flow of a monodisperse granular suspension mixed with a viscous fluid phase, flowing down an inclined plane and being driven by a centrifugal acceleration field. The scaled model allows the continuous monitoring of the flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and mass flow rates at different Ng levels. The experiments successfully identify the effects of scaling the plastic viscosity of the fluid phase, its relation with the deposition of particles over the inclined plane, and allows formulating a discussion on the suitability of simulating particle-fluid flows in a centrifugal acceleration field.

  9. Influence of slow rotation on the stability of a thermocapillary incompressible liquid flow in an infinite layer under zero-gravity conditions for small Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, Konstantin G.

    2012-06-01

    Instability of a thermocapillary flow arising in a rotating thin infinite liquid layer under zero-gravity conditions is investigated. Both boundaries of the layer are assumed to be plane and free and are subject to the tangential thermocapillary Marangoni force. A convective heat transfer at the boundaries is governed by Newton's law and the temperature of the fluid near the boundaries is a linear function of the coordinates. The axis of rotation is perpendicular to a liquid layer. The rotation is slow, which allows us to neglect the centrifugal force. The examined thermocapillary flow is described analytically, being an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. According to the linear theory of stability the obtained neutral curves depict the dependence of the critical Marangoni number on the wave number at different values of the Taylor number for the small Prandtl number (Pr = 0.1). The behavior of the finite-amplitude perturbations beyond the stability threshold is studied numerically.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC EXCITATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.; Shelyag, S.

    2013-05-01

    Observing the excitation mechanisms of incompressible transverse waves is vital for determining how energy propagates through the lower solar atmosphere. We aim to show the connection between convectively driven photospheric flows and incompressible chromospheric waves. The observations presented here show the propagation of incompressible motion through the quiet lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. We determine photospheric flow vectors to search for signatures of vortex motion and compare results to photospheric flows present in convective simulations. Further, we search for the chromospheric response to vortex motions. Evidence is presented that suggests incompressible waves can be excited by the vortex motions of a strong magnetic flux concentration in the photosphere. A chromospheric counterpart to the photospheric vortex motion is also observed, presenting itself as a quasi-periodic torsional motion. Fine-scale, fibril structures that emanate from the chromospheric counterpart support transverse waves that are driven by the observed torsional motion. A new technique for obtaining details of transverse waves from time-distance diagrams is presented and the properties of transverse waves (e.g., amplitudes and periods) excited by the chromospheric torsional motion are measured.

  11. Variations in Melt-Flow Acceleration Above and Below the Greenland Equilibrium Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwally, H.; Saba, J. L.; Steffen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Initial observations of accelerated ice flow at the equilibrium line in West-central Greenland during summer melt periods (1996 to 1999) indicated that surface melt-water rapidly propagated to the base and enhanced the basal sliding. Since then numerous observational and theoretical results have provided additional information on the melt-acceleration effect, while leading to some differing conclusions about the climatological and hydrological processes involved. Additional velocity measurements since 1999 show further characteristics of the melt-acceleration in the ice flowline though Swiss Camp, which terminates on land, and in a nearby flowline, which terminates in an outlet glacier. Accelerations as large as three times the average winter velocity are observed during stronger melt events. At downstream locations, accelerations begin earlier in the melt season, but accelerations at multiple sites along a flow line occur simultaneously later in the season. At the equilibrium line, a short period of surface uplift of about 50 cm occurs when the flow abruptly changes from acceleration to deceleration, apparently caused by ice compression during the transition. At downstream locations, the surface rises at the beginning of the melt season and drops at the end of melting suggesting an uplift forced by sub-ice water and sediment. Equivalence of the net additional displacement at upstream and downstream sites indicates no net longitudinal ice strain after the acceleration-deceleration periods. Approximate equivalence of the ratio of peak summer velocities to average winter velocities along the flowline indicate that local melt-acceleration is occurring at and above the equilibrium as well as from longitudinal coupling of downstream effects. High-frequency velocity observations show that the ice flow continues to accelerate with increasing water production during melt events, follow by an abrupt deceleration after the event, indicating that saturation of the

  12. Quasi-steady accelerator operation on the ZAP flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Golingo, R. P.; Nelson, B. A.; Ross, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment utilizes sheared flows to stabilize an otherwise unstable equilibrium. The sheared flows are maintained by streaming high velocity plasma parallel to the pinch. Previous operations of the machine show depletion of the accelerator's neutral gas supply late in the pulse leading to pinch instability. The current distribution in the accelerator exhibits characteristic modes during this operation, which is corroborated by interferometric signals. The decrease in density precipitates a loss of plasma quiescence in the pinch, which occurs on a timescale related to the flow velocity from the plasma source. To abate the depletion, the geometry of the accelerator is altered to increase the neutral gas supply. The design creates a standing deflagration front in the accelerator that persists for the pulse duration. The new operating mode is characterized by the same diagnostics as the previous mode. The lessons learned in the accelerator operations have been applied to the design of a new experiment, ZaP-HD. This work was supported by grants from the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  13. Modern hardware architectures accelerate porous media flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulczewski, Michal; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Kierzynka, Michal; Dohnalik, Marek; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Borujeni, Ali Takbiri

    2012-05-01

    Investigation of rock properties, porosity and permeability particularly, which determines transport media characteristic, is crucial to reservoir engineering. Nowadays, micro-tomography (micro-CT) methods allow to obtain vast of petro-physical properties. The micro-CT method facilitates visualization of pores structures and acquisition of total porosity factor, determined by sticking together 2D slices of scanned rock and applying proper absorption cut-off point. Proper segmentation of pores representation in 3D is important to solve the permeability of porous media. This factor is recently determined by the means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a popular method to analyze problems related to fluid flows, taking advantage of numerical methods and constantly growing computing powers. The recent advent of novel multi-, many-core and graphics processing unit (GPU) hardware architectures allows scientists to benefit even more from parallel processing and built-in new features. The high level of parallel scalability offers both, the time-to-solution decrease and greater accuracy - top factors in reservoir engineering. This paper aims to present research results related to fluid flow simulations, particularly solving the total porosity and permeability of porous media, taking advantage of modern hardware architectures. In our approach total porosity is calculated by the means of general-purpose computing on multiple GPUs. This application sticks together 2D slices of scanned rock and by the means of a marching tetrahedra algorithm, creates a 3D representation of pores and calculates the total porosity. Experimental results are compared with data obtained via other popular methods, including Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), helium porosity and nitrogen permeability tests. Then CFD simulations are performed on a large-scale high performance hardware architecture to solve the flow and permeability of porous media. In our experiments we used Lattice Boltzmann

  14. Study of Spray Disintegration in Accelerating Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was conducted to perform "proof of principlem experiments to establish the effects of propellant combustion gas velocity on propella'nt atomization characteristics. The propellants were gaseous oxygen (GOX) and Shell Wax 270. The fuel was thus the same fluid used in earlier primary cold-flow atomization studies using the frozen wax method. Experiments were conducted over a range in L* (30 to 160 inches) at two contraction ratios (2 and 6). Characteristic exhaust velocity (c*) efficiencies varied from SO to 90 percent. The hot fire experimental performance characteristics at a contraction ratio of 6.0 in conjunction with analytical predictions from the drovlet heat-up version of the Distributed Energy Release (DER) combustion computer proDam showed that the apparent initial dropsize compared well with cold-flow predictions (if adjusted for the gas velocity effects). The results also compared very well with the trend in perfomnce as predicted with the model. significant propellant wall impingement at the contraction ratio of 2.0 precluded complete evaluation of the effect of gross changes in combustion gas velocity on spray dropsize.

  15. Scalar dispersion in a periodically reoriented potential flow: acceleration via Lagrangian chaos.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Rudman, M; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G; Ord, A; Hobbs, B

    2010-04-01

    Although potential flows are irrotational, Lagrangian chaos can occur when these are unsteady, with rapid global mixing observed upon flow parameter optimization. What is unknown is whether Lagrangian chaos in potential flows results in accelerated scalar dispersion, to what magnitude, how robustly, and via what mechanisms. We consider scalar dispersion in a model unsteady potential flow, the Lagrangian topology of which is well understood. The asymptotic scalar dispersion rate q and corresponding scalar distribution (strange eigenmode) are calculated over the flow parameter space Q for Peclét numbers Pe=10{1}-10{4}. The richness of solutions over Q increases with Pe, with pattern mode locking, symmetry breaking transitions to chaos and fractally distributed maxima observed. Such behavior suggests detailed global resolution of Q is necessary for robust optimization, however localization of local optima to bifurcations between periodic and subharmonic eigenmodes suggests novel efficient means of optimization. Acceleration rates of 150 fold at Pe=10{4} are observed; significantly greater than corresponding values for chaotic Stokes flows, suggesting significant scope for dispersion acceleration in potential flows in general. PMID:20481839

  16. Nonlaminar multicomponent models for electron flow in positive polarity multigap accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Church, B.W.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    Electron flow in multigap positive-polarity inductive accelerators is studied by numerical simulation and modeling. The objective of this work is to determine the operating principles of the electron flow such that an optimally efficient design of such machines can be achieved for intense ion beam generation. Because the electrons emitted in different gaps have different energies and canonical momenta, the theory of single-component magnetic insulation has to be extended in order to describe such multicomponent electron flows. A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code is used to simulate multicomponent electron flow in multigap accelerators with two, three, and four gaps. Observations from these simulations lead to new one-dimensional, time-independent models for these flows that incorporate the time-averaged effects of diamagnetic electron vortices. Equivalent circuits are constructed for simulated accelerators using voltage{endash}current relations predicted by the models. These circuit models are incorporated into a software package to aid in the design of multigap inductive accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Acceleration of aircraft-level Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio

    This dissertation describes novel approaches to solving large-scale, high fidelity, aircraft-level Traffic Flow Management scheduling problems. Depending on the methods employed, solving these problems to optimality can take longer than the length of the planning horizon in question. Research in this domain typically focuses on the quality of the modeling used to describe the problem and the benefits achieved from the optimized solution, often treating computational aspects as secondary or tertiary. The work presented here takes the complementary view and considers the computational aspect as the primary concern. To this end, a previously published model for solving this Traffic Flow Management scheduling problem is used as starting point for this study. The model proposed by Bertsimas and Stock-Patterson is a binary integer program taking into account all major resource capacities and the trajectories of each flight to decide which flights should be held in which resource for what amount of time in order to satisfy all capacity requirements. For large instances, the solve time using state-of-the-art solvers is prohibitive for use within a potential decision support tool. With this dissertation, however, it will be shown that solving can be achieved in reasonable time for instances of real-world size. Five other techniques developed and tested for this dissertation will be described in detail. These are heuristic methods that provide good results. Performance is measured in terms of runtime and "optimality gap." We then describe the most successful method presented in this dissertation: Dantzig-Wolfe Decomposition. Results indicate that a parallel implementation of Dantzig-Wolfe Decomposition optimally solves the original problem in much reduced time and with better integrality and smaller optimality gap than any of the heuristic methods or state-of-the-art, commercial solvers. The solution quality improves in every measureable way as the number of subproblems

  18. A validation study of openfoam for hybrid rans-les simulation of incompressible flow over a backward facing step and delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Cecilia Dosh-Bluhm

    The primary objective of this study is to validate and/or identify issues for available numerical methods and turbulence models in OpenFOAM 2.0.0. Such a study will provide a guideline for users, will aid acceptance of OpenFOAM as one of the research solvers at institutions and also guide future multidisciplinary research using OpenFOAM. In addition, a problem of aerospace interest such as the flow features and vortex breakdown around a VFE-II model is obtained for SA, SST RANS and SA-DDES models and compared with DLR experiment. The available numerical methods such as time schemes, convection schemes, P-V couplings and turbulence models are tested as available for a fundamental case of a backward facing step for RANS and Hybrid RANS-LES prediction of fully turbulent flow at a Reynolds number of 32000 and the OpenFOAM predictions are validated against experimental data by Driver et.al and compared with Fluent predictions.

  19. Investigation of advanced propulsion technologies: The RAM accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    The two principal areas of advanced propulsion investigated are the ram accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater. The concept of the ram accelerator is presented as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerothermodynamics research. The ram accelerator is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled in a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Combustion on and behind the projectile generates thrust which accelerates it to very high velocities. The acceleration can be tailored for the 'soft launch' of instrumented models. The distinctive reacting flow phenomena that have been observed in the ram accelerator are relevant to the aerothermodynamic processes in airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems and are useful for validating sophisticated CFD codes. The recently demonstrated scalability of the device and the ability to control the rate of acceleration offer unique opportunities for the use of the ram accelerator as a large-scale hypersonic ground test facility. The flowing gas radiation receiver is a novel concept for using solar energy to heat a working fluid for space power or propulsion. Focused solar radiation is absorbed directly in a working gas, rather than by heat transfer through a solid surface. Previous theoretical analysis had demonstrated that radiation trapping reduces energy loss compared to that of blackbody receivers, and enables higher efficiencies and higher peak temperatures. An experiment was carried out to measure the temperature profile of an infrared-active gas and demonstrate the effect of radiation trapping. The success of this effort validates analytical models of heat transfer in this receiver, and confirms the potential of this approach for achieving high efficiency space power and propulsion.

  20. Acceleration of plasma flows in the closed magnetic fields: Simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2006-06-15

    Within the framework of a two-fluid description, possible pathways for the generation of fast flows (dynamical as well as steady) in the closed magnetic fields are established. It is shown that a primary plasma flow (locally sub-Alfvenic) is accelerated while interacting with ambient arcade-like closed field structures. The time scale for creating reasonably fast flows (> or approx. 100 km/s) is dictated by the initial ion skin depth, while the amplification of the flow depends on local plasma {beta}. It is shown that distances over which the flows become 'fast' are {approx}0.01R{sub 0} from the interaction surface (R{sub 0} being a characteristic length of the system); later, the fast flow localizes (with dimensions < or approx. 0.05R{sub 0}) in the upper central region of the original arcade. For fixed initial temperature, the final speed (> or approx. 500 km/s) of the accelerated flow and the modification of the field structure are independent of the time duration (lifetime) of the initial flow. In the presence of dissipation, these flows are likely to play a fundamental role in the heating of the finely structured stellar atmospheres; their relevance to the solar wind is also obvious.

  1. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  2. A numerical method for the quasi-incompressible Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations for variable density flows with a discrete energy law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Lin, P.; Lowengrub, J. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically a diffuse interface model for the Navier-Stokes equation with fluid-fluid interface when the fluids have different densities [48]. Under minor reformulation of the system, we show that there is a continuous energy law underlying the system, assuming that all variables have reasonable regularities. It is shown in the literature that an energy law preserving method will perform better for multiphase problems. Thus for the reformulated system, we design a C0 finite element method and a special temporal scheme where the energy law is preserved at the discrete level. Such a discrete energy law (almost the same as the continuous energy law) for this variable density two-phase flow model has never been established before with C0 finite element. A Newton method is introduced to linearise the highly non-linear system of our discretization scheme. Some numerical experiments are carried out using the adaptive mesh to investigate the scenario of coalescing and rising drops with differing density ratio. The snapshots for the evolution of the interface together with the adaptive mesh at different times are presented to show that the evolution, including the break-up/pinch-off of the drop, can be handled smoothly by our numerical scheme. The discrete energy functional for the system is examined to show that the energy law at the discrete level is preserved by our scheme.

  3. A numerical method for the quasi-incompressible Cahn–Hilliard–Navier–Stokes equations for variable density flows with a discrete energy law

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z.; Lin, P.; Lowengrub, J.S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically a diffuse interface model for the Navier–Stokes equation with fluid–fluid interface when the fluids have different densities [48]. Under minor reformulation of the system, we show that there is a continuous energy law underlying the system, assuming that all variables have reasonable regularities. It is shown in the literature that an energy law preserving method will perform better for multiphase problems. Thus for the reformulated system, we design a C{sup 0} finite element method and a special temporal scheme where the energy law is preserved at the discrete level. Such a discrete energy law (almost the same as the continuous energy law) for this variable density two-phase flow model has never been established before with C{sup 0} finite element. A Newton method is introduced to linearise the highly non-linear system of our discretization scheme. Some numerical experiments are carried out using the adaptive mesh to investigate the scenario of coalescing and rising drops with differing density ratio. The snapshots for the evolution of the interface together with the adaptive mesh at different times are presented to show that the evolution, including the break-up/pinch-off of the drop, can be handled smoothly by our numerical scheme. The discrete energy functional for the system is examined to show that the energy law at the discrete level is preserved by our scheme.

  4. Quasi-steady accelerator operation on the ZAP flow Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M. C. Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Ross, M. P.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment utilizes sheared flows to stabilize an otherwise unstable equilibrium. The sheared flows are maintained by streaming high velocity plasma parallel to the pinch. Previous operations of the machine show depletion of the accelerator’s neutral gas supply late in the pulse leading to pinch instability. The current distribution in the accelerator exhibits characteristic modes during this operation, which is corroborated by interferometric signals. The decrease in density precipitates a loss of plasma quiescence in the pinch, which occurs on a timescale related to the flow velocity from the plasma source. To abate the depletion, the geometry of the accelerator is altered to increase the neutral gas supply. The design creates a standing deflagration front in the accelerator that persists for the pulse duration. The new operating mode is characterized by the same diagnostics as the previous mode. The lessons learned in the accelerator operations have been applied to the design of a new experiment, ZaP-HD. This work was supported by grants from the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  5. An Exact Solution to the Draining Reservoir Problem of the Incompressible and Non-Viscous Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Seok-In

    2009-01-01

    The exact expressions for the drain time and the height, velocity and acceleration of the free surface are found for the draining reservoir problem of the incompressible and non-viscous liquid. Contrary to the conventional approximate results, they correctly describe the initial time dependence of the liquid velocity and acceleration. Torricelli's…

  6. A cellular automata traffic flow model considering the heterogeneity of acceleration and delay probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Lang; Wong, S. C.; Min, Jie; Tian, Shuo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the cellular automata traffic flow model, which considers the heterogeneity of vehicle acceleration and the delay probability of vehicles. Computer simulations are used to identify three typical phases in the model: free-flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving traffic jam. In the synchronized flow region of the fundamental diagram, the low and high velocity vehicles compete with each other and play an important role in the evolution of the system. The analysis shows that there are two types of bistable phases. However, in the original Nagel and Schreckenberg cellular automata traffic model, there are only two kinds of traffic conditions, namely, free-flow and traffic jams. The synchronized flow phase and bistable phase have not been found.

  7. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  8. Investigation of the aerothermodynamics of hypervelocity reacting flows in the ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.; Knowlen, C.

    1992-01-01

    New diagnostic techniques for measuring the high pressure flow fields associated with high velocity ram accelerator propulsive modes was experimentally investigated. Individual propulsive modes are distinguished by their operating Mach number range and the manner in which the combustion process is initiated and stabilized. Operation of the thermally choked ram accelerator mode begins by injecting the projectile into the accelerator tube at a prescribed entrance velocity by means of a conventional light gas gun. A specially designed obturator, which is used to seal the bore of the gun, plays a key role in the ignition of the propellant gases in the subsonic combustion mode of the ram accelerator. Once ignited, the combustion process travels with the projectile and releases enough heat to thermally choke the flow within several tube diameters behind it, thereby stabilizing a high pressure zone on the rear of the projectile. When the accelerating projectile approaches the Chapman-Jouguet detonation speed of the propellant mixture, the combustion region is observed to move up onto the afterbody of the projectile as the pressure field evolves to a distinctively different form that implies the presence of supersonic combustion processes. Eventually, a high enough Mach number is reached that the ram effect is sufficient to cause the combustion process to occur entirely on the body. Propulsive cycles utilizing on-body heat release can be established either by continuously accelerating the projectile in a single propellant mixture from low initial in-tube Mach numbers (M less than 4) or by injecting the projectile at a speed above the propellant's Chapman-Jouguet detonation speed. The results of experimental and theoretical explorations of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena and the effectiveness of the new diagnostic techniques are presented in this report.

  9. THE BERNOULLI EQUATION AND COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The incompressible Bernoulli equation is an analytical relationship between pressure, kinetic energy, and potential energy. As perhaps the simplest and most useful statement for describing laminar flow, it buttresses numerous incompressible flow models that have been developed ...

  10. Effective surface-shear viscosity of an incompressible particle-laden fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishchuk, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    The presence of even a small amount of surfactant at the particle-laden fluid interface subjected to shear makes surface flow incompressible if the shear rate is small enough [T. M. Fischer et al., J. Fluid Mech. 558, 451 (2006), 10.1017/S002211200600022X]. In the present paper the effective surface shear viscosity of a flat, low-concentration, particle-laden incompressible interface separating two immiscible fluids is calculated. The resulting value is found to be 7.6% larger than the value obtained without account for surface incompressibility.

  11. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  12. Parallel heat flux and flow acceleration in open field line plasmas with magnetic trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, Chris

    2014-10-15

    The magnetic field strength modulation in a tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) provides both flux expansion next to the divertor plates and magnetic trapping in a large portion of the SOL. Previously, we have focused on a flux expander with long mean-free-path, motivated by the high temperature and low density edge anticipated for an absorbing boundary enabled by liquid lithium surfaces. Here, the effects of magnetic trapping and a marginal collisionality on parallel heat flux and parallel flow acceleration are examined. The various transport mechanisms are captured by kinetic simulations in a simple but representative mirror-expander geometry. The observed parallel flow acceleration is interpreted and elucidated with a modified Chew-Goldberger-Low model that retains temperature anisotropy and finite collisionality.

  13. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  14. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  15. Development of anisotropy in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien; Politano, Hélène

    2008-12-01

    We present a set of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of incompressible decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in which we investigate the influence of an external uniform magnetic field B0 . A parametric study in terms of B0 intensity is made where, in particular, we distinguish the shear-from the pseudo-Alfvén waves dynamics. The initial kinetic and magnetic energies are equal with a negligible cross correlation. Both the temporal and spectral effects of B0 are discussed. A subcritical balance is found between the Alfvén and nonlinear times with both a global and a spectral definition. The nonlinear dynamics of strongly magnetized flows is characterized by a different k⊥ spectrum (where B0 defines the parallel direction) if it is plotted at a fixed k∥ (two-dimensional spectrum) or if it is integrated (averaged) over all k∥ (one-dimensional spectrum). In the former case a much wider inertial range is found with a steep power law, closer to the wave turbulence prediction than the Kolmogorov one such as in the latter case. It is believed that the averaging effect may be a source of difficulty to detect the transition towards wave turbulence in natural plasmas. Another important result of this paper is the formation of filaments reported within current and vorticity sheets in strongly magnetized flows, which modifies our classical picture of dissipative sheets in conductive flows.

  16. ELECTRON HEATING AND ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Jian; Yuan Feng; Liang, Edison

    2010-01-10

    Both analytical and numerical works show that magnetic reconnection must occur in hot accretion flows. This process will effectively heat and accelerate electrons. In this paper, we use the numerical hybrid simulation of magnetic reconnection plus the test-electron method to investigate the electron acceleration and heating due to magnetic reconnection in hot accretion flows. We consider fiducial values of density, temperature, and magnetic parameter beta{sub e} (defined as the ratio of the electron pressure to the magnetic pressure) of the accretion flow as n{sub 0} approx 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, T {sup 0}{sub e} approx 2 x 10{sup 9} K, and beta{sub e} = 1. We find that electrons are heated to a higher temperature T{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 9} K, and a fraction eta approx 8% of electrons are accelerated into a broken power-law distribution, dN(gamma) propor to gamma{sup -p}, with p approx 1.5 and 4 below and above approx1 MeV, respectively. We also investigate the effect of varying beta and n{sub 0}. We find that when beta{sub e} is smaller or n{sub 0} is larger, i.e., the magnetic field is stronger, T{sub e} , eta, and p all become larger.

  17. Turbulent Deflagrated Flame Interaction with a Fluidic Jet Flow for Deflagration-to-Detonation Flame Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Jessica; McGarry, Joseph; Ahmed, Kareem

    2015-11-01

    Detonation is a high energetic mode of pressure gain combustion. Detonation combustion exploits the pressure rise to augment high flow momentum and thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. The driving mechanism of deflagrated flame acceleration to detonation is turbulence generation and induction. A fluidic jet is an innovative method for the production of turbulence intensities and flame acceleration. Compared to traditional obstacles, the jet reduces the pressure losses and heat soak effects while providing turbulence generation control. The investigation characterizes the turbulent flame-flow interactions. The focus of the study is on classifying the turbulent flame dynamics and the temporal evolution of turbulent flame regime. The turbulent flame-flow interactions are experimentally studied using a LEGO Detonation facility. Advanced high-speed laser diagnostics, particle image velocimetry (PIV), planar laser induced florescence (PLIF), and Schlieren imaging are used in analyzing the physics of the interaction and flame acceleration. Higher turbulence induction is observed within the turbulent flame after contact with the jet, leading to increased flame burning rates. The interaction with the fluidic jet results in turbulent flame transition from the thin reaction zones to the broken reaction regime.

  18. The equations of nearly incompressible fluids. I. Hydrodynamics, turbulence, and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    A unified analysis delineating the conditions under which the equations of classical incompressible and compressible hydrodynamics are related in the absence of large-scale thermal, gravitational, and field gradients is presented. By means of singular expansion techniques, a method is developed to derive modified systems of fluid equations in which the effects of compressibility are admitted only weakly in terms of the incompressible hydrodynamic solutions (hence ``nearly incompressible hydrodynamics''). Besides including molecular viscosity self-consistently, the role of thermal conduction in an ideal fluid is also considered. With the inclusion of heat conduction, it is found that two distinct routes to incompressibility are possible, distinguished according to the relative magnitudes of the temperature, density, and pressure fluctuations. This leads to two distinct models for thermally conducting, nearly incompressible hydrodynamics—heat-fluctuation-dominated hydrodynamics (HFDH's) and heat-fluctuation-modified hydrodynamics (HFMD's). For the HFD case, the well-known classical passive scalar equation for temperature is derived as one of the nearly incompressible fluid equations and temperature and density fluctuations are predicted to be anticorrelated. For HFM fluids, a new thermal transport equation, in which compressible acoustic effects are present, is obtained together with a more-complicated ``correlation'' between temperature, density, and pressure fluctuations. Although the equations of nearly incompressible hydrodynamics are envisaged principally as being applicable to homogeneous turbulence and wave propagation in low Mach number flow, it is anticipated that their applicability is likely to be far greater.

  19. TEMPEST/N33.5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Package For Incompressible, 3D, Time Dependent Pro

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Dr.D.S.; Eyler, Dr.L.L.

    1991-04-01

    TEMPESTN33.5 provides numerical solutions to general incompressible flow problems with coupled heat transfer in fluids and solids. Turbulence is created with a k-e model and gas, liquid or solid constituents may be included with the bulk flow. Problems may be modeled in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Limitations include incompressible flow, Boussinesq approximation, and passive constituents. No direct steady state solution is available; steady state is obtained as the limit of a transient.

  20. Low-altitude electron acceleration due to multiple flow bursts in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Karlsson, T.; Hamrin, M.; Nilsson, H.; Marghitu, O.; Amm, O.; Bunescu, C.; Constantinescu, V.; Frey, H. U.; Keiling, A.; Semeter, J.; Sorbalo, E.; Vogt, J.; Forsyth, C.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2014-02-01

    At 10:00 UT on 25 February 2008, Cluster 1 spacecraft crossed the near-midnight auroral zone, at about 2 RE altitude, while two of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft, THD and THE, observed multiple flow bursts on the near-conjugate plasma sheet field lines. The flow shear pattern at THEMIS was consistent with the vortical motion at duskside of a localized flow channel. Coinciding in time with the flow bursts, Cluster 1 observed bursts of counterstreaming electrons with mostly low energies (≤441 eV), accompanied by short time scale (<5 s) magnetic field disturbances embedded in flow-associated field-aligned current systems. This conjugate event not only confirms the idea that the plasma sheet flows are the driver of the kinetic Alfvén waves accelerating the low-energy electrons but is a unique observation of disturbances in the high-altitude auroral region relevant to the multiple plasma sheet flows.

  1. On the nature of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2007-02-15

    A novel model of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of a strong external magnetic field is proposed for the explanation of recent numerical results. According to the proposed model, in the presence of the strong external magnetic field, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence becomes nonlocal in the sense that low-frequency modes cause decorrelation of interacting high-frequency modes from the inertial interval. It is shown that the obtained nonlocal spectrum of the inertial range of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence represents an anisotropic analogue of Kraichnan's nonlocal spectrum of hydrodynamic turbulence. Based on the analysis performed in the framework of the weak-coupling approximation, which represents one of the equivalent formulations of the direct interaction approximation, it is shown that incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence could be both local and nonlocal, and therefore anisotropic analogues of both the Kolmogorov and Kraichnan spectra are realizable in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  2. Effect of isolated fractures on accelerated flow in unsaturated porous rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Nimmo, J.R.; Dragila, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Fractures that begin and end in the unsaturated zone, or isolated fractures, have been ignored in previous studies because they were generally assumed to behave as capillary barriers and remain nonconductive. We conducted a series of experiments using Berea sandstone samples to examine the physical mechanisms controlling flow in a rock containing a single isolated fracture. The input fluxes and fracture orientation were varied in these experiments. Visualization experiments using dyed water in a thin vertical slab of rock were conducted to identify flow mechanisms occurring due to the presence of the isolated fracture. Two mechanisms occurred: (1) localized flow through the rock matrix in the vicinity of the isolated fracture and (2) pooling of water at the bottom of the fracture, indicating the occurrence of film flow along the isolated fracture wall. These mechanisms were observed at fracture angles of 20 and 60 degrees from the horizontal, but not at 90 degrees. Pooling along the bottom of the fracture was observed over a wider range of input fluxes for low-angled isolated fractures compared to high-angled ones. Measurements of matrix water pressures in the samples with the 20 and 60 degree fractures also demonstrated that preferential flow occurred through the matrix in the fracture vicinity, where higher pressures occurred in the regions where faster flow was observed in the visualization experiments. The pooling length at the terminus of a 20 degree isolated fracture was measured as a function of input flux. Calculations of the film flow rate along the fracture were made using these measurements and indicated that up to 22% of the flow occurred as film flow. These experiments, apparently the first to consider isolated fractures, demonstrate that such features can accelerate flow through the unsaturated zone and should be considered when developing conceptual models.

  3. Growth and decay of acceleration waves in non-ideal gas flow with radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lal; Singh, Raghwendra; Ram, Subedar

    2012-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the study of the propagation of acceleration waves along the characteristic path in a non-ideal gas flow with effect of radiative heat transfer. It is shown that a linear solution in the characteristic plane can exhibit non-linear behavior in the physical plane. It is also investigated as to how the radiative heat transfer under the optically thin limit will affect the formation of shock in planer, cylindrical and spherically symmetric flows. We conclude that there exists critical amplitude such that any compressive waves with initial amplitude greater than the critical one terminate into shock waves while an initial amplitude less than the critical one results in the decay of the disturbance. The critical time for shock formation has been computed. In this paper we also compare/contrast the nature of solution in ideal and non ideal gas flows.

  4. Multiple-grid convergence acceleration of viscous and inviscid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    A multiple-grid algorithm for use in efficiently obtaining steady solution to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The convergence of a simple, explicit fine-grid solution procedure is accelerated on a sequence of successively coarser grids by a coarse-grid information propagation method which rapidly eliminates transients from the computational domain. This use of multiple-gridding to increase the convergence rate results in substantially reduced work requirements for the numerical solution of a wide range of flow problems. Computational results are presented for subsonic and transonic inviscid flows and for laminar and turbulent, attached and separated, subsonic viscous flows. Work reduction factors as large as eight, in comparison to the basic fine-grid algorithm, were obtained. Possibilities for further performance improvement are discussed.

  5. Inertial particle acceleration statistics in turbulence: Effects of filtering, biased sampling, and flow topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Juan P. L. C.; Collins, Lance R.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of "biased sampling," i.e., the clustering of inertial particles in regions of the flow with low vorticity, and "filtering," i.e., the tendency of inertial particles to attenuate the fluid velocity fluctuations, on the probability density function of inertial particle accelerations. In particular, we find that the concept of "biased filtering" introduced by Ayyalasomayajula et al. ["Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 20, 0945104 (2008), 10.1063/1.2976174], in which particles filter stronger acceleration events more than weaker ones, is relevant to the higher order moments of acceleration. Flow topology and its connection to acceleration is explored through invariants of the velocity-gradient, strain-rate, and rotation-rate tensors. A semi-quantitative analysis is performed where we assess the contribution of specific flow topologies to acceleration moments. Our findings show that the contributions of regions of high vorticity and low strain decrease significantly with Stokes number, a non-dimensional measure of particle inertia. The contribution from regions of low vorticity and high strain exhibits a peak at a Stokes number of approximately 0.2. Following the methodology of Ooi et al. ["A study of the evolution and characteristics of the invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor in isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 381, 141 (1999), 10.1017/S0022112098003681], we compute mean conditional trajectories in planes formed by pairs of tensor invariants in time. Among the interesting findings is the existence of a stable focus in the plane formed by the second invariants of the strain-rate and rotation-rate tensors. Contradicting the results of Ooi et al., we find a stable focus in the plane formed by the second and third invariants of the strain-rate tensor for fluid tracers. We confirm, at an even higher Reynolds number, the conjecture of Collins and Keswani ["Reynolds

  6. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J.; Niederhaus, C.

    2000-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and possibly become turbulent given the proper initial conditions. R-M instability is similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability, which is generated when the two fluids undergo a constant acceleration. R-M instability is a fundamental fluid instability that is important to fields ranging from astrophysics to high-speed combustion. For example, R-M instability is currently the limiting factor in achieving a net positive yield with inertial confinement fusion. The experiments described here utilize a novel technique that circumvents many of the experimental difficulties previously limiting the study of the R-M instability. A Plexiglas tank contains two unequal density liquids and is gently oscillated horizontally to produce a controlled initial fluid interface shape. The tank is mounted to a sled on a high speed, low friction linear rail system, constraining the main motion to the vertical direction. The sled is released from an initial height and falls vertically until it bounces off of a movable spring, imparting an impulsive acceleration in the upward direction. As the sled travels up and down the rails, the spring retracts out of the way, allowing the instability to evolve in free-fall until impacting a shock absorber at the end of the rails. The impulsive acceleration provided to the system is measured by a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on the tank, and a capacitive accelerometer measures the low-level drag of the bearings. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence is used for flow visualization, which uses an Argon ion laser to illuminate the flow and a CCD camera, mounted to the sled, to capture images of the interface. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids

  7. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  8. Error-Rate Estimation Based on Multi-Signal Flow Graph Model and Accelerated Radiation Tests.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Wang, Yueke; Xing, Kefei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Zelong

    2016-01-01

    A method of evaluating the single-event effect soft-error vulnerability of space instruments before launched has been an active research topic in recent years. In this paper, a multi-signal flow graph model is introduced to analyze the fault diagnosis and meantime to failure (MTTF) for space instruments. A model for the system functional error rate (SFER) is proposed. In addition, an experimental method and accelerated radiation testing system for a signal processing platform based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA) is presented. Based on experimental results of different ions (O, Si, Cl, Ti) under the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, the SFER of the signal processing platform is approximately 10-3(error/particle/cm2), while the MTTF is approximately 110.7 h. PMID:27583533

  9. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-26

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense ({approx} 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion ({approx}100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient ({approx} 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3x10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  10. Effects of unsteady flow and real gas equations of state on high pressure ram accelerator operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Christopher Michael

    2001-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the conditions which enable thermally choked ram acceleration at fill pressures greater than 5 MPa is presented. A set of experimental parameters was determined which enabled projectiles to be accelerated continuously in propellants at 20 MPa for distances up to 4 m. The operating conditions which permit thermally choked operation at 20 MPa are considerably different from those at 5 MPa and below; the effects of initial velocity, propellant composition, projectile design, and obturator design on high pressure operation were investigated. During thermally choked operation at high pressure, the velocity-distance profile is overpredicted by a quasi-steady control volume approach for thrust determination. A revision to the control volume model accounting for unsteady flow effects was developed and presented here. The unsteady model indicates that the thrust coefficient-Mach number profile obtained for high pressure conditions is consistently lower than that obtained with the quasi-steady model, due to unsteady momentum transfer to the gas in the control volume surrounding the projectile, an effect considered negligible at 5 MPa and below. This analytical deviation correlates with high pressure experimental results. When the unsteady model incorporates the heat release behavior predicted for a real gas equation of state, good agreement is obtained with experimental velocity-distance data. A model for predicting sonic diffuser unstart under unsteady flow conditions is also presented; the model predictions agree well with experimental results. Both models indicate that the mass of fluid in a control volume, when on the order of the mass of the surrounding system, has a significant effect on the body forces acting on the system under unsteady flow conditions. The unsteady models quantify this effect by showing that thrust in an unsteady flow propulsion system is not directly proportional to pressure, and that supersonic

  11. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  12. Gravitational tides on Jupiter. 3: Atmospheric response and mean flow acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, P. J.; Lindzen, R. S.

    1994-04-01

    The gravitational tidal response at the visible cloud level of Jupiter is obtained as a function of static stability in the planetary interior. It is suggested that confirmation of the presence of static stability in the planetary interior could be achieved by observing tidal fields at cloud level. We also calculate the mean flow acceleration induced by tidal fields and suggest that, if the interior is even marginally statically stable, the tides may provide the momentum source maintaining the alternating zonal jets observed at the cloud level of the planet.

  13. Characteristics of high gradient insulators for accelerator and high power flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.

    1997-07-01

    The high gradient insulator has been demonstrated to operate at levels comparable or better than special geometry or coated insulators. Some patented insulator configurations allow for sophisticated accelerator structures, high power flow interfaces, and microwave applications not previously possible. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques available at AlliedSignal FM and T made this development possible. Bipolar and high power flow applications are specially suited for present insulator designs. The insulator shows a beneficial effect when used under RF fields or RF structures. These insulators can be designed, to a first approximation, from simple electron flight path equations. With a recently developed model of surface flashover physics the authors completed a set of design calculations that include effects such as layer density and dielectric/metal thickness. Experimental data, obtained in the last few years of development, is presented and reviewed. Several insulator fabrication characteristics, indicating critical design parameters, are also presented.

  14. A matrix-form GSM-CFD solver for incompressible fluids and its application to hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    A GSM-CFD solver for incompressible flows is developed based on the gradient smoothing method (GSM). A matrix-form algorithm and corresponding data structure for GSM are devised to efficiently approximate the spatial gradients of field variables using the gradient smoothing operation. The calculated gradient values on various test fields show that the proposed GSM is capable of exactly reproducing linear field and of second order accuracy on all kinds of meshes. It is found that the GSM is much more robust to mesh deformation and therefore more suitable for problems with complicated geometries. Integrated with the artificial compressibility approach, the GSM is extended to solve the incompressible flows. As an example, the flow simulation of carotid bifurcation is carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed GSM-CFD solver. The blood is modeled as incompressible Newtonian fluid and the vessel is treated as rigid wall in this paper.

  15. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. I - Unsteady flow concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced military aircraft 'supermaneuverability' requirements entail the sustained operation of airfoils at stalled flow conditions. The present work addresses the effects of separated flow on vehicle dynamics; an analytic method is presented which employs static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on incompressible unsteady aerodynamics. The key parameters in the analytic relationship between steady and nonsteady aerodynamics are the time-lag before a change of flow conditions can affect the separation-induced aerodynamic loads, the accelerated flow effect, and the moving wall effect.

  16. Investigation of radiative bow-shocks in magnetically accelerated plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C. Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Cordaro, S. W.; Blesener, I. C.; Hoyt, C. L.; Cahill, A. D.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Gourdain, P. A.; Seyler, C. E.; Greenly, J. B.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2015-05-15

    We present a study of the formation of bow shocks in radiatively cooled plasma flows. This work uses an inverse wire array to provide a quasi-uniform, large scale hydrodynamic flow accelerated by Lorentz forces to supersonic velocities. This flow impacts a stationary object placed in its path, forming a well-defined Mach cone. Interferogram data are used to determine a Mach number of ∼6, which may increase with radial position suggesting a strongly cooling flow. Self-emission imaging shows the formation of a thin (<60 μm) strongly emitting shock region, where T{sub e} ∼ 40–50 eV, and rapid cooling behind the shock. Emission is observed upstream of the shock position which appears consistent with a radiation driven phenomenon. Data are compared to 2-dimensional simulations using the Gorgon MHD code, which show good agreement with the experiments. The simulations are also used to investigate the effect of magnetic field in the target, demonstrating that the bow-shocks have a high plasma β, and the influence of B-field at the shock is small. This consistent with experimental measurement with micro bdot probes.

  17. Accelerating groundwater flow simulation in MODFLOW using JASMIN-based parallel computing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tangpei; Mo, Zeyao; Shao, Jingli

    2014-01-01

    To accelerate the groundwater flow simulation process, this paper reports our work on developing an efficient parallel simulator through rebuilding the well-known software MODFLOW on JASMIN (J Adaptive Structured Meshes applications Infrastructure). The rebuilding process is achieved by designing patch-based data structure and parallel algorithms as well as adding slight modifications to the compute flow and subroutines in MODFLOW. Both the memory requirements and computing efforts are distributed among all processors; and to reduce communication cost, data transfers are batched and conveniently handled by adding ghost nodes to each patch. To further improve performance, constant-head/inactive cells are tagged and neglected during the linear solving process and an efficient load balancing strategy is presented. The accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated through modeling three scenarios: The first application is a field flow problem located at Yanming Lake in China to help design reasonable quantity of groundwater exploitation. Desirable numerical accuracy and significant performance enhancement are obtained. Typically, the tagged program with load balancing strategy running on 40 cores is six times faster than the fastest MICCG-based MODFLOW program. The second test is simulating flow in a highly heterogeneous aquifer. The AMG-based JASMIN program running on 40 cores is nine times faster than the GMG-based MODFLOW program. The third test is a simplified transient flow problem with the order of tens of millions of cells to examine the scalability. Compared to 32 cores, parallel efficiency of 77 and 68% are obtained on 512 and 1024 cores, respectively, which indicates impressive scalability. PMID:23600445

  18. Dispersion of a cloud of particles in the accelerated flow behind a moving shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Gustaaf; Dittmann, Thomas; Don, Wai-Sun

    2010-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics and dispersion of bronze particles that are initially arranged in varying cloud shapes and are accelerated in the supersonic flow behind a moving normal shock. Particle clouds with a particle volume concentration of 4% are arranged initially in a rectangular, triangular and circular shape, whose angle with respect to the incoming flow are also varied. Simulations are performed with a recently developed high-order resolution Eulerian-Lagrangian method, that approximates the Euler equations governing the gas dynamics with the improved high order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme, while individual particles are traced in the Lagrangian frame using high-order time integration schemes. The purpose of these simulations is two-fold: we are aiming to match a published shocktube experiment of the dispersion of an initially, nominally rectangular cloud shape behind a moving shock and we are aiming to validate our high-order methods against these experiments. The dynamics and resulting dispersion patterns of the developing particle-laden flows are distinctly different between different cloud shapes but we will report statistical similarities and correlations between cloud spread and energy budgets of the particle phases.

  19. Multigrid Acceleration of Time-Accurate DNS of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeze, Jan; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans; Streng, Martin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient scheme for the direct numerical simulation of 3D transitional and developed turbulent flow is presented. Explicit and implicit time integration schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. The nonlinear system resulting from the implicit time discretization is solved with an iterative method and accelerated by the application of a multigrid technique. Since we use central spatial discretizations and no artificial dissipation is added to the equations, the smoothing method is less effective than in the more traditional use of multigrid in steady-state calculations. Therefore, a special prolongation method is needed in order to obtain an effective multigrid method. This simulation scheme was studied in detail for compressible flow over a flat plate. In the laminar regime and in the first stages of turbulent flow the implicit method provides a speed-up of a factor 2 relative to the explicit method on a relatively coarse grid. At increased resolution this speed-up is enhanced correspondingly.

  20. Contact detection acceleration in pebble flow simulation for pebble bed reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ji, W.

    2013-07-01

    Pebble flow simulation plays an important role in the steady state and transient analysis of thermal-hydraulics and neutronics for Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). The Discrete Element Method (DEM) and the modified Molecular Dynamics (MD) method are widely used to simulate the pebble motion to obtain the distribution of pebble concentration, velocity, and maximum contact stress. Although DEM and MD present high accuracy in the pebble flow simulation, they are quite computationally expensive due to the large quantity of pebbles to be simulated in a typical PBR and the ubiquitous contacts and collisions between neighboring pebbles that need to be detected frequently in the simulation, which greatly restricted their applicability for large scale PBR designs such as PBMR400. Since the contact detection accounts for more than 60% of the overall CPU time in the pebble flow simulation, the acceleration of the contact detection can greatly enhance the overall efficiency. In the present work, based on the design features of PBRs, two contact detection algorithms, the basic cell search algorithm and the bounding box search algorithm are investigated and applied to pebble contact detection. The influence from the PBR system size, core geometry and the searching cell size on the contact detection efficiency is presented. Our results suggest that for present PBR applications, the bounding box algorithm is less sensitive to the aforementioned effects and has superior performance in pebble contact detection compared with basic cell search algorithm. (authors)

  1. A Three-Dimensional CFD Investigation of Secondary Flow in an Accelerating, 90 deg Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchi, Richard H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently applied the WIND National Code flow solver to an accelerating elbow with a 90 deg. bend to reveal aspects of secondary flow. This elbow was designed by NACA in the early 1950's such that flow separation would be avoided. Experimental testing was also done at that time. The current three dimensional CFD investigation shows that separation has indeed been avoided. Using its three-dimensional capability, this investigation provides various viewpoints in several planes that display the inception, development, and final location of a passage vortex. Its shape first becomes discernible as a vortex near the exit of the bend. This rendition of the exit passage vortex compares well with that found in the experiments. The viewpoints show that the passage vortex settles on the suction surface at the exit about one-third of the distance between the plane wall and midspan. Furthermore, it projects into the mainstream to about one-third of the channel width. Of several turbulence models used in this investigation, the Spalart Alimaras, Baldwin Lomax, and SST (Shear Stress Transport) models were by far the most successful in matching the experiments.

  2. A Study of Laminar Compressible Viscous Pipe Flow Accelerated by an Axial Body Force, with Application to Magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1961-01-01

    A study is made of the steady laminar flow of a compressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe when the fluid is accelerated by an axial body force. The application of the theory to the magnetofluidmechanics of an electrically conducting gas accelerated by electric and magnetic fields is discussed. Constant viscosity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity are assumed. Fully developed flow velocity and temperature profiles are shown, and detailed results of the accelerating flow development, including velocity and pressure as functions of distance, are given for the case where the axial body force is constant and for the case where it is a linear function of velocity. From these results are determined the pipe entry length and the pressure difference required.

  3. Helical flows of second grade fluid due to constantly accelerated shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, M.; Rauf, A.; Fetecau, C.; Khan, N. A.

    2011-04-01

    The helical flows of second grade fluid between two infinite coaxial circular cylinders is considered. The motion is produced by the inner cylinder that at the initial moment applies torsional and longitudinal constantly accelerated shear stresses to the fluid. The exact analytic solutions, obtained by employing the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in term of usual Bessel functions of first and second kind, satisfy both the governing equations and all imposed initial and boundary conditions. In the limiting case when α → 0, the solutions for Newtonian fluid are obtained for the same motion. The large-time solutions and transient solutions for second grade fluid are also obtained, and effect of material parameter α and kinematic viscosity ν is discussed. In the last, the effects of various parameters of interest on fluid motion as well as the comparison between second grade and Newtonian fluids are analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  4. Accelerated solution of non-linear flow problems using Chebyshev iteration polynomial based RK recursions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorber, A.A.; Carey, G.F.; Bova, S.W.; Harle, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    The connection between the solution of linear systems of equations by iterative methods and explicit time stepping techniques is used to accelerate to steady state the solution of ODE systems arising from discretized PDEs which may involve either physical or artificial transient terms. Specifically, a class of Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration schemes with extended stability domains has been used to develop recursion formulas which lead to accelerated iterative performance. The coefficients for the RK schemes are chosen based on the theory of Chebyshev iteration polynomials in conjunction with a local linear stability analysis. We refer to these schemes as Chebyshev Parameterized Runge Kutta (CPRK) methods. CPRK methods of one to four stages are derived as functions of the parameters which describe an ellipse {Epsilon} which the stability domain of the methods is known to contain. Of particular interest are two-stage, first-order CPRK and four-stage, first-order methods. It is found that the former method can be identified with any two-stage RK method through the correct choice of parameters. The latter method is found to have a wide range of stability domains, with a maximum extension of 32 along the real axis. Recursion performance results are presented below for a model linear convection-diffusion problem as well as non-linear fluid flow problems discretized by both finite-difference and finite-element methods.

  5. Laboratory studies of magnetized collisionless flows and shocks using accelerated plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. E.; Smith, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are thought to play a dominant role in the overall partition of energy throughout the universe, but have historically proven difficult to create in the laboratory. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL creates conditions similar to those found in both space and astrophysical shocks by accelerating hot (100s of eV during translation) dense (1022 - 1023 m-3) Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids to high velocities (100s of km/s); resulting in β ~ 1, collisionless plasma flows with sonic and Alfvén Mach numbers of ~10. The FRC subsequently impacts a static target such as a strong parallel or anti-parallel (reconnection-wise) magnetic mirror, a solid obstacle, or neutral gas cloud to create shocks with characteristic length and time scales that are both large enough to observe yet small enough to fit within the experiment. This enables study of the complex interplay of kinetic and fluid processes that mediate cosmic shocks and can generate non-thermal distributions, produce density and magnetic field enhancements much greater than predicted by fluid theory, and accelerate particles. An overview of the experimental capabilities of MSX will be presented, including diagnostics, selected recent results, and future directions. Supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under contract DE-AC52-06NA25369.

  6. Interfacial coupling between immiscible polymers: Flow accelerates reaction and improves adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie

    As the workhorses of the plastics industry, polyolefins are consumed in the largest volume of all types of polymers. Despite their wide use, polyolefins suffer from poor adhesion and compatibility with other polar polymers due to their intrinsic low polarity and lack of functional groups. The first goal of this study is to enhance interfacial adhesion between polyolefins with other polymers through coupling reaction of functional polymers. We have used functional polyethylenes with maleic anhydride, hydroxyl, primary and secondary amino groups grafted through reactive extrusion. Functional polyolefins dramatically improved the performance of polyolefins, including adhesion, compatibility, hardness and scratch resistance, and greatly expand their applications. The second goal is to understand the factors affecting adhesion. We systematically investigated two categories of parameters. One is molecular: the type and incorporation level of functional groups. The other is processing condition: die design in extruders, reaction time and temperature. The interfacial adhesion was measured with the asymmetric dual cantilever beam test and T-peel test. The extent of reaction was quantified through measuring anchored copolymers via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative correlation between adhesion and coupling reaction was developed. A coextruded bilayer system with coupling reaction at interfaces was created to clarify processing effects on the kinetics of coupling reactions. For the reaction between maleic anhydride modified polyethylene and nylon 6, the reaction rate during coextrusion through a fishtail die with compressive/extensional flow was strikingly almost two orders of magnitude larger than that through a constant thickness die without compressive flow. The latter reaction rate was close to that of quiescent lamination. We attribute the reaction acceleration through the fishtail die to the large deformation rate under the compressive/extensional flow

  7. Particle Acceleration in a High Enthalpy Nozzle Flow with a Modified Detonation Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

    2014-04-01

    The quality of thermal sprayed coatings depends on many factors which have been investigated and are still in scientific focus. Mostly, the coating material is inserted into the spray device as solid powder. The particle condition during the spray process has a strong effect on coating quality. In some cases, higher particle impact energy leads to improved coating quality. Therefore, a computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension with a nozzle transforms the detonation gun process into an intermittent shock tunnel process in which the particles are accelerated in a high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation with nozzle in which the device generates very high particle velocities up to a frequency of 5 Hz. A variable particle injection system allows injection of the powder at any point along the nozzle axis to control particle temperature and velocity. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture is used in the experiments. Operation performance and nozzle outflow are characterized by time resolved pressure measurements. The particle conditions inside the nozzle and in the nozzle exit plane are calculated with a quasi-one-dimensional WENO-code of high order. For the experiments, particle velocity is obtained by particle image velocimetry, and particle concentration is qualitatively determined by a laser extinction method. The powders used are WC-Co(88/12), NiCr(80/20), Al2O3, and Cu. Different substrate/powder combinations for varying particle injection positions have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

  8. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  9. Fluid Physics Under a Stochastic Acceleration Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinals, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    The research summarized in this report has involved a combined theoretical and computational study of fluid flow that results from the random acceleration environment present onboard space orbiters, also known as g-jitter. We have focused on a statistical description of the observed g-jitter, on the flows that such an acceleration field can induce in a number of experimental configurations of interest, and on extending previously developed methodology to boundary layer flows. Narrow band noise has been shown to describe many of the features of acceleration data collected during space missions. The scale of baroclinically induced flows when the driving acceleration is random is not given by the Rayleigh number. Spatially uniform g-jitter induces additional hydrodynamic forces among suspended particles in incompressible fluids. Stochastic modulation of the control parameter shifts the location of the onset of an oscillatory instability. Random vibration of solid boundaries leads to separation of boundary layers. Steady streaming ahead of a modulated solid-melt interface enhances solute transport, and modifies the stability boundaries of a planar front.

  10. Role of superfluidity in nuclear incompressibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, E.

    2009-07-15

    Nuclei are propitious tools to investigate the role of the superfluidity in the compressibility of a Fermionic system. The centroid of the Giant Monopole Resonance (GMR) in Tin isotopes is predicted using a constrained Hartree-Fock Bogoliubov approach, ensuring a full self-consistent treatment. Superfluidity is found to favour the compressibitily of nuclei. Pairing correlations explain why doubly magic nuclei such as {sup 208}Pb are stiffer compared to open-shell nuclei. Fully self-consistent predictions of the GMR on an isotopic chain should be the way to microscopically extract both the incompressibility and the density dependence of a given energy functional. The macroscopic extraction of K{sub sym}, the asymmetry incompressibility, is questioned. Investigations of the GMR in unstable nuclei are called for. Pairing gap dependence of the nuclear matter incompressibility should also be investigated.

  11. Chexal-Horowitz flow-accelerated corrosion model -- Parameters and influences

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, V.K.; Horowitz, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thinning caused by FAC has lead to many leaks and complete ruptures. These failures have required costly repairs and occasionally have caused lengthy shutdowns. To deal with FAC, utilities have instituted costly inspection and piping replacement programs. Typically, a nuclear unit will inspect about 100 large bore piping components plus additional small bore components during every refueling outage. To cope with FAC, there has been a great deal of research and development performed to obtain a greater understanding of the phenomenon. Currently, there is general agreement on the mechanism of FAC. This understanding has lead to the development of computer based tools to assist utility engineers in dealing with this issue. In the United States, the most commonly used computer program to predict and control is CHECWORKS{trademark}. This paper presents a description of the mechanism of FAC, and introduces the predictive algorithms used in CHECWORKS{trademark}. The parametric effects of water chemistry, materials, flow and geometry as predicted by CHECWORKS{trademark} will then be discussed. These trends will be described and explained by reference to the corrosion mechanism. The remedial actions possible to reduce the rate of damage caused by FAC will also be discussed.

  12. Accelerating the Gauss-Seidel Power Flow Solver on a High Performance Reconfigurable Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Jong-Ho; Ravindran, Arun; Mukherjee, Arindam; Joshi, Bharat; Chassin, David P.

    2009-09-01

    The computationally intensive power flow problem determines the voltage magnitude and phase angle at each bus in a power system for hundreds of thousands of buses under balanced three-phase steady-state conditions. We report an FPGA acceleration of the Gauss-Seidel based power flow solver employed in the transmission module of the GridLAB-D power distribution simulator and analysis tool. The prototype hardware is implemented on an SGI Altix-RASC system equipped with a Xilinx Virtex II 6000 FPGA. Due to capacity limitations of the FPGA, only the bus voltage calculations of the power network are implemented on hardware while the branch current calculations are implemented in software. For a 200,000 bus system, the bus voltage calculation on the FPGA achieves a 48x speed-up with PQ buses and a 62 times for PV over an equivalent sequential software implementation. The average overall speed up of the FPGA-CPU implementation with 100 iterations of the Gauss-Seidel power solver is 2.6x over a software implementation, with the branch calculations on the CPU accounting for 85% of the total execution time. The FPGA-CPU implementation also shows linear scaling with increase in the size of the input power network.

  13. Graphics processing unit accelerated one-dimensional blood flow computation in the human arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-12-01

    One-dimensional blood flow models have been used extensively for computing pressure and flow waveforms in the human arterial circulation. We propose an improved numerical implementation based on a graphics processing unit (GPU) for the acceleration of the execution time of one-dimensional model. A novel parallel hybrid CPU-GPU algorithm with compact copy operations (PHCGCC) and a parallel GPU only (PGO) algorithm are developed, which are compared against previously introduced PHCG versions, a single-threaded CPU only algorithm and a multi-threaded CPU only algorithm. Different second-order numerical schemes (Lax-Wendroff and Taylor series) are evaluated for the numerical solution of one-dimensional model, and the computational setups include physiologically motivated non-periodic (Windkessel) and periodic boundary conditions (BC) (structured tree) and elastic and viscoelastic wall laws. Both the PHCGCC and the PGO implementations improved the execution time significantly. The speed-up values over the single-threaded CPU only implementation range from 5.26 to 8.10 × , whereas the speed-up values over the multi-threaded CPU only implementation range from 1.84 to 4.02 × . The PHCGCC algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with non-periodic BC and for viscoelastic wall laws, whereas the PGO algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with periodic BC. PMID:24009129

  14. Sensitivity analysis in multipole-accelerated panel methods for potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leathrum, James F., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    In the design of an airframe, the effect of changing the geometry on resulting computations is necessary for design optimization. The geometry is defined in terms of a series of design variables, including design variables to define the wing planform, tail, canard, pylon, and nacelle. Design optimization in this research is based on how these design variable affect the potential flow. The potential flow is computed as a function of the geometry and location of a series of panels describing the airframe, which are in turn a function of the design variables. Multipole accelerated panel methods improve the computational complexity of the problem and thus are an attractive approach. To utilize the methods in design optimization, it was necessary to define the appropriate sensitivity derivatives. The overhead incurred from finding the sensitivity derivatives in conjunction with the original computation should be small. This research developed the background for multipole-accelerated panel methods and the framework for finding sensitivity derivatives in the methods. Potential flow panel codes are commonly used for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions for three dimensional geometries. Given an airframe which has been discretized into a series of panels to define the airframe geometry, potential is computed as a function of the influence of all panels on all other panels. This is a computationally intensive problem for which efficient solutions are desired to improve the computational time and to allow greater resolution by use of more panels. One such solution is the use of hierarchical multipole methods which entail approximations of the effects of far-field terms. Hierarchical multipole methods have become prevalent in molecular dynamics and gravitational physics, and have been introduced into the fields of capacitance calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and electromagnetics. The methods utilize multipole expansions to describe the effect of bodies (i

  15. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic model of plasma flows in a quasi-steady-state accelerator with a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. N.

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports the results of numerical studies of axisymmetric flows in a coaxial plasma accelerator in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field. The calculations were performed using a two-dimensional two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic model taking into account the Hall effect and the conductivity tensor of the medium. The numerical experiments confirmed the main features of the plasmadynamic processes found previously using analytical and one-fluid models and made it possible to study plasma flows near the electrodes.

  16. Nearly incompressible fluids: Decay of solar wind density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Shaikh, D.

    2008-11-01

    The evolution of density fluctuations throughout the solar wind is investigated as the basis of a newly developed theory of nearly incompressible hydrodynamics for an inhomogeneous flow. The model is explored using two-dimensional numerical simulations. The lowest-order density fluctuations (absent in the original homogeneous nearly incompressible theory) obey a passive scalar evolution equation with an additional source term that results from coupling to the large-scale inhomogeneous mean density gradient. The importance of this source term is explored, and we estimate analytically an upper bound for the maximum possible effect of a source term for nearly incompressible flows with an inhomogeneous background (static and spherically symmetric). For typical solar wind parameters, we show that this effect is rather weak beyond 0.1 AU and that the density fluctuations can be described sufficiently accurately as a pure passive scalar. Our simulations identify the sensitive dependence of density fluctuation evolution on typical initial length-scale ratio of scalar (density) and velocity fields, an effect known from the theory of passive scalar decay and experimentally measured in grid-generated turbulence. It has long been thought that the variance in the density fluctuations (δρ)2 should decay in the manner analogous to the mean background density, implying that with heliocentric distance (δρ)2 ∝ R-4 throughout the heliosphere. Analysis of plasma data obtained by the Voyager spacecraft by Bellamy et al. (2005) showed that the density fluctuations decay much more slowly than R-4 and the decay rate exhibits a flattening between 20-30 AU and a possible rise afterward. A possible mechanism to reduce the decay rate within 30 AU was suggested to be turbulence driven by stream-stream interactions followed by more dominant pickup ion interactions beyond 30 AU. Here we show that the variance in the density fluctuations as described by the inhomogeneous nearly

  17. Calculation of the velocity of a plasma flow in the nozzle exit section of a coaxial-electrode Hall accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoshko, I. A.; Ermachenko, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    The velocity of a plasma jet in the nozzle exit section and the pressure in the discharge zone of a coaxial-electrode Hall accelerator have been calculated on the basis of the experimentally measured enthalpy, temperature, and electron concentration near the indicated section within the framework of a model of the magnetic hydrodynamics of a plasma flow.

  18. Interaction dynamics of high Reynolds number magnetized plasma flow on the CTIX plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen James

    The Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment, (CTIX), is a coaxial railgun that forms and accelerates magnetized plasma rings called compact toroids (CT's). CTIX consists of a pair of cylindrical coaxial electrodes with the region between them kept at high vacuum (2 m long, 15 cm outer diameter). Hydrogen is typically the dominant constituent of the CT plasma, however helium can also be used. The railgun effect that accelerates the CT can be accounted for by the Lorentz j x B force density created by the power input from a capacitor bank of roughly a Giga-Watt peak. The final velocity of the CT can be as high as 300 km/s, with an acceleration of about 3 billion times Earth's gravity. The compact toroid is able to withstand these forces because of a large internal magnetic field of about 1 Tesla. Understanding the nature of high speed flow of a magnetized plasma has been the primary challenge of this work. In this dissertation we will explore a sequence of fundamental questions regarding the plasma physics of CTIX. First we will go over some new results about the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field, and its electrical resistivity. Then we will present the results from a sequence of key experiments involving reconnection/compression and thermalization of the plasma during interaction of the CT with target magnetic fields of various geometries. Next, we look at the Doppler shift of a spectral line of the He II ion as a measurement of plasma velocity, and to gain insight into the ionization physics of helium in our plasma. These preliminary experiments provide the background for our primary experimental tool for investigating turbulence, a technique called Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) in which a cloud of helium can be used to enhance plasma brightness, allowing plasma density fluctuations to be imaged. We will conclude with an analysis of the images that show coherent density waves, as well as the transition to turbulence during the interaction with a

  19. Numerical simulations of the flow field ahead of an accelerating flame in an obstructed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, C.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2010-07-01

    The development of the unburned gas flow field ahead of a flame front in an obstructed channel was investigated using large eddy simulation (LES). The standard Smagorinsky-Lilly and dynamic Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid models were used in these simulations. The geometry is essentially two-dimensional. The fence-type obstacles were placed on the top and bottom surfaces of a square cross-section channel, equally spaced along the channel length at the channel height. The laminar rollup of a vortex downstream of each obstacle, transition to turbulence, and growth of a recirculation zone between consecutive obstacles were observed in the simulations. By restricting the simulations to the early stages of the flame acceleration and by varying the domain width and domain length, the three-dimensionality of the vortex rollup process was investigated. It was found that initially the rollup process was two-dimensional and unaffected by the domain length and width. As the recirculation zone grew to fill the streamwise gap between obstacles, the length and width of the computational domain started to affect the simulation results. Three-dimensional flow structures formed within the shear layer, which was generated near the obstacle tips, and the core flow was affected by large-scale turbulence. The simulation predictions were compared to experimental schlieren images of the convection of helium tracer. The development of recirculation zones resulted in the formation of contraction and expansion regions near the obstacles, which significantly affected the centerline gas velocity. Oscillations in the centerline unburned gas velocity were found to be the dominate cause for the experimentally observed early flame-tip velocity oscillations. At later simulation times, regular oscillations in the unburned streamwise gas velocity were not observed, which is contrary to the experimental evidence. This suggests that fluctuations in the burning rate might be the source of the late flame

  20. Symmetric stiffness matrix for incompressible hyperelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamatsu, T.; Stricklin, J. A.; Key, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Symmetric structure matrices are derived for solving plane strain and axisymmetric problems involving incompressible hyperelastic materials. An infinite hollow cylinder subjected to internal pressure is considered as an example. Displacement and hydrostatic pressure profiles are calculated using the Newton-Raphson iteration technique. The results are in good agreement with the exact curves.

  1. Hot electrons downstream of the termination shock and the incompressibility of the heliosheath plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Hans-Jörg; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    We consider a fast magnetosonic multifluid representation of the solar wind termination shock and assume that the shock transition occurs in two steps: First the upstream plasma is subjected to a strong electric field decelerating the supersonic ion flow and accelerating the electrons to high velocities. In this part the electric forces strongly dominate over Lorentz forces, i.e. the de-magnetization region. By means of the Vlasow theorem we obtain the distribution function and the bulk velocity of the electrons. We can show that the shocked electrons experience a strong energy gain in form of overshoot kinetic energies. In the second part of the shock, convected magnetic fields lead to Lorentz forces that compete with electric forces and take care of winding up the electrons into a shell distribution which stores about 3/4 of the upstream ion kinetic energy. Due to this the electron fluid represents the dominating pressure in the heliosheath plasma which thus, as we show, behaves incompressible under such conditions.

  2. Linear analysis of incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Tahir, N A

    2009-10-01

    The study of the linear stage of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic solids is performed by considering thick plates under a constant acceleration that is also uniform except for a small sinusoidal ripple in the horizontal plane. The analysis is carried out by using an analytical model based on the Newton second law and it is complemented with extensive two-dimensional numerical simulations. The conditions for marginal stability that determine the instability threshold are derived. Besides, the boundary for the transition from the elastic to the plastic regime is obtained and it is demonstrated that such a transition is not a sufficient condition for instability. The model yields complete analytical solutions for the perturbation amplitude evolution and reveals the main physical process that governs the instability. The theory is in general agreement with the numerical simulations and provides useful quantitative results. Implications for high-energy-density-physics experiments are also discussed. PMID:19905434

  3. Numerical Modeling of Fuel Injection into an Accelerating, Turning Flow with a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcord, Ben James

    Deliberate continuation of the combustion in the turbine passages of a gas turbine engine has the potential to increase the efficiency and the specific thrust or power of current gas-turbine engines. This concept, known as a turbine-burner, must overcome many challenges before becoming a viable product. One major challenge is the injection, mixing, ignition, and burning of fuel within a short residence time in a turbine passage characterized by large three-dimensional accelerations. One method of increasing the residence time is to inject the fuel into a cavity adjacent to the turbine passage, creating a low-speed zone for mixing and combustion. This situation is simulated numerically, with the turbine passage modeled as a turning, converging channel flow of high-temperature, vitiated air adjacent to a cavity. Both two- and three-dimensional, reacting and non-reacting calculations are performed, examining the effects of channel curvature and convergence, fuel and additional air injection configurations, and inlet conditions. Two-dimensional, non-reacting calculations show that higher aspect ratio cavities improve the fluid interaction between the channel flow and the cavity, and that the cavity dimensions are important for enhancing the mixing. Two-dimensional, reacting calculations show that converging channels improve the combustion efficiency. Channel curvature can be either beneficial or detrimental to combustion efficiency, depending on the location of the cavity and the fuel and air injection configuration. Three-dimensional, reacting calculations show that injecting fuel and air so as to disrupt the natural motion of the cavity stimulates three-dimensional instability and improves the combustion efficiency.

  4. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  5. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  6. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed. PMID:18494504

  7. Pipe degradation investigations for optimization of flow-accelerated corrosion inspection location selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Habicht, P.; Chexal, B.; Mahini, R.; McBrine, W.; Esselman, T.; Horowitz, J.

    1995-12-01

    A large amount of piping in a typical nuclear power plant is susceptible to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) wall thinning to varying degrees. A typical PAC monitoring program includes the wall thickness measurement of a select number of components in order to judge the structural integrity of entire systems. In order to appropriately allocate resources and maintain an adequate FAC program, it is necessary to optimize the selection of components for inspection by focusing on those components which provide the best indication of system susceptibility to FAC. A better understanding of system FAC predictability and the types of FAC damage encountered can provide some of the insight needed to better focus and optimize the inspection plan for an upcoming refueling outage. Laboratory examination of FAC damaged components removed from service at Northeast Utilities` (NU) nuclear power plants provides a better understanding of the damage mechanisms involved and contributing causes. Selected results of this ongoing study are presented with specific conclusions which will help NU to better focus inspections and thus optimize the ongoing FAC inspection program.

  8. The cell-in-series method: A technique for accelerated electrode degradation in redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-11-21

    Here, we demonstrate a novel method to accelerate electrode degradation in redox flow batteries and apply this method to the all-vanadium chemistry. Electrode performance degradation occurred seven times faster than in a typical cycling experiment, enabling rapid evaluation of materials. This method also enables the steady-state study of electrodes. In this manner, it is possible to delineate whether specific operating conditions induce performance degradation; we found that both aggressively charging and discharging result in performance loss. Post-mortem x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the degraded electrodes was used to resolve the effects of state of charge (SoC) and current on the electrodemore » surface chemistry. For the electrode material tested in this work, we found evidence that a loss of oxygen content on the negative electrode cannot explain decreased cell performance. Furthermore, the effects of decreased electrode and membrane performance on capacity fade in a typical cycling battery were decoupled from crossover; electrode and membrane performance decay were responsible for a 22% fade in capacity, while crossover caused a 12% fade.« less

  9. The cell-in-series method: A technique for accelerated electrode degradation in redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-11-21

    Here, we demonstrate a novel method to accelerate electrode degradation in redox flow batteries and apply this method to the all-vanadium chemistry. Electrode performance degradation occurred seven times faster than in a typical cycling experiment, enabling rapid evaluation of materials. This method also enables the steady-state study of electrodes. In this manner, it is possible to delineate whether specific operating conditions induce performance degradation; we found that both aggressively charging and discharging result in performance loss. Post-mortem x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the degraded electrodes was used to resolve the effects of state of charge (SoC) and current on the electrode surface chemistry. For the electrode material tested in this work, we found evidence that a loss of oxygen content on the negative electrode cannot explain decreased cell performance. Furthermore, the effects of decreased electrode and membrane performance on capacity fade in a typical cycling battery were decoupled from crossover; electrode and membrane performance decay were responsible for a 22% fade in capacity, while crossover caused a 12% fade.

  10. The flows of He-3 ions from the region of acceleration downwards to the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaia, Evgenia; Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Lishnevskii, Andrey

    ., 1984), or ion-acoustic turbulence in the crossing electrical and magnetic fields (V.P. Silin et al., 1988), or helical turbulence - in non-potential, convolved magnetic fields (G. Fleyshman , et al., 2012). Thus, we make conclusion about the flows of (3) He ions from the region of acceleration downwards to the low chromosphere and the photosphere. We also have a number of observable confirmations of this supposition and give more detailed substantiations and characteristics of the considered phenomenon. Some obtained numerical results are presented.

  11. Magnetogasdynamic compression of a coaxial plasma accelerator flow for micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Shriver, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A new configuration of a coaxial plasma accelerator with self-energized magnetic compressor coil attached is described. It is shown that the circuit may be treated theoretically by analyzing an equivalent circuit mesh. The results obtained from the theoretical analysis compare favorably with the results measured experimentally. Using this accelerator configuration, glass beads of 125 micron diameter were accelerated to velocities as high as 11 kilometers per second, while 700 micron diameter glass beads were accelerated to velocities as high as 5 kilometers per second. The velocities are within the hypervelocity regime of meteoroids.

  12. Simulation of plasma flows in self-field Lorentz force accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Kameshwaran

    2005-07-01

    A characteristics-based scheme for the solution of ideal MHD equations was developed, and its ability to capture time-dependent discontinuities monotonically, as well as maintain force-free equilibrium, was demonstrated. Detailed models of classical transport, real equations of state, multi-level ionization models, anomalous transport, and multi-temperature effects for argon and lithium plasmas were implemented in this code. The entire set of equations was solved on non-orthogonal meshes, using parallel computers, to provide realistic description of flowfields in various thruster configurations. The calculated flowfield in gas-fed magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters (MPDT), such as the full-scale benchmark thruster (FSBT), compared favorably with measurements. These simulations provided insight into some aspects of FSBT operation, such as the weak role of the anode geometry in affecting the coefficient of thrust, the predominantly electromagnetic nature of the thrust at nominal operating conditions, and the importance of the near-cathode region in energy dissipation. Furthermore, the simulated structure of the flow embodied a number of photographically-recorded features of the FSBT discharge. Based on the confidence gained from its success with gas-fed MPDT flows, this code was then used to study a promising high-power spacecraft thruster, the lithium Lorentz force accelerator (LiLFA), in order to uncover its interior plasma properties and to obtain insight into underlying physical processes that had been poorly understood. The simulated flowfields of density, velocity, ionization, and anomalous resistivity were shown to change qualitatively with the total current. The simulations show the presence of a velocity reducing shock at low current, which disappeared as the current was increased above the value corresponding to nominal operation. The breakdown and scaling of the various components of thrust and power were revealed. The line on which the magnetic pressure

  13. Vulcanian eruptions: experimental insights into leading shock waves, initial acceleration, and flow evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Phillips, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    Vulcanian eruptions are frequent, small-scale, short-lived explosions that occur as a result of rapid decompression of a volcanic conduit. Results of two relevant experimental studies are presented here. The first examines the initial burst phase and leading shock waves via 1-D shock-tube experiments in which mixtures of air and spherical particles are rapidly decompressed into a low-pressure environment via diaphragm rupture. Maximum gas-particle mixture velocities decrease with increasing particle diameter for a given initial pressure ratio across the diaphragm. Experiments with particles produce weaker and more slowly propagating shocks relative to experiments with air alone. Comparison of experimental data to theoretical and computational solutions leads to two key results: 1) the effective interphase drag coefficient during high- acceleration stages of an eruption is less than values previously used in multiphase models of explosive eruptions; therefore a new formulation is prescribed; and 2) leading shock waves are formed by the gas phase alone, not the solid-gas mixture, with shock wave characteristics reflecting losses due to drag between air and particles; therefore shock wave calculations should consider these losses rather than treat the system as a perfectly-coupled pseudogas. The second set of experiments examines the subsequent propagation of the pyroclastic jet or plume by injecting discrete pulses of pressurized (negatively or positively) buoyant fluids into fresh water. Dimensional analysis, based on two source parameters, total injected momentum and total injected buoyancy, identifies a universal scaling relationship for the initial propagation of short-duration impulsive flows; the non- dimensional, time-varying velocity varies as the square root of the time-varying, non-dimensional ratio of source parameters. The relationship successfully describes the experimental trends over a wide range of initial conditions as well as flow propagation of

  14. Interface waves in almost incompressible elastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virta, Kristoffer; Kreiss, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of two elastic half-planes in contact and the Stoneley interface wave that may exist at the interface between two different elastic materials, emphasis being put on the case when the half-planes are almost incompressible. We show that numerical simulations involving interface waves require an unexpectedly high number of grid points per wavelength as the materials become more incompressible. Let λ, μ, ρ and λ‧, μ‧, ρ‧ be the Lamé parameters and densities of the first and second half-plane, respectively. A theoretical study shows that if K is a real constant, λ‧ = Kλ, μ‧ = Kμ, ρ‧ = Kρ and μ → 0, then for an accurate solution the required number of grid points per wavelength scales as (μ / λ) - 1 / p, where p is the order of accuracy of the numerical method. This requirement becomes very restrictive close to the incompressible limit μ ≪ λ, especially for lower order methods i.e., a small p. The theoretical findings are supported by numerical experiments that illustrate the demanding resolution requirement as well as the superiority of higher order methods. The scaling is also seen to hold for a more general choice of Lamé parameters. Numerical experiments when one of the half-planes is a vacuum are also presented, where the higher resolution requirement is illustrated in a numerical solution of Lamb's problem.

  15. Series solution of unsteady free convection flow with mass transfer along an accelerated vertical porous plate with suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Haider; Ayub, Muhammad

    2010-12-01

    The problem of unsteady free convection flow is considered for the series solution (analytic solution). The flow is induced by an infinite vertical porous plate which is accelerated in its own plane. The series solution expressions for velocity field, temperature field and concentration distribution are presented. The influence of important parameters is seen on the velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction coefficient and temperature gradient with the help of graphs and tables. Convergence is also properly checked for different values of the important parametes for velocity field, temperature and concentration with the help of ħ-curves.

  16. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  17. Numerical algorithms for steady and unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, Mohammed; Dacles, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    The numerical analysis of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are becoming important tools in the understanding of some fluid flow problems which are encountered in research as well as in industry. With the advent of the supercomputers, more realistic problems can be studied with a wider choice of numerical algorithms. An alternative formulation is presented for viscous incompressible flows. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are cast in a velocity/vorticity formulation. This formulation consists of solving the Poisson equations for the velocity components and the vorticity transport equation. Two numerical algorithms for the steady two-dimensional laminar flows are presented. The first method is based on the actual partial differential equations. This uses a finite-difference approximation of the governing equations on a staggered grid. The second method uses a finite element discretization with the vorticity transport equation approximated using a Galerkin approximation and the Poisson equations are obtained using a least squares method. The equations are solved efficiently using Newton's method and a banded direct matrix solver (LINPACK). The method is extended to steady three-dimensional laminar flows and applied to a cubic driven cavity using finite difference schemes and a staggered grid arrangement on a Cartesian mesh. The equations are solved iteratively using a plane zebra relaxation scheme. Currently, a two-dimensional, unsteady algorithm is being developed using a generalized coordinate system. The equations are discretized using a finite-volume approach. This work will then be extended to three-dimensional flows.

  18. Least-squares solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the p-version of finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Sonnad, Vijay

    1991-01-01

    A p-version of the least squares finite element method, based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation, is developed for solving steady state incompressible viscous flow problems. The resulting system of symmetric and positive definite linear equations can be solved satisfactorily with the conjugate gradient method. In conjunction with the use of rapid operator application which avoids the formation of either element of global matrices, it is possible to achieve a highly compact and efficient solution scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical results are presented for two-dimensional flow over a backward facing step. The effectiveness of simple outflow boundary conditions is also demonstrated.

  19. Quantification of hepatic blood flow using a high-resolution phase-contrast MRI sequence with compressed sensing acceleration.

    PubMed

    Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Besa, Cecilia; Cooper, Nancy; Garcia-Flores, Julio; Schiano, Thomas D; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to evaluate the performance of a high-spatial-resolution 2D phase-contrast (PC) MRI technique accelerated with compressed sensing for portal vein (PV) and hepatic artery (HA) flow quantification in comparison with a standard PC MRI sequence. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. In this prospective study, two PC MRI sequences were compared, one with parallel imaging acceleration and low spatial resolution (generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition [GRAPPA]) and one with compressed sensing acceleration and high spatial resolution (sparse). Seventy-six patients were assessed, including 37 patients with cirrhosis. Two observers evaluated PC image quality. Quantitative analyses yielded a mean velocity, flow, and vessel area for the PV and HA and an arterial fraction. The PC techniques were compared using the paired Wilcoxon test and Bland-Altman statistics. The sensitivity of the flow parameters to the severity of cirrhosis was also assessed. RESULTS. Vessel delineation was significantly improved using the PC sparse sequence (p < 0.034). For both in vitro and in vivo measurements, PC sparse yielded lower estimates for vessel area and flow, and larger differences between PC GRAPPA and PC sparse were observed in the HA. PV velocity and flow were significantly lower in patients with cirrhosis on both PC sparse (p < 0.001 and p = 0.042, respectively) and PC GRAPPA (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). PV velocity correlated negatively with Child-Pugh class (r = -0.50, p < 0.001), whereas the arterial fraction measured with PC sparse was higher in patients with Child-Pugh class B or C disease than in those with Child-Pugh class A disease, with a trend toward significance (p = 0.055). CONCLUSION. A high-spatial-resolution highly accelerated compressed sensing technique (PC sparse) allows total hepatic blood flow measurements obtained in 1 breath-hold, provides improved delineation of the hepatic vessels compared with a standard PC

  20. Laws for third-order moments in homogeneous anisotropic incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    It is known that Kolmogorov's four-fifths law for statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulence can be generalized to anisotropic turbulence. This fundamental result for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence says that in the inertial range the divergence of the vector third-order moment |v(r) is constant and is equal to -4, where is the dissipation rate of the turbulence. This law can be extended to incompressible magnetohydrodyamic (MHD) turbulence where statistical isotropy is often not valid due, for example, to the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. Laws for anisotropic incompressible MHD turbulence were first derived by Politano and Pouquet. In this paper, the laws for vector third-order moments in homogeneous non-isotropic incompressible MHD turbulence are derived by a technique due to Frisch that clarifies the relationship between the energy flux in Fourier space and the vector third-order moments in physical space. This derivation is different from the original derivation of Politano and Pouquet which is based on the Kn-Howarth equation, and provides some new physical insights. Separate laws are derived for the cascades of energy, cross-helicity and magnetic-helicity, the three ideal invariants of incompressible MHD for flows in three dimensions. These laws are of fundamental importance in the theory of MHD turbulence where non-isotropic turbulence is much more prevalent than isotropic turbulence.

  1. Accelerated inhomogeneous (e.g. Richtmyer-Meshkov) flows: A-dot at intermediate times, vortex-accelerated vortex deposition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusky, Norman; Peng, Gaozhu; Zhang, Shuang

    2004-11-01

    We review our recent contributions [1,2,3,4] in the light of their omission in recent publications [5,6,7,8]. Included is the VAVD process ( also called: secondary baroclinic circulation generation) which yields more positive and negative circulation through intermediate times than the original shock-accelerated vortex deposition (SAVD). VAVD is due to the acceleration provided by the rolled up vortex from SAVD and more important, the strongly increased density gradients of the multiphase front, also caused by the roll-up process . In addition we quantify : the effect of the initial thickness of the interfacial transition layer; the approach to constant a-dot at intermediate-to-late times; the ubiquity of vortex projectiles and transition to turbulence. Refs: 1.Zabusky, N.J., Kotelnikov, A.D., Gulak, Y. & Peng, G. Amplitude growth rate of a Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable two-dimensional interface to intermediate times. J. Fluid Mechanics, 475, p. 147-162,2003. 2.N. J. Zabusky, S. Gupta and Y. Gulak. Localization and spreading of contact discontinuity layers in simulations of compressible dissipationless flows. J. Comput. Phys. 188 (2) (2003) 347-363, 2003. 3.G. Peng, N. J. Zabusky & S. Zhang. Vortex-accelerated secondary baroclinic vorticity deposition and late intermediate time dynamics of a two-dimensional RM interface. Phys. Fluids 15 (12), 3730-3744, 2003. 4. S. Zhang, N. J. Zabusky, G. Peng & S. Gupta. Shock Gaseous Cylinder Interactions: Dynamically validated initial conditions provide excellent agreement between experiments and Navier-Stokes simulations to late-intermediate time. Phys.Fluids 16(5), 1203-1216, 2004. 5.P. Vorobieff , N.-G. Mohamed, C. Tomkins, C. Goodenough, M. Marr-Lyon, and R. F. Benjamin Scaling evolution in shock-induced transition to turbulence PHYS REV. E 68, 065301.2003. 6.C. Matsuoka, K. Nishihara and Y. Fukuda,. Nonlinear evolution of an interface in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. PHYS. REV. E 67, 036301 2003!& erratum 7.K. Nishihara

  2. Effect of initial acceleration on the development of the flow field of an airfoil pitching at constant rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koochesfahani, M. M.; Smiljanovski, V.; Brown, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    We present results from a series of experiments where an airfoil is pitched at constant rate from 0 to 60 degrees angle of attack. It is well documented that the dynamic stall behavior of such an airfoil strongly depends on the nondimensional pitch rate K = dot-alpha C/(2U(sub infinity)), where C is the chord, dot-alpha the constant pitch rate, and U(sub infinity) the free stream speed. In reality, the actual motion of the airfoil deviates from the ideal ramp due to the finite acceleration and deceleration periods imposed by the damping of drive system and response characteristics of the airfoil. It is possible that the pitch rate alone may not suffice in describing the flow and that the details of the motion trajectory before achieving a desired constant pitch rate may also affect the processes involved in the dynamic stall phenomenon. The effects of acceleration and deceleration periods are investigated by systematically varing the acceleration magnitude and its duration through the initial acceleration phase to constant pitch rate. The magnitude and duration of deceleration needed to bring the airfoil motion to rest is similarly controlled.

  3. Nearly incompressible fluids. II - Magnetohydrodynamics, turbulence, and waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible (NI) fluid dynamics developed previously for hydrodynamics is extended to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Based on a singular expansion technique, modified systems of fluid equations are obtained for which the effects of compressibility are admitted only weakly in terms of the different possible incompressible solutions. NI MHD represents the interface between the compressible and incompressible magnetofluid descriptions in the subsonic regime. It is shown that three distinct NI descriptions exist corresponding to each of the three possible plasma beta regimes. The detailed theory of weakly compressible corrections to the various incompressible MHD descriptions is presented, and the implications for the solar wind are discussed.

  4. INS3D: An incompressible Navier-Stokes code in generalized three-dimensional coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, S. E.; Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the INS3D code, which computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is described. The flow solver utilizes a pseudocompressibility approach combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This manual describes key operating features to orient new users. This includes the organization of the code, description of the input parameters, description of each subroutine, and sample problems. Details for more extended operations, including possible code modifications, are given in the appendix.

  5. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA. PMID:27587174

  6. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  7. Signature of recent ice flow acceleration in the radar attenuation and temperature structure of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Dustin; Seroussi, Helene; Chu, Winnie; Young, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Englacial temperature structure exerts significant control on the rheology and flow of glaciers and ice sheets. It is however logistically prohibitive to directly measure at the glacier-catchment scale. As a result, numerical ice sheet models often make broad assumptions about englacial temperatures based on contemporary ice surface velocities. However, this assumption might break down in regions - like the Amundsen Sea Embayment - that have experienced recent acceleration since temperature and rheology do not respond instantaneously to changes in ice flow regime. To address this challenge, we present a new technique for estimating englacial attenuation rates using bed echoes from radar sounding data. We apply this technique to an airborne survey of Thwaites Glacier and compare the results to temperature and attenuation structures modeled using the numerical Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) for three surface velocity scenarios. These include contemporary surface velocities, surface velocities from the early 1970s, and ice-sheet balance velocities. We find that the observed attenuation structure is much closer to those modeled with pre-acceleration surface velocities. This suggests that ice sheet models initialized with contemporary surface velocities are likely overestimating the temperature and underestimating the rheology of the fast-flowing trunk and grounding zone of Thwaites Glacier.

  8. Numerical simulation of reacting flow in a thermally choked ram accelerator projectile launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.

    1991-06-01

    CFD solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations are presently applied to a ram-accelerator projectile launcher's reacting and nonreacting turbulent flowfields. The gases in question are a hydrocarbon such as CH4, an oxidizer such as O2, and an inert gas such as N2. Numerical simulations are presented which highlight in-bore flowfield details and allow comparisons with measured launch tube wall pressures and projectile thrust as a function of velocity. The computation results thus obtained are used to ascertain the operational feasibility of a proposed 120-mm-bore ram accelerator system.

  9. Structure of reconnection boundary layers in incompressible MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnerup, B.U.Oe.; Wang, D.J. )

    1987-08-01

    The incompressible MHD equations with nonvanishing viscosity and resistivity are simplified by use of the boundary layer approximation to describe the flow and magnetic field in the exit flow regions of magnetic field reconnection configurations when the reconnection rate is small. The conditions are derived under which self-similar solutions exist of the resulting boundary layer equations. For the case of zero viscosity and resistivity, the equations describing such self-similar layers are then solved in terms of quadratures, and the resulting flow and field configurations are described. Symmetric solutions, relevant, for example, to reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, as well as asymmetric solutions, relevant to reconnection at the earth's magnetopause, are found to exist. The nature of the external solutions to which the boundary layer solutions should be matched is discussed briefly, but the actual matching, which is to occur at Alfven-wave characteristic curves in the boundary layer solutions, is not carried out. Finally, it is argued that the solutions obtained may also be used to describe the structure of the intense vortex layers observed to occur at magnetic separatrices in computer simulations and in certain analytical models of the reconnection process.

  10. A numerical and experimental investigation of the flow acceleration region proximal to an orifice.

    PubMed

    Anayiotos, A S; Perry, G J; Myers, J G; Green, D W; Fan, P H; Nanda, N C

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to quantify valvular regurgitation have recently been focused on the proximal orifice flow field. A complete description of the proximal orifice flow field is provided in this investigation. A steady state in vitro model accessible by both color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) was utilized. Velocities for varying flow rates and orifices were calculated by finite element modeling (FEM), by LDV and by CDU. The steady flow model was composed of circular orifices of 3, 5 and 10 mm diameters at flow rates from 0.7 to 10 L/min. Regurgitant flow rates were calculated from the proximal CDU data by two separate methods. The first approach utilized angle corrected velocities while the second approach utilized only velocities which did not require angle correction (centerline velocities). Both methods correlated well with known flow rates (y = 0.97x -0.09, r = 0.98, SEE = 0.45, p < 0.0001; and y = 1.0x + 0.07, r = 0.99, SEE = 0.27, p < 0.0001, respectively) and were superior to results obtained by assuming a hemispherical geometry as is done in the aliasing technique. The methodology provides a complete analysis of the proximal flow field and involves fewer geometric assumptions than the aliasing approach. This may prove to be an advantage when analyzing in vivo flow fields with complex, uncertain geometry. PMID:7571143

  11. Numerical solution of the two-dimensional time-dependent incompressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, David L.; Taylor, Lafayette K.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the artificial compressibility form of the 2D time-dependent incompressible Euler equations. The approach is based on using an approximate Riemann solver for the cell face numerical flux of a finite volume discretization. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and presented for all boundaries and in-flow out-flow situations. The system of algebraic equations is solved using the discretized Newton-relaxation (DNR) implicit method. Numerical results are presented for both steady and unsteady flow.

  12. Radiation from accelerated particles in relativistic jets with shocks and shear-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Phil; Dutan, Ioana; Niemiec, Jacek; Medvedev, Mikhail; Meli, Athina; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nordlund, Aake; Trier Frederiksen, Jacob; Sol, Helene; Zhang, Bing; Pohl, Martin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    We investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electron’s transverse deflection and acceleration. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KKHI) is also responsible to create strong DC and AC magnetic fields. The velocity shears in core-sheath jets create strong magnetic field perpendicular to the jet. We examine how the Lorentz factors of jets affect the growth rates of KKHI. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in these turbulent magnetic fields in the shocks. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, its temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We will investigate synthetic spectra from accelerated electrons in strong magnetic fields generated by KKHI. The calculated properties of the emerging radiation provide our understanding of the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  13. On the application of MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnels to investigate hypersonic gas flows over bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Alfyorov, V.I.; Yegorov, I.V.; Shcherbakov, G.I.

    1995-12-31

    The paper contains the results of applying a hypervelocity MHD-gas acceleration wind tunnel to investigations of flows over bodies. Consideration is given to the conditions of re producing gas dynamic and thermochemical flow parameters as applied to different types of tests: pressure and heat flux distributions, determination of shock wave positions and shapes. The measured heat fluxes towards the leading edge of swept wings are presented for sweep angles ranging from 0{degrees} to 60{degrees} at a flow velocity of U{approximately}6000 m/s. An appreciable influence of the surface nonequilibrium and catalyticity on their values is indicated. Possible investigations of flows over bodies at ultra high heat fluxes, q {approximately} 10 kW/m{sup 2} are discussed. The results of applying the facility to the verification of calculation codes and thermodynamic gas models are analyzed for flows over a hemisphere, a cone and a wedge. The calculated and measured surface pressure distributions are in good agreement for a hemisphere and satisfactory for a cone and a wedge. The shock wave positions and shapes are compared. It is shown that respective gas glow is impossible to use for this purpose.

  14. VORTEX PARADIGM FOR ACCELERATED INHOMOGENEOUS FLOWS: Visiometrics for the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusky, Norman J.

    1999-01-01

    We illustrate how cogent visiometrics can provide peak insights that lead to pathways for discovery through computer simulation. This process includes visualizing, quantifying, and tracking evolving coherent structure morphologies. We use the vortex paradigm (Hawley & Zabusky 1989) to guide, interpret, and model phenomena arising in numerical simulations of accelerated inhomogeneous flows, e.g. Richtmyer-Meshkov shock-interface and shock-bubble environments and Rayleigh-Taylor environments. Much of this work is available on the Internet at the sites of my collaborators, A Kotelnikov, J Ray, and R Samtaney, at our Vizlab URL, http://vizlab.rutgers.edu/vizlab.html.

  15. Transonic-flutter Investigation of Wings Attached to Two Low-acceleration Rocket-propelled Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Reginald R; Lauten, William T , Jr; Angle, Ellwyn E

    1948-01-01

    Two low-acceleration transonic-flutter vehicles were launched and flown. The first carried two test wings, one of which fluttered at M = 0.92 at a frequency of 61.4 cycles per second. The reference flutter speed determined from two-dimensional theory for an unswept wing in incompressible flow is conservative when compared to the experimental flutter speed. The second vehicle carried two test wings, one of which failed at M = 0.71 because of low-frequency divergent oscillation. Since this failure was not caused by conventional flexure-torsion flutter, no comparison with a reference flutter speed can be made.

  16. The Interplay of Acceleration and Vorticity Fields in the Tip Region of Massively-Separated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rival, David; Kriegseis, Jochen

    2013-11-01

    The influence of seemingly analogous plate kinematics (plunge vs. tow) on instantaneous forces has been investigated. Simultaneous measurements by means of three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) and a six-component force/moment sensor have been performed. Despite identical effective shear-layer velocities and effective angles of attack, the force histories vary between the two cases (plunge and tow). To uncover this discrepancy, a combined analysis of vorticity, Lagrangian (total) fluid acceleration and vortex-force contribution (Lamb vector) has been performed. It is found that leading-edge vortex (LEV) and tip vortex (TV) formation are nearly identical during the acceleration phase for both cases. However, at the end of acceleration the tow LEV rolls off the plate. As such, the development of vortex force also ceases once this roll-off process begins. Also TV strength as well as its relative positioning to the plate surface influences the instantaneous force. Based on a Lamb-vector analysis of the TV, the present work provides insight into the underlying cause-effect relation. Particularly, it is demonstrated that the sensitivity of the resulting vortex-force formation is dependent on the interplay between streamwise vorticity and spanwise (inboard) velocity.

  17. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  18. Estimation of particle size based on LDV measurements in a de-accelerating flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of velocity measurements made with a laser velocimeter is strongly dependent upon the response of the seeding particles to the dynamics of the flow field. The smaller the particle the better the response to flow fluctuations and gradients and therefore the more accurate velocity measurement. In direct conflict is the requirement of light scattering efficiency to obtain signals with the laser velocimeter which, in general, is better as the particle size is increased. In low speed flow fields these two requirements on particle size overlap and accurate measurements may be obtained. However in high speed flows, where the velocity gradients may be severe, very small particles are required to maintain sufficient dynamic response characteristics to follow the flow. Therefore if velocity measurements are to be made in these flows, the laser velocimeter must be designed with sufficient sensitivity to obtain signals from these small particles. An insitu determination of the size distribution of kaolin particles (Al2O3, .2 + or - SiO2 . 2H2O) in the 16-foot Transonic Tunnel and the sensitivity characteristics of the laser velocimeter system is described.

  19. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . PMID:26371170

  20. Incompressible Polaritons in a Flat Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Matteo; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.; Blatter, Gianni; Huber, Sebastian D.; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We study the interplay of geometric frustration and interactions in a nonequilibrium photonic lattice system exhibiting a polariton flat band as described by a variant of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We show how to engineer strong photonic correlations in such a driven, dissipative system by quenching the kinetic energy through frustration. This produces an incompressible state of photons characterized by short-ranged crystalline order with period doubling. The latter manifests itself in strong spatial correlations, i.e., on-site and nearest-neighbor antibunching combined with extended density-wave oscillations at larger distances. We propose a state-of-the-art circuit QED realization of our system, which is tunable in situ.

  1. Incompressible Polaritons in a Flat Band.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Matteo; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P L; Blatter, Gianni; Huber, Sebastian D; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We study the interplay of geometric frustration and interactions in a nonequilibrium photonic lattice system exhibiting a polariton flat band as described by a variant of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We show how to engineer strong photonic correlations in such a driven, dissipative system by quenching the kinetic energy through frustration. This produces an incompressible state of photons characterized by short-ranged crystalline order with period doubling. The latter manifests itself in strong spatial correlations, i.e., on-site and nearest-neighbor antibunching combined with extended density-wave oscillations at larger distances. We propose a state-of-the-art circuit QED realization of our system, which is tunable in situ. PMID:26551811

  2. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.

  3. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  4. Velocity-correction schemes for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general coordinate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serson, D.; Meneghini, J. R.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents methods of including coordinate transformations into the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the velocity-correction scheme, which is commonly used in the numerical solution of unsteady incompressible flows. This is important when the transformation leads to symmetries that allow the use of more efficient numerical techniques, like employing a Fourier expansion to discretize a homogeneous direction. Two different approaches are presented: in the first approach all the influence of the mapping is treated explicitly, while in the second the mapping terms related to convection are treated explicitly, with the pressure and viscous terms treated implicitly. Through numerical results, we demonstrate how these methods maintain the accuracy of the underlying high-order method, and further apply the discretisation strategy to problems where mixed Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisations can be applied, thereby extending the usefulness of this discretisation technique.

  5. Users' Manual for Computer Code SPIRALI Incompressible, Turbulent Spiral Grooved Cylindrical and Face Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.; Shapiro, Wilbur

    2005-01-01

    The SPIRALI code predicts the performance characteristics of incompressible cylindrical and face seals with or without the inclusion of spiral grooves. Performance characteristics include load capacity (for face seals), leakage flow, power requirements and dynamic characteristics in the form of stiffness, damping and apparent mass coefficients in 4 degrees of freedom for cylindrical seals and 3 degrees of freedom for face seals. These performance characteristics are computed as functions of seal and groove geometry, load or film thickness, running and disturbance speeds, fluid viscosity, and boundary pressures. A derivation of the equations governing the performance of turbulent, incompressible, spiral groove cylindrical and face seals along with a description of their solution is given. The computer codes are described, including an input description, sample cases, and comparisons with results of other codes.

  6. Gauss-Seidel Accelerated: Implementing Flow Solvers on Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Guttromson, Ross T.

    2006-06-01

    Non-linear steady-state power flow solvers have typically relied on the Newton-Raphson method to efficiently compute solutions on today's computer systems. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, which have recently been integrated into high-performance computers by major computer system vendors, offer an opportunity to significantly increase the performance of power flow solvers. However, only some algorithms are suitable for an FPGA implementation. The Gauss-Seidel method of solving the AC power flow problem is an excellent example of such an opportunity. In this paper we discuss algorithmic design considerations, optimization, implementation, and performance results of the implementation of the Gauss-Seidel method running on a Silicon Graphics Inc. Altix-350 computer equipped with a Xilinx Virtex II 6000 FPGA.

  7. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, K. F. von; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Beaupre, S. R.

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C x C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO{sub 2} samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 {mu}l/min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 {mu}A of negative {sup 12}C current after the C x C, leading to about 400 {sup 14}C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  8. Rayleigh-Benard Simulation using Gas-Kinetic BGK Scheme in the Incompressible Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun; Lui, Shiu-Hong

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, a gas-kinetic BGK model is constructed for the Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection in the incompressible flow limit, where the flow field and temperature field are described by two coupled BGK models. Since the collision times and pseudo-temperature in the corresponding BGK models can be different, the Prandtl number can be changed to any value instead of a fixed Pr=1 in the original BGK model. The 2D Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection is studied and numerical results are compared with theoretical ones as well as other simulation results.

  9. LU-SGS implicit algorithm for three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with source term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the concept of pseudocompressibility. A lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel implicit scheme is developed for three-dimensional incompressible viscous flow computations. The present algorithm offers additional advantages when solving the flow equations with source terms. Complete vectorizability of the algorithm on oblique planes of sweep in three-dimensions is accomplished in a new flow solver, INS3D-LU code. Spatial differencing is a second-order accurate semi-discrete finite-volume method augmented by a third-order accurate numerical dissipation model which is based on spectral-radii. Comparison of numerical solutions for a curved duct with experimental data shows good agreement. The method is applied to calculate the inducer flow of the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopump.

  10. Accelerated gas-liquid visible light photoredox catalysis with continuous-flow photochemical microreactors.

    PubMed

    Straathof, Natan J W; Su, Yuanhai; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol, we describe the construction and use of an operationally simple photochemical microreactor for gas-liquid photoredox catalysis using visible light. The general procedure includes details on how to set up the microreactor appropriately with inlets for gaseous reagents and organic starting materials, and it includes examples of how to use it to achieve continuous-flow preparation of disulfides or trifluoromethylated heterocycles and thiols. The reported photomicroreactors are modular, inexpensive and can be prepared rapidly from commercially available parts within 1 h even by nonspecialists. Interestingly, typical reaction times of gas-liquid visible light photocatalytic reactions performed in microflow are lower (in the minute range) than comparable reactions performed as a batch process (in the hour range). This can be attributed to the improved irradiation efficiency of the reaction mixture and the enhanced gas-liquid mass transfer in the segmented gas-liquid flow regime. PMID:26633128

  11. Potential flow in two-dimensional deflected nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, J. D.; Stockman, N. O.

    1981-01-01

    Three programs analyze flow: SCIRCL, geometry definition program; 24Y, incompressible two-dimensional potential-flow program; and NOZZLEC, program combining incompressible potential-flow solutions into solutions of interest after compressibility correction. Program group is written in FORTRAN IV for implementation on UNIVAC 1100/42.

  12. Incompressibility in finite nuclei and nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.; Stone, N. J.; Moszkowski, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    The incompressibility (compression modulus) K0 of infinite symmetric nuclear matter at saturation density has become one of the major constraints on mean-field models of nuclear many-body systems as well as of models of high density matter in astrophysical objects and heavy-ion collisions. It is usually extracted from data on the giant monopole resonance (GMR) or calculated using theoretical models. We present a comprehensive reanalysis of recent data on GMR energies in even-even 112-124Sn and 106,100-116Cd and earlier data on 58≤A≤208 nuclei. The incompressibility of finite nuclei KA is calculated from experimental GMR energies and expressed in terms of A-1/3 and the asymmetry parameter β =(N-Z)/A as a leptodermous expansion with volume, surface, isospin, and Coulomb coefficients Kvol, Ksurf, Kτ, and KCoul. Only data consistent with the scaling approximation, leading to a fast converging leptodermous expansion, with negligible higher-order-term contributions to KA, were used in the present analysis. Assuming that the volume coefficient Kvol is identified with K0, the KCoul=-(5.2±0.7) MeV and the contribution from the curvature term KcurvA-2/3 in the expansion is neglected, compelling evidence is found for K0 to be in the range 250

  13. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  14. Flow Visualization and Measurements of the Mixing Evolution of a Shock-Accelerated Gas Curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Prestridge, K.; Vorobieff, P.V.; Rightley, P.M.; Benjamin, R.F

    1999-07-19

    We describe a highly-detailed experimental characterization of the impulsively driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This instability is produced by flowing a diffuse, vertical curtain of heavy gas (SF{sub 6}) into the test section of an air-filled horizontally oriented shock tube. The instability evolves after the passage of a Mach 1.2 shock past the curtain, and the development of the curtain is visualized by seeding the SF{sub 6} with small (d{approximately}0.5 and micro;m) glycol droplets using a modified theatrical fog generator. Because the event lasts only 1 ms and the initial conditions vary from test to test, rapid and complete data acquisition is required in order to characterize the initial and dynamic conditions for each experimental shot. Through the use of a custom-built pulsed Nd: YAG laser, we are able to image the flowfield at seven different times. We acquire a double-pulsed image of the flow with the use of a second pulsed Nd:YAG, which is used to determine the instantaneous velocity field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). During a single experiment, high resolution images of the initial conditions and dynamic conditions are acquired using three CCD cameras. Issues of the fidelity of the flow seeding technique and the reliability of the PIV technique will be addressed. We have successfully provided interesting data through analysis of the images alone, and we are hoping that PIV information will be able to add further physical insight to the evolution of the RM instability and the transition to turbulence.

  15. Steady-state hydrodynamics of a viscous incompressible fluid with spinning particles.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2011-12-21

    The steady-state hydrodynamics of a viscous incompressible fluid with spinning particles is studied on the basis of extended Stokes equations. The profiles of flow velocity and spin velocity in simple flow situations may be used to determine the vortex viscosity and spin viscosity of the molecular liquid or fluid suspension. As an example, one situation studied is the flow generated by a uniform torque density in a planar layer of infinite fluid. The spinning particles drive a nearly uniform flow on either side of the layer, in opposite directions on the two sides. The Green function of the extended Stokes equations is derived. The translational and rotational friction coefficients of a sphere with no-slip boundary conditions, and the corresponding flow profiles, are calculated. PMID:22191899

  16. Aggressive, accelerated subdomain smoothers for Stokes flow with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanan, Patrick; May, Dave; Schenk, Olaf; Rupp, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Scalable solvers for mantle convection and lithospheric dynamics with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure typically require the use of a multigrid method. To leverage new hybrid CPU-accelerator architectures on leadership compute clusters, multigrid hierarchies which can reduce communication and use high available arithmetic intensity are at a premium, motivating more aggressive coarsening schemes and smoothers. We present results of a comparative study of two competitive GPU-enabled subdomain smoothers within an additive Schwarz method. Chebyshev-Jacobi smoothing has been shown to be an effective smoother, and its nature as a low-communication method built from basic linear algebra routines allows its use on a wide range of devices with current libraries. ILU smoothing is also of interest and is known to provide robust smoothing in some cases, but has traditionally been difficult to use in a fine-grained parallel environment. However, a recently-introduced variant by Chow and Patel allows for incomplete factorizations to be computed and applied in these environments, hence allowing us to study them as well. We use and extend the pTatin3D, PETSc, and ViennaCL libraries to integrate promising methods into a realistic application framework.

  17. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  18. The velocity and acceleration signatures of small-scale vortices in turbulent channel flow*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kenneth T.; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2002-04-01

    Time-resolved particle-image velocimetry measurements are made in the streamwise-wall-normal plane of turbulent channel flow at Ret?=?550 and 1747. Temporal and convective derivatives of velocity are computed from this data in order to evaluate the small-scale behaviour of these quantities as well as of the velocity itself. Instantaneous velocity fields indicate that the flow is dominated by small-scale vortex cores believed to be associated with hairpin/hairpin-like vortices. These vortices have been observed in realizations of the random velocity in other wall turbulence studies. In this work, a deterministic ‘vortex signature’ is determined by conditional averaging techniques. This average signature is consistent with the hairpin vortex signature defined by Adrian and co-workers: circular streamlines with a strong ejection of low-speed fluid away from the wall (a Q2 event) just upstream of the vortex head. In addition, the spatial extent of these small-scale vortices appears to remain relatively constant within the Reynolds-number range studied herein.

  19. Navier wall law for nonstationary viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Mitsuo

    2016-05-01

    We study the Navier wall law for the two-dimensional initial boundary value problem of the Navier-Stokes equations in a domain with a rough boundary. The Navier wall law is verified for the initial data in C1 class under the natural compatibility condition. Our proof relies on the boundary layer analysis and the L∞ theory of the Navier-Stokes equations in the half space.

  20. Robust preconditioners for incompressible MHD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yicong; Hu, Kaibo; Hu, Xiaozhe; Xu, Jinchao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we develop two classes of robust preconditioners for the structure-preserving discretization of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system. By studying the well-posedness of the discrete system, we design block preconditioners for them and carry out rigorous analysis on their performance. We prove that such preconditioners are robust with respect to most physical and discretization parameters. In our proof, we improve the existing estimates of the block triangular preconditioners for saddle point problems by removing the scaling parameters, which are usually difficult to choose in practice. This new technique is applicable not only to the MHD system, but also to other problems. Moreover, we prove that Krylov iterative methods with our preconditioners preserve the divergence-free condition exactly, which complements the structure-preserving discretization. Another feature is that we can directly generalize this technique to other discretizations of the MHD system. We also present preliminary numerical results to support the theoretical results and demonstrate the robustness of the proposed preconditioners.