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Sample records for accelerating mode frequency

  1. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  2. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1991-05-21

    An accelerating cavity is disclosed having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps. 17 figures.

  3. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    An accelerating cavity having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps.

  4. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  5. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  6. Quantum random walks using quantum accelerator modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Z.-Y.; Burnett, K.; D'Arcy, M. B.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2006-01-15

    We discuss the use of high-order quantum accelerator modes to achieve an atom optical realization of a biased quantum random walk. We first discuss how one can create coexistent quantum accelerator modes, and hence how momentum transfer that depends on the atoms' internal state can be achieved. When combined with microwave driving of the transition between the states, a different type of atomic beam splitter results. This permits the realization of a biased quantum random walk through quantum accelerator modes.

  7. The Nature of Accelerating Modes in PBG Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, TRobert J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Transverse magnetic (TM) modes with phase velocities at or just below the speed of light, c, are intended to accelerate relativistic particles in hollow-core, photonic band gap (PBG) fibers. These are so-called 'surface defect modes', being lattice modes perturbed by the defect to have their frequencies shifted into the band gap, and they can have any phase velocity. PBG fibers also support so-called 'core defect modes' which are characterized as having phase velocities always greater than c and never cross the light line. In this paper we explore the nature of these two classes of accelerating modes and compare their properties.

  8. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Carrender, Curtis Lee; Anderson, Gordon A.; Steele, Kerry D.

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  9. Radio frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, Alfred

    1985-01-01

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  10. Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Omura, Y.; Lee, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

  11. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  12. Resistance-driven bunching mode of an accelerated ion pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1981-10-16

    Amplification of a longitudinal perturbation of an ion pulse in a linear induction accelerator is calculated. The simplified accelerator model consists only of an applied field (E/sub a/), distributed gap impedance per meter (R) and beam-pipe capacity per meter (C). The beam is treated as a cold, one-dimensional fluid. It is found that normal mode frequencies are nearly real, with only a very small damping rate proportional to R. This result is valid for a general current profile and is not restricted to small R. However, the mode structure exhibits spatial amplification from pulse head to tail by the factor exp(RCLv/sub o//2), where L is pulse length and v/sub 0/ is drift velocity. This factor is very large for typical HIF parameters. An initially small disturbance, when expanded in terms of the normal modes, is found to oscillate with maximum amplitude proportional to the amplification factor.

  13. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.J.; Colby, E.R.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.S.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2011-11-21

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. They will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  14. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; McGuinness, C. M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Siemann, R. H.; Spencer, J. E.; Walz, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Sears, C. M. S.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50 pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. We will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  15. Radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stokes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerator concept in which rf electric fields are used to focus, bunch, and accelerate the beam. Because the RFQ can provide strong focusing at low velocities, it can capture a high-current dc ion beam from a low-voltage source and accelerate it to an energy of 1 MeV/nucleon within a distance of a few meters. A recent experimental test at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has confirmed the expected performance of this structure and has stimulated interest in a wide variety of applications. The general properties of the RFQ are reviewed and examples of applications of this new accelerator are presented.

  16. Two-beam, Multi-mode Detuned Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A two-beam accelerator structure is described having several novel features including all metal construction, no transfer structures required between the drive and accelerator channels, symmetric fields at the axes of each channel, RF micropulse widths on cavity irises that are less than half those for a conventional cavity at the same fundamental frequency by virtue of using several harmonically-related cavity modes, and a transformer ratio much greater than unity by the use of detuned cavities. Detuning is also shown to allow either parallel or anti-parallel directions for the drive and accelerated beams. A preliminary calculation for the dilution of emittance due to short-range wakes for drive beam parameters similar to those for CLIC shows this effect to be acceptably small.

  17. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-12-15

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, γ=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ∘} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  18. Microdiaphragm resonating biosensors in higher frequency modes.

    PubMed

    Olfatnia, M; Xu, T; Miao, J M; Ong, L S

    2011-12-01

    Influences of different vibration modes of microdiaphragm resonating biosensors on their detecting capability are investigated in this paper. In order to study the mass sensing capability of the sensor, gold layers with different thicknesses are deposited on the sensor's surface. The frequency shift due to this mass deposition in different frequency modes is measured. An increase in the sensitivity and the quality factor (Q-factor) is found with the increase in the vibration mode number of the sensor. The experimental results demonstrate that the mass sensitivity and quality factor of the device are 4.08 Hz/ng and 241.80 at the ninth mode. These are 2.76 and 10.26 times higher than the mass sensitivity and the Q-factor of the device at the first mode. The observations lead to this conclusion that the sensitivity of microdiaphragm resonating biosensors can be increased by working in higher modes without changing their physical parameters.

  19. Low-frequency vibrational modes of glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Wang, Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution terahertz absorption and Raman spectra of glutamine in the frequency region 0.2 THz-2.8 THz are obtained by using THz time domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. Based on the experimental and the computational results, the vibration modes corresponding to the terahertz absorption and Raman scatting peaks are assigned and further verified by the theoretical calculations. Spectral investigation of the periodic structure of glutamine based on the sophisticated hybrid density functional B3LYP indicates that the vibrational modes come mainly from the inter-molecular hydrogen bond in this frequency region.

  20. Tuning vibrational mode localization with frequency windowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Talbot, Justin J.; Steele, Ryan P.

    2016-09-01

    Local-mode coordinates have previously been shown to be an effective starting point for anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy calculations. This general approach borrows techniques from localized-orbital machinery in electronic structure theory and generates a new set of spatially localized vibrational modes. These modes exhibit a well-behaved spatial decay of anharmonic mode couplings, which, in turn, allows for a systematic, a priori truncation of couplings and increased computational efficiency. Fully localized modes, however, have been found to lead to unintuitive mixtures of characteristic motions, such as stretches and bends, and accordingly large bilinear couplings. In this work, a very simple, tunable localization frequency window is introduced, in order to realize the transition from normal modes to fully localized modes. Partial localization can be achieved by localizing only pairs of modes within this traveling frequency window, which allows for intuitive interpretation of modes. The optimal window size is suggested to be a few hundreds of wave numbers, based on small- to medium-sized test systems, including water clusters and polypeptides. The new sets of partially localized coordinates retain their spatial coupling decay behavior while providing a reduced number of potential energy evaluations for convergence of anharmonic spectra.

  1. Interaction of the ATA beam with the TM/sub 030/ mode of the accelerating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, V.K.

    1985-02-14

    The interaction of the electron beam in the Advanced Test Accelerator with an azimuthally symmetric mode of the accelerating cells is investigated theoretically. The interaction possibly could cause modulation of the beam current at the resonant frequency of the mode. Values of the shunt impedance and Q value of the mode were obtained from previous measurement and analysis. Lagranian hydrodynamics is employed and a WKB solution to the equation of motion is obtained. Results indicate that the interaction will not be a problem in the accelerator.

  2. Light pressure acceleration with frequency-tripled laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang

    2014-08-15

    Light pressure acceleration of ions in the interaction of the frequency-tripled (3ω) laser pulse and foil target is studied, and a promising method to increase accelerated ion energy is shown. Results show that at a constant laser energy, much higher ion energy peak value is obtained for 3ω laser compared with that using the fundamental frequency laser. The effect of energy loss during frequency conversion on ion acceleration is considered, which may slightly decrease the acceleration effect.

  3. Extraction and absorption of higher order modes in room temperature accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes methods for extracting and absorbing unwanted higher-order modes (HOMs) from normal-conducting accelerator structures. An introduction to the problems caused by HOMs is followed by a brief history of the development of techniques to suppress them, and some examples taken from existing and planned accelerators. These include damped radio frequency (RF) cavities for storage rings such as the proposed PEP-II B factory and accelerating structures for future linear collider projects.

  4. Radio-Frequency Pulse Compression for Linear Accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantista, Christopher Dennis

    Recent efforts to develop plans for an electron -positron linear collider with center-of-mass energy approaching a TeV have highlighted the need for sources capable of delivering hundreds of megawatts of peak rf drive power at X-band frequencies. This need has driven work in the area of rf pulse compression, which enhances the peak power available from pulsed rf tubes by compressing their output pulses in time, accumulating the available energy into shorter pulses. The classic means of rf pulse compression for linear accelerators is SLED. This technique is described, and the problem it presents for multibunch acceleration explained. Other pulse compression schemes, capable of producing suitable output pulses are explored, both theoretically and experimentally, in particular Binary Pulse Compression and SLED-II. The merits of each are considered with regard to gain, efficiency, complexity, size and cost. The development of some novel system components, along with the theory behind their design, is also discussed. The need to minimize copper losses in long waveguide runs led to the use of the circular TE_{01} propagation mode in over-moded guide, requiring much attention to mechanisms of coupling power between modes. The construction and commissioning of complete, high-power pulse compression systems is reported on, as well as their use in the testing of X-band accelerating structures, which, along with the X-band klystrons used, were developed at SLAC in parallel with the pulse compression work. The focus of the dissertation is on SLED-II, the favored scheme in some current linear accelerator designs. In addition to our experimental results, practical implementation considerations and design improvements are presented. The work to date has led to detailed plans for SLED-II systems to be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator, now under construction at SLAC. The prototype of the upgraded system is near completion. Descriptions of various rf pulse

  5. Radio-frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, A.

    1982-10-19

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  6. Improvement of Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Frequency Acceleration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stec, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise floor of low frequency acceleration data acquired on the Space Shuttle Main Engines is higher than desirable. Difficulties of acquiring high quality acceleration data on this engine are discussed. The approach presented in this paper for reducing the acceleration noise floor focuses on a search for an accelerometer more capable of measuring low frequency accelerations. An overview is given of the current measurement system used to acquire engine vibratory data. The severity of vibration, temperature, and moisture environments are considered. Vibratory measurements from both laboratory and rocket engine tests are presented.

  7. Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young; Miginsky, S.

    2012-07-02

    In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

  8. Development of Acceleration Sensor and Acceleration Evaluation System for Super-Low-Range Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Shogo; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes the development process for acceleration sensors used on automobiles and an acceleration evaluation system designed specifically for acceleration at super-low-range frequencies. The features of the newly developed sensor are as follows. 1) Original piezo-bimorph design based on a disc-center-fixed structure achieves pyroeffect cancelling and stabilization of sensor characteristics and enables the detection of the acceleration of 0.0009 G at the super-low-range-frequency of 0.03 Hz. 2) The addition of a self-diagnostic function utilizing the characteristics of piezoceramics enables constant monitoring of sensor failure. The frequency range of acceleration for accurate vehicle motion control is considered to be from DC to about 50 Hz. However, the measurement of acceleration in the super-low-range frequency near DC has been difficult because of mechanical and electrical noise interruption. This has delayed the development of the acceleration sensor for automotive use. We have succeeded in the development of an acceleration evaluation system for super-low-range frequencies from 0.015 Hz to 2 Hz with detection of the acceleration range from 0.0002 G (0.2 gal) to 1 G, as well as the development of a piezoelectric-type acceleration sensor for automotive use.

  9. Combining Acceleration and Displacement Dependent Modal Frequency Responses Using an MSC/NASTRAN DMAP Alter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Ludwiczak, Damian R.

    1996-01-01

    Solving for dynamic responses of free-free launch vehicle/spacecraft systems acted upon by buffeting winds is commonly performed throughout the aerospace industry. Due to the unpredictable nature of this wind loading event, these problems are typically solved using frequency response random analysis techniques. To generate dynamic responses for spacecraft with statically-indeterminate interfaces, spacecraft contractors prefer to develop models which have response transformation matrices developed for mode acceleration data recovery. This method transforms spacecraft boundary accelerations and displacements into internal responses. Unfortunately, standard MSC/NASTRAN modal frequency response solution sequences cannot be used to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent responses required for spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. External user-written computer codes can be used with MSC/NASTRAN output to perform such combinations, but these methods can be labor and computer resource intensive. Taking advantage of the analytical and computer resource efficiencies inherent within MS C/NASTRAN, a DMAP Alter has been developed to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent modal frequency responses for performing spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. The Alter has been used successfully to efficiently solve a common aerospace buffeting wind analysis.

  10. Radio frequency focused interdigital linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.; Starling, W. Joel

    2006-08-29

    An interdigital (Wideroe) linear accelerator employing drift tubes, and associated support stems that couple to both the longitudinal and support stem electromagnetic fields of the linac, creating rf quadrupole fields along the axis of the linac to provide transverse focusing for the particle beam. Each drift tube comprises two separate electrodes operating at different electrical potentials as determined by cavity rf fields. Each electrode supports two fingers, pointing towards the opposite end of the drift tube, forming a four-finger geometry that produces an rf quadrupole field distribution along its axis. The fundamental periodicity of the structure is equal to one half of the particle wavelength .beta..lamda., where .beta. is the particle velocity in units of the velocity of light and .lamda. is the free space wavelength of the rf. Particles are accelerated in the gaps between drift tubes. The particle beam is focused in regions inside the drift tubes.

  11. Frequencies and modes for shells of revolution (FAMSOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwhorter, L. B.; Haisler, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Using stiffness matrix and lumped-mass representation specified number of natural frequencies are obtained using inverse iteration method. Mode shapes for each frequency are also obtained. These frequencies and mode shapes can be found in reasonable periods of computer time utilizing this code.

  12. A Hilbert-Vlasov code for the study of high-frequency plasma beatwave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Begue, M.L.; Johnston, T.W.; Shoucri, M.

    1996-04-01

    High-frequency beatwave simulations relevant to the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) experiment with relativistic eulerian hybrid Vlasov code are presented. These Hilbert-Vlasov simulations revealed a rich variety of phenomena associated with the fast particle dynamics induced by beatwave experiment for a high ratio of driver frequency to plasma frequency {omega}{sub pump}/{omega}{sub pump} {approx} 33. The present model allows one to extend detailed modeling to frequency ratios greater than the current practical maximum of 10 or so, for Vlasov or particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, by replacing the Maxwell equations by mode equations for the electromagnetic Vlasov code. Numerical results, including beat frequency chirping (i.e., pump frequency linearly decreasing with time), show that the amplitude limit due to relativistic detuning can be enhanced with accelerated particles up to the ultrarelativistic energies with a high-acceleration gradient of more than 25 GeV/m.

  13. The coupled dipole modes of the NLC accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Gluckstern, R.; Holtkamp, N.

    1992-03-01

    The proposed accelerator cavity of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is a disk-loaded structure composed of 200 cells, operating at 11.42 GHz. The proposed mode of operation is to accelerate bunches in trains of 10, with a bunch spacing of 42 cm. One problem is that one bunch in a train can excite transverse wakefields in the accelerator cavity which, in turn, can deflect following bunches and result in emittance growth. A method of curing this problem is to detune the transverse modes of the cavity. Beam dynamics simulations for the NLC have shown that by keeping the transverse wakefield at the positions of the nine trailing bunches at or below 1 MW/nC/m{sup 2} we can void emittance growth. Earlier, approximate calculations of the wakefields, which did not include the cell-to-cell coupling of the modes, have shown that by the proper Gaussian detuning the above level of cancellation can be achieved. A specific goal of this report is to see if this conclusion still holds when coupling is included in the calculation. Note that in this paper we focus on the modes belonging to the first dipole passband, which are the most important. A special feature of these modes in the detuned NLC cavity is that the cell-to-cell coupling changes sign somewhere in the middle of the structure.

  14. Exploring the Frequency Stability Limits of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for Metrological Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Baumgartel, Lukas; Grudinin, Ivan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are attracting increasing interest as promising frequency reference cavities. Unlike commonly used Fabry-Perot cavities, however, they are filled with a bulk medium whose properties have a significant impact on the stability of its resonance frequencies. In this context that has to be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, a small monolithic resonator provides opportunity for better stability against vibration and acceleration. this feature is essential when the cavity operates in a non-laboratory environment. In this paper, we report a case study for a crystalline resonator, and discuss the a pathway towards the inhibition of vibration-and acceleration-induced frequency fluctuations.

  15. About the p-mode frequency shifts in HD 49933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; Régulo, C.; Ballot, J.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.

    2011-06-01

    We study the frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of the low-degree p modes measured in the F5V star HD 49933, by analyzing the second run of observations collected by the CoRoT satellite. The 137-day light curve is divided into two subseries corresponding to periods of low and high stellar activity. The activity-frequency relationship is obtained independently from the analysis of the mode frequencies extracted by both a local and a global peak-fitting analyses, and from a cross-correlation technique in the frequency range between 1450 μHz and 2500 μHz. The three methods return consistent results. We show that the frequency shifts measured in HD 49933 present a frequency dependence with a clear increase with frequency, reaching a maximal shift of about 2 μHz around 2100 μHz. Similar variations are obtained between the l = 0 and l = 1 modes. At higher frequencies, the frequency shifts show indications of a downturn followed by an upturn, consistent between the l = 0 and 1 modes. We show that the frequency variation of the p-mode frequency shifts of the solar-like oscillating star HD 49933 has a comparable shape to the one observed in the Sun, which is understood to arise from changes in the outer layers due to its magnetic activity.

  16. Nonlinear amplification of side-modes in frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Probst, R A; Steinmetz, T; Wilken, T; Hundertmark, H; Stark, S P; Wong, G K L; Russell, P St J; Hänsch, T W; Holzwarth, R; Udem, Th

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how suppressed modes in frequency combs are modified upon frequency doubling and self-phase modulation. We find, both experimentally and by using a simplified model, that these side-modes are amplified relative to the principal comb modes. Whereas frequency doubling increases their relative strength by 6 dB, the growth due to self-phase modulation can be much stronger and generally increases with nonlinear propagation length. Upper limits for this effect are derived in this work. This behavior has implications for high-precision calibration of spectrographs with frequency combs used for example in astronomy. For this application, Fabry-Pérot filter cavities are used to increase the mode spacing to exceed the resolution of the spectrograph. Frequency conversion and/or spectral broadening after non-perfect filtering reamplify the suppressed modes, which can lead to calibration errors. PMID:23736390

  17. H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O'Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H-mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

  18. Attempt to accelerate asymmetric species with unequal frequencies in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Mernick, K.; Hayes, T.; Severino, F.

    2015-07-09

    This report summarizes the beam studies on accelerating asymmetric beams with unequal frequencies, during the proton-Gold/Aluminum run in 2015. The experiment failed due to modulated beam-beam effects even though the beams were separated by at least 15 mm.

  19. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5.1015 ions s-1 m-2 (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20-350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  20. New modes of particle acceleration, techniques & sources symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    A Symposium on {open_quotes}New Modes of Particle Acceleration Technique and Sources{close_quotes} was held August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was the first of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor the National Science Foundation, as part of our {open_quotes}New Ideas for Particle Accelerators{close_quotes} program. The symposia was organized and chaired by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of ITP/Brookhaven National Laboratory. This Symposium provided a perspective on the future direction of the Advanced Accelerator Research. The experimental study of elementary particles has become concentrated at a few large laboratories throughout the world because of the size and cost of the accelerator facilities needed for this work. For example, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, currently under construction, is 27 km in circumference and is being financed by the European membership of CERN plus contributions from non-member nations. An evolutionary approach to construction of ever higher energy colliders will only continue this trend towards high cost and large size.

  1. PULSATION FREQUENCIES AND MODES OF GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bihan, Bastien; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-02-10

    We calculate the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of the acoustic oscillations of giant exoplanets and explore the dependence of the characteristic frequency {nu}{sub 0} and the eigenfrequencies on several parameters: the planet mass, the planet radius, the core mass, and the heavy element mass fraction in the envelope. We provide the eigenvalues for degree l up to 8 and radial order n up to 12. For the selected values of l and n, we find that the pulsation eigenfrequencies depend strongly on the planet mass and radius, especially at high frequency. We quantify this dependence through the calculation of the characteristic frequency {nu}{sub 0} which gives us an estimate of the scale of the eigenvalue spectrum at high frequency. For the mass range 0.5 M{sub J} {<=} M{sub P} {<=} 15 M{sub J} , and fixing the planet radius to the Jovian value, we find that {nu}{sub 0} {approx} 164.0 Multiplication-Sign (M{sub P} /M{sub J} ){sup 0.48}{mu}Hz, where M{sub P} is the planet mass and M{sub J} is Jupiter's mass. For the radius range from 0.9 to 2.0 R{sub J} , and fixing the planet's mass to the Jovian value, we find that {nu}{sub 0} {approx} 164.0 Multiplication-Sign (R{sub P} /R{sub J} ){sup -2.09}{mu}Hz, where R{sub P} is the planet radius and R{sub J} is Jupiter's radius. We explore the influence of the presence of a dense core on the pulsation frequencies and on the characteristic frequency of giant exoplanets. We find that the presence of heavy elements in the envelope affects the eigenvalue distribution in ways similar to the presence of a dense core. Additionally, we apply our formalism to Jupiter and Saturn and find results consistent with both the observational data of Gaulme et al. and previous theoretical work.

  2. New modes of particle accelerations techniques and sources. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on New Modes of Particle Accelerations - Techniques and Sources, August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  3. Modal vector estimation for closely spaced frequency modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.; Blair, M.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for obtaining improved modal vector estimates for systems with closely spaced frequency modes are discussed. In describing the dynamical behavior of a complex structure modal parameters are often analyzed: undamped natural frequency, mode shape, modal mass, modal stiffness and modal damping. From both an analytical standpoint and an experimental standpoint, identification of modal parameters is more difficult if the system has repeated frequencies or even closely spaced frequencies. The more complex the structure, the more likely it is to have closely spaced frequencies. This makes it difficult to determine valid mode shapes using single shaker test methods. By employing band selectable analysis (zoom) techniques and by employing Kennedy-Pancu circle fitting or some multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) curve fit procedure, the usefulness of the single shaker approach can be extended.

  4. Localized radio frequency communication using asynchronous transfer mode protocol

    DOEpatents

    Witzke, Edward L.; Robertson, Perry J.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2007-08-14

    A localized wireless communication system for communication between a plurality of circuit boards, and between electronic components on the circuit boards. Transceivers are located on each circuit board and electronic component. The transceivers communicate with one another over spread spectrum radio frequencies. An asynchronous transfer mode protocol controls communication flow with asynchronous transfer mode switches located on the circuit boards.

  5. Engineering functionality gradients by dip coating process in acceleration mode.

    PubMed

    Faustini, Marco; Ceratti, Davide R; Louis, Benjamin; Boudot, Mickael; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine; Boissière, Cédric; Grosso, David

    2014-10-01

    In this work, unique functional devices exhibiting controlled gradients of properties are fabricated by dip-coating process in acceleration mode. Through this new approach, thin films with "on-demand" thickness graded profiles at the submillimeter scale are prepared in an easy and versatile way, compatible for large-scale production. The technique is adapted to several relevant materials, including sol-gel dense and mesoporous metal oxides, block copolymers, metal-organic framework colloids, and commercial photoresists. In the first part of the Article, an investigation on the effect of the dip coating speed variation on the thickness profiles is reported together with the critical roles played by the evaporation rate and by the viscosity on the fluid draining-induced film formation. In the second part, dip-coating in acceleration mode is used to induce controlled variation of functionalities by playing on structural, chemical, or dimensional variations in nano- and microsystems. In order to demonstrate the full potentiality and versatility of the technique, original graded functional devices are made including optical interferometry mirrors with bidirectional gradients, one-dimensional photonic crystals with a stop-band gradient, graded microfluidic channels, and wetting gradient to induce droplet motion.

  6. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  7. High-Frequency Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) transducers in aluminum cylinders reveal waveform features with high amplitudes and with velocities that depend on the feature's dominant frequency. In a given waveform, high-frequency features generally arrive earlier than low-frequency features, typical for normal mode propagation. To analyze these waveforms, the elastic equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system for the high-frequency case in which the acoustic wavelength is small compared to the cylinder geometry, and the surrounding medium is air. Dispersive P- and S-wave normal mode propagations are predicted to exist, but owing to complex interference patterns inside a cylinder, the phase and group velocities are not smooth functions of frequency. To assess the normal mode group velocities and relative amplitudes, approximate dispersion relations are derived using Bessel functions. The utility of the normal mode theory and approximations from a theoretical and experimental standpoint are demonstrated by showing how the sequence of P- and S-wave normal mode arrivals can vary between samples of different size, and how fundamental normal modes can be mistaken for the faster, but significantly smaller amplitude, P- and S-body waves from which P- and S-wave speeds are calculated.

  8. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-06-15

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5·10{sup 15} ions s{sup −1} m{sup −2} (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20–350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  9. Study of electron acceleration through the ? mode in a collisional plasma-filled cylindrical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdoli-Arani, A.; Moghaddasi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Acceleration of an externally injected electron inside the collisional plasma-filled cylindrical waveguide during its motion in the fields of the ? mode excited by microwave radiation is studied. The effect of the electron collision frequency with background ions on the deflection angle and energy gain of electron, when it is injected along the direction of the mode propagation is investigated. The fields for the mode, the deflection angle of electron trajectory, due to these fields, and the electron energy gradient are obtained. The results for collisionless and collisional plasma are graphically presented. The numerical results illustrate that the presence of the electron collision term in the dielectric permittivity can reduce the electron's energy gain in the configuration.

  10. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  11. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan; Milton, Stephen

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  12. Direct ion acceleration with variable-frequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peano, Fabio; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Coppa, Gianni; Mulas, Roberta

    2007-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration commonly relies on indirect schemes, in which the ions are accelerated by the space-charge field in laser-irradiated solid targets, either via plasma-expansion processes [1], or resorting to electrostatic shock structures [2]. Here, we propose the production of monoergetic ion beams via direct acceleration by the laser field (in vacuum or in tenuous plasmas) [3]. The method exploits two counterpropagating lasers with variable frequency to drive a beat-wave structure with variable phase velocity: the ions are trapped in the beat wave and accelerated to high energies. The physical mechanism is described with a 1D theory, providing the general conditions for trapping and scaling laws for the relevant ion-beam features. The validity and the robustness of the method are confirmed by 2D PIC simulations with OSIRIS [4]. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Phys. 2, 48 (2006); L. Robson et al., Nature Phys. 3, 58 (2007); B.M. Hegelich et al., Nature 439, 441 (2006). [2] L.O. Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 015002 (2004). [3] F. Peano et al., submitted for publication (2007). [4] R. A. Fonseca et al., Lect. Notes Comp. Sci. 2331, 342 (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2002).

  13. Low frequency wave modes of liquid-filled flexible tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yuan-Fang; Peng, Tzu-Huan

    2015-09-01

    Many canals in the human body are liquid-filled thin wall flexible tubes. In general the P-wave and S-wave velocities of tube material are much slower than the sound velocity of the liquid. It is interested to study the dynamic deformation of the wall caused by pressure fluctuation of liquid. In the low frequency range, the liquid pressure is essentially axial symmetric. Therefore, axial symmetric wave propagation modes are investigated. The calculated spectrum shows there are two modes with zero frequency limit. Phase velocities of these two modes are much smaller than the sound velocity of the liquid. They are also slower than the P-wave velocity of the tube material. At very low wave number, radial displacements of both liquid particles and tube are very small compared to their axial counter parts. As the frequency goes higher, boundary waves are observed.

  14. A traveling-wave forward coupler design for a new accelerating mode in a silicon woodpile accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Ziran; Lee, Chunghun H.; Wootton, Kent P.; Ng, Cho -Kuen; Qi, Minghao H.; England, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon woodpile photonic crystals provide a base structure that can be used to build a three-dimensional dielectric waveguide system for high-gradient laser driven acceleration. A new woodpile waveguide design that hosts a phase synchronous, centrally confined accelerating mode is proposed. Comparing with previously discovered silicon woodpile accelerating modes, this mode shows advantages in terms of better electron beam loading and higher achievable acceleration gradient. Several traveling-wave coupler design schemes developed for multi-cell RF cavity accelerators are adapted to the woodpile power coupler design for this new accelerating mode. Design of a forward coupled, highly efficient silicon woodpile accelerator is achieved.more » Simulation shows high efficiency of over 75% of the drive laser power coupled to this fundamental accelerating mode, with less than 15% backward wave scattering. The estimated acceleration gradient, when the coupler structure is driven at the damage threshold fluence of silicon at its operating 1.506 μm wavelength, can reach 185 MV/m. Lastly, a 17-layer woodpile waveguide structure was successfully fabricated, and the measured bandgap is in excellent agreement with simulation.« less

  15. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the A(sub 0), A(sub 1), S(sub 0), and S(sub 2)Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along, and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Low frequency mechanical modes of viruses with atomic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric; Sankey, Otto

    2008-03-01

    The low frequency mechanical modes of viruses can provide important insights into the large global motions that a virus may exhibit. Recently it has been proposed that these large global motions may be excited using impulsive stimulated Raman scattering producing permanent damage to the virus. In order to understand the coupling of external probes to the capsid, vibrational modes with atomic detail are essential. The standard approach to find the atomic modes of a molecule with N atoms requires the formation and diagonlization of a 3Nx3N matrix. As viruses have 10^5 or more atoms, the standard approach is difficult. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, we have developed a method to construct the mechanical modes of large molecules such as viruses with atomic detail. Application to viruses such as the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, satellite tobacco necrosis virus, and M13 bacteriophage show a fairly complicated picture of the mechanical modes.

  17. Observation of upper drift modes in radio frequency produced magnetized plasmas with frequency above ion cyclotron frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Saha, S. K.; Chowdhury, S.; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In a RF produced magnetized argon plasma expanding into a larger expansion chamber, electrostatic modes propagating azimuthally in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and frequency greater than the ion cyclotron frequency are observed. In the radial direction, the mode amplitude peaks at a location where the radial density gradient is maximum. The modes are detected at axial locations up to 16 cm away from the entrance aperture. For fixed values of the neutral pressure and magnetic field, the mode frequency is found to be independent of the location at which it is measured. The modes exhibit drift wave characteristics revealing a radial structure with the azimuthal mode number m = 1 at the lower radial locations (r ˜ 3.0 cm) while the m = 2 mode is located in the outer region. Theoretical modeling using a local dispersion relation based on the fluid equations predicts destabilization of the modes with frequency greater than the ion-cyclotron frequency by electron-neutral collisions and exhibiting other drift wave features.

  18. Observation of upper drift modes in radio frequency produced magnetized plasmas with frequency above ion cyclotron frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Saha, S. K.; Chowdhury, S.; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-12-15

    In a RF produced magnetized argon plasma expanding into a larger expansion chamber, electrostatic modes propagating azimuthally in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and frequency greater than the ion cyclotron frequency are observed. In the radial direction, the mode amplitude peaks at a location where the radial density gradient is maximum. The modes are detected at axial locations up to 16 cm away from the entrance aperture. For fixed values of the neutral pressure and magnetic field, the mode frequency is found to be independent of the location at which it is measured. The modes exhibit drift wave characteristics revealing a radial structure with the azimuthal mode number m = 1 at the lower radial locations (r ∼ 3.0 cm) while the m = 2 mode is located in the outer region. Theoretical modeling using a local dispersion relation based on the fluid equations predicts destabilization of the modes with frequency greater than the ion-cyclotron frequency by electron-neutral collisions and exhibiting other drift wave features.

  19. Disappearance of high frequency modes in polymer dilute solution viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Jain, Semant

    2009-03-01

    We address the problem of the ``missing modes'' in the high frequency rheology of dilute polymer solutions. According to the Rouse-Zimm theory, the slow viscoelastic response of dilute polymers is dominated by the collective motion of the chain, as described by a bead-spring model. However, one expects this description to break down at high frequencies at which chain motion on scales too small to be represented by beads and springs should be evident; this motion should be controlled by rotations of individual backbone bonds of the polymer. The viscoelastic response produced by these ``local modes'' is observable in polymer melts; however, for dilute polymer solutions, the ``local modes'' are absent from viscoelastic spectra, as shown by Schrag and coworkers (Peterson, et al., J. Polym. Sci. B, 39:2860 (2001)). Here we address this problem by directly simulating single polymer chains using Brownian dynamics simulations, with realistic bending and torsional potentials. We show using these simulations that the ``missing modes'' result from barriers to bond rotation that make the chain ``dynamically rigid'' at high frequencies. As a result, the ``dynamical Kuhn length'' of the chain exceeds the static one, and the chain at high frequencies is not able to explore local conformations as fast as would be needed for their relaxation to contribute to the mechanical relaxation spectrum.

  20. Mode trap for absorbing transverse modes of an accelerated electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Chojnacki, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around its aperture and extending radially out toward its absorbing material layer.

  1. Mode trap for absorbing transverse modes of an accelerated electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Chojnacki, E.P.

    1994-05-31

    A mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around its aperture and extending radially out toward its absorbing material layer. 9 figs.

  2. Coupled whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Preu, S; Schwefel, H G L; Malzer, S; Döhler, G H; Wang, L J; Hanson, M; Zimmerman, J D; Gossard, A C

    2008-05-12

    We report on coupling of two whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range. Due to the long wavelength in the millimeter to submillimeter range, the resonators can be macroscopic allowing for accurate size and shape control. This is necessary to couple specific modes of two or more resonators. Sets of polyethylene (PE) and quartz disk resonators are demonstrated, with medium (loaded) quality (Q)-factors of 40-800. Both exhibit coinciding resonance frequency spectra over more than ten times the free spectral range. Loading effects of single resonators are investigated which provide strong Q-factor degradation and red-shifts of the resonances in the 0.2% range. By coupling two resonators of the same size, we observe mode splitting, in very good agreement with our numerical calculations.

  3. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  4. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  5. Frequency stabilization via the mixed mode in three mode HeNe lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J D; Joo, K; Buice, E S; Spronck, J W; Munnig Schmidt, R H

    2010-02-05

    This paper describes a three mode HeNe laser frequency stabilization technique using the mixed mode frequency to obtain a fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10{sup -11}. The mixed mode frequency occurs due to optical nonlinear interactions with the adjacent modes at each of the three modes. In precision displacement interferometry systems, the laser source frequency must be stabilized to provide an accurate conversion ratio between phase change and displacement. In systems, such as lithography applications, which require high speed, high accuracy and low data age uncertainty, it is also desirable to avoid periodic nonlinearities, which reduces computation time and errors. One method to reduce periodic nonlinearity is to spatially separate the measurement and reference beams to prevent optical mixing, which has been shown for several systems. Using spatially separated beams and the proper optical configuration, the interferometer can be fiber fed, which can increase the interferometer's stability by reducing the number of beam steering optical elements. Additionally, as the number of measurement axes increases, a higher optical power from the laser source is necessary.

  6. Development of an automatic frequency measurement system for RF linear accelerator magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Joo, Youngwoo; Lee, Soo Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Hyung Dal; Song, Ki Beak

    2015-06-01

    An X-band [9300 MHz] magnetron frequency measurement system was developed for the electron linear accelerators at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The measurement and the display of the RF frequency during the accelerator operation time is a crucial factor for continuous operation for two key reasons. Firstly, if the RF frequency of the magnetron is not known, then the amount of frequency tuning cannot be known, and the appropriate RF power cannot be supplied to the accelerating-structure. Second, values including the accelerating-structure's coolingwater temperature setting, the solenoid-magnet's cooling-water temperature setting, and the tuning of the source's (magnetron's) frequency can be undertaken because the RF frequency is used as the reference. A key component of the accelerator is the accelerating-structure. The volume of the accelerating-structure changes according to the environment's temperature; there, the resonance frequency of the accelerating-structure varies. When the resonance frequency of the accelerator is changed, the output becomes unstable, and a low beam energy is obtained. Accordingly, was developed a magnetron frequency-measuring device in order to stabilize the accelerator's operation. The results of the test demonstrate that the measurement's accurate up to 100 kHz, which enables the provision of an accurate RF power to the accelerating -structure. In this paper, we discuss the RF frequency measurement system for the magnetron to enable a more stable accelerator operation in a linac.

  7. Distributed coupling and multi-frequency microwave accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Li, Zenghai; Borchard, Philipp

    2016-07-05

    A microwave circuit for a linear accelerator has multiple metallic cell sections, a pair of distribution waveguide manifolds, and a sequence of feed arms connecting the manifolds to the cell sections. The distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections so that alternating pairs of cell sections are connected to opposite distribution waveguide manifolds. The distribution waveguide manifolds have concave modifications of their walls opposite the feed arms, and the feed arms have portions of two distinct widths. In some embodiments, the distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections by two different types of junctions adapted to allow two frequency operation. The microwave circuit may be manufactured by making two quasi-identical parts, and joining the two parts to form the microwave circuit, thereby allowing for many manufacturing techniques including electron beam welding, and thereby allowing the use of un-annealled copper alloys, and hence greater tolerance to high gradient operation.

  8. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Background Radiation From Electron Acceleration Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; van der Velde, Oscar; Farges, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently proposed that the acceleration of electrons during the growth and branching of streamers above thunderclouds initiated by intense lightning discharges could result in detectable low frequency electromagnetic radiation from several tens of kHz up to several hundreds of kHz (Qin et al., GRL, 2012). The intensity of the predicted radiation scales with the streamer density which is particularly large during spectacular sprite occurrences such as jellyfish sprites and/or dancing sprites. Dancing sprites are up to one second long sequences of consecutive sprites or sprite groups which are typically separated by some hundreds of milliseconds and which tend to follow the spatial development of large scale intracloud lightning discharges. A particularly spectacular series of 10 dancing sprite events over a Mediterranean mesoscale convective system was recorded with a low light video camera in south-eastern France during the early morning hours of August 31, 2012. Each dancing sprite event was composed of ~3-4 consecutive sprites or groups of sprites. All of these sprite occurrences were associated with a sudden enhancement ~2 uV/m/Hz-1/2 of the low frequency electromagnetic background radiation as measured with a radio receiver in south-west England. It is estimated that ~1000 streamers at a height of ~40 km are necessary to epxlain the observed electric field strengths. These sudden enhancements are superimposed on a more continuous low frequency electromagnetic background radiation which accompanies each dancing sprite event. It is speculated that this low frequency 'radio glow' results from filamentary streamers near the cloud top as a result of the large scale electrostatic charging of the thundercloud and that it may be used as an indicator for sprite occurrences in future studies.

  9. Quantum dot mode locked lasers for coherent frequency comb generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, A.; Calò, C.; Rosales, R.; Watts, R. T.; Merghem, K.; Accard, A.; Lelarge, F.; Barry, L. P.; Ramdane, A.

    2013-12-01

    Monolithic semiconductor passively mode locked lasers (MLL) are very attractive components for many applications including high bit rate telecommunications, microwave photonics and instrumentation. Owing to the three dimensional confinement of the charge carriers, quantum dot based mode-locked lasers have been the subject of intense investigations because of their improved performance compared to conventional material systems. Indeed, the inhomogeneous gain broadening and the ultrafast absorption recovery dynamics are an asset for short pulse generation. Moreover, the weak coupling of amplified spontaneous emission with the guided modes plus low loss waveguide leads to low timing jitter. Our work concentrates on InAs quantum dash nanostructures grown on InP substrate, intended for applications in the 1.55 μm telecom window. InAs/InP quantum dash based lasers, in particular, have demonstrated efficient mode locking in single section Fabry-Perot configurations. The flat optical spectrum of about 12 nm, combined with the narrow RF beat note linewidth of about 10 kHz make them a promising technology for optical frequency comb generation. Coherence between spectral modes was assessed by means of spectral phase measurements. The parabolic spectral phase profile indicates that short pulses can be obtained provided the intracavity dispersion can be compensated by inserting a single mode fiber.

  10. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  11. Travel Mode Detection with Varying Smartphone Data Collection Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Muhammad Awais; Hato, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are becoming increasingly popular day-by-day. Modern smartphones are more than just calling devices. They incorporate a number of high-end sensors that provide many new dimensions to smartphone experience. The use of smartphones, however, can be extended from the usual telecommunication field to applications in other specialized fields including transportation. Sensors embedded in the smartphones like GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope can collect data passively, which in turn can be processed to infer the travel mode of the smartphone user. This will solve most of the shortcomings associated with conventional travel survey methods including biased response, no response, erroneous time recording, etc. The current study uses the sensors' data collected by smartphones to extract nine features for classification. Variables including data frequency, moving window size and proportion of data to be used for training, are dealt with to achieve better results. Random forest is used to classify the smartphone data among six modes. An overall accuracy of 99.96% is achieved, with no mode less than 99.8% for data collected at 10 Hz frequency. The accuracy is observed to decrease with decrease in data frequency, but at the same time the computation time also decreases. PMID:27213380

  12. Travel Mode Detection with Varying Smartphone Data Collection Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Shafique, Muhammad Awais; Hato, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are becoming increasingly popular day-by-day. Modern smartphones are more than just calling devices. They incorporate a number of high-end sensors that provide many new dimensions to smartphone experience. The use of smartphones, however, can be extended from the usual telecommunication field to applications in other specialized fields including transportation. Sensors embedded in the smartphones like GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope can collect data passively, which in turn can be processed to infer the travel mode of the smartphone user. This will solve most of the shortcomings associated with conventional travel survey methods including biased response, no response, erroneous time recording, etc. The current study uses the sensors’ data collected by smartphones to extract nine features for classification. Variables including data frequency, moving window size and proportion of data to be used for training, are dealt with to achieve better results. Random forest is used to classify the smartphone data among six modes. An overall accuracy of 99.96% is achieved, with no mode less than 99.8% for data collected at 10 Hz frequency. The accuracy is observed to decrease with decrease in data frequency, but at the same time the computation time also decreases. PMID:27213380

  13. Travel Mode Detection with Varying Smartphone Data Collection Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Muhammad Awais; Hato, Eiji

    2016-05-18

    Smartphones are becoming increasingly popular day-by-day. Modern smartphones are more than just calling devices. They incorporate a number of high-end sensors that provide many new dimensions to smartphone experience. The use of smartphones, however, can be extended from the usual telecommunication field to applications in other specialized fields including transportation. Sensors embedded in the smartphones like GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope can collect data passively, which in turn can be processed to infer the travel mode of the smartphone user. This will solve most of the shortcomings associated with conventional travel survey methods including biased response, no response, erroneous time recording, etc. The current study uses the sensors' data collected by smartphones to extract nine features for classification. Variables including data frequency, moving window size and proportion of data to be used for training, are dealt with to achieve better results. Random forest is used to classify the smartphone data among six modes. An overall accuracy of 99.96% is achieved, with no mode less than 99.8% for data collected at 10 Hz frequency. The accuracy is observed to decrease with decrease in data frequency, but at the same time the computation time also decreases.

  14. Different coupling modes mediate cortical cross-frequency interactions.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Randolph F; Herrmann, Christoph S; Engel, Andreas K; Schneider, Till R

    2016-10-15

    Cross-frequency coupling (CFC) has been suggested to constitute a highly flexible mechanism for cortical information gating and processing, giving rise to conscious perception and various higher cognitive functions in humans. In particular, it might provide an elegant tool for information integration across several spatiotemporal scales within nested or coupled neuronal networks. However, it is currently unknown whether low-frequency (theta/alpha) or high-frequency gamma oscillations orchestrate cross-frequency interactions, raising the question of who is master and who is slave. While correlative evidence suggested that at least two distinct CFC modes exist, namely, phase-amplitude-coupling (PAC) and amplitude-envelope correlations (AEC), it is currently unknown whether they subserve distinct cortical functions. Novel non-invasive brain stimulation tools, such as transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), now provide the unique opportunity to selectively entrain the low- or high-frequency component and study subsequent effects on CFC. Here, we demonstrate the differential modulation of CFC during selective entrainment of alpha or gamma oscillations. Our results reveal that entrainment of the low-frequency component increased PAC, where gamma power became preferentially locked to the trough of the alpha oscillation, while gamma-band entrainment enhanced AECs and reduced alpha power. These results provide causal evidence for the functional role of coupled alpha and gamma oscillations for visual processing. PMID:26608244

  15. Different coupling modes mediate cortical cross-frequency interactions.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Randolph F; Herrmann, Christoph S; Engel, Andreas K; Schneider, Till R

    2016-10-15

    Cross-frequency coupling (CFC) has been suggested to constitute a highly flexible mechanism for cortical information gating and processing, giving rise to conscious perception and various higher cognitive functions in humans. In particular, it might provide an elegant tool for information integration across several spatiotemporal scales within nested or coupled neuronal networks. However, it is currently unknown whether low-frequency (theta/alpha) or high-frequency gamma oscillations orchestrate cross-frequency interactions, raising the question of who is master and who is slave. While correlative evidence suggested that at least two distinct CFC modes exist, namely, phase-amplitude-coupling (PAC) and amplitude-envelope correlations (AEC), it is currently unknown whether they subserve distinct cortical functions. Novel non-invasive brain stimulation tools, such as transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), now provide the unique opportunity to selectively entrain the low- or high-frequency component and study subsequent effects on CFC. Here, we demonstrate the differential modulation of CFC during selective entrainment of alpha or gamma oscillations. Our results reveal that entrainment of the low-frequency component increased PAC, where gamma power became preferentially locked to the trough of the alpha oscillation, while gamma-band entrainment enhanced AECs and reduced alpha power. These results provide causal evidence for the functional role of coupled alpha and gamma oscillations for visual processing.

  16. Modeling low frequency vibrational modes of large biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto; Dykeman, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Mechanical oscillations of proteins in their native state are relevant to understanding the flexibility of the protein assembly, the binding of substrates, the mechanical action involved in enzymatic activity, and the vibrational response to light scattering. Often, only the low frequency modes are of interest and coarse grained methods or other approximations are used due to the large size of the dynamical matrix. We introduce a computational approach, which exploits the methodology from electronic structure Order N methods, to find the vibrational modes below some frequency threshold (analogous to a Fermi-level in electronic structure theory). The approach allows systems to be described in atomistic detail. We use a generalized Born force field to model the interactions. Examples of normal modes for icosahedral viruses (e.g. satellite tobacco necrosis virus), tubular viruses (e.g. M13), and enzymes (e.g. lysozyme, HIV-protease, alpha-lytic protease) will be discussed. This effort is motivated by recent experimental work to produce high amplitude vibrations of viruses from impulsive stimulated Raman scattering.

  17. Preferential amplification of rising versus falling frequency whistler mode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. D.; Harid, V.; Spasojevic, M.; Gołkowski, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of ground-based ELF/VLF observations of injected whistler mode waves from the 1986 Siple Station experiment demonstrates the preferential magnetospheric amplification of rising over descending frequency-time ramps. From examining conjugate region receptions of ±1 kHz/s frequency-time ramps, we find that rising ramps generate an average total power 1.9 times higher than that of falling frequency ramps when both are observed during a transmission. And in 17% of receptions, only rising ramps are observed above the noise floor. Furthermore, the amplification ratio inversely correlates with the noise and total signal power. Using a narrowband Vlasov-Maxwell numerical simulation, we explore the preferential amplification due to differences in linear growth rate as a function of frequency, relative to the frequency which maximizes the linear growth rate for a given anisotropy, and in nonlinear phase trapping. These results contribute to the understanding of magnetospheric wave amplification and the preference for structured rising elements in chorus.

  18. Conformational heterogeneity and low-frequency vibrational modes of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, E; Smith, Jeremy C; Perahia, David

    2006-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation and normal mode analysis are used to calculate the vibrational density of states of dihydrofolate reductase complexed with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate at 120 K and the results are compared with the experimental spectrum derived from inelastic neutron scattering. The simulation results indicate that the experimental spectrum arises from an average over proteins trapped in different conformations with structural differences mainly in the loop regions, and that these conformations have significantly different low-frequency (<20 cm-1) spectra. Thus, the experimentally measured spectrum is an average over the vibrational modes of different protein conformations and is thus inhomogeneously broadened. The implications of this broadening for future neutron scattering experiments and ligand binding calculations are discussed.

  19. High efficiency in mode-selective frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Nicolás; Sipe, J E

    2016-01-15

    Frequency conversion (FC) is an enabling process in many quantum information protocols. Recently, it has been observed that upconversion efficiencies in single-photon, mode-selective FC are limited to around 80%. In this Letter, we argue that these limits can be understood as time-ordering corrections (TOCs) that modify the joint conversion amplitude of the process. Furthermore, using a simple scaling argument, we show that recently proposed cascaded FC protocols that overcome the aforementioned limitations act as "attenuators" of the TOCs. This observation allows us to argue that very similar cascaded architectures can be used to attenuate TOCs in photon generation via spontaneous parametric downconversion. Finally, by using the Magnus expansion, we argue that the TOCs, which are usually considered detrimental for FC efficiency, can also be used to increase the efficiency of conversion in partially mode-selective FC.

  20. High efficiency in mode-selective frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Nicolás; Sipe, J E

    2016-01-15

    Frequency conversion (FC) is an enabling process in many quantum information protocols. Recently, it has been observed that upconversion efficiencies in single-photon, mode-selective FC are limited to around 80%. In this Letter, we argue that these limits can be understood as time-ordering corrections (TOCs) that modify the joint conversion amplitude of the process. Furthermore, using a simple scaling argument, we show that recently proposed cascaded FC protocols that overcome the aforementioned limitations act as "attenuators" of the TOCs. This observation allows us to argue that very similar cascaded architectures can be used to attenuate TOCs in photon generation via spontaneous parametric downconversion. Finally, by using the Magnus expansion, we argue that the TOCs, which are usually considered detrimental for FC efficiency, can also be used to increase the efficiency of conversion in partially mode-selective FC. PMID:26766715

  1. A new low-frequency backward mode in inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2014-07-15

    When an electromagnetic transverse wave propagates through an inhomogeneous plasma so that its electric field has a component in the direction of the background density gradient, there appears a disbalance of charge in every plasma layer, caused by the density gradient. Due to this, some additional longitudinal electric field component appears in the direction of the wave vector. This longitudinal field may couple with the usual electrostatic longitudinal perturbations like the ion acoustic, electron Langmuir, and ion plasma waves. As a result, these standard electrostatic waves are modified and in addition to this a completely new low-frequency mode appears. Some basic features of the coupling and modification of the ion acoustic wave, and properties of the new mode are discussed here, in ordinary electron-ion and in pair plasmas.

  2. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  3. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shixiang; Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Ailing; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Chen, Jia'er

    2014-02-01

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  4. Few-mode fiber based distributed curvature sensor through quasi-single-mode Brillouin frequency shift.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Ruoxu; Liu, Deming; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Can; Wei, Huifeng; Tong, Weijun; Shum, Perry Ping; Tang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a few-mode fiber (FMF) based optical-fiber sensor for distributed curvature measurement through quasi-single-mode Brillouin frequency shift (BFS). By central-alignment splicing FMF and single-mode fiber (SMF) with a fusion taper, a SMF-components-compatible distributed curvature sensor based on FMF is realized using the conventional Brillouin optical time-domain analysis system. The distributed BFS change induced by bending in FMF has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. The precise BFS response to the curvature along the fiber link has been calibrated. A proof-of-concept experiment is implemented to validate its effectiveness in distributed curvature measurement. PMID:27192275

  5. Mode Selection for a Single-Frequency Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    A superstructured fiber-grating-based mode selection filter for a single-frequency fiber laser eliminates all free-space components, and makes the laser truly all-fiber. A ring cavity provides for stable operations in both frequency and power. There is no alignment or realignment required. After the fibers and components are spliced together and packaged, there is no need for specially trained technicians for operation or maintenance. It can be integrated with other modules, such as telescope systems, without extra optical alignment due to the flexibility of the optical fiber. The filter features a narrow line width of 1 kHz and side mode suppression ratio of 65 dB. It provides a high-quality laser for lidar in terms of coherence length and signal-to-noise ratio, which is 20 dB higher than solid-state or microchip lasers. This concept is useful in material processing, medical equipment, biomedical instrumentation, and optical communications. The pulse-shaping fiber laser can be directly used in space, airborne, and satellite applications including lidar, remote sensing, illuminators, and phase-array antenna systems.

  6. Multi-frequency modes in superconducting resonators: Bridging frequency gaps in off-resonant couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    A SQUID inserted in a superconducting waveguide resonator imposes current and voltage boundary conditions that makes it suitable as a tuning element for the resonator modes. If such a SQUID element is subject to a periodically varying magnetic flux, the resonator modes acquire frequency side bands. We calculate the multi-frequency eigenmodes and these can couple resonantly to physical systems with different transition frequencies and this makes the resonator an efficient quantum bus for state transfer and coherent quantum operations in hybrid quantum systems. As an example of the application, we determine their coupling to transmon qubits with different frequencies and we present a bi-chromatic scheme for entanglement and gate operations. In this calculation, we obtain a maximally entangled state with a fidelity F = 95 % . Our proposal is competitive with the achievements of other entanglement-gates with superconducting devices and it may offer some advantages: (i) There is no need for additional control lines and dephasing associated with the conventional frequency tuning of qubits. (ii) When our qubits are idle, they are far detuned with respect to each other and to the resonator, and hence they are immune to cross talk and Purcell-enhanced decay.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor modes in constant-density incompressible fluids accelerated by radiation pressure. [astrophysical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the behavior of linear perturbations in an incompressible fluid undergoing acceleration by radiation pressure, with reference to processes occurring in quasars, supernovae, and planetary nebulae. It is shown that, contrary to prior expectation, fluids accelerated by radiation pressure, are not always unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Some are, in fact, unstable, but the nature of the instability is qualitatively different.

  8. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42-216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy. The

  9. Low-frequency vibrational modes in blue opsin: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumuruganandham, Saravana Prakash; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    Vibrational excitations of low-frequency collective modes are essential for functionally important conformational transitions in proteins. We have carried out an analysis of the low-frequency modes in blue opsin based on both normal-mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. Power spectra obtained by molecular dynamics agree well with the normal modes. A representative set of low-frequency modes is discussed with the help of vector-field representation. We thus demonstrate that terahertz spectroscopy of low-frequency modes might be relevant for identifying those vibrational degrees of freedom that correlate to known conformational changes in opsins.

  10. Magneto-hydrodynamics simulation study of deflagration mode in co-axial plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-15

    Experimental studies by Poehlmann et al. [Phys. Plasmas 17(12), 123508 (2010)] on a coaxial electrode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma accelerator have revealed two modes of operation. A deflagration or stationary mode is observed for lower power settings, while higher input power leads to a detonation or snowplow mode. A numerical modeling study of a coaxial plasma accelerator using the non-ideal MHD equations is presented. The effect of plasma conductivity on the axial distribution of radial current is studied and found to agree well with experiments. Lower conductivities lead to the formation of a high current density, stationary region close to the inlet/breech, which is a characteristic of the deflagration mode, while a propagating current sheet like feature is observed at higher conductivities, similar to the detonation mode. Results confirm that plasma resistivity, which determines magnetic field diffusion effects, is fundamentally responsible for the two modes.

  11. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    PubMed

    Busa, Michael A; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01) during early stance and at the head (p<0.01) during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01) and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01) in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01). When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  12. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running

    PubMed Central

    Busa, Michael A.; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E. A.; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01) during early stance and at the head (p<0.01) during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01) and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01) in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01). When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability. PMID:27271850

  13. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    PubMed

    Busa, Michael A; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01) during early stance and at the head (p<0.01) during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01) and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01) in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01). When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability. PMID:27271850

  14. Measurement of Resonant Frequencies and Modes of Freestanding Nanoparticle Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Lin, Xiao-Min; Jaeger, Heinrich; Guest, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    We recently showed that freestanding membranes of ligated nanoparticles can be assembled in a one-step drying-mediated process [1]. These 10nm thin membranes can stretch over holes up to 100 microns in diameter and are supported by a substrate only along their outer edge, thereby freely suspending of the order of 100 million close-packed particles [2]. Previous work has focused on quasi-static mechanical properties [1-3]. Here we present the first investigation of the full dynamic response of freely suspended nanoparticle membranes, utilizing a high frequency laser interferometer with picometer sensitivity. This instrument allows us to rapidly measure the dynamical properties of freestanding nanoparticle monolayers for the first time including resonant frequencies, quality factors, and images of different modes.[4pt] [1] Klara E. Mueggenburg et al., ``Elastic membranes of close-packed nanoparticle arrays,'' Nature Materials 6, 656-660 (2007). [0pt] [2] Jinbo He et al., ``Fabrication and Mechanical properties of large-scale freestanding nanoparticle membranes,'' Small 6, 1449-1456 (2010).[0pt] [3] Pongsakorn Kanjanaboos et al., ``Strain Patterning and Direct Measurement of Poisson's Ratio in Nanoparticle Monolayer Sheets,'' Nano Letters 11, 2567-2571 (2011).

  15. Strong Destabilization of Stable Modes with a Half-Frequency Associated with Chirping Geodesic Acoustic Modes in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Itoh, K.; Osakabe, M.; Lesur, M.; Shimizu, A.; Ogawa, K.; Toi, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Sasaki, M.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Abrupt and strong excitation of a mode has been observed when the frequency of a chirping energetic-particle driven geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) reaches twice the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency. The frequency of the secondary mode is the GAM frequency, which is a half-frequency of the primary EGAM. Based on the analysis of spatial structures, the secondary mode is identified as a GAM. The phase relation between the secondary mode and the primary EGAM is locked, and the evolution of the growth rate of the secondary mode indicates nonlinear excitation. The results suggest that the primary mode (EGAM) contributes to nonlinear destabilization of a subcritical mode.

  16. Acceleration of FDTD mode solver by high-performance computing techniques.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Xi, Yanping; Huang, Wei-Ping

    2010-06-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) compact finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) mode solver is developed based on wave equation formalism in combination with the matrix pencil method (MPM). The method is validated for calculation of both real guided and complex leaky modes of typical optical waveguides against the bench-mark finite-difference (FD) eigen mode solver. By taking advantage of the inherent parallel nature of the FDTD algorithm, the mode solver is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). It is demonstrated that the high-performance computing technique leads to significant acceleration of the FDTD mode solver with more than 30 times improvement in computational efficiency in comparison with the conventional FDTD mode solver running on CPU of a standard desktop computer. The computational efficiency of the accelerated FDTD method is in the same order of magnitude of the standard finite-difference eigen mode solver and yet require much less memory (e.g., less than 10%). Therefore, the new method may serve as an efficient, accurate and robust tool for mode calculation of optical waveguides even when the conventional eigen value mode solvers are no longer applicable due to memory limitation.

  17. Variable frequency heavy-ion linac, RILAC I. Design, construction and operation of its accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Masatoshi; Chiba, Yoshiaki; Tonuma, Tadao; Hemmi, Masatake; Miyazawa, Yoshitoshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Kambara, Tadashi; Kase, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Fusako

    1984-11-01

    A variable frequency linear accelerator at RIKEN (IPCR), which is named RILAC, is designed to accelerate ions of almost every element in the periodic table. In this report, the design, construction and performance of the resonator cavities of this linac are described. A new accelerating structure was developed for the variable frequency scheme. The principal aim of the development was to obtain a configuration within the cavity to keep a uniform voltage distribution along the accelerating axis over the wide range of resonant frequencies required. The final form adopted is a coaxial quarter-wave type resonator with a race-track-like cross section for its coaxial inner and outer conductors. It has a movable shorting device as a frequency tuner and its open end is enlarged and loaded with drift tubes, connected to the inner and outer conductors alternatingly. The structure can maintain the required uniformity of the accelerating voltage within 10% in spite of resonant frequency tuning between 17 and 45 MHz. A relatively modest accelerating gradient was chosen so that cw operation could be realized. The RILAC is composed of six such cavities which are independently excited and it succeeded in the acceleration of a beam through all the cavities in 1981.

  18. Sampling frequency affects the processing of Actigraph raw acceleration data to activity counts.

    PubMed

    Brønd, Jan Christian; Arvidsson, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    ActiGraph acceleration data are processed through several steps (including band-pass filtering to attenuate unwanted signal frequencies) to generate the activity counts commonly used in physical activity research. We performed three experiments to investigate the effect of sampling frequency on the generation of activity counts. Ideal acceleration signals were produced in the MATLAB software. Thereafter, ActiGraph GT3X+ monitors were spun in a mechanical setup. Finally, 20 subjects performed walking and running wearing GT3X+ monitors. Acceleration data from all experiments were collected with different sampling frequencies, and activity counts were generated with the ActiLife software. With the default 30-Hz (or 60-Hz, 90-Hz) sampling frequency, the generation of activity counts was performed as intended with 50% attenuation of acceleration signals with a frequency of 2.5 Hz by the signal frequency band-pass filter. Frequencies above 5 Hz were eliminated totally. However, with other sampling frequencies, acceleration signals above 5 Hz escaped the band-pass filter to a varied degree and contributed to additional activity counts. Similar results were found for the spinning of the GT3X+ monitors, although the amount of activity counts generated was less, indicating that raw data stored in the GT3X+ monitor is processed. Between 600 and 1,600 more counts per minute were generated with the sampling frequencies 40 and 100 Hz compared with 30 Hz during running. Sampling frequency affects the processing of ActiGraph acceleration data to activity counts. Researchers need to be aware of this error when selecting sampling frequencies other than the default 30 Hz.

  19. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O' Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  20. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  1. Generation of two-mode optical signals with broadband frequency tunability and low spurious signal level.

    PubMed

    Song, Ho-Jin; Shimizu, Naofumi; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2007-10-29

    For continuous millimeter and terahertz-wave applications, a two-mode optical signal generation technique that uses two arrayed waveguide gratings and two optical switch units is presented. In addition to easy and fast operation, this scheme offers broadband frequency tunability and high signal purity with a low spurious mode level. Mode spacing, which corresponds to the frequency of the generated MM/THz-wave signal after photomixing, was successfully swept in the range of 200 ~ 550 GHz and the optical spurious mode suppression ratio higher than 25 dBc was achieved. In addition, spurious modes characteristics were investigated by using second harmonic generation (SHG) autocorrelation methods for several frequencies.

  2. Transmission and Propagation of an Accelerating Mode in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-K.; England, R.J.; Lee, L.-Q.; Noble, R.; Rawat, V.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A hollow core photonic bandgap (PBG) lattice in a dielectric fiber can provide high gradient acceleration in the optical regime, where the accelerating mode resulting from a defect in the PBG fiber can be excited by high-power lasers. Efficient methods of coupling laser power into the PBG fiber are an area of active research. In this paper, we develop a simulation method using the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P to study the propagation of the accelerating mode in the PBG fiber and determine the radiation pattern into free space at the end of the PBG fiber. The far-field radiation will be calculated and the mechanism of coupling power from an experimental laser setup will be discussed.

  3. Effect of relativistic acceleration on localized two-mode Gaussian quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Lorek, Krzysztof; Checińska, Agata; Smith, Alexander R. H.; Mann, Robert B.; Dragan, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    We study how an arbitrary Gaussian state of two localized wave packets, prepared in an inertial frame of reference, is described by a pair of uniformly accelerated observers. We explicitly compute the resulting state for arbitrarily chosen proper accelerations of the observers and independently tuned distance between them. To do so, we introduce a generalized Rindler frame of reference and analytically derive the corresponding state transformation as a Gaussian channel. Our approach provides several new insights into the phenomenon of vacuum entanglement such as the highly nontrivial effect of spatial separation between the observers including sudden death of entanglement. We also calculate the fidelity of the two-mode channel for nonvacuum Gaussian states and obtain bounds on classical and quantum capacities of a single-mode channel. Our framework can be directly applied to any continuous variable quantum information protocol in which the effects of acceleration or gravity cannot be neglected.

  4. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  5. Determining XV-15 aeroelastic modes from flight data with frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt-rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed). All spectral data were computed using chirp z-transforms. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by fitting curves to frequency-response magnitude and phase data. The results given in this report are for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Also, frequency and damping values are compared with theoretical predictions made using two different programs, CAMRAD and ASAP. The frequency-domain data-analysis method proved to be very reliable and adequate for tracking aeroelastic modes during flight-envelope expansion. This approach required less flight-test time and yielded mode estimations that were more repeatable, compared with the exponential-decay method previously used.

  6. Statistics and Properties of Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes in Structural Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Edan; Düring, Gustavo; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency vibrational modes play a central role in determining various basic properties of glasses, yet their statistical and mechanical properties are not fully understood. Using extensive numerical simulations of several model glasses in three dimensions, we show that in systems of linear size L sufficiently smaller than a crossover size LD, the low-frequency tail of the density of states follows D (ω )˜ω4 up to the vicinity of the lowest Goldstone mode frequency. We find that the sample-to-sample statistics of the minimal vibrational frequency in systems of size L frequency modes are spatially quasilocalized and that their localization and associated quartic anharmonicity are largely frequency independent. The effect of preparation protocols on the low-frequency modes is elucidated, and a number of glassy length scales are briefly discussed.

  7. Nonlinear acceleration of the electron inertia-dominated magnetohydrodynamic modes due to electron parallel compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Taro; Naitou, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Shinji; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2005-09-15

    The behavior of the collisionless magnetohydrodynamics modes is investigated by the gyrokinetic particle simulation in a cylindrical tokamak plasma in the parameter region where the effects of electron inertia and electron parallel compressibility are competitive for magnetic reconnection. Although the linear growth of the m=1 internal kink-tearing mode is dominated by the electron inertia, it is found that the growth rate can be nonlinearly accelerated due to the electron parallel compressibility proportional to the ion sound Larmor radius {rho}{sub s}. It is also found that, as decreasing the electron skin depth {delta}{sub e}, the maximum growth rate before the internal collapse saturates independently of the microscopic scales such as {delta}{sub e} and {rho}{sub s}. The acceleration of growth rate is also observed in the nonlinear phase of the m=2 double tearing mode.

  8. Comparisons of radio frequency technology for superconducting accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimber, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities, normal conducting as well as superconducting, there has been a need to drive them with RF power. At first glance, the function of an RF drive system may seem simple and straightforward, but this belies subtleties that greatly affect the performance of the cavity itself, diminishing efforts in perfecting techniques in design and manufacture. It can also contribute to a significant portion of the initial capital and ongoing running costs of a facility, maintenance labor, downtime and future expenditure as the system ages. The RF `system', should be thought of as just that, the entire collection of components from wall plug to cavity. Following this integrated approach will enable the system to meet or exceed its design goals. This paper seeks to review the current state of RF technology for superconducting structures and to compare these technologies, looking at what has traditionally been used, developments that have enabled higher efficiencies and higher reliabilities as well as looking towards future technologies. It will concentrate on superconducting applications, but much of the narrative is equally applicable to normal conducting structures as well.

  9. RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1988-04-12

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in responsive to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations in the spectrum of a frequency mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that a frequency mode-locked laser with a sinusoidal sweep of modulation frequency around a mode-locking condition represents an ideal optical system for observing in the spectral domain the phenomena of dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations of electrons in an ideal solid placed in an external ac electric field.

  11. Excitation of High-Frequency Internal Kink Mode by Deeply-Trapped Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Shaojie

    2010-08-01

    Deeply trapped energetic ions can destabilize the internal kink mode with both high and low frequencies with a potato-orbit limit in the EAST-like tokamaks. The threshold beta value of the deeply trapped energetic ions, the real frequency, and the growth rate of the internal kink mode are predicted in this paper.

  12. Difference frequency modulation of multi-section dual-mode lasers with nanoscale surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, Topi; Virtanen, Heikki; Viheriälä, Jukka; Salmi, Joel; Aho, Antti T.; Dumitrescu, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    Dual-mode multi-section quantum-well distributed feedback lasers with surface gratings have been fabricated, without regrowth, at 1310 and 1550 nm using UV nano-imprint lithography. Several laser and grating sections have been employed to control and stabilize the dual-mode emission and to reduce mode competition. Frequency differences between 15 GHz and 1 THz were achieved for different longitudinal structures. Frequency difference variations of several GHz have been measured under bias modulation with rates up to a few GHz. Higher frequency difference modulation rates are expected from improved measurement setups and from employing quantum dot active regions for further reduction of mode competition.

  13. Identification of sudden stiffness changes in the acceleration response of a bridge to moving loads using ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aied, H.; González, A.; Cantero, D.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of heavy traffic together with aggressive environmental loads poses a threat to the safety of an aging bridge stock. Often, damage is only detected via visual inspection at a point when repairing costs can be quite significant. Ideally, bridge managers would want to identify a stiffness change as soon as possible, i.e., as it is occurring, to plan for prompt measures before reaching a prohibitive cost. Recent developments in signal processing techniques such as wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) have aimed to address this need by identifying a stiffness change from a localised feature in the structural response to traffic. However, the effectiveness of these techniques is limited by the roughness of the road profile, the vehicle speed and the noise level. In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied by the first time to the acceleration response of a bridge model to a moving load with the purpose of capturing sudden stiffness changes. EEMD is more adaptive and appears to be better suited to non-linear signals than wavelets, and it reduces the mode mixing problem present in EMD. EEMD is tested in a variety of theoretical 3D vehicle-bridge interaction scenarios. Stiffness changes are successfully identified, even for small affected regions, relatively poor profiles, high vehicle speeds and significant noise. The latter is due to the ability of EEMD to separate high frequency components associated to sudden stiffness changes from other frequency components associated to the vehicle-bridge interaction system.

  14. Single-mode waveguide optical isolator based on direction-dependent cutoff frequency.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lingling; Drezdzon, Samuel M; Yoshie, Tomoyuki

    2008-09-29

    A single-mode-waveguide optical isolator based on propagation direction dependent cut-off frequency is proposed. The isolation bandwidth is the difference between the cut-off frequencies of the lowest forward and backward propagating modes. Perturbation theory is used for analyzing the correlation between the material distribution and the bandwidth. The mode profile determines an appropriate distribution of non-reciprocal materials.

  15. Testing the identification of p-mode frequencies in solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régulo, C.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Roca Cortés, T.

    2004-01-01

    The regular pattern that high n p-mode frequencies of solar-like stars show is used to design a method for a quick check to the identification of the modes. The case of a wrong mode identification or a spurious one is clearly shown by the method, which depends rather weakly on the possible stellar models. An application of the method shows evidences of misidentification in the recent frequencies of α Cen A suggested by Bouchy & Carrier (2002).

  16. Acceleration of relativistic electrons due to resonant interaction with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Shklyar, David

    2016-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems of the radiation belt studies is the problem of particles energization. Being related to the process of particle precipitation and posing a threat to scientific instruments on satellites, the problem of highly energetic particles in the radiation belts turns out to be very important. A lot of progress has been made in this field, but still some aspects of the energization process remain open. The main mechanism of particle energization in the radiation belts is the resonant interaction with different waves, mainly, in whistler frequency range. The problem of special interest is the resonant wave-particle interaction of the electrons of relativistic energies. Relativistic resonance condition provides some important features such as the so-called relativistic turning acceleration discovered by Omura et al. [1, 2]. This process appears to be a very efficient mechanism of acceleration in the case of interaction with the whistler-mode waves propagating along geomagnetic field lines. But some whistler-mode waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field lines, and the efficiency of relativistic turning acceleration in this case is to be studied. In this report, we present the Hamiltonian theory of the resonant interaction of relativistic electrons with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves. We have shown that the presence of turning point requires a special treatment when one aims to derive the resonant Hamiltonian, and we have obtained two different resonant Hamiltonians: one to be applied far enough from the turning point, while another is valid in the vicinity of the turning point. We have performed numerical simulation of relativistic electron interaction with whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere by a monochromatic source. It could be, for example, a low-frequency transmitter. The wave-field distribution along unperturbed particle trajectory is calculated by means of geometrical optics. We show that the obliquity of

  17. Identification of XV-15 aeroelastic modes using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1989-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt-Rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed) with cross spectral and transfer function methods. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by performing curve fits to transfer function magnitude and phase data and to cross spectral magnitude data. Results are given for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Frequency and damping values are also compared with earlier predictions.

  18. Dual-mode operation of dual-frequency liquid crystal cell by horizontal switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao Ping; Preman, Smarty P.; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jae Chang

    2008-03-01

    A dual-mode operation featuring a dual-frequency liquid crystal (LC) cell has been proposed in this paper. This dual-mode operation conducted by the horizontal switching allows the device to work as either dynamic or memory mode, named in terms of the monostability and bistability, respectively, of which, the dynamic mode is responsible for the gray-scale generation by modulating the birefringence of LC, while the memory mode is responsible for the power saving by the long retention time of two stable states. We have revealed the switching mechanism for both operation modes, besides, the electro-optical effects will be demonstrated by the experimental results.

  19. The Effects of Frequency, Distribution, Mode of Presentation, and First Language on Learning an Artificial Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyata, Munehiko

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents results from a series of experiments investigating adult learning of an artificial language and the effects that input frequency (high vs. low token frequency), frequency distribution (skewed vs. balanced), presentation mode (structured vs. scrambled), and first language (English vs. Japanese) have on such learning.…

  20. Effects of Frequency and Motion Paradigm on Perception of Tilt and Translation During Periodic Linear Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an effect of frequency on the gain of tilt and translation perception. Results from different motion paradigms are often combined to extend the stimulus frequency range. For example, Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) and Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC) are useful to test low frequencies of linear acceleration at amplitudes that would require impractical sled lengths. The purpose of this study was to compare roll-tilt and lateral translation motion perception in 12 healthy subjects across four paradigms: OVAR, VRC, sled translation and rotation about an earth-horizontal axis. Subjects were oscillated in darkness at six frequencies from 0.01875 to 0.6 Hz (peak acceleration equivalent to 10 deg, less for sled motion below 0.15 Hz). Subjects verbally described the amplitude of perceived tilt and translation, and used a joystick to indicate the direction of motion. Consistent with previous reports, tilt perception gain decreased as a function of stimulus frequency in the motion paradigms without concordant canal tilt cues (OVAR, VRC and Sled). Translation perception gain was negligible at low stimulus frequencies and increased at higher frequencies. There were no significant differences between the phase of tilt and translation, nor did the phase significantly vary across stimulus frequency. There were differences in perception gain across the different paradigms. Paradigms that included actual tilt stimuli had the larger tilt gains, and paradigms that included actual translation stimuli had larger translation gains. In addition, the frequency at which there was a crossover of tilt and translation gains appeared to vary across motion paradigm between 0.15 and 0.3 Hz. Since the linear acceleration in the head lateral plane was equivalent across paradigms, differences in gain may be attributable to the presence of linear accelerations in orthogonal directions and/or cognitive aspects based on the expected motion paths.

  1. Dual-frequency modes of the dust acoustic surface wave in a semibounded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-07-01

    Dual-frequency modes of the dust acoustic surface waves propagating at the interface between a nonmagnetized multicomponent Lorentzian dusty plasma and a vacuum are investigated, including nonthermal and positron effects. The dispersion relation is kinetically derived by employing the specular reflection boundary condition and the dielectric permittivity for dusty plasma containing positrons. We found that there exist two modes of the dust acoustic surface wave; high- and low-frequency modes. We observe that both H and L modes are enhanced by the increase of the pair annihilation rate. However, the effects of positron density are twofold depending on the ratio of annihilated positrons. The effects of nonthermal plasmas are also investigated on the H and L modes of dust acoustic surface waves. We found that the nonthermal plasmas reduce the frequencies of both H and L modes.

  2. Dual-frequency modes of the dust acoustic surface wave in a semibounded system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-07-01

    Dual-frequency modes of the dust acoustic surface waves propagating at the interface between a nonmagnetized multicomponent Lorentzian dusty plasma and a vacuum are investigated, including nonthermal and positron effects. The dispersion relation is kinetically derived by employing the specular reflection boundary condition and the dielectric permittivity for dusty plasma containing positrons. We found that there exist two modes of the dust acoustic surface wave; high- and low-frequency modes. We observe that both H and L modes are enhanced by the increase of the pair annihilation rate. However, the effects of positron density are twofold depending on the ratio of annihilated positrons. The effects of nonthermal plasmas are also investigated on the H and L modes of dust acoustic surface waves. We found that the nonthermal plasmas reduce the frequencies of both H and L modes.

  3. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2015-05-08

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both themore » crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which exhibit anharmonicity.« less

  4. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2015-05-08

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which exhibit anharmonicity.

  5. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2015-06-01

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to report our findings related to low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. The breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry by the laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are much more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show much stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they could be used as effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness for few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence study shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which are known to exhibit anharmonicity.

  6. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2015-06-10

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand the low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm(-1)) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using a laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis, the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and, thus, their frequencies show a stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that in the temperature range -150 to 30 °C, the breathing modes have a weak anharmonic behavior, in contrast to the HF Raman modes that exhibit strong anharmonicity.

  7. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  8. Stimulation of titanium implant osseointegration through high-frequency vibration loading is enhanced when applied at high acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Vandamme, Katleen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Naert, Ignace; Possemiers, Tine; Chaudhari, Amol; Sasaki, Keiichi; Duyck, Joke

    2014-11-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, applied by means of whole body vibration (WBV), affects the bone. Deconstructing a WBV loading stimulus into its constituent elements and investigating the effects of frequency and acceleration individually on bone tissue kinetics around titanium implants were aimed for in this study. A titanium implant was inserted in the tibia of 120 rats. The rats were divided into 1 control group (no loading) and 5 test groups with low (L), medium (M) or high (H) frequency ranges and accelerations [12-30 Hz at 0.3×g (F(L)A(H)); 70-90 Hz at 0.075×g (F(M)A(M)); 70-90 Hz at 0.3×g (F(M)A(H)); 130-150 Hz at 0.043×g (F(H)A(L)); 130-150 Hz at 0.3×g (F H A H)]. WBV was applied for 1 or 4 weeks. Implant osseointegration was evaluated by quantitative histology (bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and peri-implant bone formation (BV/TV)). A 2-way ANOVA (duration of experimental period; loading mode) with α = 0.05 was performed. BIC significantly increased over time and under load (p < 0.0001). The highest BICs were found for loading regimes at high acceleration with medium or high frequency (F(M)A(H) and F(H)A(H)), and significantly differing from F(L)A(H) and F(M)A(M) (p < 0.02 and p < 0.005 respectively). BV/TV significantly decreased over time (p < 0.0001). Loading led to a site-specific BV/TV increase (p < 0.001). The highest BV/TV responses were found for F(M)A(H) and F(H)A(H), significantly differing from F(M)A(M) (p < 0.005). The findings reveal the potential of high-frequency vibration loading to accelerate and enhance implant osseointegration, in particular when applied at high acceleration. Such mechanical signals hold great, though untapped, potential to be used as non-pharmacologic treatment for improving implant osseointegration in compromised bone.

  9. Stimulation of titanium implant osseointegration through high-frequency vibration loading is enhanced when applied at high acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Vandamme, Katleen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Naert, Ignace; Possemiers, Tine; Chaudhari, Amol; Sasaki, Keiichi; Duyck, Joke

    2014-11-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, applied by means of whole body vibration (WBV), affects the bone. Deconstructing a WBV loading stimulus into its constituent elements and investigating the effects of frequency and acceleration individually on bone tissue kinetics around titanium implants were aimed for in this study. A titanium implant was inserted in the tibia of 120 rats. The rats were divided into 1 control group (no loading) and 5 test groups with low (L), medium (M) or high (H) frequency ranges and accelerations [12-30 Hz at 0.3×g (F(L)A(H)); 70-90 Hz at 0.075×g (F(M)A(M)); 70-90 Hz at 0.3×g (F(M)A(H)); 130-150 Hz at 0.043×g (F(H)A(L)); 130-150 Hz at 0.3×g (F H A H)]. WBV was applied for 1 or 4 weeks. Implant osseointegration was evaluated by quantitative histology (bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and peri-implant bone formation (BV/TV)). A 2-way ANOVA (duration of experimental period; loading mode) with α = 0.05 was performed. BIC significantly increased over time and under load (p < 0.0001). The highest BICs were found for loading regimes at high acceleration with medium or high frequency (F(M)A(H) and F(H)A(H)), and significantly differing from F(L)A(H) and F(M)A(M) (p < 0.02 and p < 0.005 respectively). BV/TV significantly decreased over time (p < 0.0001). Loading led to a site-specific BV/TV increase (p < 0.001). The highest BV/TV responses were found for F(M)A(H) and F(H)A(H), significantly differing from F(M)A(M) (p < 0.005). The findings reveal the potential of high-frequency vibration loading to accelerate and enhance implant osseointegration, in particular when applied at high acceleration. Such mechanical signals hold great, though untapped, potential to be used as non-pharmacologic treatment for improving implant osseointegration in compromised bone. PMID:25209971

  10. The effect of small-scale structure on normal mode frequencies and global inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snieder, Roel; Beckers, Jos; Neele, Filip

    1991-01-01

    A model of all the subduction zones and spreading ridges of the earth's upper mantle is used for the purpose of computing normal-mode frequency shifts for an earth model that contains significant small-scale structure. The model is detailed, and a short outline of the employed scattering theory is given. The normal-mode frequency shifts are shown, and inversions for a global earth model using the synthetic normal-mode frequency shifts are presented. The earth model in this inversion is presented as a truncated series of spherical harmonics, and a comparison is made with the true projection of structure on the same low-order spherical harmonics.

  11. Modeling of long range frequency sweeping for energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nyqvist, R. M.; Breizman, B. N.

    2013-04-15

    Long range frequency sweeping events are simulated numerically within a one-dimensional, electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The numerical solution accounts for fast particle trapping and detrapping in an evolving wave field with a fixed wavelength, and it includes three distinct collisions operators: Drag (dynamical friction on the background electrons), Krook-type collisions, and velocity space diffusion. The effects of particle trapping and diffusion on the evolution of holes and clumps are investigated, and the occurrence of non-monotonic (hooked) frequency sweeping and asymptotically steady holes is discussed. The presented solution constitutes a step towards predictive modeling of frequency sweeping events in more realistic geometries.

  12. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; et al

    2016-04-08

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9mm, speed of 50–120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for themore » entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Altogether, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is need« less

  13. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3-0.9 mm, speed of 50-120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9 mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3 mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3-5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Overall, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is needed to determine whether the projected heat flux reduction required for ITER can be met.

  14. Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Yu-An S.; Calabrese, Carolyn R.; Michener, Carolyn M.; Murray, Elizabeth Heller; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.; Noordzij, J. Pieter; Stepp, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of neck-skin acceleration for relative fundamental frequency (RFF) analysis. Method: Forty individuals with voice disorders associated with vocal hyperfunction and 20 age- and sex-matched control participants were recorded with a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer and a microphone while producing speech…

  15. Low-Frequency Interlayer Raman Modes to Probe Interface of Twisted Bilayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengxi; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-02-10

    van der Waals homo- and heterostructures assembled by stamping monolayers together present optoelectronic properties suitable for diverse applications. Understanding the details of the interlayer stacking and resulting coupling is crucial for tuning these properties. We investigated the low-frequency interlayer shear and breathing Raman modes (<50 cm(-1)) in twisted bilayer MoS2 by Raman spectroscopy and first-principles modeling. Twisting significantly alters the interlayer stacking and coupling, leading to notable frequency and intensity changes of low-frequency modes. The frequency variation can be up to 8 cm(-1) and the intensity can vary by a factor of ∼5 for twisting angles near 0° and 60°, where the stacking is a mixture of high-symmetry stacking patterns and is thus sensitive to twisting. For twisting angles between 20° and 40°, the interlayer coupling is nearly constant because the stacking results in mismatched lattices over the entire sample. It follows that the Raman signature is relatively uniform. Note that for some samples, multiple breathing mode peaks appear, indicating nonuniform coupling across the interface. In contrast to the low-frequency interlayer modes, high-frequency intralayer Raman modes are much less sensitive to interlayer stacking and coupling. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of low-frequency Raman modes for probing the interfacial coupling and environment of twisted bilayer MoS2 and potentially other two-dimensional materials and heterostructures. PMID:26797083

  16. Analysis on the Time and Frequency Domains of the Acceleration in Front Crawl Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Joaquín Madera; Moreno, Luis-Millán González; Mahiques, Juan Benavent; Muñoz, Víctor Tella

    2012-01-01

    The swimming involves accelerations and decelerations in the swimmer’s body. Thus, the main objective of this study is to make a temporal and frequency analysis of the acceleration in front crawl swimming, regarding the gender and the performance. The sample was composed by 31 male swimmers (15 of high-level and 16 of low-level) and 20 female swimmers (11 of high-level and 9 of low-level). The acceleration was registered from the third complete cycle during eight seconds in a 25 meters maximum velocity test. A position transducer (200Hz) was used to collect the data, and it was synchronized to an aquatic camera (25Hz). The acceleration in the temporal (root mean square, minimum and maximum of the acceleration) and frequency (power peak, power peak frequency and spectral area) domains was calculated with Fourier analysis, as well as the velocity and the spectrums distribution in function to present one or more main peaks (type 1 and type 2). A one-way ANOVA was used to establish differences between gender and performance. Results show differences between genders in all the temporal domain variables (p<0.05) and only the Spectral Area (SA) in the frequency domain (p<0.05). Between gender and performance, only the Root Mean Square (RMS) showed differences in the performance of the male swimmers (p<0.05) and in the higher level swimmers, the Maximum (Max) and the Power Peak (PP) of the acceleration showed differences between both genders (p<0.05). These results confirms the importance of knowing the RMS to determine the efficiency of the swimmers regarding gender and performance level PMID:23487001

  17. Absorption and emission of extraordinary-mode electromagnetic waves near cyclotron frequency in nonequilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, H. K.; Tsai, S. T.; Zhou, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is presented of two cases: (1) weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone type distribution, and (2) electrons with a drift velocity parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Numerical computations are given for physical parameters close to those in the polar region of the earth magnetosphere and laboratory experiments, with attention to the fast extraordinary-mode radiation whose frequency is near that of the electron cyclotron frequency. The fast extraordinary mode can escape from a strong field region to the weaker field region and may therefore be measured outside the plasma. It is found that the X mode radiation can be amplified by means of a cyclotron maser effect when the electrons have a loss-cone distribution, and it is concluded that, when the electron energy is sufficiently high, the X mode cutoff frequency may be lower than the cyclotron frequency.

  18. Frequency shift and mode coupling of the collective modes of superfluid Fermi gases in the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yu; Wen Wen; Huang Guoxiang

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of large-amplitude collective modes in a superfluid Fermi gas in the crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) based on a hydrodynamic approach. We first solve the superfluid hydrodynamic equations that describe the time evolution of fermionic condensates in the BCS-BEC crossover and calculate explicitly the frequency shifts of the collective modes induced by nonlinear effects using the Lindstedt-Poincare method. The result shows that the frequency shifts display different features in different superfluid regimes. We then study the second-harmonic generation of the collective modes under a phase-matching condition, which can be fulfilled by choosing appropriate parameters of the system. The analytical results obtained are checked by numerical simulations and good agreement is found.

  19. Low-Frequency Interlayer Raman Modes to Probe Interface of Twisted Bilayer MoS 2

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Shengxi; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-02-21

    A variety of van der Waals homo- and hetero- structures assembled by stamping monolayers together present optoelectronic properties suitable for diverse applications. Understanding the details of the interlayer stacking and resulting coupling is crucial for tuning these properties. Twisted bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides offer a great platform for developing a precise understanding of the structure/property relationship. Here, we study the low-frequency interlayer shear and breathing Raman modes (<50 cm-1) in twisted bilayer MoS2 by Raman spectroscopy and first-principles modeling. Twisting introduces both rotational and translational shifts and significantly alters the interlayer stacking and coupling, leading to notable frequency and intensitymore » changes of low-frequency modes. The frequency variation can be up to 8 cm-1 and the intensity can vary by a factor of ~5 for twisting near 0 and 60 , where the stacking is a mixture of multiple high-symmetry stacking patterns and is thus especially sensitive to twisting. Moreover, for twisting angles between 20 and 40 , the interlayer coupling is nearly constant since the stacking results in mismatched lattices over the entire sample. It follows that the Raman signature is relatively uniform. Interestingly, unlike the breathing mode, the shear mode is extremely sensitive to twisting: it disappears between 20 and 40 as its frequency drops to almost zero due to the stacking-induced mismatch. Note that for some samples, multiple breathing mode peaks appear, indicating non-uniform coupling across the interface. In contrast to the low-frequency interlayer modes, high-frequency intralayer Raman modes are much less sensitive to interlayer stacking and coupling, showing negligible changes upon twisting. Our research demonstrates the effectiveness of low-frequency Raman modes for probing the interfacial coupling and environment of twisted bilayer MoS2, and potentially other two-dimensional materials and

  20. Atomistic modeling of the low-frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2010-02-01

    We describe a technique for calculating the low-frequency mechanical modes and frequencies of a large symmetric biological molecule where the eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix are determined with full atomic detail. The method, which follows order N methods used in electronic structure theory, determines the subset of lowest-frequency modes while using group theory to reduce the complexity of the problem. We apply the method to three icosahedral viruses of various T numbers and sizes; the human viruses polio and hepatitis B, and the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, a plant virus. From the normal-mode eigenvectors, we use a bond polarizability model to predict a low-frequency Raman scattering profile for the viruses. The full atomic detail in the displacement patterns combined with an empirical potential-energy model allows a comparison of the fully atomic normal modes with elastic network models and normal-mode analysis with only dihedral degrees of freedom. We find that coarse-graining normal-mode analysis (particularly the elastic network model) can predict the displacement patterns for the first few (˜10) low-frequency modes that are global and cooperative.

  1. Vertical normal modes of human ears: Individual variation and frequency estimation from pinna anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Parham; Takemoto, Hironori; Nishimura, Ryouichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Beyond the first peak of head-related transfer functions or pinna-related transfer functions (PRTFs) human pinnae are known to have two normal modes with "vertical" resonance patterns, involving two or three pressure anti-nodes in cavum, cymba, and fossa. However, little is known about individual variations in these modes, and there is no established model for estimating their center-frequencies from anthropometry. Here, with geometries of 38 pinnae measured, PRTFs were calculated and vertical modes visualized by numerical simulation. Most pinnae were found to have both Cavum-Fossa and Cavum-Cymba modes, with opposite-phase anti-nodes in cavum and either fossa or cymba, respectively. Nevertheless in both modes, fossa involvement varied substantially across pinnae, dependent on scaphoid fossa depth and cymba shallowness. Linear regression models were evaluated in mode frequency estimation, with 3322 measures derived from 31 pinna landmarks. The Cavum-Fossa normal mode frequency was best estimated [correlation coefficient r = 0.89, mean absolute error (MAE) = 257 Hz or 4.4%] by the distance from canal entrance to helix rim, and cymba horizontal depth. The Cavum-Cymba normal mode frequency was best estimated (r = 0.92, MAE = 247 Hz or 3.2%) by the sagittal-plane distance from concha floor to cymba anterior wall, and cavum horizontal depth. PMID:27586714

  2. Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic modes in nonuniform cold quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, H.; Ahmad, Ali; Khan, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    The low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic linear modes in a nonuniform cold quantum electron-ion plasma are studied. The effect of stationary dust on an electrostatic mode is also investigated. The quantum corrections in the linear dispersion relations of a cold dense plasma are presented with possible applications.

  3. Frequency-Shaped Sliding Mode Control for Rudder Roll Damping System of Robotic Boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xinping; Yu, Zhenyu; Nonami, Kenzo

    In this paper, a robotic boat model of combined yaw and roll rate is obtained by a system identification approach. The identified system is designed with frequency-shaped sliding mode control. The control scheme is composed of a sliding mode observer and a sliding mode controller. The stability and reachability of the switching function are proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulations and experiment carried out at INAGE offshore show that successful course keeping and roll reduction results are achieved.

  4. Stability and natural frequency of nonspherical mode of an encapsulated microbubble in a viscous liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Wang, Qianxi

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) subject to an ultrasound wave have wide and important medical applications, including sonography, drug delivery, and sonoporation. The nonspherical shape oscillation of an EMB, termed as shape modes, is one of the core mechanisms of these applications and therefore its natural frequency is a fundamentally important parameter. Based on the linear stability theory, we show that shape modes of an EMB in a viscous Newtonian liquid are stable. We derive an explicit expression for the natural frequency of shape modes, in terms of the equilibrium radius of an EMB, and the parameters of the external liquid, coating, and internal gases. The expression is validated by comparing to the numerical results obtained from the dynamic equations of shape modes of an EMB. The natural frequency of shape modes shifts appreciably due to the viscosity of the liquid, and this trend increases with the mode number. The significant viscous effects are due to the no-slip condition for the liquid flow at the surface of an EMB. Our results show that when subject to an acoustic wave, the shape instability for an EMB is prone to appear if 2ωk/ωd = n, where ωk is the natural frequency of shape modes, ωd is the driving frequency of the acoustic wave, and n is a natural number. The effects of viscosity on the natural frequency is thus critical in setting the driving frequency of ultrasound to avoid or activate shape modes of EMBs, which should be considered in the applications of medical ultrasound.

  5. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  6. Scaling laws for the intrapulse frequency stability of an injection mode selected TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willetts, D. V.; Harris, M. R.

    1983-05-01

    Heterodyne measurements of the intrapulse frequency behavior of an injection mode selected TEA CO2 laser are presented. The frequency rose as the square of time at a rate varying linearly with energy and strongly dependent on spot size. These results are in accordance with a laser induced medium perturbative (LIMP) model, which allows the chirp in any TEA laser system to be predicted.

  7. Effect of saturated frequency chirping on mode-locked laser pulses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D. M.; Tittel, F. K.; Rabson, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A dye-induced nonlinear frequency chirping is analytically shown to have significant modifications on the nature of the output mode-locked lasers. It is shown that the saturated frequency sweeping is responsible for substantial pulse broadening as well as substructures.

  8. Higher-order vibrational mode frequency tuning utilizing fishbone-shaped microelectromechanical systems resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoya; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2013-04-01

    Resonators based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have received considerable attention for their applications for wireless equipment. The requirements for this application include small size, high frequency, wide bandwidth and high portability. However, few MEMS resonators with wide-frequency tuning have been reported. A fishbone-shaped resonator has a resonant frequency with a maximum response that can be changed according to the location and number of several exciting electrodes. Therefore, it can be expected to provide wide-frequency tuning. The resonator has three types of electrostatic forces that can be generated to deform a main beam. We evaluate the vibrational modes caused by each exciting electrodes by comparing simulated results with measured ones. We then successfully demonstrate the frequency tuning of the first to fifth resonant modes by using the algorithm we propose here. The resulting frequency tuning covers 178 to 1746 kHz. In addition, we investigate the suppression of the anchor loss to enhance the Q-factor. An experiment shows that tapered-shaped anchors provide a higher Q-factor than rectangular-shaped anchors. The Q-factor of the resonators supported by suspension beams is also discussed. Because the suspension beams cause complicated vibrational modes for higher frequencies, the enhancement of the Q-factor for high vibrational modes cannot be obtained here. At present, the tapered-anchor resonators are thought to be most suitable for frequency tuning applications.

  9. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  10. Solar-cycle variations of large frequency separations of acoustic modes: implications for asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; New, R.

    2011-06-01

    We have studied solar-cycle changes in the large frequency separations that can be observed in Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) data. The large frequency separation is often one of the first outputs from asteroseismic studies because it can help constrain stellar properties like mass and radius. We have used three methods for estimating the large separations: use of individual p-mode frequencies, computation of the autocorrelation of frequency-power spectra, and computation of the power spectrum of the power spectrum. The values of the large separations obtained by the different methods are offset from each other and have differing sensitivities to the realization noise. A simple model was used to predict solar-cycle variations in the large separations, indicating that the variations are due to the well-known solar-cycle changes to mode frequency. However, this model is only valid over a restricted frequency range. We discuss the implications of these results for asteroseismology.

  11. Dissipation of Alfven Waves via Generation of High-Frequency Electrostatic Waves and Transverse Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhter, A.; Singh, N.; Khazanov, G.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite observations in the auroral plasma have revealed that extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play a dominant role in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral plasma. The electromagnetic components of the ELF (EMELF) waves are the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves below the cyclotron frequency of the lightest ion species in a multi-ion plasma. Shear Alfvén waves (SAWs) constitute the lowest frequency components of the ELF waves below the ion cyclotron frequency of the heaviest ion. The mechanism for the transfer of energy from such EMELF waves to ions affecting transverse ion heating still remains a matter of debate. A very ubiquitous feature of ELF waves now observed in several rocket and satellite experiments is that they occur in conjunction with high-frequency electrostatic waves. The frequency spectrum of the composite wave turbulence extends from the low frequency of the Alfvénic waves to the high frequency of proton plasma frequency and/or the lower hybrid frequency. The spectrum does not show any feature organized by the ion cyclotron frequencies and their harmonics. Such broadband waves consisting of both the EM and ES waves are now popularly referred as BBELF waves. We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in- cell simulations showing that the ES components are directly generated by cross-field plasma instabilities driven by the drifts of the ions and electrons in the EM component of the BBELF waves. We also demonstrate that the ES wave generation is directly involved in the transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) as commonly measured with the BBELF wave events. In the simulation we drive the plasma by the transverse electric field, Ey, of the EM waves; the frequency of Ey is varied from a frequency below the heavy ion cyclotron frequency to below the light ion cyclotron frequency. We have also performed simulations for Ey having a continuous spectrum given by a power law with different spectral indexes. The driving electric

  12. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  13. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangyu; Wen, Hao; Fang, Zhenyun; Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  14. Gyrokinetic simulation on the effect of radio frequency waves on ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Sen, S.; Vahala, G.

    2016-02-01

    The ion-temperature-driven modes are studied in the presence of radio frequency waves by the use of the Gyro-Kinetic simulation Code. It is shown that the radio frequency waves through the ponderomotive force can stabilise the ion-temperature-gradient instabilities and contrary to the usual belief no radio frequency wave-induced flow generation hypothesis is required. This might be a major way to create a transport barrier in the fusion energy generation.

  15. Photon frequency-mode matching using acousto-optic frequency beam splitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Nick S.; Stace, T. M.

    2006-03-15

    It is a difficult engineering task to create distinct solid state single photon sources which nonetheless emit photons at the same frequency. It is also hard to create entangled photon pairs from quantum dots. In the spirit of quantum engineering we propose a simple optical circuit which can, in the right circumstances, make frequency distinguishable photons frequency indistinguishable. Our circuit can supply a downstream solution to both problems, opening up a large window of allowed frequency mismatches between physical mechanisms. The only components used are spectrum analysers or prisms and an acousto-optic modulator. We also note that an acousto-optic modulator can be used to obtain Hong-Ou-Mandel two photon interference effects from the frequency distinguishable photons generated by distinct sources.

  16. Mode confinement in photonic quasicrystal point-defect cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gennaro, E.; Savo, S.; Andreone, A.; Galdi, V.; Castaldi, G.; Pierro, V.; Masullo, M. Rosaria

    2008-10-01

    In this letter, we present a study of the confinement properties of point-defect resonators in finite-size photonic-bandgap structures composed of aperiodic arrangements of dielectric rods, with special emphasis on their use for the design of cavities for particle accelerators. Specifically, for representative geometries, we study the properties of the fundamental mode (as a function of the filling fraction, structure size, and losses) via two-dimensional and three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations, as well as microwave measurements at room temperature. Results indicate that for reduced-size structures, aperiodic geometries exhibit superior confinement properties by comparison with periodic ones.

  17. Inversion of high frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Tian, G.

    2003-01-01

    The phase velocity of Rayleigh-waves of a layered earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth parameters: compressional (P)-wave velocity, shear (S)-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. For the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves, analysis of the Jacobian matrix for high frequencies (2-40 Hz) provides a measure of dispersion curve sensitivity to earth model parameters. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence of the four earth model parameters. This thesis is true for higher modes of high frequency Rayleigh waves as well. Our numerical modeling by analysis of the Jacobian matrix supports at least two quite exciting higher mode properties. First, for fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh wave data with the same wavelength, higher modes can "see" deeper than the fundamental mode. Second, higher mode data can increase the resolution of the inverted S-wave velocities. Real world examples show that the inversion process can be stabilized and resolution of the S-wave velocity model can be improved when simultaneously inverting the fundamental and higher mode data. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  19. Oscillation mode frequencies of 61 main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appourchaux, T.; Chaplin, W. J.; García, R. A.; Gruberbauer, M.; Verner, G. A.; Antia, H. M.; Benomar, O.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Deheuvels, S.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Howe, R.; Régulo, C.; Salabert, D.; Bedding, T. R.; White, T. R.; Ballot, J.; Mathur, S.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Basu, S.; Gilliland, R. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Uddin, K.; Stumpe, M. C.; Barclay, T.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Solar-like oscillations have been observed by Kepler and CoRoT in several solar-type stars, thereby providing a way to probe the stars using asteroseismology Aims: We provide the mode frequencies of the oscillations of various stars required to perform a comparison with those obtained from stellar modelling. Methods: We used a time series of nine months of data for each star. The 61 stars observed were categorised in three groups: simple, F-like, and mixed-mode. The simple group includes stars for which the identification of the mode degree is obvious. The F-like group includes stars for which the identification of the degree is ambiguous. The mixed-mode group includes evolved stars for which the modes do not follow the asymptotic relation of low-degree frequencies. Following this categorisation, the power spectra of the 61 main-sequence and subgiant stars were analysed using both maximum likelihood estimators and Bayesian estimators, providing individual mode characteristics such as frequencies, linewidths, and mode heights. We developed and describe a methodology for extracting a single set of mode frequencies from multiple sets derived by different methods and individual scientists. We report on how one can assess the quality of the fitted parameters using the likelihood ratio test and the posterior probabilities. Results: We provide the mode frequencies of 61 stars (with their 1-σ error bars), as well as their associated échelle diagrams. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Ultralow-Frequency Collective Compression Mode and Strong Interlayer Coupling in Multilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shan; Zhang, Anmin; Liu, Kai; Ji, Jianting; Ye, Y. G.; Luo, X. G.; Chen, X. H.; Ma, Xiaoli; Jie, Yinghao; Chen, Changfeng; Wang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-02-01

    The recent renaissance of black phosphorus (BP) as a two-dimensional (2D) layered material has generated tremendous interest, but its unique structural characters underlying many of its outstanding properties still need elucidation. Here we report Raman measurements that reveal an ultralow-frequency collective compression mode (CCM) in BP, which is unprecedented among similar 2D layered materials. This novel CCM indicates an unusually strong interlayer coupling, and this result is quantitatively supported by a phonon frequency analysis and first-principles calculations. Moreover, the CCM and another branch of low-frequency Raman modes shift sensitively with changing number of layers, allowing an accurate determination of the thickness up to tens of atomic layers, which is considerably higher than previously achieved by using high-frequency Raman modes. These findings offer fundamental insights and practical tools for further exploration of BP as a highly promising new 2D semiconductor.

  1. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30 GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  2. Oscillations of a vertically stratified dissipative atmosphere. II. Low frequency trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Dmitrienko, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped atmosphere waves, such as IGW waveguide modes and Lamb modes, are described using dissipative solution above source (DSAS) (Dmitrienko and Rudenko, 2016). According to this description, the modes are disturbances penetrating without limit in the upper atmosphere and dissipating their energy throughout the atmosphere; leakage from a trapping region to the upper atmosphere is taken into consideration. The DSAS results are compared to those based on both accurate and WKB approximated dissipationless equations. It is shown that the spatial and frequency characteristics of modes in the upper atmosphere calculated by any of the methods are close to each other and are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  3. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method.

    PubMed

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  4. Detecting chaos in particle accelerators through the frequency map analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Papaphilippou, Yannis

    2014-06-01

    The motion of beams in particle accelerators is dominated by a plethora of non-linear effects, which can enhance chaotic motion and limit their performance. The application of advanced non-linear dynamics methods for detecting and correcting these effects and thereby increasing the region of beam stability plays an essential role during the accelerator design phase but also their operation. After describing the nature of non-linear effects and their impact on performance parameters of different particle accelerator categories, the theory of non-linear particle motion is outlined. The recent developments on the methods employed for the analysis of chaotic beam motion are detailed. In particular, the ability of the frequency map analysis method to detect chaotic motion and guide the correction of non-linear effects is demonstrated in particle tracking simulations but also experimental data.

  5. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-05-15

    Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequencies 2πF{sub c}{sup (s)}≡(q{sub s}B/M{sub s}c) for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially uniform plasmas the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression, in which collective effects enter only through the E × B rotation frequency f{sub E} and the species fraction δ{sub s}. The m = 1 center-of-mass mode is in agreement with a simple “clump” model. Additionally, ultra-cold ion plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed, in agreement with a more general theory.

  6. Statistics and Properties of Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes in Structural Glasses.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Edan; Düring, Gustavo; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-07-15

    Low-frequency vibrational modes play a central role in determining various basic properties of glasses, yet their statistical and mechanical properties are not fully understood. Using extensive numerical simulations of several model glasses in three dimensions, we show that in systems of linear size L sufficiently smaller than a crossover size L_{D}, the low-frequency tail of the density of states follows D(ω)∼ω^{4} up to the vicinity of the lowest Goldstone mode frequency. We find that the sample-to-sample statistics of the minimal vibrational frequency in systems of size Lfrequency modes are spatially quasilocalized and that their localization and associated quartic anharmonicity are largely frequency independent. The effect of preparation protocols on the low-frequency modes is elucidated, and a number of glassy length scales are briefly discussed. PMID:27472122

  7. High frequency core localized modes in neutral beam heated plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    A band of high frequency modes in the range 50--150 kHz with intermediate toroidal mode numbers 4 < n < 10 are commonly observed in the core of supershot plasmas on TFTR. Two distinct varieties of MHD modes are identified corresponding to a flute-like mode predominantly appearing around the q = 1 surface and an outward ballooning mode for q > 1. The flute-like modes have nearly equal amplitude on the high field and low field side of the magnetic axis and are mostly observed in moderate performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} < 2{tau}{sub L} while the ballooning-like modes have enhanced amplitude on the low field side of the magnetic axis and tend to appear in higher performance supershot plasmas with {tau}{sub E} > 2{tau}{sub L}, where {tau}{sub L} is the equivalent L-mode confinement time. The modes propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction and are highly localized with radial widths {Delta}r {approximately} 5--10 cm, fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n, {tilde T}{sub e}/T{sub e} < 0.01, and radial displacements {zeta}{sub r} {approximately} 0.1 cm. Unlike the toroidally localized high-n activity observed just prior to major and minor disruptions on TFTR, these modes are typically much weaker, more benign, and may be indicative of kinetic ballooning modes destabilized by resonant circulating neutral beam ions.

  8. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  9. Electron acceleration at slow-mode shocks in the magnetic reconnection region in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henry; Önel, Hakan; Warmuth, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    A solar flare appears as an sudden enhancement of the emission of electromagnetic radiation of the Sun covering a broad range of the spectrum from the radio up to the gamma-ray range. That indicates the generation of energetic electrons during flares, which are considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere, as for instance by NASA's MMS mission, have shown that electrons can efficiently accelerated at the slow-mode shocks occuring in the magnetic reconnection region. This mechanism is applied to solar flares. The electrons are accelerated by the cross-shock potential at slow-mode shocks resulting in magnetic field aligned beams of energetic electrons in the downstream region. The interaction of this electron beam with the plasma leads to the excitation of whistler waves and, subsequently, to a strong heating of the electrons in the downstream region. Considering this process under coronal circumstances, enough electrons with energies >30keV are generated in the magnetic reconnection region as required for the hard X-ray radiation during solar flares as observed by NASA's RHESSI mission.

  10. Studies of beam induced dipole-mode signals in accelerating structures at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, M.

    1997-06-01

    Beam emittance dilution by self induced transverse fields (wakefields) in accelerating structures is a key problem in linear accelerators. To minimize the wakefield effects the beam trajectory must be precisely centered within the structures. An efficient way to achieve this is to detect beam induced microwave signals in the lowest dipole mode band and to steer the beam by minimizing these signals. This paper briefly covers some experiences from SLC S-band structures, but mainly concentrates on results of a wakefield instrumentation scheme applied to a NLC prototype X-band structure and tested with beam in the SLC linac. A beam based in-situ structure straightness measurement is shown as well as results of beam steering experiments based on phase and amplitude detection of two separated modes in the structure. After centering the beam the reduction of the wakefield was demonstrated independently by probing it with a test bunch that is deflected by the residual wakefield at a short distance behind the drive bunch.

  11. Wavelength tunable coherent burst-mode receiver design under transient frequency offset.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2013-08-26

    Wavelength tunable optical coherent burst-mode receivers (BMR) can offer flexibility and sub-wavelength granularity for dynamic WDM networks. A new BMR design with dispersion equalizer plus frequency offset estimator is proposed for simultaneous dispersion compensation and frequency offset estimation. Its good performance is verified by simulations. A training sequence as short as 4 K symbols, corresponding to an initialization time of 160 ns, is found to be enough to support 200 km transmission distance plus over ± 5 GHz frequency offset. The new BMR design can also work under the case when transient frequency offset from wavelength tuning exists in the system.

  12. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  13. Flute mode waves near the lower hybrid frequency excited by ion rings in velocity space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C.; Hudson, M.

    1982-01-01

    Discrete emissions at the lower hybrid frequency are often seen on the S3-3 satellite. Simultaneous observation of perpendicularly heated ions suggests that these ions may provide the free energy necessary to drive the instability. Studies of the dispersion relation for flute modes excited by warm ion rings in velocity space show that waves are excited with real frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and with growth rates ranging from about 0.01 to 1 times the ion cyclotron frequency. Numerical results are therefore consistent with the possibility that the observed ions are the free energy source for the observed waves.

  14. Smooth and flat phase-locked Kerr frequency comb generation by higher order mode suppression.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-W; Liu, H; Yang, J; Yu, M; Kwong, D-L; Wong, C W

    2016-05-16

    High-Q microresonator is perceived as a promising platform for optical frequency comb generation, via dissipative soliton formation. In order to achieve a higher quality factor and obtain the necessary anomalous dispersion, multi-mode waveguides were previously implemented in Si3N4 microresonators. However, coupling between different transverse mode families in multi-mode waveguides results in periodic disruption of dispersion and quality factor, and consequently causes perturbation to dissipative soliton formation and amplitude modulation to the corresponding spectrum. Careful choice of pump wavelength to avoid the mode crossing region is thus critical in conventional Si3N4 microresonators. Here, we report a novel design of Si3N4 microresonator in which single-mode operation, high quality factor, and anomalous dispersion are attained simultaneously. The novel microresonator is consisted of uniform single-mode waveguides in the semi-circle region, to eliminate bending induced mode coupling, and adiabatically tapered waveguides in the straight region, to avoid excitation of higher order modes. The intrinsic quality factor of the microresonator reaches 1.36 × 10(6) while the group velocity dispersion remains to be anomalous at -50 fs(2)/mm. With this novel microresonator, we demonstrate that broadband phase-locked Kerr frequency combs with flat and smooth spectra can be generated by pumping at any resonances in the optical C-band.

  15. Smooth and flat phase-locked Kerr frequency comb generation by higher order mode suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-W.; Liu, H.; Yang, J.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2016-05-01

    High-Q microresonator is perceived as a promising platform for optical frequency comb generation, via dissipative soliton formation. In order to achieve a higher quality factor and obtain the necessary anomalous dispersion, multi-mode waveguides were previously implemented in Si3N4 microresonators. However, coupling between different transverse mode families in multi-mode waveguides results in periodic disruption of dispersion and quality factor, and consequently causes perturbation to dissipative soliton formation and amplitude modulation to the corresponding spectrum. Careful choice of pump wavelength to avoid the mode crossing region is thus critical in conventional Si3N4 microresonators. Here, we report a novel design of Si3N4 microresonator in which single-mode operation, high quality factor, and anomalous dispersion are attained simultaneously. The novel microresonator is consisted of uniform single-mode waveguides in the semi-circle region, to eliminate bending induced mode coupling, and adiabatically tapered waveguides in the straight region, to avoid excitation of higher order modes. The intrinsic quality factor of the microresonator reaches 1.36 × 106 while the group velocity dispersion remains to be anomalous at ‑50 fs2/mm. With this novel microresonator, we demonstrate that broadband phase-locked Kerr frequency combs with flat and smooth spectra can be generated by pumping at any resonances in the optical C-band.

  16. Smooth and flat phase-locked Kerr frequency comb generation by higher order mode suppression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.-W.; Liu, H.; Yang, J.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    High-Q microresonator is perceived as a promising platform for optical frequency comb generation, via dissipative soliton formation. In order to achieve a higher quality factor and obtain the necessary anomalous dispersion, multi-mode waveguides were previously implemented in Si3N4 microresonators. However, coupling between different transverse mode families in multi-mode waveguides results in periodic disruption of dispersion and quality factor, and consequently causes perturbation to dissipative soliton formation and amplitude modulation to the corresponding spectrum. Careful choice of pump wavelength to avoid the mode crossing region is thus critical in conventional Si3N4 microresonators. Here, we report a novel design of Si3N4 microresonator in which single-mode operation, high quality factor, and anomalous dispersion are attained simultaneously. The novel microresonator is consisted of uniform single-mode waveguides in the semi-circle region, to eliminate bending induced mode coupling, and adiabatically tapered waveguides in the straight region, to avoid excitation of higher order modes. The intrinsic quality factor of the microresonator reaches 1.36 × 106 while the group velocity dispersion remains to be anomalous at −50 fs2/mm. With this novel microresonator, we demonstrate that broadband phase-locked Kerr frequency combs with flat and smooth spectra can be generated by pumping at any resonances in the optical C-band. PMID:27181420

  17. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Psikal, J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Margarone, D.

    2014-07-15

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7 × 10{sup 21 }W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100 nm and 200 nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  18. Frequency stabilization and transverse mode discrimination in injection-seeded unstable resonator TEA CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.; Brothers, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal mode selection by injection has been demonstrated as a viable technique for TEA-CO2 lasers with pulse energies of a Joule or greater. Once reliable generation of single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulses is obtained, the characteristics and the causes of intrapulse frequency variation can be studied. These include the effect of the decaying plasma, the thermal gradient due to the energy dissipation associated with the laser mechanism itself, and the pressure shift of the center frequency of the laser transition. The use of the positive-branch unstable resonator as an efficient means of coupling a discharge with large spatial dimensions to an optical cavity mode introduces another concern: namely, what can be done to emphasize transverse mode discrimination in an unstable resonator cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency. These issues are discussed in this paper, and relevant experimental results are included.

  19. On the application of frequency selective common mode feedback for multifrequency EIT.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Peter J; Wu, Yu; Bayford, Richard H; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Common mode voltages are frequently a problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and other bioimpedance applications. To reduce their amplitude common mode feedback is employed. Formalised analyses of both current and voltage feedback is presented in this paper for current drives. Common mode effects due to imbalances caused by the current drives, the electrode connections to the body load and the introduction of the body impedance to ground are considered. Frequency selective narrowband common mode feedback previously proposed to provide feedback stability is examined. As a step towards multifrequency applications the use of narrowband feedback is experimentally demonstrated for two simultaneous current drives. Measured results using standard available components show a reduction of 62 dB for current feedback and 31 dB for voltage feedback. Frequencies ranged from 50 kHz to 1 MHz.

  20. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  1. Method of Tuning Frequency of the Defect Mode in Two-Dimensional Square Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shuya; Wu, Fugen; Zhang, Xin; Yao, Yuanwei; Zhong, Huilin; He, Yun; Cheng, Cong

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the defect modes created by taking a single rod away from the center of the supercell in two-dimensional photonic crystals. Through theoretical calculation, we find that the defect band can exist in the photonic band gaps, and the position of the defect band frequency intensively depends on the position and radius size of the defect rod. When the radius of the defect rod is bigger than that of the normal rods, the frequency of the defect band can be tunable in a wider range by moving the defect position while the doubly degenerate defect modes may split into two nondegenerate defect modes. The investigation provides a theoretical instruction to design the optical resonator with tunable frequency.

  2. Observation of Modes at Frequencies Near the Second Alfvin Gap in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson. E.; Van Dam, J.W.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.; Fu, G.Y.; Hosea, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.

    1999-04-01

    Modes has been observed in the frequency range of the second Alfvenic gap in H-minority ICRF heated plasmas in TFTR. This observation is surprising in that the second gap is generally considered to be small in circular cross section plasmas. The mode is inferred to be a core mode, i.e., localized in some sense within the q=1 surface. This follows from the observation that the time dependence of the mode frequency is consistent with the changes in the central density, with the appearance of the mode in the latter part of the sawtooth period when the central fast ion beta has peaked up, and with the direction of propagation, the last of these being explained by a hollow first ion beta profile, which is only present in the core region. The modes are generally not observed during on-axis H-minority heating, but commonly observed during off-axis heating on the high field side (with the resonant layer outside the q=1 surface). A model has been proposed that the beta of the fast ions opens the second gap, allowing instability. For TFTR parameters, the model predicts a gap width of approximately 10 kHz, which is 2.5% of the second gap frequency. If the backwards mode propagation is due to a hollow fast ion profile (as indicated in the TRANSP calculations), then instability due to wave-particle resonance at the magnetic curvature precessional frequency can occur only if the precessional frequency is reversed--which can indeed be the case for off-axis heating on the high field side. Thus, trapped fast ion pressure effects seem to explain several of the observed features of these second gap fluctuations.

  3. Selection and amplification of modes of an optical frequency comb using a femtosecond laser injection-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H. S.; Kim, E. B.; Park, S. E.; Park, C. Y.

    2006-10-30

    The authors have demonstrated the selection and the amplification of the components of an optical frequency comb using a femtosecond laser injectionlocking technique. The author used a mode-locked femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser as the master laser and a single-mode diode laser as the slave laser. The femtosecond laser injection-locking technique was applied to a filter for mode selection of the optical frequency comb and an amplifier for amplification of the selected mode. The authors could obtain the laser source selected only the desired mode of the optical frequency comb and amplified the power of the selected modes several thousand times.

  4. Effect of master oscillator stability over pulse repetition frequency on hybrid semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor mode-locked lasers are a very attractive laser pulse source for high accuracy length metrology. However, for some applications, this kind of device does not have the required frequency stability. Operating the laser in hybrid mode will increase the laser pulse repetition frequency (PRF) stability. In this study it is showed that the laser PRF is not only locked to the master oscillator but also maintains the same level of stability of the master oscillator. The device used in this work is a 10 mm long mode-locked asymmetrical cladding single section InAs/InP quantum dash diode laser emitting at 1580 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of ≈4.37 GHz. The laser nominal stability in passive mode (no external oscillator) shows direct dependence with the gain current and the stability range goes from 10-4 to 10-7. Several oscillators with different stabilities were used for the hybrid-mode operation (with external oscillator) and the resulting mode-locked laser stability compared. For low cost oscillators with low stability, the laser PRF stability achieves a value of 10-7 and for higher stable oscillation source (such as oven controlled quartz oscillators (OXCO)) the stability can reach values up to 10-12 (τ =1 s).

  5. Common mode frequency instability in internally phase-locked terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Wanke, M C; Grine, A D; Fuller, C T; Nordquist, C D; Cich, M J; Reno, J L; Lee, Mark

    2011-11-21

    Feedback from a diode mixer integrated into a 2.8 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to phase lock the difference frequencies (DFs) among the Fabry-Perot (F-P) longitudinal modes of a QCL. Approximately 40% of the DF power was phase locked, consistent with feedback loop bandwidth of 10 kHz and phase noise bandwidth ~0.5 MHz. While the locked DF signal has ≤ 1 Hz linewidth and negligible drift over ~30 min, mixing measurements between two QCLs and between a QCL and molecular gas laser show that the common mode frequency stability is no better than a free-running QCL.

  6. Spoof surface plasmon modes on doubly corrugated metal surfaces at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Bao; Du, Chao-Hai; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Spoof surface plasmons (SSPs) have many potential applications such as imaging and sensing, communications, innovative leaky wave antenna and many other passive devices in the microwave and terahertz (THz) spectrum. The extraordinary properties of SSPs (e.g. extremely strong near field, enhanced beam–wave interaction) make them especially attractive for developing novel THz electronic sources. SSP modes on doubly corrugated metal surfaces are investigated and analyzed both theoretically and numerically in this paper. The analytical SSP dispersion expressions of symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are obtained with a simplified modal field expansion method; the results are also verified by the finite integration method. Additionally, the propagation losses are also considered for real copper surfaces with a limited constant conductivity in a THz regime. It is shown that the asymptotical frequency of the symmetric mode at the Brillouin boundary decreases along with the decreased gap size between these two corrugated metal surfaces while the asymptotical frequency increases for the anti-symmetric mode. The anti-symmetric mode demonstrates larger propagation losses than the symmetric mode. Further, the losses for both symmetric and anti-symmetric modes decrease when this gap size enlarges. By decreasing groove depth, the asymptotical frequency increases for both the symmetric and the anti-symmetric mode, but the variation of propagation losses is more complicated. Propagation losses increase along with the increased period. Our studies on the dispersion characteristics and propagation losses of SSP modes on this doubly corrugated metallic structure with various parameters is instructive for numerous applications such as waveguides, circuitry systems with high integration, filters and powerful electronic sources in the THz regime.

  7. Processing of manganese zinc ferrites for high-frequency switch-mode power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.R.; Amarakoon, V.W.R. ); Sullivan, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The development and the continued success of switch-mode power supplies have created an expanding commercial market. This market is continually challenging the ferrite industry to produce high-quality ferrite cores capable of operating at increasingly higher frequencies. The advantage of the switch-mode power supply is that, as the switching frequency is increased, power output also increases. This allows smaller core volumes to transform the same amount of power as a larger core would at lower frequencies. This paper reports that the main motivation for using ferrite transformer cores is the dramatic reduction of eddy current losses when compared with traditional iron core transformers. The reduction of these losses is brought about by the high electrical resistivities of magnetic oxides, which can be up to a million times higher than those possessed by alloys. Of all the ferrites, manganese zinc ferrites have the lowest losses, in high-drive applications (up to a frequency of {approx}2 MHz).

  8. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  9. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  10. Experimental Hingeless Rotor Characteristics at Full Scale First Flap Mode Frequencies (including Rotor Frequency Response to Shaft Oscillations), Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczynski, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The completion of the High Advance Ratio Research Program is reported. The primary objectives of the program were to experimentally determine the rotor frequency response to shaft pitching and rolling oscillations and to acquire steady response and frequency response data at high advance ratios for hingeless rotors with typical, full-scale, first flap mode natural frequencies. Secondary objectives of the program included the further evaluation of both the hub moment feedback control system and the simplified rigid blade flapping theory with respect to shaft oscillations. The bulk of the text is devoted to the presentation and examination of representative experimental results. All the analyzed test data are documented in tabular and/or graphical formats.

  11. Electron beam excitation of upstream waves in the whistler mode frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Hung K.; Smith, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine whistler mode instabilities arising from electron beams in interplanetary space at 1 AU. Both parallel and obliquely propagating solutions are considered. We demonstrate that the generation of two simultaneous whistler mode waves is possible, and even reasonably likely, for beam parameters frequently encountered upstream of the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks. We also explore the generation of left-hand polarized waves at whistler mode frequencies under these same conditions. We offer both parametric variations derived from numerical solutions of the various instabilities as well as an analytical treatment of the problem which succeeds in unifying the various numerical results.

  12. Zero-frequency and slow elastic modes in phononic monolayer granular membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Yang; Pichard, Hélène; Tournat, Vincent; Theocharis, Georgios; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dispersion properties of elastic waves in hexagonal and honeycomb monolayer granular membranes with either out-of-plane or in-plane particle motion. The particles interact predominantly via normal and transverse contact rigidities. When rotational degrees of freedom are taken into account, the bending and torsional rigidities of the intergrain contacts can control some of the phononic modes. The existence of zero-frequency modes, zero-group-velocity modes and their transformation into slow propagating phononic modes due to weak bending and torsional intergrain interactions are investigated. We also study the formation and manipulation of Dirac cones and multiple degenerated modes. This could motivate variety of potential applications in elastic waves control by manipulating the contact rigidities in granular phononic crystals. PMID:26607105

  13. Advances on Empirical Mode Decomposition-based Time-Frequency Analysis Methods in Hydrocarbon Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Xue, Y. J.; Cao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which is a data-driven adaptive decomposition method and is not limited by time-frequency uncertainty spreading, is proved to be more suitable for seismic signals which are nonlinear and non-stationary. Compared with other Fourier-based and wavelet-based time-frequency methods, EMD-based time-frequency methods have higher temporal and spatial resolution and yield hydrocarbon interpretations with more statistical significance. Empirical mode decomposition algorithm has now evolved from EMD to Ensemble EMD (EEMD) to Complete Ensemble EMD (CEEMD). Even though EMD-based time-frequency methods offer many promising features for analyzing and processing geophysical data, there are some limitations or defects in EMD-based time-frequency methods. This presentation will present a comparative study on hydrocarbon detection using seven EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods, which include: (1) first, EMD combined with Hilbert transform (HT) as a time-frequency analysis method is used for hydrocarbon detection; and (2) second, Normalized Hilbert transform (NHT) and HU Methods respectively combined with HT as improved time-frequency analysis methods are applied for hydrocarbon detection; and (3) three, EMD combined with Teager-Kaiser energy (EMD/TK) is investigated for hydrocarbon detection; and (4) four, EMD combined with wavelet transform (EMDWave) as a seismic attenuation estimation method is comparatively studied; and (5) EEMD- and CEEMD- based time-frequency analysis methods used as highlight volumes technology are studied. The differences between these methods in hydrocarbon detection will be discussed. The question of getting a meaningful instantaneous frequency by HT and mode-mixing issues in EMD will be analysed. The work was supported by NSFC under grant Nos. 41430323, 41404102 and 41274128.

  14. Low-frequency interlayer breathing mode in few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2015-03-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), as a layered material, has attracted intense interest recently. Many interesting electronic and optoelectronic properties are being explored based on its unique anisotropic structure. In this work, we studied the Raman spectra in few-layer BP, including the intralayer and interlayer vibrational modes. Besides the three typical Raman modes Agfrequency modes were observed in few-layer BP, as predicted by the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The interlayer breathing mode at around 87 cm-1 was assigned as Ag0, since the DFT calculation result showed it has the symmetry of Ag0. In addition, the polarization dependence of the Raman modes in BP is studied systematically. Both the DFT calculation and the experimental results show that the polarization dependence profiles are sensitive to the crystal orientation of BP. In addition, the temperature dependence of the modes is studied in the range of -150 °C to room temperature. It is found that the Ag0 mode has almost no dependence on the temperature change, and the out-of-plane mode (Ag1) has weaker dependence than the in-plane modes (B2g and Ag2) .

  15. Accelerating frequency-domain diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jaya; Chandrasekharan, Venkittarayan; Upendra, Vishwajith; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction uses advanced numerical models that are computationally costly to be implemented in the real time. The graphics processing units (GPUs) offer desktop massive parallelization that can accelerate these computations. An open-source GPU-accelerated linear algebra library package is used to compute the most intensive matrix-matrix calculations and matrix decompositions that are used in solving the system of linear equations. These open-source functions were integrated into the existing frequency-domain diffuse optical image reconstruction algorithms to evaluate the acceleration capability of the GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C 1060) with increasing reconstruction problem sizes. These studies indicate that single precision computations are sufficient for diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction. The acceleration per iteration can be up to 40, using GPUs compared to traditional CPUs in case of three-dimensional reconstruction, where the reconstruction problem is more underdetermined, making the GPUs more attractive in the clinical settings. The current limitation of these GPUs in the available onboard memory (4 GB) that restricts the reconstruction of a large set of optical parameters, more than 13,377.

  16. Vibration Mode Observation of Piezoelectric Disk-type Resonator by High Frequency Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    For future mobile phones based on cognitive radio technology, a compact multi-band RF front-end architecture is strongly required and an integrated multi-band RF filter bank is a key component in it. Contour-mode resonators are receiving increased attention for a multi-band filter solution, because its resonant frequency is mainly determined by its size and shape, which are defined by lithography. However, spurious responses including flexural vibration are also excited due to its thin structure. To improve resonator performance and suppress spurious modes, visual observation with a laser probe system is very effective. In this paper, we have prototyped a mechanically-coupled disk-array filter, which consists of a Si disk and 2 disk-type resonators of higher-order wine-glass mode, and observed its vibration modes using a high-frequency laser-Doppler vibrometer (UHF-120, Polytec, Inc.). As a result, it was confirmed that higher order wine-glass mode vibration included a compound displacement, and that its out-of-plane vibration amplitude was much smaller than other flexural spurious modes. The observed vibration modes were compared with FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation results. In addition, it was also confirmed that the fabrication error, e.g. miss-alignment, induced asymmetric vibration.

  17. Rapid Frequency Chirps of TAE mode due to Finite Orbit Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herb; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    The tip model for the TAE mode in the large aspect ratio limit, conceived by Rosenbluth et al. in the frequency domain, together with an interaction term in the frequency domain based on a map model, has been extended into the time domain. We present the formal basis for the model, starting with the Lagrangian for the particle wave interaction. We shall discuss the formal nonlinear time domain problem and the procedure that needs to obtain solutions in the adiabatic limit.

  18. Operation Mode on Pulse Modulation in Atmospheric Radio Frequency Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Huang, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    The discharge operation regime of pulse modulated atmospheric radio frequency (RF) glow discharge in helium is investigated on the duty cycle and frequency of modulation pulses. The characteristics of radio frequency discharge burst in terms of breakdown voltage, alpha(α)-gamma(γ) mode transition voltage and current are demonstrated by the discharge current voltage characteristics. The minimum breakdown voltage of RF discharge burst was obtained at the duty cycle of 20% and frequency of 400 kHz, respectively. The α-γ mode transition of RF discharge burst occurs at higher voltage and current by reducing the duty cycle and elevating the modulation frequency before the RF discharge burst evolving into the ignition phase, in which the RF discharge burst can operate stably in the γ mode. It proposes that the intensity and stability of RF discharge burst can be improved by manipulating the duty cycle and modulation frequency in pulse modulated atmospheric RF glow discharge. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475043 and 11375042)

  19. Mode locking effects on the playing frequency for fork fingerings on the clarinet.

    PubMed

    Nederveen, C J; Dalmont, J-P

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear excitation of wind instruments generates higher harmonics of the playing frequency. These higher harmonics are coupled to resonances in the pipe. This is called mode locking. When the pipe modes are not harmonic, the playing frequency shifts away from the fundamental in order to maximize the output. It may go up or down, depending on the position of the modes and the amplitude. The effect is especially manifest for fork fingerings. Three fork fingerings on a clarinet were investigated. They were artificially blown between the threshold and extinction pressure. A time domain simulation was carried out based on a lumped model of the excitation coupled to an input impedance calculated from the instrument dimensions. At low amplitudes the fundamental frequency dominates and the playing frequency is governed by the position of the first peak in the input impedance spectra. At higher blowing pressures the playing frequency shifts. For both blowing and simulation this follows the same pattern. The frequencies predicted by the calculations are higher than the values found by blowing, which may be due to inadequacies in the model description, to uncertainties of the various parameters, as reed stiffness, moving reed area, and the properties of the slit flow.

  20. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  1. Distinguishing defect induced intermediate frequency modes from combination modes in the Raman spectrum of single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dilip K.; Iyer, Parameswar K.; Giri, P. K.

    2012-03-15

    Understanding of the origin of some of the intermediate frequency modes (IFMs) in the Raman spectrum of carbon nanotubes has remained controversial in the literature. In this work, through controlled introduction and elimination of defects in carbon nanotubes, we attempt to isolate the IFMs due to structural defects from that of the combination modes in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Our investigations on pristine and defect engineered SWCNTs using ion-irradiation, thermal annealing, and laser processing show systematic changes in the IFMs in the range 400-1200 cm{sup -1} and its manipulation with the processing parameters. In particular, we found that the intensity of IFM at 929 cm{sup -1} scale up with the increasing defect concentration, while that at 668 cm{sup -1} follows opposite behavior. New IFM peaks were observed upon the creation of a controlled amount of structural defects through 30 keV N{sup +} ion irradiation. Elimination of defects through vacuum annealing results into reduction of intensity of some IFMs identified as defect related, while the intensity of characteristic combination modes correspondingly increases. Our results show that the IFMs observed at 709, 805, 868, 926, and 1189 cm{sup -1} are due to structural defects in the SWCNTs, while those in the range 400-550 cm{sup -1} and at 669 cm{sup -1} are due to the combination modes. Our x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis on ion irradiated SWCNTs supports the Raman results.

  2. Electrostatic hydrogen-cyclotron wave emission below the hydrogen-cyclotron frequency in the auroral acceleration region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Conrad, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested for the excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves at frequencies below the ion-cyclotron frequency in the midst of the auroral acceleration region, which is assumed to consist of downward moving double layers. The mechanism involves upward flowing ions interacting with a downward flowing background plasma. The upward flowing ions are the ion beams accelerated by the double layer. The downward motion of the background plasma corresponds to a plasma expansion into the density cavity that develops in connection with double layer formation in the acceleration region. The ion-cyclotron waves excited by the counterstreaming flows are doppler shifted to frequencies below the harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency. It is suggested that such wave emissions could account for some very narrow-banded waves at frequencies below the hydrogen cyclotron frequency that were observed by the S3-3 satellite.

  3. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  4. Dynamic spectra of radio frequency bursts associated with edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatipamula, Shekar G.; Yun, G. S.; Leem, J.; Park, H. K.; Kim, K. W.; Akiyama, T.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic emissions in the radio frequency (RF) range are detected in the high-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma using a fast RF spectrometer on the KSTAR tokamak. The emissions at the crash events of edge-localized modes (ELMs) are found to occur as strong RF bursts with dynamic features in intensity and spectrum. The RF burst spectra (obtained with frequency resolution better than 10 MHz) exhibit diverse spectral features and evolve in multiple steps before the onset and through the ELM crash: (1) a narrow-band spectral line around 200 MHz persistent for extended duration in the pre-ELM crash times, (2) harmonic spectral lines with spacing comparable to deuterium or hydrogen ion cyclotron frequency at the pedestal, (3) rapid onset (faster than ~1 μs) of intense RF burst with wide-band continuum in frequency which coincides with the onset of ELM crash, and (4) a few additional intense RF bursts with chirping-down narrow-band spectrum during the crash. These observations indicate plasma waves are excited in the pedestal region and strongly correlated with the ELM dynamics such as the onset of the explosive crash. Thus the investigation of RF burst occurrence and their dynamic spectral features potentially offers the possibility of exploring H-mode physics in great detail.

  5. X-Mode Frequency Modulated Density Profile Reflectometer on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongyang; Liu, Ahdi; Li, Hong; Li, Bin; Zhou, Chu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Hu, Jianqiang; Xie, Jinlin; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan

    2013-09-01

    An extraordinary-mode (X-mode) frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) profile reflectometer has been built on EAST. In the reflectometer, continuous waves with frequency sweeping from 12.5 GHz to 18 GHz were generated through a Hyperabrupt Tuned-varactor Oscillator (HTO) source and a four times active multiplier was used to increase the frequency to V-band (50 GHz to 72 GHz). The polarization of horn lens antenna is perpendicular to the magnetic field line at the edge plasmas. According to the V-band frequency range and polarization, the system cover density range from 0.5 × 1019m-3 to 3.0 × 1019m-3 (when toroidal magnetic field is 1.8 T), with time resolution of 12.5 ~ 50 μs. The density profile could be calculated by assuming the edge profile through an empirical equation. The maximum spatial error deduced by the method is about 4 cm. This reflectometer has been successfully applied in 2010 autumn EAST campaign, the temporal evolution of density profiles was acquired during the low confinement mode to high confinement mode transition. The density pedestal of EAST Tokamak was observed and the top value and gradient of the density pedestal were estimated.

  6. College Student Ratings of Student Academic Support: Frequency, Importance, and Modes of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Blair; Mazer, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that student academic support plays a vital role at the college level as students often view communication with peers as their primary source of academic support (Thompson, 2008). This research advances the Student Academic Support Scale (SASS) as a method of assessing the frequency, importance, and mode of communicating academic…

  7. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke post synaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Marijn N.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Koekkoek, S. K. E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Serdijn, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficacy of high frequency switched-mode neural stimulation. Instead of using a constant stimulation amplitude, the stimulus is switched on and off repeatedly with a high frequency (up to 100 kHz) duty cycled signal. By means of tissue modeling that includes the dynamic properties of both the tissue material as well as the axon membrane, it is first shown that switched-mode stimulation depolarizes the cell membrane in a similar way as classical constant amplitude stimulation. These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency. PMID:25798105

  8. Generation of ordinary mode electromagnetic radiation near the upper hybrid frequency in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown by means of plasma numerical simulations that long-wavelength ordinary mode electromagnetic radiation can be generated from short-wavelength electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma. A possible relation of this process to nonthermal continuum radiation in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  9. Development of the Parental Academic Support Scale: Frequency, Importance, and Modes of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Blair; Mazer, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Parent-teacher communication represents a primary form of parental support, a phenomenon meriting significant attention given the connections between support and academic achievement (Thompson, 2008b). A series of studies advance the Parental Academic Support Scale (PASS) to assess the frequency, importance, and modes parents use to communicate…

  10. Laser Processing on the Surface of Niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency Accelerator Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja; Klopf, Michael; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting Radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators.~ Their performance is dominated by a several nm thick layer at the interior surface. ~Maximizing its smoothness is found to be critical and aggressive chemical treatments are employed to this end.~ We describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative ``greener'' approach.~ Modeling guided selection of parameters for irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.~ The resulting topography was examined by SEM, AFM and Stylus Profilometry.

  11. Low-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Iron Line Variability of Discoseismic Corrugation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsky, Iryna; Tsang, D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of iron lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the inner-most regions of accretion discs around black holes. The dependence of the relativistically broadened line profile on the oscillation-phase is studied for discoseismic corrugation modes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as their natural frequency corresponds well to the 0.1-10 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in X-ray binaries. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and QPO-phase stacked Fe-Kalpha line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of LFQPOs.

  12. A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangzong; Long, Xingwu; Zhang, Bin; Jin, Shilong

    2012-03-01

    A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is presented and demonstrated. Applied acceleration causes a change in the refractivity of sensing gas in one of the two cavities, resulting in a beat frequency variation between two orthogonal polarized lights. As a result, this approach produces a modulation of beat frequency strictly proportional to the input acceleration. Preliminary experiments with a 632.8 nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser confirm the validity of the laser sensor. The experimental results show that the laser sensor in this approach characterizes a nearly linear response to the input acceleration, which is a projection of gravitational acceleration. The experimental values of the scale factors are mostly in good agreement with theoretical ones. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, an acceleration measurement resolution of 10 -5-10 -6 gravitational acceleration (within ±5 g measurement range) could be expected. Furthermore, we investigate the principle about the sign of the scale factor in detail, and propose a simple but efficient method to distinguish the direction of the acceleration acted on the laser sensor.

  13. Computational imaging using a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Decroze, Cyril; Carsenat, David; Yurduseven, Okan; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R.

    2015-05-11

    We present a 3D computational imaging system based on a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies. The core component of this system is an electrically large rectangular cavity with one corner re-shaped to catalyze mode mixing, often called a Sinai Billiard. The front side of the cavity is perforated with a grid of periodic apertures that sample the cavity modes and project them into the imaging scene. The radiated fields are scattered by the scene and are measured by low gain probe antennas. The complex radiation patterns generated by the cavity thus encode the scene information onto a set of frequency modes. Assuming the first Born approximation for scattering dynamics, the received signal is processed using computational methods to reconstruct a 3D image of the scene with resolution determined by the diffraction limit. The proposed mode-mixing cavity is simple to fabricate, exhibits low losses, and can generate highly diverse measurement modes. The imaging system demonstrated in this letter can find application in security screening and medical diagnostic imaging.

  14. Frequency analysis and pulsational mode identification of two γ Doradus stars: HD 40745 and HD 189631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonneuve, F.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.; Mantegazza, L.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Suárez, J. C.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.

    2011-08-01

    Gravity modes present in γ Doradus stars probe the deep stellar interiors and are thus of particular interest in asteroseismology. Mode identification will improve the knowledge of these stars considerably and allow an understanding of the issues with current pulsational models. A frequency analysis followed by a mode identification were done based on the high-resolution spectroscopic data of two γ Doradus stars: HD 189631 and HD 40745. Extensive spectroscopic data sets are obtained by three instruments: HARPS, FEROS and HERCULES. We obtained 422 spectra for HD 189631 and 248 spectra for HD 40745. The pulsational frequencies were determined by four methods: analysis of the variation in equivalent width, variation in radial velocity, asymmetry of the line profile and the pixel-by-pixel frequency analysis. The mode identification was done using the recently developed Fourier Parameter Fit method. Without achieving the same degree of confidence for all results, we report the identification of four pulsational modes in HD 189631: (ℓ= 1; m =+1) at f1= 1.67 d-1; (3; -2) at f2= 1.42 d-1; (2; -2) at f3= 0.07 d-1; and (4; +1) at f4= 1.82 d-1; and two modes in HD 40745: (2; -1) at f1= 0.75 d-1 and (3; -3) at f2= 1.09 d-1. This study provides the first pulsational analysis based on spectroscopy of HD 189631 and HD 40745. We discuss the performance of current methods of analysis and outline the difficulties presented by γ Doradus stars. Based on observations made with the 1-m telescope at the Mount John University Observatory (HERCULES), and with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Observatories under the Normal Programme 081.D-0610 (HARPS) and the Large Programmes 178.D-0361 (FEROS) and 182.D-0356 (HARPS). Mode identification results were obtained with the software package FAMIAS developed in the framework of the FP6 European Coordination Action HELAS ().

  15. Condition for short pulse generation in ultrahigh frequency mode-locking of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Paslaski, J.

    1991-11-01

    It is shown that although it is possible to obtain mode-locking without self-pulsation when certain criteria are satisfied, the shortest pulses are almost always generated at or close to the onset of self-pulsation. Thus, the amplitude of the optical pulse train is modulated by the (relatively) low-frequency envelop of a few gigahertz under this condition. This observation was obtained by simultaneously measuring the pulsewidth using an autocorrelator and monitoring the optical intensity using a high-speed photodiode and a microwave spectrum analyzer. It is concluded that while it is possible to generate picosecond optical pulses in ultrahigh-frequency mode-locking of quantum-well lasers, very short pulses (approaching 1 ps) are almost always accompanied by self-pulsation which is manifested as low-frequency (gigahertz) envelope modulation of the optical pulse train.

  16. Computing frequency by using generalized zero-crossing applied to intrinsic mode functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention presents a method for computing Instantaneous Frequency by applying Empirical Mode Decomposition to a signal and using Generalized Zero-Crossing (GZC) and Extrema Sifting. The GZC approach is the most direct, local, and also the most accurate in the mean. Furthermore, this approach will also give a statistical measure of the scattering of the frequency value. For most practical applications, this mean frequency localized down to quarter of a wave period is already a well-accepted result. As this method physically measures the period, or part of it, the values obtained can serve as the best local mean over the period to which it applies. Through Extrema Sifting, instead of the cubic spline fitting, this invention constructs the upper envelope and the lower envelope by connecting local maxima points and local minima points of the signal with straight lines, respectively, when extracting a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) from a signal under consideration.

  17. Investigation of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films in identifying high-frequency vibration modes of flexible plates.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Liou, Hong-Cin; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2014-06-01

    Compared with piezoelectric ceramics such as lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics, the low density and high compliance of the PVDF films make them a more suitable choice in modal testing, especially for detecting high-frequency modes in flexible or inflatable structures. In this work, dynamic sensing performances of PVDF films for flexible structures in modal testing are examined, with considerations including the repeatability of the impact source, the accuracy of the sensing responses, and the influences of the nodal lines on the frequency spectra of the transient responses. Two flexible plates with different boundary conditions and thickness are considered. Experimental results, compared with FEM computations or theoretical predictions, demonstrate the excellent dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF film in modal testing applications, especially for identification of high-frequency modes on flexible structures. PMID:24859669

  18. Mode properties of low-frequency waves: Kinetic theory versus Hall-MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    In fluid theory, the ordering of low-frequency modes in a homogeneous plasma is based on the phase velocity, since modes do not intersect each other in dispersion diagrams as a function of wavenumber or other parameters. In linear kinetic theory, modes cross each other. Thus a consistent and useful classification should be based on the physical properties of the modes instead. This paper attempts such a classification by documeting the dispersion and general mode properties of the low-frequency waves (omega much less than (OMEGA(sub ci) OMEGA(sub ce) (exp 1/2)), where OMEGA(sub ci), OMEGA(sub ce) are the cyclotron frequencies of the ions and electrons, respectively) in kinetic theory, and by comparing them to the results of two-fluid theory. Kinetic theory gives a seperate Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) wave with phase speed Omega/k approximately = v(sub A) cos theta for omega much less than OMEGA(sub ci), where v(sub A) is the Alfven velocity and theta the angle of propagation between wave vector k and background magnetic field B(sub o). For a given wavenumber, the magnetosonic mode is a double-valued solution with a singular point in theta, beta parameter space, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. It is shown that a branch cut starting at the singular point theta approximately 30 deg, beta approximately 3 and leading to larger beta gives a practical and consitent seperation of this double-valued magnetosonic solution. Selection of this branch cut results in a moderately damped fast/magnetos onic and a heavily damped slow/sound wave. A comprehensive review of the polarization, compressibility and other mode properties is given and shown to be consistent with the selected branch cut. At small wavenumbers, the kinetic mode properties typically start to deviate significantly from their fluid counterparts at beta approximately 0.5. At larger beta, there is no longer a consistent correspondence between the fluid and kinetic modes. Kinetic

  19. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2013-12-02

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30 GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  20. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  1. Centrifugal acceleration modes for incompressible fluid in the leakage annulus between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for calculating complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the fluid resonances and is used to analyze the perturbed flow in the leakage path between a shrouded-pump impeller and its housing. The eigenvalues obtained are consistent with the forced-response curves. First- and second-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to lateral excitations, and first-natural-frequency eigensolutions are presented for mode shapes corresponding to axial excitation.

  2. Low-frequency modes and nonbarotropic effects in pseudo-Newtonian accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipser, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed formalism is used to reexamine the question of the existence of hydrodynamical modes that pulsate with very low frequencies in the inner regions of accretion disks. The formalism is valid in an exact sense for the adiabatic pulsations of rotating Newtonian fluids that are generally nonbarotropic (such as those with 'nonadiabatic temperature gradients,' for example), and hence its application in the present context represents an improvement over previous analyses that are more approximate. The formalism is applied to thin non-self-gravitating disks, with the gravitational potential of the central source modified in the usual way in order to simulate relativistic effects. In the barotropic limit, the analyses indicate that in many cases nearly Keplerian disks exhibit nonaxisymmetric modes of pulsation that are trapped in the inner disk regions, with pulsation periods much longer than the dynamical timescale. These results are similar to those of earlier calculations that assume disks pulsate without changing the temperature distribution. A method is developed for including lowest order nonbarotropic effects. Previous analyses have been incapable of accurately treating the nonbarotropic regime. The application of the present method to the low-frequency modes reveals that, due to unexpected cancellations among terms, the nonbarotropic correction to the pusation frequency omega is only of order tilde-omega(sub BV exp 2) omega, where tilde-omega(sub BV) is the appropriate dimensionless Brunt-Vaisala frequency. This correction is much smaller than the expected correction of order tilde-omega(sub BV) Omega, where Omega is the rotation angular velocity. The important conclusion drawn from this is that nonbarotropic corrections are generally small and hence that low-frequency modes persist into the nonbarotropic regime. For disk temperatures appropriate to X-ray emission, the adiabatic frequencies of trapped modes are of the same order as the frequencies

  3. Relativistic Tennis with Photons: Frequency Up-Shifting, Light Intensification and Ion Acceleration with Flying Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Rosanov, N. N.; Zhidkov, A. G.

    2011-01-04

    We formulate the Flying Mirror Concept for relativistic interaction of ultra-intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas, present its theoretical description and the results of computer simulations and laboratory experiments. In collisionless plasmas, the relativistic flying mirrors are thin and dense electron or electron-ion layers accelerated by the high intensity electromagnetic waves up to velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum; in nonlinear-media and in nonlinear vacuum they are the ionization fronts and the refraction index modulations induced by a strong electromagnetic wave. The reflection of the electromagnetic wave at the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency change due to the double Doppler effect. In the co-propagating configuration, in the radiation pressure dominant regime, the energy of the electromagnetic wave is transferred to the ion energy providing a highly efficient acceleration mechanism. In the counter-propagation configuration the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the gamma-factor squared. If the relativistic mirror performs an oscillatory motion as in the case of the electron motion at the plasma-vacuum interface, the reflected light spectrum is enriched with high order harmonics.

  4. Relativistic Tennis with Photons: Frequency Up-Shifting, Light Intensification and Ion Acceleration with Flying Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Rosanov, N. N.; Zhidkov, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the Flying Mirror Concept for relativistic interaction of ultra-intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas, present its theoretical description and the results of computer simulations and laboratory experiments. In collisionless plasmas, the relativistic flying mirrors are thin and dense electron or electron-ion layers accelerated by the high intensity electromagnetic waves up to velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum; in nonlinear-media and in nonlinear vacuum they are the ionization fronts and the refraction index modulations induced by a strong electromagnetic wave. The reflection of the electromagnetic wave at the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency change due to the double Doppler effect. In the co-propagating configuration, in the radiation pressure dominant regime, the energy of the electromagnetic wave is transferred to the ion energy providing a highly efficient acceleration mechanism. In the counter-propagation configuration the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the gamma-factor squared. If the relativistic mirror performs an oscillatory motion as in the case of the electron motion at the plasma-vacuum interface, the reflected light spectrum is enriched with high order harmonics.

  5. PULSATING B-TYPE STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 884: FREQUENCIES, MODE IDENTIFICATION, AND ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Carrier, F.; Miglio, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance, and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismology study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B stars in the open cluster NGC 884. We describe a thorough investigation of the pulsational properties of all B-type stars in the cluster. Overall, our detailed frequency analysis resulted in 115 detected frequencies in 65 stars. We found 36 mono-periodic, 16 bi-periodic, 10 tri-periodic, and 2 quadru-periodic stars and one star with nine independent frequencies. We also derived the amplitudes and phases of all detected frequencies in the U, B, V, and I filter, if available. We achieved unambiguous identifications of the mode degree for 12 of the detected frequencies in nine of the pulsators. Imposing the identified degrees and measured frequencies of the radial, dipole, and quadrupole modes of five pulsators led to a seismic cluster age estimate of log (age/yr) = 7.12-7.28 from a comparison with stellar models. Our study is a proof-of-concept for and illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of a young open cluster.

  6. Two novel measurements for the drive-mode resonant frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  7. Low-frequency magnetohydrodynamics and geodesic acoustic modes in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg, C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes, especially the geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), in toroidal plasmas with large aspect ratio and circular cross section, including the effects of toroidal plasma rotation. A system of equations describing MHD modes with frequency of the order of the sound frequency in such plasmas is derived from the Frieman-Rotenberg equation, using a technique where the plasma perturbation ξ and the perturbed magnetic field Q are expanded separately in the inverse aspect ratio ɛ = r/R, where r and R denote the minor and major radii of the plasma torus, respectively. The large-scale, ideal MHD properties of the GAM induced by toroidal rotation (Wahlberg 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 115003) are thereafter analysed in more detail employing this system of equations. It is shown that both the axisymmetric GAMs existing in rotating plasmas are localized on a specific magnetic surface only to leading order in ɛ, and that a 'halo' consisting of finite components of both ξ and Q with dominant poloidal mode numbers m = ±2 appears outside this magnetic surface to higher orders in ɛ.

  8. Spectroscopic pulsational frequency identification and mode determination of γ Doradus star HD 12901

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, E.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2012-12-01

    Using multisite spectroscopic data collected from three sites, the frequencies and pulsational modes of the γ Doradus star HD 12901 were identified. A total of six frequencies in the range 1-2 d-1 were observed, their identifications supported by multiple line-profile measurement techniques and previously published photometry. Five frequencies were of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for mode identification, and all five displayed similar three-bump standard deviation profiles which were fitted well with (l,m) = (1,1) modes. These fits had reduced χ2 values of less than 18. We propose that this star is an excellent candidate to test models of non-radially pulsating γ Doradus stars as a result of the presence of multiple (1,1) modes. This paper includes data taken at the Mount John University Observatory of the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), the McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin (Texas, USA) and the European Southern Observatory at La Silla (Chile).

  9. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M.

    2015-06-20

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  10. Investigation of pulsed mode operation with the frequency tuned CAPRICE ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimone, F.; Tinschert, K.; Endermann, M.; Hollinger, R.; Kondrashev, S.; Lang, R.; Mäder, J.; Patchakui, P. T.; Spädtke, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to increase the intensity of the highly charged ions produced by the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs), techniques like the frequency tuning and the afterglow mode have been developed and in this paper the effect on the ion production is shown for the first time when combining both techniques. Recent experimental results proved that the tuning of the operating frequency of the ECRIS is a promising technique to achieve higher ion currents of higher charge states. On the other hand, it is well known that the afterglow mode of the ECRIS operation can provide more intense pulsed ion beams in comparison with the continuous wave (cw) operation. These two techniques can be combined by pulsing the variable frequency signal driving the traveling wave tube amplifier which provides the high microwave power to the ECRIS. In order to analyze the effect of these two combined techniques on the ion source performance, several experiments were carried out on the pulsed frequency tuned CAPRICE (Compacte source A Plusiers Résonances Ionisantes Cyclotron Electroniques)-type ECRIS. Different waveforms and pulse lengths have been investigated under different settings of the ion source. The results of the pulsed mode have been compared with those of cw operation.

  11. Discovery of binarity, spectroscopic frequency analysis, and mode identification of the δ Scuti star 4 CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, V. S.; Themeßl, N.; Breger, M.; Degroote, P.; Aerts, C.; Beck, P. G.; Tkachenko, A.; Van Reeth, T.; Bloemen, S.; Debosscher, J.; Castanheira, B. G.; McArthur, B. E.; Pápics, P. I.; Fritz, V.; Falcon, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    More than 40 years of ground-based photometric observations of the δ Sct star 4 CVn has revealed 18 independent oscillation frequencies, including radial as well as non-radial p-modes of low spherical degree ℓ ≤ 2. From 2008 to 2011, more than 2000 spectra were obtained at the 2.1 m Otto-Struve telescope at the McDonald Observatory. We present the analysis of the line-profile variations, based on the Fourier-parameter fit method, detected in the absorption lines of 4 CVn, which carry clear signatures of the pulsations. From a non-sinusoidal, periodic variation of the radial velocities, we discover that 4 CVn is an eccentric binary system with an orbital period Porb = 124.44 ± 0.03 d and an eccentricity e = 0.311 ± 0.003. We detect 20 oscillation frequencies, 9 of which previously unseen in photometric data; attempt mode identification for the two dominant modes, f1 = 7.3764 d-1 and f2 = 5.8496 d-1; and determine the prograde or retrograde nature of 7 of the modes. The projected rotational velocity of the star, veqsini ≃ 106.7 km s-1, translates to a rotation rate of veq/vcrit ≥ 33%. This relatively high rotation rate hampers unique mode identification, since higher order effects of rotation are not included in the current methodology. We conclude that, in order to achieve unambiguous mode identification for 4 CVn, a complete description of rotation and the use of blended lines have to be included in mode-identification techniques. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.The software package FAMIAS, developed in the framework of the FP6 European Coordination Action HELAS (http://www.helas-eu.org/), has been used in this research.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Excited states of the high-frequency vibrational modes and kinetics of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barykov, V. Yu.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the carrier frequency of the exciting laser pulse on the kinetics of intramolecular photoinduced charge transfer in the multi-channel stochastic model is studied. It is shown that the population of different states of high-frequency intramolecular modes upon varying the frequency of the excitation pulse can considerably alter the rate constant of ultrafast charge transfer. It is found that a negative vibrational spectral effect is expected in the vicinity of a barrier-free area (the rate constant of photoinduced charge transfer decreases along with the carrier frequency of the excitation pulse), while a positive effect is predicted in areas of high and low exergonicity (an inverse dependence). It is concluded that the value of the spectral effect falls along with the time of vibrational relaxation. For ultrafast photo-induced charge transfer, however, it remains considerable up to relaxation times of 100 fs.

  13. Enhanced ultra-low-frequency interlayer shear modes in folded graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting

    2014-08-01

    Few-layer graphene has attracted tremendous attention owing to its exceptional electronic properties inherited from single-layer graphene and new features led by introducing extra freedoms such as interlayer stacking sequences or rotations. Effectively probing interlayer shear modes are critical for unravelling mechanical and electrical properties of few-layer graphene and further developing its practical potential. Unfortunately, shear modes are extremely weak and almost fully blocked by a Rayleigh rejecter in Raman measurements. This greatly hinders investigations of shear modes in few-layer graphene. Here, we demonstrate enhancing of shear modes by properly folding few-layer graphene. As a direct benefit of the strong signal, enhancement mechanism, vibrational symmetry, anharmonicity and electron-phonon coupling of the shear modes are uncovered through studies of Raman mapping, polarization- and temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. This work complements Raman studies of graphene layers, and paves an efficient way to exploit low-frequency shear modes of few-layer graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials.

  14. Neutron production from a mobile linear accelerator operating in electron mode for intraoperative radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, G.; Dominietto, M.; Cannillo, B.; Ciocca, M.; Krengli, M.; Mones, E.; Negri, E.; Brambilla, M.

    2006-02-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy is increasingly performed using mobile linac delivering therapeutic radiation doses in unshielded operating rooms. While no special neutron-shielding problem should arise for operation at 10 MeV or less, it is not clear whether this holds true for operation at higher energies. This paper reports the measured neutron production from a Mobetron mobile electron linac, operated at 12 MeV, and compares the results with those from a conventional linac, also operated at 12 MeV in electron mode. Neutron leakage measurements were performed by means of passive bubble detectors in the scattering foil, patient and floor planes. Neutron dose equivalent rates per unit of electron dose delivered by the Mobetron at its normal treatment distance (50 cm SSD) were 0.33 µSv Gy-1 at the accelerator head, 0.18 µSv Gy-1 in the patient plane at 15 cm from the beam axis and 0.31 µSv Gy-1 at the floor plane, on the beam axis and under the beam stopper. For a weekly workload of 250 Gy, the weekly neutron dose equivalents at 12 MeV for the Mobetron at a distance of 300 cm from the scattering foil were 14.3 and 1.7 µSv/week for floor below and adjoining areas on the same floor, respectively. Neutron dose equivalent rates generated from Mobetron are at least one order of magnitude lower than ones produced by a conventional linac operated at the same energy in electron mode. Mobetron can be used at 12 MeV in an unshielded operating room for a weekly workload of up to 250 Gy if the bremsstrahlung x-rays are shielded to negligible levels.

  15. Hybrid modes, substrate leakage, and losses of slotline at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozzi, Tullio; Moglie, Franco; Morini, Antonio; Marchionna, Emilio; Politi, Marco

    1990-08-01

    Guided hybrid propagation in a slotline at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies is discussed. The analysis is carried out rigorously in the space domain, involving the variational solution of a singular integral equation for an E, field tangential to the slot. Data are obtained for field distributions, dispersion, and characteristic impedance, and are compared with data available in the literature. Results are reported on power lost by the propagation mode in the conductors and in the dielectric substrate. The analysis highlights the onset of leakage into a sufficiently thick substrate due the excitation of a transverse magnetic surface wave. This sets a high-frequency limit for lossless operation.

  16. Pulse dynamics in a mode-locked fiber laser and its quantum limited comb frequency uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengying; Funk, Andrew C; Yang, Changxi; Cundiff, Steven T

    2014-06-01

    We present an experimental study of pulse dynamics in a mode-locked Er:fiber laser. By injecting a continuous wave laser with sinusoidal intensity modulation into the fiber laser, we are able to modulate the gain. Measuring the response of the pulse energy, central frequency, central pulse time, and phase to the gain modulation allows determination of the parameters that describe their coupling. Based on the experimentally derived parameters, we evaluate the free running comb linewidth and frequency uncertainty with feedback included, assuming quantum noise is the limiting factor. Optimization of fiber lasers is also discussed.

  17. Low-phase-noise, single-frequency, single-mode 608 W thulium fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Book, Lewis D; Rothenberg, Joshua E

    2009-04-15

    A chain of four Tm-doped fibers amplified a single-frequency, 2040 nm diode laser to 608 W with M(2)=1.05+/-0.03, limited by available pump power. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limits were investigated by splicing different lengths of passive fiber to the output of the final amplifier stage. Integrated rms phase noise above 1 kHz was less than lambda/30, suggesting the possibility of further scaling via coherent beam combining. To our knowledge, this is the highest power obtained from any single-frequency, single-mode fiber laser.

  18. Measurements of frequency fluctuations in aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicholas; Piazza, Gianluca

    2014-06-01

    As part of the current drive to engineer miniaturized monolithic high-performance microelectromechanical-enabled oscillators, there is a need for further study of frequency fluctuations in microelectromechanical resonators. To this end, we present the measurement of frequency fluctuations for 128 aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators. The measurements show that fluctuations are sufficiently large to play an important role in oscillator performance. These results were obtained for the first time from vector network analyzer measurements and are accompanied by an analysis of the experimental setup.

  19. Frequency domain holography of laser wakefield accelerators in the nonlinear bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S. A.; Kalmykov, S.; Dong, P.; Reed, S. A.; Downer, M.; Shvets, G.

    2009-11-01

    We present the theoretical basis of frequency domain holography (FDH), a technique for single-shot visualization of laser driven plasma wakes. In FDH, the nonlinear index modulations of the plasma wake are recorded as phase shifts in a co-propagating probe pulse, and interference with a reference allows for the reconstruction of the wake structure. Earlier experimental work [N. H. Matlis et al., Nature Phys. 2, 749 (2006)] has shown that reconstruction of the probe phase is sufficient for imaging weakly nonlinear periodic wakes. In the highly nonlinear regime, the laser ponderomotive force blows out plasma electrons and forms a density ``bubble'' that strongly focuses the probe light. We show that imaging the bubble requires full (amplitude and phase) reconstruction of the probe pulse, and find reconstructions of simulated frequency domain holograms in full agreement with direct PIC modeling of the probe pulse. We also assess the sensitivity of the technique to the spectral bandwidth of the probe and reference pulses. In combination with ray-tracing techniques which help evaluate the localized frequency up- and down-shifts of the probe light (``photon acceleration''), FDH appears to be a unique tool for visualization of plasma wakes. This work is supported by the US DOE grants DE-FG02-04ER41321 and DE-FG02-07ER54945.

  20. Low Frequency Vibration Characteristics of the Space Acceleration Measurement System 2 Tape Drive Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Russell, James W.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes results of force and moment measurements of the Space Acceleration Measurement System 2 (SAMS 2) Tape Drive Assembly (TDA) over the frequency range from 0.35 Hz to 256 Hz for steady state operations including write, read, rewind, and fast forward. Time domain force results are presented for transient TDA operations that include software eject, manual eject, and manual load. Three different mounting configurations were employed for attaching the inner box with the tape drive unit to the outer box. Two configurations employed grommet sets with spring rates of 42 and 62 pounds per inch respectively. The third configuration employed a set of metallic washers. For all four steady state operations the largest average forces were on the Y axis with the metallic washers and were less than 0.005 pounds. The largest average moments were on the X axes with the washers and were less than 0.030 pound inches. At the third octave centerband frequency of 31.5 Hz, the 42 pound per inch grommets showed the greatest forces and moments for read and write operations. At the third octave centerband frequency of 49.6 Hz, the 62 pound per inch grommets showed the greatest forces and moments for rewind operation. Transient operation forces ranged from 0.75 pounds for the software eject to greater than 1 pound for manual load and eject.

  1. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes. PMID:24127792

  2. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f0 and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f0 drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO3(10overline{1}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  3. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  4. Frequency tuning, nonlinearities and mode coupling in circular mechanical graphene resonators.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A M; Midtvedt, D; Croy, A; Isacsson, A

    2013-10-01

    We study circular nanomechanical graphene resonators by means of continuum elasticity theory, treating them as membranes. We derive dynamic equations for the flexural mode amplitudes. Due to the geometrical nonlinearity the mode dynamics can be modeled by coupled Duffing equations. By solving the Airy stress problem we obtain analytic expressions for the eigenfrequencies and nonlinear coefficients as functions of the radius, suspension height, initial tension, back-gate voltage and elastic constants, which we compare with finite element simulations. Using perturbation theory, we show that it is necessary to include the effects of the non-uniform stress distribution for finite deflections. This correctly reproduces the spectrum and frequency tuning of the resonator, including frequency crossings. PMID:24008430

  5. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun; Johnson, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (ωS) approaches the crossover frequency (ωcr), and the parallel wavenumber (k∥) is close to the critical wavenumber k* ∥(ωS = ωcr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ωcr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k∥ ≈ k*∥∥.

  6. Method of particle energy determination based on measurement of waveguide mode frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhtin, A. V.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of determination of charged particle energy is developed. This method consists in use of dependency of waveguide mode frequencies on Lorenz factor of particle. For this method it is principal that the particle bunch generates radiation in waveguide and the mode frequencies depend essentially on the Lorenz factor. Three variants of realization of such technique are considered. The first variant consists in use of a thin dielectric layer in a waveguide. The second variant is based on use of a waveguide containing a system of wires coated with a dielectric material. The third version consists in application of a circular waveguide having a grid wall. For all cases analytical solutions of the problems are obtained (in the case of grid waveguide we use the averaged boundary conditions). Some typical results of computations are given. Advantages and disadvantages of different variants are discussed. It is noted that the grid waveguide can be used as well for generation of microwave radiation.

  7. Frequency band of the f-mode Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Burkhard; Korobkin, Oleg; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2010-04-01

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars can be unstable to the gravitational-wave-driven Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism if they have a neutral point in the spectrum of nonaxisymmetric f-modes. We investigate the frequencies of these modes in two sequences of uniformly rotating polytropes using nonlinear simulations in full general relativity, determine the approximate locations of the neutral points, and derive limits on the observable frequency band available to the instability in these sequences. We find that general relativity enhances the detectability of a CFS-unstable neutron star substantially, both by widening the instability window and enlarging the band into the optimal range for interferometric detectors like LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO-600.

  8. High-frequency Born synthetic seismograms based on coupled normal modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency and full waveform synthetic seismograms on a 3-D laterally heterogeneous earth model are simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The set of coupled integral equations that describe the 3-D response are simplified into a set of uncoupled integral equations by using the Born approximation to calculate scattered wavefields and the pure-path approximation to modulate the phase of incident and scattered wavefields. This depends upon a decomposition of the aspherical structure into smooth and rough components. The uncoupled integral equations are discretized and solved in the frequency domain, and time domain results are obtained by inverse Fourier transform. Examples show the utility of the normal mode approach to synthesize the seismic wavefields resulting from interaction with a combination of rough and smooth structural heterogeneities. This approach is applied to an ~4 Hz shallow crustal wave propagation around the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). ?? The Author Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  9. High-frequency Born synthetic seismograms based on coupled normal modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred F.

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency and full waveform synthetic seismograms on a 3-D laterally heterogeneous earth model are simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The set of coupled integral equations that describe the 3-D response are simplified into a set of uncoupled integral equations by using the Born approximation to calculate scattered wavefields and the pure-path approximation to modulate the phase of incident and scattered wavefields. This depends upon a decomposition of the aspherical structure into smooth and rough components. The uncoupled integral equations are discretized and solved in the frequency domain, and time domain results are obtained by inverse Fourier transform. Examples show the utility of the normal mode approach to synthesize the seismic wavefields resulting from interaction with a combination of rough and smooth structural heterogeneities. This approach is applied to an ∼4 Hz shallow crustal wave propagation around the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD).

  10. Frequency band of the f-mode Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, Burkhard; Korobkin, Oleg; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2010-04-15

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars can be unstable to the gravitational-wave-driven Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz (CFS) mechanism if they have a neutral point in the spectrum of nonaxisymmetric f-modes. We investigate the frequencies of these modes in two sequences of uniformly rotating polytropes using nonlinear simulations in full general relativity, determine the approximate locations of the neutral points, and derive limits on the observable frequency band available to the instability in these sequences. We find that general relativity enhances the detectability of a CFS-unstable neutron star substantially, both by widening the instability window and enlarging the band into the optimal range for interferometric detectors like LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO-600.

  11. Time-frequency characterization of nonlinear normal modes and challenges in nonlinearity identification of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank

    2011-10-01

    Presented here is a new time-frequency signal processing methodology based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) and a new conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method for characterization of nonlinear normal modes and parametric identification of nonlinear multiple-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems. Different from short-time Fourier transform and wavelet transform, HHT uses the apparent time scales revealed by the signal's local maxima and minima to sequentially sift components of different time scales. Because HHT does not use pre-determined basis functions and function orthogonality for component extraction, it provides more accurate time-varying amplitudes and frequencies of extracted components for accurate estimation of system characteristics and nonlinearities. CPD uses adaptive local harmonics and function orthogonality to extract and track time-localized nonlinearity-distorted harmonics without the end effect that destroys the accuracy of HHT at the two data ends. For parametric identification, the method only needs to process one steady-state response (a free undamped modal vibration or a steady-state response to a harmonic excitation) and uses amplitude-dependent dynamic characteristics derived from perturbation analysis to determine the type and order of nonlinearity and system parameters. A nonlinear two-degree-of-freedom system is used to illustrate the concepts and characterization of nonlinear normal modes, vibration localization, and nonlinear modal coupling. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method can provide accurate time-frequency characterization of nonlinear normal modes and parametric identification of nonlinear dynamical systems. Moreover, results show that nonlinear modal coupling makes it impossible to decompose a general nonlinear response of a highly nonlinear system into nonlinear normal modes even if nonlinear normal modes exist in the system.

  12. On the contribution of sunspots to the observed frequency shifts of solar acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. R. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L.

    2016-09-01

    Activity-related variations in the solar oscillation properties have been known for 30 years. However, the relative importance of the different contributions to the observed variations is not yet fully understood. Our goal is to estimate the relative contribution from sunspots to the observed activity-related variations in the frequencies of the acoustic modes. We use a variational principle to relate the phase differences induced by sunspots on the acoustic waves to the corresponding changes in the frequencies of the global acoustic oscillations. From the sunspot properties (area and latitude as a function of time), we are able to estimate the spot-induced frequency shifts. These are then combined with a smooth frequency shift component, associated with long-term solar-cycle variations, and the results compared with the frequency shifts derived from the Global Oscillation Network Group data. The result of this comparison is consistent with a sunspot contribution to the observed frequency shifts of roughly 30 per cent, with the remaining 70 per cent resulting mostly from a global, non-stochastic variation, possibly related to the changes in the overall magnetic field. Moreover, analysis of the residuals obtained after the subtraction of the model frequency shifts from the observations indicates the presence of a 1.5-yr periodicity in the data in phase with the quasi-biennial variations reported in the literature.

  13. Surface vibrational modes of alpha-quartz(0001) probed by sum-frequency spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Tao; Shen, Y R

    2008-07-01

    Infrared-visible sum-frequency spectroscopy was used to probe surface vibrations of alpha-quartz(0001) under ambient conditions. Two modes at 880 and 980 cm(-1) were observed and identified as arising from Si-O-Si and Si-OH structures of the surface. Heat treatment and hydroxylation could convert Si-OH to Si-O-Si and vice versa. The technique is generally applicable to studies of surface phonons of other oxides, semiconductors, and insulators. PMID:18764125

  14. High-frequency phonon modes on stepped and kinked Cu surfaces: Experiments and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, Abdelkader; Staikov, Pavlin; Rahman, Talat S.; Radnik, Joerg

    2000-02-15

    Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, we have found step-localized vibrational modes with frequencies higher than those of the bulk phonons on Cu(532) and Cu(211). From structural and lattice dynamical calculations based on many-body interaction potentials, we trace the origin of these modes to local effects involving surface relaxations and resulting stiffening of force constants between the step (or kink-site) atom and its ''bulk'' nearest neighbor. Such modes are not observed on Cu(511) and Cu(17,1,1), although they are predicted in the theoretical calculations. We discuss the impact of these results on systems with bond-length-bond-order correlation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Controlled excitation of electromagnetic band-gap line and point defect modes at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, M.; Klein, N.

    2003-03-01

    We report on the controlled excitation of line and point defect modes in a two-dimensional hexagonal electromagnetic band-gap structure made of rods of dielectric material (aluminium oxide). We compared simulation performed with a numerical field simulation software and experimental measurements at microwave frequencies with regard to coupling from external waveguides to line defects and subsequent coupling to resonant modes. We observed that for a line defect in the photonic crystal the impedance matching to a waveguide is strongly dependent on the defect width. We furthermore demonstrated that the coupling to a localized defect resonance can be strongly influenced by the variation of certain single lattice elements, affecting transmission behavior and quality factor of the resonant modes.

  16. Jamming effects on code synchronization of burst-mode frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, Mike G.; Wicker, Mark A.

    The authors characterize the performance of a multiple-dwell FHSS (frequency-hopping spread-spectrum) code synchronization scheme in the presence of channel dynamics. Random hop jamming is assumed. The coarse acquisition system uses both passive and active correlation to implement a serial search of the code-uncertainty region. The in-lock monitoring is accomplished using a two-dwell active correlator with a relatively long integration time. Both burst- and continuous-mode communications links are considered. Appropriate performance parameters are developed, and design considerations are discussed. Performance curves are given for the various cases considered. Although a fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme adequately mitigates the effects of dynamic jamming in a continuous-mode communications link, it is shown to be inadequate for a burst-mode communications link.

  17. Low-frequency linear-mode regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosetto, Annamaria; Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Ricci, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the wide range of physical parameters characterizing the scrape-off layer (SOL) of existing tokamaks, the regimes of low-frequency linear instabilities in the SOL are identified by numerical and analytical calculations based on the linear, drift-reduced Braginskii equations, with cold ions. The focus is put on ballooning modes and drift wave instabilities, i.e., their resistive, inertial, and ideal branches. A systematic study of each instability is performed, and the parameter space region where they dominate is identified. It is found that the drift waves dominate at high R /Ln, while the ballooning modes at low R /Ln; the relative influence of resistive and inertial effects is discussed. Electromagnetic effects suppress the drift waves and, when the threshold for ideal stability is overcome, the ideal ballooning mode develops. Our analysis is a first stage tool for the understanding of turbulence in the tokamak SOL, necessary to interpret the results of non-linear simulations.

  18. High- and low-frequency phonon modes in dipolar quantum gases trapped in deep lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluckov, Aleksandra; Gligorić, Goran; Hadžievski, Ljupčo; Malomed, Boris A.; Pfau, Tilman

    2013-02-01

    We study normal modes propagating on top of the stable uniform background in arrays of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) droplets trapped in a deep optical lattice. Both the on-site mean-field dynamics of the droplets and their displacement due to the repulsive dipole-dipole interactions (DDIs) are taken into account. Dispersion relations for two modes, viz., high- and low- frequency counterparts of optical and acoustic phonon modes in condensed matter, are derived analytically and verified by direct simulations, for both cases of the repulsive and attractive contact interactions. The (counterpart of the) optical-phonon branch does not exist without the DDIs. These results are relevant in the connection to emerging experimental techniques enabling real-time imaging of the condensate dynamics and direct experimental measurement of phonon dispersion relations in BECs.

  19. A Dual Mode Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Cell Stimulator Produces Acceleration of Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Rizk, Hatem; Mo, Chenglin; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Leticia; Abreu, Eduardo; Brotto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test of a dual-mode electric and magnetic biological stimulator (EM-Stim). The stimulator generates pulsing electric and magnetic fields at programmable rates and intensities. While electric and magnetic stimulators have been reported before, this is the first device that combines both modalities. The ability of the dual stimulation to target bone and muscle tissue simultaneously has the potential to improve the therapeutic treatment of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. The device is fully programmable, portable and easy to use, and can run from a battery or a power supply. The device can generate magnetic fields of up to 1.6 mT and output voltages of +/−40 V. The EM-Stim accelerated myogenic differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes as evidenced by morphometric, gene expression, and protein content analyses. Currently, there are many patents concerned with the application of single electrical or magnetic stimulation, but none that combine both simultaneously. However, we applied for and obtained a provisional patent for new device to fully explore its therapeutic potential in pre-clinical models. PMID:23445453

  20. An Investigation of the Natural Frequencies and Mode Shapes of Liquids In Oblate Spheroidal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, H. Wayne; Walton, William C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to gain some understanding of the character of the free vibration modes of liquids In oblate spheroidal tanks applicable in missile and space vehicle systems, Measured natural frequencies were obtained for the lowest three or four, antisymmetric modes of oscillation as a function of the liquid depth for three orientations of each of several such tanks of different size and oblateness. The orientations considered were such that: (a) the equator of the spheroid was horizontal and oscillations were along a diameter of the circular liquid surface; (b) the equator of the spheroid was vertical and the oscillations were along the minor axis of the elliptical liquid surface; and (c) the equator of the spheroid was vertical and the oscillations were along the major axis of the elliptical liquid surface; The frequency data are presented as dimensionless parameters developed for each orientation to permit the application of the experimental results to the prediction of the natural frequencies of tanks of different size and oblateness. Photographs we re made of representative surface wave or mode, shapes for each orientation.

  1. Joint inversion of high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher modes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    Joint inversion of multimode surface waves for estimating the shear (S)-wave velocity has received much attention in recent years. In this paper, we first analyze sensitivity of phase velocities of multimodes of surface waves for a six-layer earth model, and then we invert surface-wave dispersion curves of the theoretical model and a real-world example. Sensitivity analysis shows that fundamental mode data are more sensitive to the S-wave velocities of shallow layers and are concentrated on a very narrow frequency band, while higher mode data are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and are distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multimode joint inversion to define S-wave velocities. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least-square method and the singular-value decomposition technique to invert high-frequency surface waves with fundamental and higher mode data simultaneously can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of S-wave velocities. ?? 2007.

  2. Low-frequency interlayer vibration modes in two-dimensional layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianting; Dong, Shan; Zhang, Anmin; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have been attracted tremendous research interest because of their novel photoelectric properties. If a single atomic layer instead of individual atoms is taken as a rigid motion object, two unique interlayer vibrations, i.e. compression/breathing and shear motions, at ultra-low frequencies can be expected and actually have been observed in many layered materials. The vibrations stem from the interlayer van der Waals interaction and can be well described by a conventional linear-chain model in most cases. The vibration frequencies strongly depend on layer thickness, which enables an accurate determination of layer numbers. A quick and nondestructive determination of flake thickness is particularly important for the materials, since the physical properties can be dramatically changed in the cases of several atomic layers. As a measure of interlayer coupling, the low-frequency modes are also sensitive to the stacking methods of atomic layers and the overlapping of different kinds of 2D materials. This allows the modes to play a key role in the applications like van der Waals heterojunctions. In this paper, we will give a brief review on the experimental observations and theoretical understanding of the interlayer modes in several typical 2D systems, as well as their actual and potential applications.

  3. Energetic Particle Effects Can Explain the Low Frequency of Alfvin Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2001-01-31

    During beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak, modes with lower frequencies than expected for toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) are often observed. We present the analysis of one of these ''beta-induced Alfvin eigenmodes'' (BAE) with a high-n stability code HINST that includes the effect of the energetic ions on the mode frequency. It shows that the ''BAE'' could be the theoretically predicted resonant-TAE (RTAE), which is also called an energetic-particle mode (EPM).

  4. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, John M.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  5. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  6. Evidence of Resonant Mode Coupling and the Relationship between Low and High Frequencies in a Rapidly Rotating a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day-1 (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of "normal" combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day-1 in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  7. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating a star

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2014-03-10

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day{sup –1} (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day{sup –1} in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  8. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    DOE PAGES

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Reece, Charles

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-IImore » superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.« less

  9. Current sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-Frequency Assisted Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    The inductive formation of current sheets in a conical theta pinch FARAD (Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge) thruster is investigated experimentally with time-integrated photography. The goal is to help in understanding the mechanisms and conditions controlling the strength and extent of the current sheet, which are two indices important for FARAD as a propulsion concept. The profiles of these two indices along the inside walls of the conical acceleration coil are assumed to be related to the profiles of the strength and extent of the luminosity pattern derived from photographs of the discharge. The variations of these profiles as a function of uniform back-fill neutral pressure (with no background magnetic field and all parameters held constant) provided the first clues on the nature and qualitative dependencies of current sheet formation. It was found that there is an optimal pressure for which both indices reach a maximum and that the rate of change in these indices with pressure differs on either side of this optimal pressure. This allowed the inference that current sheet formation follows a Townsend-like breakdown mechanism modified by the existence of a finite pressure-dependent radio-frequency-generated electron density background. The observation that the effective location of the luminosity pattern favors the exit-half of the conical coil is explained as the result of the tendency of the inductive discharge circuit to operate near its minimal self-inductance. Movement of the peak in the luminosity pattern towards the upstream side of the cone with increasing pressure is believed to result from the need of the circuit to compensate for the increase in background plasma resistivity due to increasing pressure.

  10. Magnetorheological fluid behavior in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode: Experimental tests and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode and proposes a mathematical model to reveal the MR mechanism. A specific MR squeeze structure avoiding the cavitation effect is designed for the experimental tests. The magnetic field- and gap distance-dependent damping force of the MR squeeze structure is presented and compared with the dramatically large damping force under quasi-static excitations, a moderate damping force is observed at high frequencies. Subsequently, in order to interpret the behavior of MR fluids at high frequencies, employing the continuum media theory, a mathematical model is established with consideration of the fluid inertia and hysteresis property. The damping force comparison between the model and experimental tests indicates that in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode, the squeeze-strengthen effect does not work and the shear yield stress can be applied well to characterize the flow property of MR fluids. In addition, the hysteresis property has a significant influence on the damping performance.

  11. Dynamic Confinement of ITER Plasma by O-Mode Driver at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2009-05-01

    A low B-field side launched electron cyclotron O-Mode driver leads to the dynamic rf confinement, in addition to rf turbulent heating, of ITER plasma. The scaling law for the local energy confinement time τE is evaluated (τE ˜ 3neTe/2Q, where (3/2) neTe is the local plasma thermal energy density and Q is the local rf turbulent heating rate). The dynamics of unstable dissipative trapped particle modes (DTPM) strongly coupled to Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for gyrotron frequency 170GHz; power˜24 MW CW; and on-axis B-field ˜ 10T. In the case of dynamic stabilization of DTPM turbulence and for the heavily damped T-G modes, the energy confinement time scales as τE˜(I0)-2, whereby I0(W/m^2) is the O-Mode driver irradiance. R. Prater et. al., Nucl. Fusion 48, No 3 (March 2008). E. P. Velikhov, History of the Russian Tokamak and the Tokamak Thermonuclear Fusion Research Worldwide That Led to ITER (Documentary movie; Stefan Studios Int'l, La Jolla, CA, 2008; E. P. Velikhov, V. Stefan.) M N Rosenbluth, Phys. Scr. T2A 104-109 1982 B. B. Kadomtsev and O. P. Pogutse, Nucl. Fusion 11, 67 (1971).

  12. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  13. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  14. Excitation of slosh waves associated with low frequency impulsive reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid and vapor within a tank in reduced gravity to enable liquid outflow or vapor venting. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior to main engine restart poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the stability of the most efficient technique for propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage and weight penalties. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flow field activated by 0.1 Hz low frequency, impulsive reverse gravity acceleration, during reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70 and 80 percent, have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed. Slosh wave excitation shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which impose time dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for the spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  15. Frequency-Domain Tomography for Single-shot, Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Downer, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Intense laser pulses propagating through plasma create plasma wakefields that often evolve significantly, e.g. by expanding and contracting. However, such dynamics are known in detail only through intensive simulations. Laboratory visualization of evolving plasma wakes in the ``bubble'' regime is important for optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Recently snap-shots of quasi-static wakes were recorded using frequency-domain holography (FDH). To visualize the wake's evolution, we have generalized FDH to frequency-domain tomography (FDT), which uses multiple probes propagating at different angles with respect to the pump pulse. Each probe records a phase streak, imprinting a partial record of the evolution of pump-created structures. We then topographically reconstruct the full evolution from all phase streaks. To prove the concept, a prototype experiment visualizing nonlinear index evolution in glass is demonstrated. Four probes propagating at 0, 0.6, 2, 14 degrees to the index ``bubble'' are angularly and temporally multiplexed to a single spectrometer to achieve cost-effective FDT. From these four phase streaks, an FDT algorithm analogous to conventional CT yields a single-shot movie of the pump's self-focusing dynamics.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: p-mode frequencies of the solar twin 18 Sco (Bazot+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazot, M.; Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Carfantan, H.; Bedding, T. R.; Dumusque, X.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Petit, P.; Theado, S.; Van Grootel, V.; Arentoft, T.; Castro, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Dintrans, B.; Kjeldsen, H.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S.; Vauclair, S.

    2012-07-01

    Results from the estimation of the parameter of the spectrum model using the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) algorithm described in Sect.4. A burn-in sequence has been removed. The data is stored in the form of an array [1975001x54] The first 52 columns give the frequencies of the modes order by degree (13 l=0 modes, 13 l=1 modes, 13 l=2 modes, 13 l=3 modes). For each mode, they are sorted in ascending order. The last two columns of each line give the parameters Gamma1 and Gamma2. (1 data file).

  17. Method for detecting moment connection fracture using high-frequency transients in recorded accelerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, J.E.; Elebi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge earthquake caused brittle fractures in steel moment frame building connections, despite causing little visible building damage in most cases. Future strong earthquakes are likely to cause similar damage to the many un-retrofitted pre-Northridge buildings in the western US and elsewhere. Without obvious permanent building deformation, costly intrusive inspections are currently the only way to determine if major fracture damage that compromises building safety has occurred. Building instrumentation has the potential to provide engineers and owners with timely information on fracture occurrence. Structural dynamics theory predicts and scale model experiments have demonstrated that sudden, large changes in structure properties caused by moment connection fractures will cause transient dynamic response. A method is proposed for detecting the building-wide level of connection fracture damage, based on observing high-frequency, fracture-induced transient dynamic responses in strong motion accelerograms. High-frequency transients are short (<1 s), sudden-onset waveforms with frequency content above 25 Hz that are visually apparent in recorded accelerations. Strong motion data and damage information from intrusive inspections collected from 24 sparsely instrumented buildings following the 1994 Northridge earthquake are used to evaluate the proposed method. The method's overall success rate for this data set is 67%, but this rate varies significantly with damage level. The method performs reasonably well in detecting significant fracture damage and in identifying cases with no damage, but fails in cases with few fractures. Combining the method with other damage indicators and removing records with excessive noise improves the ability to detect the level of damage. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  19. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface. PMID:24999844

  20. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  1. Frequency Reuse, Cell Separation, and Capacity Analysis of VHF Digital Link Mode 3 TDMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2003-01-01

    The most recent studies by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation industry have indicated that it has become increasingly difficult to make new VHF frequency or channel assignments to meet the aviation needs for air-ground communications. FAA has planned for several aggressive improvement measures to the existing systems, but these measures would not meet the projected voice communications needs beyond 2009. FAA found that since 1974 there has been, on the average, a 4 percent annual increase in the number of channel assignments needed to satisfy the air-ground communication traffic (approximately 300 new channel assignments per year). With the planned improvement measures, the channel assignments are expected to reach a maximum number of 16615 channels by about 2010. Hence, the FAA proposed the use of VDL Mode 3 as a new integrated digital voice and data communications systems to meet the future air traffic demand. This paper presents analytical results of frequency reuse; cell separation and capacity estimation of VDL Mode 3 TDMA systems that FAA has planned to implement the future VHF air-ground communications system by the year 2010. For TDMA, it is well understood that the frequency reuse factor is a crucial parameter for capacity estimation. Formulation of this frequency reuse factor is shown, taking into account the limitation imposed by the requirement to have a sufficient Signal to Co-Channel Interference Ratio. Several different values for the Signal to Co-Channel Interference Ratio were utilized corresponding to the current analog VHF DSB-AM systems, and the future digital VDL Mode 3. The required separation of Co-Channel cells is computed for most of the Frequency Protected Service Volumes (FPSV's) currently in use by the FAA. Additionally, the ideal cell capacity for each FPSV is presented. Also, using actual traffic for the Detroit air space, a FPSV traffic distribution model is used to generate a typical cell for channel capacity

  2. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  3. Causal Modes in the Low-frequency variability of Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Erik; Zampieri, Matteo; Artale, Vincenzo; Gualdi, Silvio; Molini, Annalisa

    2015-04-01

    In the last three decades, the Mediterranean and the Middle East experienced a phase of warming larger than the one that could be expected from global warming, and largely ascribable to natural (e.g. internal) climate variability. To better understand this process we explore here the presence of causal relationships among the diverse modes of variability of the climate system, focusing in particular on inter-annual and decadal scales of variability, influencing the climate of Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern regions. Causality measures used in this study include time and frequency-domain Granger causality (GC) and the phase slope index (Ψ), a directional coupling statistic developed by Nolte et. al. in 2007. GC metrics are applied to signals before and after the filtering of high frequency (inter-annual) components, while Ψ is designed to discern between low-frequency causal flow and higher frequency components. To assure the necessary sample size, the analysis is based on the preindustrial runs of the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), which are free from external perturbation and last some hundred years. We selected the runs based on ENSO stationarity - to ensure that the simulations reached the equilibrium - and the consistent representation of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which is considered one of the main drivers for the low-frequency (decadal) climate variability of the Mediterranean and the Middle East in summer. Finally, we discuss the potential of causality metrics for the predictability of future decadal variability in these regions.

  4. Acoustic Reflection and Transmission of 2-Dimensional Rotors and Stators, Including Mode and Frequency Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1999-01-01

    A reduced order modeling scheme has been developed for the unsteady acoustic and vortical coupling between blade rows of a turbomachine. The essential behavior of the system is governed by modal scattering coefficients (i.e., reflection and transmission coefficients) of the rotor, stator, inlet and nozzle, which are calculated as if they were connected to non-reflecting ducts. The objective of this report is to identify fundamental behavior of these scattering coefficients for a better understanding of the role of blade row reflection and transmission in noise generation. A 2D flat plate unsteady cascade model is used for the analysis with the expectation that the general behavior presented herein will carry over to models that include more realistic flow and geometry. It is shown that stators scatter input waves into many modes at the same frequency whereas rotors scatter on frequency, or harmonic order. Important cases are shown here the rotor reflection coefficient is greater than unity; a mode at blade passing frequency (BPF) traveling from the stator with unit sound power is reflected by the rotor with more than unit power at 2xBPF and 3xBPE Analysis is presented to explain this unexpected phenomenon. Scattering curves are presented in a format chosen for design use and for physical interpretation. To aid in interpretation of the curves, formulas are derived for special condition where waveforms are parallel to perpendicular to the rotor.

  5. Low frequency vibrational modes of oxygenated myoglobin, hemoglobins, and modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, S; Proniewicz, L M; Bronder, H; Kincaid, J R

    1994-12-01

    The low frequency resonance Raman spectra of the dioxygen adducts of myoglobin, hemoglobin, its isolated subunits, mesoheme-substituted hemoglobin, and several deuteriated heme derivatives are reported. The observed oxygen isotopic shifts are used to assign the iron-oxygen stretching (approximately 570 cm-1) and the heretofore unobserved delta (Fe-O-O) bending (approximately 420 cm-1) modes. Although the delta (Fe-O-O) is not enhanced in the case of oxymyoglobin, it is observed for all the hemoglobin derivatives, its exact frequency being relatively invariable among the derivatives. The lack of sensitivity to H2O/D2O buffer exchange is consistent with our previous interpretation of H2O/D2O-induced shifts of v(O-O) in the resonance Raman spectra of dioxygen adducts of cobalt-substituted heme proteins; namely, that those shifts are associated with alterations in vibrational coupling of v(O-O) with internal modes of proximal histidyl imidazole rather than to steric or electronic effects of H/D exchange at the active site. No evidence is obtained for enhancement of the v(Fe-N) stretching frequency of the linkage between the heme iron and the imidazole group of the proximal histidine. PMID:7983043

  6. Constructing the frequency and wave normal distribution of whistler-mode wave power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, C. E. J.; Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new methodology that allows the construction of wave frequency distributions due to growing incoherent whistler-mode waves in the magnetosphere. The technique combines the equations of geometric optics (i.e., raytracing) with the equation of transfer of radiation in an anisotropic lossy medium to obtain spectral energy density as a function of frequency and wavenormal angle. We describe the method in detail and then demonstrate how it could be used in an idealized magnetosphere during quiet geomagnetic conditions. For a specific set of plasma conditions, we predict that the wave power peaks off the equator at ˜15° magnetic latitude. The new calculations predict that wave power as a function of frequency can be adequately described using a Gaussian function, but as a function of wavenormal angle, it more closely resembles a skew normal distribution. The technique described in this paper is the first known estimate of the parallel and oblique incoherent wave spectrum as a result of growing whistler-mode waves and provides a means to incorporate self-consistent wave-particle interactions in a kinetic model of the magnetosphere over a large volume.

  7. Layering effects on low frequency modes in n-layered MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Antonio; Polcar, Tomas

    2016-02-14

    n-Layered (n = 2, 3, 4) MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) have been studied using DFT techniques. Long-range van der Waals forces have been modeled using the Grimme correction to capture interlayer interactions. We study the dynamic and electronic dependence of atomic displacement on the number of layers. We find that the displacement patterns mainly affected by a change in the layer number are low-frequency modes at Γ and A k-points; such modes are connected with the intrinsic tribological response. We disentangle electro-phonon coupling by combining orbital polarization, covalency and cophonicity analysis with phonon band calculations. We find that the frequency dependence on the number of layers and the atomic type has a non-trivial relation with the electronic charge distribution in the interlayer region. We show that the interlayer electronic density can be adjusted by appropriately tuning M-X cophonicity, acting as a knob to control vibrational frequencies, hence the intrinsic frictional response. The present results can be exploited to study the electro-phonon coupling effects in TMD-based materials beyond tribological applications. PMID:26806673

  8. Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Yuan, Chang; Xin, Zhao; Fan, Yang; Cheng-En, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter working in continuous conduction mode (CCM) are studied in this paper. First of all, the two-dimensional discrete mapping model is established. Next, reference current at the period-doubling point and the border of inductor current are derived. Then, the bifurcation diagrams are drawn with the aid of MATLAB. Meanwhile, circuit simulations are executed with PSIM, and time domain waveforms as well as phase portraits in i L-v C plane are plotted with MATLAB on the basis of simulation data. After that, we construct the Jacobian matrix and analyze the stability of the system based on the roots of characteristic equations. Finally, the validity of theoretical analysis has been verified by circuit testing. The simulation and experimental results show that, with the increase of reference current I ref, the corresponding switching frequency f is approaching to low-frequency stage continuously when the period-doubling bifurcation happens, leading to the converter tending to be unstable. With the increase of f, the corresponding I ref decreases when the period-doubling bifurcation occurs, indicating the stable working range of the system becomes smaller. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376029), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China, and the College Graduate Research and Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. SJLX15_0092).

  9. Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Yuan, Chang; Xin, Zhao; Fan, Yang; Cheng-En, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter working in continuous conduction mode (CCM) are studied in this paper. First of all, the two-dimensional discrete mapping model is established. Next, reference current at the period-doubling point and the border of inductor current are derived. Then, the bifurcation diagrams are drawn with the aid of MATLAB. Meanwhile, circuit simulations are executed with PSIM, and time domain waveforms as well as phase portraits in i L–v C plane are plotted with MATLAB on the basis of simulation data. After that, we construct the Jacobian matrix and analyze the stability of the system based on the roots of characteristic equations. Finally, the validity of theoretical analysis has been verified by circuit testing. The simulation and experimental results show that, with the increase of reference current I ref, the corresponding switching frequency f is approaching to low-frequency stage continuously when the period-doubling bifurcation happens, leading to the converter tending to be unstable. With the increase of f, the corresponding I ref decreases when the period-doubling bifurcation occurs, indicating the stable working range of the system becomes smaller. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376029), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China, and the College Graduate Research and Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. SJLX15_0092).

  10. Investigations of the low frequency modes of ferric cytochrome c using vibrational coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul M

    2014-06-12

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ~44 cm(-1) that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ~421-435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ~55 and 30 cm(-1). The intensity of the mode near 44 cm(-1) appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421-435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm(-1) is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d(6) configuration.

  11. Purity of the single frequency mode of a hybrid semiconductor-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wahbeh, Mamoun; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-06-15

    The penalty of extending the cavity length of a laser diode when seeking a linewidth reduction is normally revealed by poor side mode suppression, which prevents the laser from operating purely in a single mode of the external cavity. A hybrid laser, based on a C-band semiconductor optical amplifier combined with a long erbium doped fiber external cavity, is carefully engineered to operate with high spectral purity and outstanding stability. For the first time, a side-mode suppression ratio of ≥42 dB, measured at a resolution of 1.16 pm (149 MHz) at all intra-cavity powers above the lasing threshold, is reported. The output power at the peak lasing wavelength is 13.3 dBm. Also, the ability to lock such a hybrid laser to a particular external-cavity mode is realized for the first time. Excluding the effect of mechanical and thermal drifts on the cavity length, the long-term frequency stability is demonstrated to be within ± 11 Hz while the long-term linewidth is 2.26 kHz, measured using the self-beating technique under free running conditions. PMID:26193582

  12. High-Frequency Acceleration: Therapeutic Tool to Preserve Bone following Tooth Extractions.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, M; Lopez, J A; Alabdullah, H; Vongthongleur, T; Sangsuwon, C; Alikhani, M; Alansari, S; Oliveira, S M; Nervina, J M; Teixeira, C C

    2016-03-01

    A common problem in clinical dentistry is the significant and rapid bone loss that occurs after tooth extraction. Currently there is no solution for the long-term preservation of alveolar bone. Previously, we showed that high-frequency acceleration (HFA) has an osteogenic effect on healthy alveolar bone. However, it is not known if HFA can preserve alveolar bone after extraction without negatively affecting wound healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of HFA on alveolar bone loss and the rate of bone formation after tooth extraction. Eighty-five adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: control, static (static load), and HFA. In all groups, the maxillary right third molar was extracted. The HFA group received HFA for 5 min/d, applied through the second molar. The static group received the same magnitude of static load. The control group did not receive any stimulation. Some animals received fluorescent dyes at 26 and 54 d. Samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 28, and 56 for fluorescence microscopy, micro-computed tomography, histology, RNA, and protein analyses. We found that HFA increased bone volume in the extraction site and surrounding alveolar bone by 44% when compared with static, while fully preserving alveolar bone height and width long-term. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of osteogenic markers and intramembranous bone formation and by decreased expression of osteoclastic markers and bone resorption activity, as well as decreased expression of many inflammatory markers. HFA is a noninvasive safe treatment that can be used to prevent alveolar bone loss and/or accelerate bone healing after tooth extraction.

  13. Dynamical Analysis of Externally Induced Mode Locking via Variable Frequency Complex Demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, W. A.; Wootton, A. J.

    1996-11-01

    Mirnov oscillations detected by magnetic probes in discharges mode locked by a resonant external magnetic perturbation are analyzed dynamically. We use variable frequency complex demodulation [Gasquet and Wootton, RSI, to be published] for this analysis. This technique allows for the time-resolved determination of the harmonic content of the non-stationary Mirnov signal. This harmonic content is compared to theoretical predictions of the interaction of tearing modes with a resonant external perturbation, described by the pendulum equation. In the case of interest, the analytic prediction for the harmonic content agrees with the observed data from TEXT-U. The technique also allows for analysis of the magnitude of error fields resonant at the rational surface giving rise to the Mirnov signals, and we give an estimate of the m=2, n=1 error field on TEXT-U.

  14. SU-E-T-627: Failure Modes and Effect Analysis for Monthly Quality Assurance of Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, J; Xiao, Y; Wang, J; Peng, J; Lu, S; Hu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) on routine monthly Quality Assurance (QA) tests (physical tests part) of linear accelerator. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis method was performed for monthly QA procedures. A detailed process tree of monthly QA was created and potential failure modes were defined. Each failure mode may have many influencing factors. For each factor, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of probability of occurrence (O), the severity of effect (S), and detectability of the failure (D). The RPN scores are in a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating stronger correlation to a given influencing factor of a failure mode. Five medical physicists in our institution were responsible to discuss and to define the O, S, D values. Results: 15 possible failure modes were identified and all RPN scores of all influencing factors of these 15 failue modes were from 8 to 150, and the checklist of FMEA in monthly QA was drawn. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Conclusion: The influencing factors of RPN greater than 50 were considered as highly-correlated factors of a certain out-oftolerance monthly QA test. FMEA is a fast and flexible tool to develop an implement a quality management (QM) frame work of monthly QA, which improved the QA efficiency of our QA team. The FMEA work may incorporate more quantification and monitoring fuctions in future.

  15. Temperature Dependence of Soft Mode Frequency and Dielectric Constant in Ferroelectric PbHPO4 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhayay, Trilok Chandra; Joshi, Mayank

    2011-11-01

    By using double-time temperature dependent Green's function method, expressions for soft mode frequency and dielectric constant are derived. Model Hamiltonian used by earlier workers is modified and used in the derivation. Model values are fitted and compared with experimental data of others. The high dielectric constant of ferroelectrics-thousand and tens of thousands in a number of cases makes them commercially important in the manufacture of small size capacitors of high capacitance. The property of hysteresis suggests their use as memory devices for electronic computers. Piezoelectric acoustic and pyroelectric infrared detectors are the devices based on ferroelectrics.

  16. Frequency-stabilized Yb:fiber comb with a tapered single-mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xie; Hai-Nian, Han; Long, Zhang; Zi-Jiao, Yu; Zheng, Zhu; Lei, Hou; Li-Hui, Pang; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a stable Yb:fiber frequency comb with supercontinuum generation by using a specially designed tapered single-mode fiber, in which a spectrum spanning from 500 nm to 1500 nm is produced. The carrier-envelope offset signal of the Yb:fiber comb is measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of more than 40 dB and a linewidth narrower than 120 kHz. The repetition rate and carrier-envelope offset signals are simultaneously phase locked to a microwave reference frequency. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Grant No. 2012CB821304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378040).

  17. Harmonic signal generation and frequency upconversion using selective sideband Brillouin amplification in single-mode fiber.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Choi, Woo-Young

    2007-06-15

    Harmonic signal generation and frequency upconversion at millimeter-wave bands are experimentally demonstrated by using selective sideband Brillouin amplification induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering in a single-mode fiber. The harmonic signals and frequency upconverted signals are simultaneously generated by the beating of optical sidebands, one of which is Brillouin amplified. By using this method, we successfully demonstrate generation of third-harmonic millimeter waves at 32.55 GHz with f(LO) of 10.85 GHz and upconversion of 10 Mbps quadrature-shift keyed data at f(IF) of 1.55 GHz into a 30 GHz band with more than 17 dB RF power gain.

  18. MEMS switching of contour-mode aluminum nitride resonators for switchable and reconfigurable radio frequency filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordquist, Christopher D.; Branch, Darren W.; Pluym, Tammy; Choi, Sukwon; Nguyen, Janet H.; Grine, Alejandro; Dyck, Christopher W.; Scott, Sean M.; Sing, Molly N.; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2016-10-01

    Switching of transducer coupling in aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators provides an enabling technology for future tunable and reconfigurable filters for multi-function RF systems. By using microelectromechanical capacitive switches to realize the transducer electrode fingers, coupling between the metal electrode finger and the piezoelectric material is modulated to change the response of the device. On/off switched width extensional resonators with an area of  <0.2 mm2 demonstrate a Q of 2000, K 2 of 0.72, and  >24 dB switching ratio at a resonator center frequency of 635 MHz. Other device examples include a 63 MHz resonator with switchable impedance and a 470 MHz resonator with 127 kHz of fine center frequency tuning accomplished by mass loading of the resonator with the MEMS switches.

  19. Nonlinear mode interactions and frequency-jump effects in a doubly tuned oscillator configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, J.; Lashinsky, H.

    1980-05-01

    Frequency-jump effects associated with nonlinear mode competition are investigated in an oscillator configuration consisting of a passive linear resonance system coupled to an active nonlinear resonance system. These effects give rise to a hysteresis pattern whose height and width can be related to system parameters such as the resonance frequencies, dissipation, coupling coefficient, etc. It is noted that these effects offer a novel means of determining these parameters in cases in which conventional techniques may not be desirable or as advantageous. The analysis provides an qualitative explanation of empirical observations in a recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiment (Timsit and Daniels, 1976). The results also apply to other nonlinear resonance systems such as lasers, microwave generators, and electronic oscillators.

  20. Nanoliter liquid characterization by open whispering-gallery mode dielectric resonators at millimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaforost, E. N.; Klein, N.; Vitusevich, S. A.; Offenhäusser, A.; Barannik, A. A.

    2008-10-01

    We present an approach for identification and concentration determination of liquids of pico to nanoliter volumes at a frequency of 35 GHz based on a whispering-gallery mode (WGM) dielectric resonator technique. A quasioptical coupling scheme based on dielectric image waveguides was employed to excite high-Q running wave WGMs with uniform azimuthal field distribution in cylindrical sapphire disks with quality factors up to 4×105 at room temperature. Measurement of the liquid induced changes in the resonator quality factor and resonance frequency has been performed for droplets down to 90 pl volume spotted at different positions on the surface of the sapphire disk. We have employed our method for concentration determination of ethanol, glucose, and albumin dissolved in water. Solutions with concentration values well below 10% could be clearly separated from pure water. Our method is promising for the characterization of biological liquids.

  1. solarFLAG hare and hounds: estimation of p-mode frequencies from Sun-as-star helioseismology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Reyes, S. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; García, R. A.; Appourchaux, T.; Baudin, F.; Boumier, P.; Elsworth, Y.; Fletcher, S. T.; Lazrek, M.; Leibacher, J. W.; Lochard, J.; New, R.; Régulo, C.; Salabert, D.; Toutain, T.; Verner, G. A.; Wachter, R.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the results of the latest solarFLAG hare-and-hounds exercise, which was concerned with testing methods for extraction of frequencies of low-degree solar p modes from data collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. We have used the new solarFLAG simulator, which includes the effects of correlated mode excitation and correlations with background noise, to make artificial time-series data that mimic Doppler velocity observations of the Sun-as-a-star. The correlations give rise to asymmetry of mode peaks in the frequency power spectrum. 10 members of the group (the hounds) applied their `peak-bagging' codes to a 3456-d data set, and the estimated mode frequencies were returned to the hare (who was WJC) for comparison. Analysis of the results reveals a systematic bias in the estimated frequencies of modes above ~1.8mHz. The bias is negative, meaning the estimated frequencies systematically underestimate the input frequencies. We identify two sources that are the dominant contributions to the frequency bias. Both sources involve failure to model accurately subtle aspects of the observed power spectral density in the part (window) of the frequency power spectrum that is being fitted. One source of bias arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density coming from all those modes whose frequencies lie outside the fitting windows. The other source arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density of the weak l = 4 and 5 modes, which are often ignored in Sun-as-a-star analysis. The Sun-as-a-star peak-bagging codes need to allow for both sources, otherwise the frequencies are likely to be biased.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  4. High Resolution Switching Mode Inductance-to-Frequency Converter with Temperature Compensationti

    PubMed Central

    Matko, Vojko; Milanović, Miro

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a novel method for the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal oscillating in the switching oscillating circuit to achieve better temperature stability of the converter. The novelty of this method lies in the switching-mode converter, the use of additionally connected impedances in parallel to the shunt capacitances of the quartz crystal, and two inductances in series to the quartz crystal. This brings a considerable reduction of the temperature influence of AT-cut crystal frequency change in the temperature range between 10 and 40 °C. The oscillator switching method and the switching impedances connected to the quartz crystal do not only compensate for the crystal's natural temperature characteristics but also any other influences on the crystal such as ageing as well as from other oscillating circuit elements. In addition, the method also improves frequency sensitivity in inductance measurements. The experimental results show that through high temperature compensation improvement of the quartz crystal characteristics, this switching method theoretically enables a 2 pH resolution. It converts inductance to frequency in the range of 85–100 μH to 2–560 kHz. PMID:25325334

  5. High resolution switching mode inductance-to-frequency converter with temperature compensation.

    PubMed

    Matko, Vojko; Milanović, Miro

    2014-10-16

    This article proposes a novel method for the temperature-compensated inductance-to-frequency converter with a single quartz crystal oscillating in the switching oscillating circuit to achieve better temperature stability of the converter. The novelty of this method lies in the switching-mode converter, the use of additionally connected impedances in parallel to the shunt capacitances of the quartz crystal, and two inductances in series to the quartz crystal. This brings a considerable reduction of the temperature influence of AT-cut crystal frequency change in the temperature range between 10 and 40 °C. The oscillator switching method and the switching impedances connected to the quartz crystal do not only compensate for the crystal's natural temperature characteristics but also any other influences on the crystal such as ageing as well as from other oscillating circuit elements. In addition, the method also improves frequency sensitivity in inductance measurements. The experimental results show that through high temperature compensation improvement of the quartz crystal characteristics, this switching method theoretically enables a 2 pH resolution. It converts inductance to frequency in the range of 85-100 µH to 2-560 kHz.

  6. Validation of Broadly Filtered Diagonalization Method for Extracting Frequencies and Modes from High-Performance Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, T.M.; Cary, J.R.; Werner, G.R.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    Recent developments have shown that one can get around the difficulties of finding the eigenvalues and eigenmodes of the large systems studied with high performance computation by using broadly filtered diagonalization [G. R. Werner and J. R. Cary, J. Compo Phys. 227, 5200 (2008)]. This method can be used in conjunction with any time-domain computation, in particular those that scale very well up to 10000s of processors and beyond. Here we present results that show that this method accurately obtains both modes and frequencies of electromagnetic cavities, even when frequencies are nearly degenerate. The application was to a well-characterized Kaon separator cavity, the A15. The computations are shown to have a precision to a few parts in 10{sup 5}. Because the computed frequency differed from the measured frequency by more than this amount, a careful validation study to determine all sources of difference was undertaken. Ultimately, more precise measurements of the cavity showed that the computations were correct, with remaining differences accounted for by uncertainties in cavity dimensions and atmospheric and thermal conditions. Thus, not only was the method validated, but it was shown to have the ability to predict differences in cavity dimensions from fabrication specifications.

  7. Mission Assessment of the Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed inductive thrusters have typically been considered for future, high-power, missions requiring nuclear electric propulsion. These high-power systems, while promising equivalent or improved performance over state-of-the-art propulsion systems, presently have no planned missions for which they are well suited. The ability to efficiently operate an inductive thruster at lower energy and power levels may provide inductive thrusters near term applicability and mission pull. The Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge concept demonstrated potential for a high-efficiency, low-energy pulsed inductive thruster. The added benefits of energy recapture and/or pulse compression are shown to enhance the performance of the pulsed inductive propulsion system, yielding a system that con compete with and potentially outperform current state-of-the-art electric propulsion technologies. These enhancements lead to mission-level benefits associated with the use of a pulsed inductive thruster. Analyses of low-power near to mid-term missions and higher power far-term missions are undertaken to compare the performance of pulsed inductive thrusters with that delivered by state-of-the-art and development-level electric propulsion systems.

  8. Frequency response of laminated composite plates and shells with matrix cracks type of damage mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Aly A.

    The present study has been designed to tackle a new set of problems for structural composites, as these materials are finding new applications in civil engineering field. An attempt has been made to study the frequency response of laminated polymer composite plates and shallow shells containing matrix cracks type of damage with arbitrary support conditions and free vibratory motions. The shell governing equations are derived using a simplified shallow shell theory based on a first order shear deformation field. The continuum damage mechanics approach has been used to model the matrix cracks in a damaged region within the plates and shallow shells. In such approach, the damage is accounted for in the laminate constitutive equations by using a set of second order tensor internal state variables which are strain-like quantities. The simplified damage model was then used to study the changes in frequency response of laminated composite plates and shallow cylindrical shells. The Ritz method and a finite element method have been proposed and developed as approximate solution procedures to quantify the change in the free vibration frequencies due to matrix cracks type of damage under both material as well as geometrical variables such as size, shape and extent of damage, degree of curvature, ratio of orthotropy, thickness ratio as well as support conditions. The analysis of various plates and shells with a centrally located damaged-zone depicts a typical trend of reduction in the vibration frequencies. This reduction is more pronounced for higher frequency modes and it shows greater sensitivity toward the size of the damaged region and density of cracks. The results also show that the changes in the frequency, especially for the fundamental mode, appear to be less sensitive to the shell boundary conditions as well as small values of curvature. The investigation of various undamaged plates and shallow shells demonstrates the importance of a first-order shear deformation

  9. One dimensional full wave analysis of slow-to-fast mode conversion in lower hybrid frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe

    2014-12-15

    The linear conversion from the slow wave to the fast wave in the lower hybrid range of frequencies is analyzed numerically by using the set of field equations describing waves in a cold plane-stratified plasma. The equations are solved as a two-point boundary value problem, where the polarizations of each mode are set consistently in the boundary conditions. The scattering coefficients and the field patterns are obtained for various density profiles. It is shown that, for large density scale length, the results agree well with the traditional cognitions. In contrast, the reflected component and the probable transmitted-converted component from the conversion region, which are neglected in the usual calculations, become significant when the scale length is smaller than the wavelength of the mode. The inclusion of these new components will improve the accuracy of the simulated propagation and deposition for the injected rf power when the conversion process is involved within a sharp-varying density profile. Meanwhile, the accessibility of the incident slow wave for the low frequency case is also affected by the scale length of the density profile.

  10. TeraSCREEN: multi-frequency multi-mode Terahertz screening for border checks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Naomi E.; Alderman, Byron; Allona, Fernando; Frijlink, Peter; Gonzalo, Ramón; Hägelen, Manfred; Ibáñez, Asier; Krozer, Viktor; Langford, Marian L.; Limiti, Ernesto; Platt, Duncan; Schikora, Marek; Wang, Hui; Weber, Marc Andree

    2014-06-01

    The challenge for any security screening system is to identify potentially harmful objects such as weapons and explosives concealed under clothing. Classical border and security checkpoints are no longer capable of fulfilling the demands of today's ever growing security requirements, especially with respect to the high throughput generally required which entails a high detection rate of threat material and a low false alarm rate. TeraSCREEN proposes to develop an innovative concept of multi-frequency multi-mode Terahertz and millimeter-wave detection with new automatic detection and classification functionalities. The system developed will demonstrate, at a live control point, the safe automatic detection and classification of objects concealed under clothing, whilst respecting privacy and increasing current throughput rates. This innovative screening system will combine multi-frequency, multi-mode images taken by passive and active subsystems which will scan the subjects and obtain complementary spatial and spectral information, thus allowing for automatic threat recognition. The TeraSCREEN project, which will run from 2013 to 2016, has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme under the Security Call. This paper will describe the project objectives and approach.

  11. High-Frequency Electrostatic Wave Generation and Transverse Ion Acceleration by Low Alfvenic Wave Components of BBELF Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Mukhter, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Satellite observations in the auroral plasma have revealed that extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play a dominant role in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral plasma. The electromagnetic components of the ELF (EMELF) waves are the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves below the cyclotron frequency of the lightest ion species in a multi-ion plasma. Shear Alfv6n waves (SAWS) constitute the lowest frequency components of the ELF waves below the ion cyclotron frequency of the heaviest ion. The -2 mechanism for the transfer of energy from such EMELF waves to ions affecting transverse ion heating still remains a matter of debate. A very ubiquitous fe8ture of ELF waves now observed in several rocket and satellite experiments is that they occur in conjunction with high-frequency electrostatic waves. The frequency spectrum of the composite wave turbulence extends from the low frequency of the Alfvenic waves to the high frequency of proton plasma frequency and/or the lower hybrid frequency. The spectrum does not show any feature organized by the ion cyclotron frequencies and their harmonics. Such broadband waves consisting of both the EM and ES waves are now popularly referred as BBELF waves. We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in-cell simulations showing that the ES components are directly generated by cross- field plasma instabilities driven by the drifts of the ions and electrons in the EM component of the BBELF waves.

  12. Two-frequency mode-locked lasing in a monoblock diode-pumped Nd{sup 3+}:GGG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baburin, N V; Galagan, B I; Danileiko, Yu K; Chikov, V A; Il'ichev, Nikolai N; Masalov, Anatolii V; Molchanov, V Ya

    2001-04-30

    The locking of two mutually orthogonal polarisation modes of a diode-pumped cw Nd{sup 3+}:GGG laser is experimentally demonstrated. The mode locking is accomplished with a radio signal at the intermode beat frequency. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Synthesize Modes and Correlate

    2005-10-01

    SMAC is an automated experimental modal parameter extraction package which determines the natural frequencies of vibration, viscous damping ratios and mode shapes from experimental accelerance frequency response functions (FRFs). It is written in the MATLAB interpretive matrix language and has a graphical user interface.

  14. A study of trapped mode resonances in asymmetric X-shape resonator for frequency selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejian; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yiqi; Zhu, Yiming

    2013-08-01

    FSS is a two-dimensional periodic array of resonating metallic-dielectric structures, When FSS device steps into Terahertz range from microwave range, it is studied as THz functional components (such as Terahertz filter, Terahertz biochemical sensor, etc.) to promote the functionality of the THz spectroscopy/imaging system. When the device requires a narrow band transmission window for frequency selecting or a high electric field concentration in certain area to improve its sensitivity for sensing, normally, a high quality (Q) resonant structure can give helps. Recently, high-Q resonance induced by trapped mode resonance i studied widely in FSS research areas. To induce trapped mode resonance, one can simply break the symmetric of the unit structure of FSS. In this paper, several asymmetric X-shaped resonators for FSS working in terahertz range have been studied numerically. To compare the behaviour of X-shape resonator under different conditions (with additional part: Heart lines, Shoulder lines, Wrap or Shoes squares), a common platform (θ=60, θis angle of X shape) which is suitable for most of cases was used to make the study more meaningful. As the field enhancement behaviour is related to the trapped mode introduced by the asymmetric structure, we propose such kind of device to be used as a high quality filter or as a sensing element for biochemical samples.

  15. Explaining the absence of high-frequency relaxation modes of polymers in dilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha Dalal, Indranil; Larson, Ronald

    2013-03-01

    Using multi-scale modeling, including Molecular Dynamics and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, we explain the long-mysterious absence of high frequency modes in the dynamics of isolated polymer chains in good solvents, reported years ago by Schrag and coworkers. The relaxation spectrum we obtain for a chain of 30 monomers at atomistic resolution is, remarkably, a single exponential while that of a chain of 100 monomers is fit by only two modes. This result is surprising in view of the many relaxation modes present in melts of such chains, but agrees perfectly with experimental observations (Peterson et al. J. Polym. Sci.: Part B 2001). We also performed BD simulations in which the explicit solvent molecules are replaced by a viscous continuum. Although the local dynamics is suppressed with the addition of bending, torsion, side groups and excluded volume interactions (as suggested in Jain and Larson, Macromolecules 2008), none of the BD simulations predict a single exponential relaxation for a short chain. Our results indicate that the chain dynamics at small length scales (down to a few Kuhn steps) is significantly different from the predictions of models based on a continuum solvent, and finally help explain the experimental results of Schrag and coworkers.

  16. Oblique Bernstein Mode Generation Near the Upper-hybrid Frequency in Solar Pre-flare Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryshtal, A.; Fedun, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Voitsekhovska, A.

    2015-11-01

    We study analytically the generation process of the first harmonics of the pure electron weakly oblique Bernstein modes. This mode can appear as a result of the rise and development of a corresponding instability in a solar active region. We assume that this wave mode is modified by the influence of pair Coulomb collisions and a weak large-scale sub-Dreicer electric field in the pre-flare chromosphere near the footpoints of a flare loop. To describe the pre-flare plasma we used the model of the solar atmosphere developed by Fontenla, Avrett, and Loeser ( Astrophys. J. 406, 319, 1993). We show that the generated first harmonic is close to the upper-hybrid frequency. This generation process begins at the very low threshold values of the sub-Dreicer electric field and well before the beginning of the preheating phase of a flare. We investigate the necessary conditions for the existence of non-damped first harmonics of oblique Bernstein waves with small amplitudes in the flare area.

  17. Effects of density stratification on the frequencies of the inertial-gravity modes of the Earth's fluid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Mahmoud, B.; Moradi, A.; Kamruzzaman, M.; Naseri, H.

    2015-08-01

    The Earth's outer core is a rotating ellipsoidal shell of compressible, stratified and self-gravitating fluid. As such, in the treatment of geophysical problems a realistic model of this body needs to be considered. In this work, we consider compressible and stratified fluid core models with different stratification parameters, related to the local Brunt-Väisälä frequency, in order to study the effects of the core's density stratification on the frequencies of some of the inertial-gravity modes of this body. The inertial-gravity modes of the core are free oscillations with periods longer than 12 hr. Historically, an incompressible and homogeneous fluid is considered to study these modes and analytical solutions are known for the frequencies and the displacement eigenfunctions of a spherical model. We show that for a compressible and stratified spherical core model the effects of non-neutral density stratification may be significant, and the frequencies of these modes may change from model to model. For example, for a spherical core model the frequency of the spin-over mode, the (2, 1, 1) mode, is unaffected while that of the (4, 1, 1) mode is changed from -0.410 for the Poincaré core model to -0.434, -0.447 and -0.483 for core models with the stability parameter β = -0.001, -0.002 and -0.005, respectively, a maximum change of about 18 per cent when β = -0.005. Our results also show that for small stratification parameter, |β| ≤ 0.005, the frequency of an inertial-gravity mode is a nearly linear function of β but the slope of the line is different for different modes, and that the effects of density stratification on the frequency of a mode is likely related to its spatial structure, which remains the same in different Earth models. We also compute the frequencies of some of the modes of the `PREM' (spherical shell) core model and show that the frequencies of these modes may also be significantly affected by non-zero β.

  18. Frequencies of the geodesic acoustic mode and Alfvén gap modes in high-q{sup 2}β plasmas with non-circular cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Fesenyuk, O. P.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.

    2013-12-15

    This work generalizes recent results [O. P. Fesenyuk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085014 (2012)] to plasmas with elongated cross section. It suggests new expressions for the frequencies of the geodesic acoustic mode and Alfvén gap modes in tokamaks, with a large ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure and a large safety factor (q≫1, which takes place in discharges with reversed-shear configuration and, especially, in hollow-current discharges)

  19. Investigations of the Low Frequency Modes of Ferric Cytochrome c Using Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ∼44 cm–1 that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ∼421–435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ∼55 and 30 cm–1. The intensity of the mode near 44 cm–1 appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421–435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm–1 is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d6 configuration. PMID:24823442

  20. A third-order mode high frequency biosensor with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xiao; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Ye, Tian-Xiang; Guo, Cang-Ran; Yi, Li-Ting; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Liu, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-09-15

    An atomic resolution ultra-high sensitivity surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor for DNA sequences and cells detection is proposed. Interdigitated transducers (IDTs) fabricated on LiNbO3 substrate achieve a high quality factor (Q) of over 4000 at a frequency of 6.4 GHz (third-order harmonic mode) using an optimized design and process. The biosensor shows excellent linear responses to target DNA in the range from 1 μg/ml to 1 ng/ml with a high sensitivity of 6.7 × 10(-16)g/cm(2)/Hz, hence the difference of a single hybridized DNA base can also be distinguished. With such a high mass resolution, the biosensor is capable of quantitative detection of living cancer cells. The frequency responses of single mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (EMT6) cell and mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell are studied. The interferences in the experiments show insignificant influence on the frequency shift, which verifies the high selectivity of the biosensor. The biosensor is also able to repeat the sensing ability after rough cleaning, therefore cost reduction is achieved from the recycling process in practical applications. The detection limit is defined from the noise analysis of the device, atomic resolution is realized according to the calculation, thereby initiating a potential tool for high-precision medical diagnoses and phenomena observation at the atomic-level.

  1. Improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator for burst-mode continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wen-Chao; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Bai, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A data-aided technique for carrier frequency offset estimation with continuous phase modulation (CPM) in burst-mode transmission is presented. The proposed technique first exploits a special pilot sequence, or training sequence, to form a sinusoidal waveform. Then, an improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator is introduced to determine the frequency offset using the sinusoid. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that our estimator is noteworthy in the following aspects. First, the estimator can operate independently of timing recovery. Second, it has relatively low outlier, i.e., the minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to guarantee estimation accuracy. Finally, the most important property is that our estimator is complexity-reduced compared to the existing dichotomous search methods: it eliminates the need for fast Fourier transform (FFT) and modulation removal, and exhibits faster convergence rate without accuracy degradation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301179), the Doctorial Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. 20110203110011), and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B08038).

  2. Search for solar normal modes in low-frequency seismic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Ross C.

    We use seismic array processing methods to attempt to enhance very low frequency harmonic signals (0-400 microhertz, also ?Hz or uHz) recorded on broadband seismic arrays. Since the discovery of this phenomenon in the 1990s, harmonic signals at these very low frequencies have come to be known as the Earth's "hum." A number of hypotheses have been suggested for the Earth's hum, including forcing by atmospheric turbulence, ocean waves, and, most recently, the Sun. We test the solar hypothesis by searching for statistically significant harmonic lines that correlate with independently observed solar free oscillations. The solar model assumes that free oscillations of the sun modulate the solar wind, producing pure harmonic components of Earth's magnetic field that are postulated to couple to the ground by electromagnetic induction. In this thesis we search the multitaper spectrum of stacks of seismic instruments for solar normal frequencies. We use a median stack instead of the more conventional mean because a more robust estimate of center is required for these low signal-to-noise data with occasional transients. A key advantage of a stack is that data gaps are easily ignored when computing the beam. Results from a stack of 18 Transportable Array stations show multiple possible g-mode detections at the 95-99% confidence level. We are presently applying this method to data from the Homestake Mine array, and may also do so with data from a broadband borehole array currently operating at Pinon Flats, California.

  3. Acceleration of Magnetospheric Relativistic Electrons by Ultra-Low Frequency Waves: A Comparison between Two Cases Observed by Cluster and LANL Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, X.; Fung, S. F.; Tan, L. C.; Sharma, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin and acceleration of magnetospheric relativistic electrons (MREs) in the Earth's radiation belt during geomagnetic storms is an important subject and yet one of outstanding questions in space physics. It has been statistically suggested that during geomagnetic storms, ultra-low-frequency (ULF) Pc-5 wave activities in the magnetosphere are correlated with order of magnitude increase of MRE fluxes in the outer radiation belt. Yet, physical and observational understandings of resonant interactions between ULF waves and MREs remain minimum. In this paper, we show two events during storms on September 25, 2001 and November 25, 2001, the solar wind speeds in both cases were > 500 km/s while Cluster observations indicate presence of strong ULF waves in the magnetosphere at noon and dusk, respectively, during a approx. 3-hour period. MRE observations by the Los Alamos (LANL) spacecraft show a quadrupling of 1.1-1.5 MeV electron fluxes in the September 25, 2001 event, but only a negligible increase in the November 2.5, 2001 event. We present a detailed comparison between these two events. Our results suggest that the effectiveness of MRE acceleration during the September 25, 2001 event can be attributed to the compressional wave mode with strong ULF wave activities and the physical origin of MRE acceleration depends more on the distribution of toroidal and poloidal ULF waves in the outer radiation belt.

  4. Mode sequence, frequency change of nonsoft phonons, and LO-TO splitting in strained tetragonal BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeliarijaona, Aldo; Fu, Huaxiang

    2015-09-01

    Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy revealed the existence of an unusual large-frequency shift occurring to a nonsoft mode of E (TO4 ) when BaTiO3 is strained to a SrTiO3 substrate [D. Tenne et al., Science 313, 1614 (2006), 10.1126/science.1130306]. It raised two interesting questions: (i) whether there are other nonsoft modes that possess similar or even larger strain-induced frequency shifts and (ii) how the mode sequence is altered by these shifts in frequency. Note that mode sequence is also pivotal in correctly indexing and assigning the spectroscopy peaks observed in all Raman experiments. By mapping out the evolutions of individual phonon modes as a function of strain using first-principles density functional perturbation calculations, we determine the mode sequence and strain-induced phonon frequency shifts in prototypical BaTiO3. Our study reveals that the mode sequence is drastically different when BaTiO3 is strained to SrTiO3 compared to that in the unstrained structure, caused by multiple mode crossings. Furthermore, we predict that three other nonsoft modes, A1(TO2), E (LO4 ), and A1(TO3), display even larger strain-induced frequency shifts than E (TO4 ). The strain responses of individual modes are found to be highly mode specific, and a mechanism that regulates the magnitude of the frequency shift is provided. As another key outcome of this study, we tackle a long-standing problem of LO-TO splitting in ferroelectrics. A rigorous definition for the LO-TO splitting is formulated, which allows this critical quantity to be calculated quantitatively. The definition immediately reveals a new finding; that is, a large LO-TO splitting not only exists for E (LO4 ), which is previously known and originates from a soft mode, it also occurs for a nonsoft A1(LO3) mode. The LO-TO splitting is shown to decrease drastically with compressive strain, and this decrease cannot be explained by the Born effective charges and high-frequency dielectric constants.

  5. Fabrication, optimization, and characterization of monolithic semiconductor mode-locked lasers and colliding, pulse mode-locked lasers at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, Marco; Sorel, Marc; Laybourn, Peter J.; Giuliani, Guido; Donati, Silvano

    2004-09-01

    This work reports on the fabrication, optimisation and characterisation of monolithic mode-locked lasers (MLLs) and colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) lasers with repetition rate in the range 10-60 GHz. The devices consist of double section split-contact ridge waveguide lasers fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well (DQW) material. For CPM devices, the saturable absorber section was fabricated with a coplanar ground-signal-ground (G-S-G) pad structure. The optimum saturable absorber size for efficient mode-locking is found experimentally. The fabricated devices are characterised in terms of operating regimes (Continuous Wave, Self-Pulsation, Mode-Locking) and the mode-locking signals were observed in the frequency domain using an external fast photodiode. In the case of CPM devices a mm-wave signal could also be extracted directly from the saturable absorber section of the laser using a microwave probe.

  6. Comparison Study of Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet Systems for an Accelerator Using Cost-Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C

    2004-02-19

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be one-of-a-kind facilities, and to meet their luminosity goals they must have guaranteed availability over their several decade lifetimes. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is one viable option for a 1 TeV electron-positron linear collider, it has an 85% overall availability goal. We previously showed how a traditional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of a SLAC electromagnet leads to reliability-enhancing design changes. Traditional FMEA identifies failure modes with high risk but does not consider the consequences in terms of cost, which could lead to unnecessarily expensive components. We have used a new methodology, ''Life Cost-Based FMEA'', which measures risk of failure in terms of cost, in order to evaluate and compare two different technologies that might be used for the 8653 NLC magnets: electromagnets or permanent magnets. The availabilities for the two different types of magnet systems have been estimated using empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus expert opinion on permanent magnet failure modes and industry standard failure data. Labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are predicted using a Monte Carlo simulation of all possible magnet failures over a 30-year lifetime. Our goal is to maximize up-time of the NLC through magnet design improvements and the optimal combination of electromagnets and permanent magnets, while reducing magnet system lifecycle costs.

  7. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures (˜140 °C) the discharge transitions from "ring mode" to "red mode," which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from "good emission" for optical pumping to "poor emission." Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  8. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  9. Use of Time-Frequency Analysis and Neural Networks for Mode Identification in a Wireless Software-Defined Radio Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandetto, Matteo; Guainazzo, Marco; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    2004-12-01

    The use of time-frequency distributions is proposed as a nonlinear signal processing technique that is combined with a pattern recognition approach to identify superimposed transmission modes in a reconfigurable wireless terminal based on software-defined radio techniques. In particular, a software-defined radio receiver is described aiming at the identification of two coexistent communication modes: frequency hopping code division multiple access and direct sequence code division multiple access. As a case study, two standards, based on the previous modes and operating in the same band (industrial, scientific, and medical), are considered: IEEE WLAN 802.11b (direct sequence) and Bluetooth (frequency hopping). Neural classifiers are used to obtain identification results. A comparison between two different neural classifiers is made in terms of relative error frequency.

  10. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics in accelerator physics: radio frequency pulse compression and power transport; computational methods for the computer analysis of microwave components; persistent wakefields associated with waveguide damping of higher order modes; and photonic band gap cavities.

  11. 1540-nm single frequency single-mode pulsed all fiber laser for coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Diao, Weifeng; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A single-mode single frequency eye-safe pulsed all fiber laser based on master oscillator power amplification structure is presented. This laser is composed of a narrow linewidth distributed laser diode seed laser and two-stage cascade amplifiers. 0.8 m longitudinally gradient strained erbium/ytterbium co-doped polarization-maintaining fiber with a core diameter of 10 μm is used as the gain fiber and two acoustic-optics modulators are adopted to enhance pulse extinction ratio. A peak power of 160 W and a pulse width of 200 ns at 10 kHz repetition rate are achieved with transform-limited linewidth and diffraction-limited beam quality. This laser will be employed in a compact short range coherent Doppler wind lidar.

  12. Temperature coefficient of frequency modeling for CMOS-MEMS bulk mode composite resonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siping; Chen, Wen-Chien; Bahr, Bichoy; Fang, Weileun; Li, Sheng-Shian; Weinstein, Dana

    2015-06-01

    CMOS-MEMS resonators, which are promising building blocks for achieving monolithic integration of MEMS structure, can be used for timing and filtering applications, and control circuitry. SiO2 has been used to make MEMS resonators with quality factor Q > 10(4), but temperature instability remains a major challenge. In this paper, a design that uses an embedded metal block for temperature compensation is proposed and shows sub-ppm temperature stability (-0.21 ppm/K). A comprehensive analytical model is derived and applied to analyze and optimize the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the CMOS-MEMS composite material resonator. Comparison with finite element method simulation demonstrates good accuracy. The model can also be applied to predict and analyze the TCF of MEMS resonators with arbitrary mode shape, and its integration with simulation packages enables interactive and efficient design process.

  13. Intra-cavity frequency-doubled mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 325 nm.

    PubMed

    Bek, Roman; Baumgärtner, Stefan; Sauter, Fabian; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We present a passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser (SDL) emitting at 650nm with intra-cavity second harmonic generation to the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure contain InP quantum dots (QDs) as active material. In a v-shaped cavity using the semiconductor samples as end mirrors, a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed in front of the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) for pulsed UV laser emission in one of the two outcoupled beams. Autocorrelation (AC) measurements at the fundamental wavelength reveal a FWHM pulse duration of 1.22ps. With a repetition frequency of 836MHz, the average output power is 10mW per beam for the red emission and 0.5mW at 325nm.

  14. Mode selection and frequency tuning by injection in pulsed TEA-CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Menzies, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model characterizing pulsed-TEA-CO2-laser injection locking by tunable CW-laser radiation is presented and used to explore the requirements for SLM pulse generation. Photon-density-rate equations describing the laser mechanism are analyzed in terms of the mode competition between photon densities emitted at two frequencies. The expression derived for pulsed dye lasers is extended to homogeneously broadened CO2 lasers, and locking time is defined as a function of laser parameters. The extent to which injected radiation can be detuned from the CO2 line center and continue to produce SLM pulses is investigated experimentally in terms of the analytical framework. The dependence of locking time on the detuning/pressure-broadened-halfwidth ratio is seen as important for spectroscopic applications requiring tuning within the TEA-laser line-gain bandwidth.

  15. Optical sum-frequency generation in a whispering-gallery-mode resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Kowligy, Abijith S.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Kumar, Prem

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate sum-frequency generation between a telecom wavelength and the Rb D2 line, achieved through natural phase matching in a nonlinear whispering gallery mode resonator. Due to the strong optical field confinement and ultra high Q of the cavity, the process saturates already at sub-mW pump peak power, at least two orders of magnitude lower than in existing waveguide-based devices. The experimental data are in agreement with the nonlinear dynamics and phase matching theory based on spherical geometry. Our experimental and theoretical results point toward a new platform for manipulating the color and quantum states of light waves for applications such as atomic memory based quantum networking and logic operations with optical signals.

  16. Computational study of ion cyclotron frequency stabilization of the m = 1 interchange mode in mirror geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Francis, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    A cylindrical plasma model is used to study the stabilizing effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF) waves on the m = 1 magnetohydrodynamic interchange mode. The fast wave eigenmodes of the column and the near-field antenna pattern are calculated numerically for a diffuse plasma profile when ..omega..>..cap omega../sub i/. The resulting ponderomotive force and sideband contributions to global interchange stability are then determined using a rigid shift trial function. For far-field stabilization it is verified that the direct ponderomotive and sideband contributions cancel exactly as the conducting wall supporting the fast wave eigenmode moves out to infinity. The near-field stabilization effect is related numerically to the driven k/sub parallel/ spectrum of the waves and their radial profiles. The numerical model is employed to calculate threshold ICRF wave amplitudes for the stabilization experiments in the Phaedrus tandem mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. 51, 1955 (1983)).

  17. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  19. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  20. Cavity mode frequencies and strong optomechanical coupling in two-membrane cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Xuereb, André; Malossi, Nicola; Vitali, David

    2016-08-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Pérot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes. We derive the equations for the mode resonances and provide approximate analytical solutions for them as a function of the membrane positions, which act as an excellent approximation when the relative and center-of-mass position of the two membranes are much smaller than the cavity length. With these analytical solutions, one finds that extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion can be achieved in the limit of highly reflective membranes when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by them. We also study the cavity finesse of the system and verify that, under the conditions of large coupling, it is not appreciably affected by the presence of the two membranes. The achievable large values of the ratio between the optomechanical coupling and the cavity decay rate, g/κ , make this two-membrane system the simplest promising platform for implementing cavity optomechanics in the strong coupling regime.

  1. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  2. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Dohlus, M.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.; Vogt, M.

    2011-09-07

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak accelerating electric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.

  3. Reliability and Failure Modes of Solid-State Lighting Electrical Drivers Subjected to Accelerated Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Sakalaukus, Peter; Davis, Lynn

    2015-02-19

    An investigation of an off-the-shelf solid-state lighting device with the primary focus on the accompanied light-emitting diode (LED) electrical driver (ED) has been conducted. A set of 10 EDs were exposed to temperature humidity life testing of 85% RH and 85 C (85/85) without an electrical bias per the JEDEC standard JESD22-A101C in order to accelerate the ingress of moisture into the aluminum electrolytic capacitor (AEC) and the EDs in order to assess the reliability of the LED drivers for harsh environment applications. The capacitance and equivalent series resistance for each AEC inside the ED were measured using a handheld LCR meter as possible leading indications of failure. The photometric quantities of a single pristine light engine were monitored in order to investigate the interaction between the light engine and the EDs. These parameters were used in assessing the overall reliability of the EDs. In addition, a comparative analysis has been conducted between the 85/85 accelerated test data and a previously published high-temperature storage life accelerated test of 135°C. The results of the 85/85 acceleration test and the comparative analysis are presented in this paper.

  4. Reliability and Failure Modes of Solid-State Lighting Electrical Drivers Subjected to Accelerated Aging

    DOE PAGES

    Lall, Pradeep; Sakalaukus, Peter; Davis, Lynn

    2015-02-19

    An investigation of an off-the-shelf solid-state lighting device with the primary focus on the accompanied light-emitting diode (LED) electrical driver (ED) has been conducted. A set of 10 EDs were exposed to temperature humidity life testing of 85% RH and 85 C (85/85) without an electrical bias per the JEDEC standard JESD22-A101C in order to accelerate the ingress of moisture into the aluminum electrolytic capacitor (AEC) and the EDs in order to assess the reliability of the LED drivers for harsh environment applications. The capacitance and equivalent series resistance for each AEC inside the ED were measured using a handheldmore » LCR meter as possible leading indications of failure. The photometric quantities of a single pristine light engine were monitored in order to investigate the interaction between the light engine and the EDs. These parameters were used in assessing the overall reliability of the EDs. In addition, a comparative analysis has been conducted between the 85/85 accelerated test data and a previously published high-temperature storage life accelerated test of 135°C. The results of the 85/85 acceleration test and the comparative analysis are presented in this paper.« less

  5. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3-3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10-1 to 101 W cm-3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  6. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  7. Developments of frequency comb microwave reflectometer for the interchange mode observations in LHD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, R.; Tokuzawa, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamada, I.; Inagaki, S.; Kasuya, N.

    2016-02-01

    We have upgraded the multi-channel microwave reflectometer system which uses a frequency comb as a source and measure the distribution of the density fluctuation caused by magneto-hydro dynamics instability. The previous multi-channel system was composed of the Ka-band, and the U-band system has been developed. Currently, the U-band system has eight frequency channels, which are 43.0, 45.0, 47.0, 49.0, 51.0, 53.0, 55.0, and 57.0 GHz, in U-band. Before the installation to the Large Helical Device (LHD), several tests for understanding the system characteristics, which are the phase responsibility, the linearity of output signal, and others, have been carried out. The in situ calibration in LHD has been done for the cross reference. In the neutral beam injected plasma experiments, we can observe the density fluctuation of the interchange mode and obtain the radial distribution of fluctuation amplitude.

  8. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-09-01

    Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the -dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. These dielectric changes can produce large rapid changes in the resonant frequency, the reflectivity, and the power density of the cavity. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a RF signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the electric field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a constant absorbed power in a fiber tow, which is important for controlling the tow heating and temperature. This paper describes the design and testing of feedback controller with mullite rods in a single-mode TE{sub 10n} resonator driven by a commercial TWT.

  9. Ribbon thickness dependence of the Magnetic Alloy core characteristics in the accelerating frequency region of the J-PARC synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, M.; Shimada, T.; Tamura, F.; Yamamoto, M.; Hara, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Ohmori, C.; Takata, K.; Toda, M.; Yoshii, M.; Schnase, A.

    2014-06-01

    We employ Magnetic Alloy (MA) core loaded RF cavities for the J-PARC synchrotrons to achieve a high field gradient. The MA core has a laminated structure of 18 μm thick ribbon layers. We have been developing high shunt impedance MA cores to prepare for an increase of beam power. At low frequencies, it is well known that the eddy current loss in the ribbon is proportional to the square of the ribbon thickness. The MA core shunt impedance can be increased by using thinner ribbons. On the other hand, at high frequencies, the MA core magnetic characteristics are largely different from low frequencies. Using thinner ribbons might be effective to increase the MA core shunt impedance in the accelerating frequency region of the J-PARC synchrotrons. We reviewed the theoretical calculations of the ribbon thickness dependence of the MA core magnetic characteristics and we derived the ribbon thickness dependence from measured data. The measured data show that the MA core shunt impedance is inversely proportional to the ribbon thickness in the accelerating frequency region of the J-PARC synchrotrons, which is consistent with our calculations.

  10. Raman scattering studies of the low-frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water—observation of an axial torsion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, K. T.; Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2006-11-01

    Low-wavenumber (<=20 cm-1) acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The dominant acoustic vibrational mode has been found to be at 8.5 cm-1. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low-frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly.

  11. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations.

    PubMed

    Ramaprabhu, P; Karkhanis, V; Banerjee, R; Varshochi, H; Khan, M; Lawrie, A G W

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g(t)∼t^{n}, with n≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009)10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g(t) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s^{2}, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids-at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s^{2} and Z, while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models. PMID:26871165

  12. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, P.; Karkhanis, V.; Banerjee, R.; Varshochi, H.; Khan, M.; Lawrie, A. G. W.

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g (t ) ˜tn , with n ≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g (t ) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s2, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids—at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s2 and Z , while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models.

  13. Evolution of the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability under the influence of time-dependent accelerations.

    PubMed

    Ramaprabhu, P; Karkhanis, V; Banerjee, R; Varshochi, H; Khan, M; Lawrie, A G W

    2016-01-01

    From nonlinear models and direct numerical simulations we report on several findings of relevance to the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by time-varying acceleration histories. The incompressible, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) were performed in two (2D) and three dimensions (3D), and at a range of density ratios of the fluid combinations (characterized by the Atwood number). We investigated several acceleration histories, including acceleration profiles of the general form g(t)∼t^{n}, with n≥0 and acceleration histories reminiscent of the linear electric motor experiments. For the 2D flow, results from numerical simulations compare well with a 2D potential flow model and solutions to a drag-buoyancy model reported as part of this work. When the simulations are extended to three dimensions, bubble and spike growth rates are in agreement with the so-called level 2 and level 3 models of Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 79, 065303(R) (2009)10.1103/PhysRevE.79.065303], and with corresponding 3D drag-buoyancy model solutions derived in this article. Our generalization of the RT problem to study variable g(t) affords us the opportunity to investigate the appropriate scaling for bubble and spike amplitudes under these conditions. We consider two candidates, the displacement Z and width s^{2}, but find the appropriate scaling is dependent on the density ratios between the fluids-at low density ratios, bubble and spike amplitudes are explained by both s^{2} and Z, while at large density differences the displacement collapses the spike data. Finally, for all the acceleration profiles studied here, spikes enter a free-fall regime at lower Atwood numbers than predicted by all the models.

  14. Absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser using a selected single mode from a femtosecond fiber laser comb.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Young; Lee, Sung Hun; Lee, Won Kyu; Moon, Han Seb; Suh, Ho Suhng

    2008-03-01

    We performed an absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser utilizing a femtosecond injection locking technique that can select one component among the fiber laser comb modes. The injection locking scheme has all the fiber configurations. Femtosecond comb lines of 250 MHz spacing based on the fiber femtosecond laser were used for injection locking of a distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating at 1542 nm as a frequency reference. The comb injected DFB laser serves as a selection filter of optical comb modes and an amplifier for amplification of the selected mode. The DFB laser injection locked to the desired comb mode was used to evaluate the frequency stability and absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser. The frequency stability of the acetylene stabilized laser was measured to be 1.1 x 10(-12) for a 1 s averaging time, improving to 6.9 x 10(-14) after 512 s. The absolute frequency of the laser stabilized on the P(16) transition of (13)C(2)H(2) was measured to be 194 369 569 385.7 kHz.

  15. Dependence of vestibular reactions on frequency of action of sign-variable accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapayev, E. V.; Vorobyev, O. A.; Ivanov, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It was revealed that during the tests with continuous action of sign variable Coriolis acceleration the development of kinetosis was proportionate to the time of head inclinations in the range of 1 to 4 seconds while illusions of rocking in sagittal plane was more expressed in fast inclinations. The obtained data provided the evidence of sufficient dependence of vestibulovegetative and vestibulosensory reactions on the period of repetition of sign variable Coriolis acceleration.

  16. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, Hanond Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2014-09-15

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  17. Magnetic field dependence of the lowest-frequency edge-localized spin wave mode in a magnetic nanotriangle.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Lim, H S; Wang, Z K; Ng, S C; Kuok, M H; Adeyeye, A O

    2011-03-01

    An understanding of the spin dynamics of nanoscale magnetic elements is important for their applications in magnetic sensing and storage. Inhomogeneity of the demagnetizing field in a non-ellipsoidal magnetic element results in localization of spin waves near the edge of the element. However, relative little work has been carried out to investigate the effect of the applied magnetic fields on the nature of such localized modes. In this study, micromagnetic simulations are performed on an equilateral triangular nanomagnet to investigate the magnetic field dependence of the mode profiles of the lowest-frequency spin wave. Our findings reveal that the lowest-frequency mode is localized at the base edge of the equilateral triangle. The characteristics of its mode profile change with the ground state magnetization configuration of the nanotriangle, which, in turn, depends on the magnitude of the in-plane applied magnetic field.

  18. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    McFerran, J. J.

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for echelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of {approx}8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested.

  19. Dual mode cobaloxime crystals: Acceleration of trans-cis photochromic reaction rate by photoisomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akiko

    2016-08-01

    Our recent results on the photochromic reactions in dual mode cobaloxime crystals containing azobenzene derivatives are briefly reviewed. This work represents the first step toward the design of functional materials which can be controlled by two independent external stimuli, one by visible light and the other by UV radiation.

  20. Nonlinear local parallel acceleration of electrons through Landau trapping by oblique whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Artemyev, Anton; Mourenas, Didier; Mozer, Forrest; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B are analyzed to identify long-lasting (more than 6 h) signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. Such Landau resonant interactions result in the trapping of ˜1-10 keV electrons and their acceleration up to 100-300 keV. This kind of process becomes important for oblique whistler mode waves having a significant electric field component along the background magnetic field. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. We demonstrate that the electron energy corresponding to the observed plateau remains in very good agreement with the energy required for Landau resonant interaction with the simultaneously measured oblique chorus waves over 6 h and a wide range of L shells (from 4 to 6) in the outer belt. The efficient parallel acceleration modifies electron pitch angle distributions at energies ˜50-200 keV, allowing us to distinguish the energized population. The observed energy range and the density of accelerated electrons are in reasonable agreement with test particle numerical simulations.

  1. Optical frequency-domain chromatic dispersion measurement method for higher-order modes in an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Jung; Jung, Yongmin; Oh, Kyunghwan; Kim, Dug Young

    2005-12-12

    We propose a new chromatic dispersion measurement method for the higher-order modes of an optical fiber using optical frequency modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry. An optical fiber which supports few excited modes was prepared for our experiments. Three different guiding modes of the fiber were identified by using far-field spatial beam profile measurements and confirmed with numerical mode analysis. By using the principle of a conventional FMWC interferometry with a tunable external cavity laser, we have demonstrated that the chromatic dispersion of a few-mode optical fiber can be obtained directly and quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have also compared our measurement results with those of conventional modulation phase-shift method. PMID:19503215

  2. Entanglement and nonclassicality in four-mode Gaussian states generated via parametric down-conversion and frequency up-conversion

    PubMed Central

    Arkhipov, Ievgen I.; Peřina Jr., Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Multipartite entanglement and nonclassicality of four-mode Gaussian states generated in two simultaneous nonlinear processes involving parametric down-conversion and frequency up-conversion are analyzed assuming the vacuum as the initial state. Suitable conditions for the generation of highly entangled states are found. Transfer of the entanglement from the down-converted modes into the up-converted ones is also suggested. The analysis of the whole set of states reveals that sub-shot-noise intensity correlations between the equally-populated down-converted modes, as well as the equally-populated up-converted modes, uniquely identify entangled states. They represent a powerful entanglement identifier also in other cases with arbitrarily populated modes. PMID:27658508

  3. Low-Frequency Wave Activity Detected by MMS during Dusk Magnetopause Crossings and its Relation to Heating and Acceleration of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Roux, A.; Retino, A.; Mirioni, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Chust, T.; Berthomier, M.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Leroy, P.; Alison, D.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Marklund, G. T.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T.; Ergun, R. E.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Macri, J.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Fischer, D.; Leinweber, H. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Nakamura, R.; Argall, M. R.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K.; Wilder, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 9th of July, the MMS fleet of four satellites have evolved into a tetrahedral configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 160 km and an apogee of 12 earth radii on the dusk side. In this study we report on ultra-low (1 mHz to ~10 Hz) and very-low (10 Hz to ~ 4 kHz) frequency wave activity measured by the four satellites during several crossings of the dusk equatorial magnetopause. Since the Larmor radius of magnetosheath protons is of the order of 50 km, this inter-satellite distance allows us to investigate in detail the physics of the magnetopause at proton scales including current structures related to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as well as other energy transfer processes. From wave polarization analysis, we characterize the different types of emissions and discuss different mechanisms of heating and acceleration of particles. In particular, we focus on the electron heating by kinetic Alfvén waves and lower hybrid waves and the electron acceleration by oblique whistler mode waves, which have been suggested as possible mechanisms from previous Cluster and THEMIS measurements.

  4. Empirical mode decomposition: a method to reduce low frequency interferences from surface electroenterogram.

    PubMed

    Ye, Y; Garcia-Casado, J; Martinez-de-Juan, J L; Ponce, J L

    2007-06-01

    The surface electroenterogram (EEnG) is a non-invasive method of studying myoelectrical bowel activity. However, surface EEnG recordings are contaminated by cardiac activity, respiratory and motion artifacts, and other sources of interference. The aim of this work is to remove the respiration artifact and the very low frequency components from surface EEnG by means of empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Eleven recording sessions were carried out on canine model. Several parameters were calculated before and after the application of the method: signal-to-interference ratio (S/I ratio) and the attenuation level of the signal and of interference. The results show that the S/I ratio was significantly higher after the application of the method (3.68+/-5.54 dB vs. 10.45+/-3.65 dB), the attenuation level of signal and of interference is -0.49+/-0.80 dB versus -7.26+/-5.42 dB, respectively. Therefore, EMD could be a useful aid in identifying the intestinal slow wave and in removing interferences from EEnG recordings.

  5. Theory of relaxation dynamics within carotenoids via high frequency stretching modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balevicius, Vytautas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2015-03-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous natural pigment molecules acting as light harvesters in the blue-green region of the spectrum, and at the same time ensuring the photoprotection against excessive light by quenching the triplet state of chlorophylls and singlet oxygen. However, their photophysics is still not fully understood, because the absorption takes place not into the optically dark lowest excited state S1, but to the short-lived higher-lying state S2. This leads to complicated intramolecular energy redistribution schemes within carotenoids. From the transient absorption experiments it is known that the S1 state is populated shortly after the excitation of the S2 state (on the time-scale of tens of femtoseconds). The corresponding excited state absorption signal is blue-shifting and narrowing at early times, which is attributed to the vibrational cooling of the S1 state. We apply the secular density matrix theory to take into account both the internal conversion from the S2 into the S1 state and the subsequent relaxation within the manifold of high-frequency vibrational states corresponding to the carbon-carbon stretching modes (C-C and C=C). It allows us to obtain relevant pump-probe spectra in the time range from femto- to picoseconds.

  6. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Dohlus, M.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.; Vogt, M.

    2011-09-07

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak acceleratingmore » electric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.« less

  7. MOST photometry of the RRdLyrae variable AQLeo: two radial modes, 32 combination frequencies and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruberbauer, Michael; Kolenberg, Katrien; Rowe, Jason F.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Reegen, Piet; Kuschnig, Rainer; Cameron, Chris; Kallinger, Thomas; Weiss, Werner W.; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rucinski, Slavek; Sasselov, Dimitar; Walker, Gordon A. H.

    2007-08-01

    Highly precise and nearly uninterrupted optical photometry of the RRLyrae star AQLeo was obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars) satellite over 34.4d in 2005 February-March. AQLeo was the first known double-mode RRLyrae pulsator (RRd star). Three decades after its discovery, MOST observations have revealed that AQLeo oscillates with at least 42 frequencies, of which 32 are linear combinations (up to the sixth order) of the radial fundamental mode and its first overtone. Evidence for period changes of these modes is found in the data. The other intrinsic frequencies may represent an additional non-radial pulsation mode and its harmonics (plus linear combinations) which warrant theoretical modelling. The unprecedented number of frequencies detected with amplitudes down to mmag precision also presents an opportunity to test non-linear theories of mode growth and saturation in RRd stars. MOST is a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna. E-mail: gruberbauer@astro.univie.ac.at

  8. Quantum frequency conversion and strong coupling of photonic modes using four-wave mixing in integrated microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, Z.; Liscidini, M.; Sipe, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Single-photon-level quantum frequency conversion has recently been demonstrated using silicon nitride microring resonators. The resonance enhancement offered by such systems enables high-efficiency translation of quantum states of light across wide frequency ranges at subwatt pump powers. We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the conversion dynamics in these systems and show that they are capable of converting single- and multiphoton quantum states. Analytic formulas for the conversion efficiency, spectral conversion probability density, and pump-power requirements are derived which are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. We show that with only modest improvement to the state of the art, efficiencies exceeding 95% are achievable using less than 100 mW of pump power. At the critical driving strength that yields maximum conversion efficiency, the spectral conversion probability density is shown to exhibit a flat-topped peak, indicating a range of insensitivity to the spectrum of a single-photon input. Two alternate theoretical approaches are presented to study the conversion dynamics: a dressed-mode approach that yields a better intuitive picture of the conversion process, and a study of the temporal dynamics of the participating modes in the resonator, which uncovers a regime of Rabi-like coherent oscillations of single photons between two different frequency modes. This oscillatory regime arises from the strong coupling of distinct frequency modes mediated by coherent pumps.

  9. Experimental validation of a radio frequency photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stragier, X. F. D.; Luiten, O. J.; van der Geer, S. B.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Brussaard, G. J. H.

    2011-07-01

    A purpose-built RF-photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator has been thoroughly tested. Different properties of the RF-photogun have been measured such as energy, energy spread and transverse emittance. The focus of this study is the investigation of the smallest possible focus spot and focus stability at the entrance of the plasma channel. For an electron bunch with 10 pC charge and 3.7 MeV kinetic energy, the energy spread was 0.5% with a shot-to-shot stability of 0.05%. After focusing the bunch by a pulsed solenoid lens at 140 mm from the middle of the lens, the focal spot was 40 μm with a shot-to-shot stability of 5 μm. Higher charge leads to higher energy spread and to a larger spot size, due to space charge effects. All properties were found to be close to design values. Given the limited energy of 3.7 MeV, the properties are sufficient for this gun to serve as injector for one particular version of laser wakefield acceleration, i.e., injection ahead of the laser pulse. These measured electron bunch properties were then used as input parameters for simulations of electron bunch injection in a laser wakefield accelerator. The arrival time jitter was deduced from measurements of the energy fluctuation, in combination with earlier measurements using THz coherent transition radiation, and is around 150 fs in the present setup. The bunch length in the focus, simulated using particle tracking, depends on the accelerated charge and goes from 100 fs at 0.1 pC to 1 ps at 50 pC. When simulating the injection of the 3.7 MeV electron bunch of 10 pC in front of a 25 TW laser pulse with a waist of 30 μm in a plasma with a density of 0.7 × 1024 m-3, the maximum accelerated charge was found to be 1.2 pC with a kinetic energy of ˜900 MeV and an energy spread of ˜5%. The experiments combined with the simulations show the feasibility of external injection and give a prediction of the output parameters that can be expected from a laser

  10. The application of low frequency longitudinal guided wave mode for the inspection of multi-hole steel floral pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Xie, X. D.; Wu, B.; Li, Y. H.; He, C. F.

    2012-03-01

    Shed-pipe grouting technology, an effective advanced supporting method, is often used in the excavation of soft strata. Steel floral pipes are one of the key load-carrying components of shed-pipe grouting supporting structures. Guided waves are a very attractive methodology to inspect multi-hole steel floral pipes as they offer long range inspection capability, mode and frequency tuning, and cost effectiveness. In this contribution, preliminary experiments are described for the inspection of steel floral pipes using a low frequency longitudinal guided wave mode, L(0,2). The relation between the number of grouting holes and the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first end-reflected signal was obtained. The effect of the grouting holes in steel floral pipes on the propagation velocity of the L(0,2) mode at 30 kHz was analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the typical grouting holes in steel floral pipe have no significant effect on the propagation of this mode. As a result, low frequency longitudinal guided wave modes have potential for the non-destructive long range inspection of multi-hole steel floral pipes. Furthermore, the propagation velocity of the investigated L(0,2) mode at 30 kHz decreases linearly with the increase of the number of grouting holes in a steel floral pipe. It is also noticeable that the effect of the grouting holes cumulates along with the increase in the number of grouting holes and subsequent increase in reflection times of longitudinal guided waves in the steel floral pipe. The application potential of the low frequency longitudinal guided wave technique for the inspection of embedded steel floral pipes is discussed.

  11. On the detection of natural frequencies and mode shapes of submerged rotating disk-like structures from the casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Seidel, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    To avoid resonance problems in rotating turbomachinery components such as impellers, it is of paramount importance to determine the natural frequencies of these parts when they are under operation. Nevertheless, most of these rotating structures are inaccessible and in some cases submerged and confined. To measure the natural frequencies of submerged impellers from the rotating frame is complicated, because sensors have to be well fixed, withstand with large pressure and centrifugal forces. Furthermore, the signals have to be transmitted to the stationary frame. For this reason it may be advantageous to measure the natural frequencies with sensors placed on the casing. In this paper, the analysis of rotating disk-like structures submerged and confined has been performed from the stationary frame. Previously, an analytical model to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the disk from the rotating frame is presented. Once natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained in the rotating frame, the transmission to the stationary frame has been deduced. A rotating disk test rig has been used for the experimental study. It consist of a rotating disk that has been excited from the rotating frame with a piezoelectric patch and it response has been measured from both rotating and stationary frame. Results shows that for rotating submerged structures in heavy fluids such as water, not only the structural modes of the rotating part are different than for rotating structures in air, but also the transmission from the rotating to the stationary frame.

  12. Non-linear eye movements during visual-vestibular interaction under body oscillation with step-mode lateral linear acceleration.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shigeo; Katayama, Naomi

    2005-02-01

    We investigated visual-vestibular interactions in normal humans, where a constant speed of optokinetic stimulation was combined with whole body oscillation of lateral linear acceleration (10 m stroke). The acceleration mode was not sinusoidal, but rectangular (step). The pure optokinetic reflex (reference OKR) and the OKR under combined stimulation (combined OKR) were induced by a random-dot pattern projected onto a hemispherical dome-screen affixed to a chair on a linear accelerator. The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) was determined separately in the dark during acceleration-step oscillation. Since the tVOR was masked by the OKR under combined stimulation, the interaction was assessed as changes in combined-OKR velocity at two segments of opposing acceleration; in other words, tVOR directions identical to (agonistic) and opposite to (antagonistic) the OKR direction. When a moderate optokinetic stimulus-speed of 40 deg/s was combined with a moderate acceleration of 0.3 G (3.0 m/s2) as in Experiment 1 (N=10), the combined-OKR velocity always increased during the agonistic condition, and the motion of the visual pattern was perceived as slow and clear in this segment. On the other hand, during the antagonistic condition, the combined-OKR velocity either remained unchanged or increased moderately, and the motion of the visual pattern was sensed as fast and unclear. Notably, in most subjects, the velocity difference in combined-OKR between the agonistic and antagonistic conditions was around the value of the tVOR velocity. In five of the ten subjects who completed an additional test session with the acceleration level increased from 0.3 to 0.5 G (4.9 m/s2), similar findings were maintained individually, suggesting independent behavior of tVOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that the interaction could be direction-selective; in other words, both tVOR and OKR are additive during the agonistic condition, but tVOR is suppressed during the antagonistic condition

  13. Current Sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-01-01

    Data from an inductive conical theta pinch accelerator are presented to gain insight into the process of inductive current sheet formation in the presence of a preionized background gas produced by a steady-state RF-discharge. The presence of a preionized plasma has been previously shown to allow for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages and energies than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerator concepts, leading to greater accelerator efficiencies at lower power levels. Time-resolved magnetic probe measurements are obtained for different background pressures and pulse energies to characterize the effects of these parameters on current sheet formation. Indices are defined that describe time-resolved current sheet characteristics, such as the total current owing in the current sheet, the time-integrated total current ('strength'), and current sheet velocity. It is found that for a given electric field strength, maximums in total current, strength, and velocity occur for one particular background pressure. At other pressures, these current sheet indices are considerably smaller. The trends observed in these indices are explained in terms of the principles behind Townsend breakdown that lead to a dependence on the ratio of the electric field to the background pressure. Time-integrated photographic data are also obtained at the same experimental conditions, and qualitatively they compare quite favorably with the time-resolved magnetic field data.

  14. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  15. In-situ diagnostics and degradation mapping of a mixed-mode accelerated stress test for proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing availability of more durable membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells, there is a need for a more stressful test that combines chemical and mechanical stressors to enable accelerated screening of promising membrane candidates. Equally important is the need for in-situ diagnostic methods with sufficient spatial resolution that can provide insights into how membranes degrade to facilitate the development of durable fuel cell systems. In this article, we report an accelerated membrane stress test and a degradation diagnostic method that satisfy both needs. By applying high-amplitude cycles of electrical load to a fuel cell fed with low-RH reactant gases, a wide range of mechanical and chemical stressful conditions can be created within the cell which leads to rapid degradation of a mechanically robust Ion Power™ N111-IP membrane. Using an in-situ shorting/crossover diagnostic method on a segmented fuel cell fixture that provides 100 local current measurements, we are able to monitor the progression and map the degradation modes of shorting, thinning, and crossover leak over the entire membrane. Results from this test method have been validated by conventional metrics of fluoride release rates, physical crossover leak rates, pinhole mapping, and cross-sectional measurements.

  16. Non-Gaussian Dyadic and Triadic Mutual Information among Atmospheric-Oceanic Low Frequency Variability Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Principal components (PCs) of the low-frequency variability have zero cross correlation by construction but they are not statistically independent. Their degree of dependency is assessed through the Shannon mutual information (MI). PCs were computed here both for: 1) the monthly running means of the stream functions of a one million days run of a T63, 3level, perpetual winter forced, quasi-geostrophic (QG3) model and 2) the annual running means of the SST from GISS 1880-2012 data. One computes both the dyadic MI: I(X,Y) and triadic MI: I(X,Y,Z) among arbitrary PCs X,Y,Z (rotated or not) by using a kernel-based MI estimation method applied to previously Gaussianized marginal variables obtained by Gaussian anamorphosis thus making estimation more resistant to outliers. Non-vanishing MI comes from the non-Gaussianity of the full PDF of the state-vector of retained PCs. Statistically significant non-Gaussian dyadic MI appears between leading PC-pairs, both for the QG3 model run (projecting on planetary-slow scales) and for GISS data where some nonlinear correlations are emphasized between Pacific and Atlantic SST modes. We propose an iterative optimization algorithm looking for uncorrelated variables X, Y, Z, (obtained from orthogonal projections), taken from a multivariate space of N PCs (N≥3), which maximize I(X,Y,Z), i.e. their triadic non-Gaussian interaction. It also maximizes the joint negentropy leading to the presence of relevant non-linear correlations across the three linearly uncorrelated variables. This is solved through an iterative optimization method by maximizing a positive contrast function (e.g. the squared expectation E(XYZ)2 ), vanishing under Gaussian conditions. In order to understand the origin of a statistically significant positive mutual information I(X,Y,Z)>0, one decomposes it into a dyadic term: I2(X,Y,Z)≡I(X,Y)+I(X,Z)+I(Y,Z), vanishing iff X,Y,Z are pair-wised independent and into a triadic term, the so called interactivity term: It(X

  17. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  18. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  19. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  20. High frequency normal mode statistics in a shallow water waveguide: the effect of random linear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2014-07-01

    Using transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulation, the statistical properties of mode propagation at a frequency of 1 kHz are studied in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves. The environment is typical of summer conditions in the mid-Atlantic bight during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Observables of interest include the second and fourth moments of the mode amplitudes, which are relevant to full-field mean intensity and scintillation index. It is found that mode phase randomization has a strong adiabatic component while at the same time mode coupling rates are significant. As a consequence, a computationally efficient transport theory is presented, which models cross-mode correlation adiabatically, but accounts for mode coupling using the mode energy equations of Creamer [(1996). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2825-2838]. The theory also has closed-form expressions for the internal wave scattering matrix and a correction for an edge effect. The hybrid transport theory is shown to accurately reproduce many statistical quantities from the Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Frequency Shift of Polar Whispering Gallery Modes Caused by Uniaxial Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, H.-P.; Schmitzer, H.; Lutti, J.; Borri, P.; Langbein, W.

    2010-03-01

    Optical whispering gallery modes in small spheres -so called microcavity optical resonators- have been investigated in the past years because they are promising as single virus or single bacterium detectors and as pressure sensors for microfluidic applications. Due to high Q-factors whispering gallery modes are very sensitive to changes of the shape and the refractive index of the sphere. Both can be caused by mechanical stress. A small exerted compressive force will therefore lead to an energy shift of the resonant modes. The relationship between this energy shift and the exerted force depends on the geometry of the experimental setup. We investigated the energy shift of polar modes in polystyrene beads of 45 micron diameter applying an uniaxial force. With increasing force we find a shift to higher energy for resonator modes with different mode order n and number l. The observed results will be compared with model calculations.

  2. Low-frequency normal modes that describe allosteric transitions in biological nanomachines are robust to sequence variations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Brooks, Bernard R; Thirumalai, D

    2006-05-16

    By representing the high-resolution crystal structures of a number of enzymes using the elastic network model, it has been shown that only a few low-frequency normal modes are needed to describe the large-scale domain movements that are triggered by ligand binding. Here we explore a link between the nearly invariant nature of the modes that describe functional dynamics at the mesoscopic level and the large evolutionary sequence variations at the residue level. By using a structural perturbation method (SPM), which probes the residue-specific response to perturbations (or mutations), we identify a sparse network of strongly conserved residues that transmit allosteric signals in three structurally unrelated biological nanomachines, namely, DNA polymerase, myosin motor, and the Escherichia coli chaperonin. Based on the response of every mode to perturbations, which are generated by interchanging specific sequence pairs in a multiple sequence alignment, we show that the functionally relevant low-frequency modes are most robust to sequence variations. Our work shows that robustness of dynamical modes at the mesoscopic level is encoded in the structure through a sparse network of residues that transmit allosteric signals.

  3. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  4. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    PubMed

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz.

  5. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  6. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Hogan, Mark; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  7. Very low frequency waves stimulated by an electron accelerator in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtet, J. A.; Pran, B. K.; Egeland, A.; Grandal, B.; Jacobsen, T. A.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.

    1981-01-01

    The sounding rocket, Polar 5, carrying a 10 keV electron accelerator in a mother-daughter configuration and other diagnostic instruments, was launched into a slightly disturbed ionosphere with weak auroral activity on February 1, 1976 from Northern Norway to study VLF wave phenomena. The rocket trajectory crossed two auroral regions: one, between 86 and 111 s flight time, and a secondary region between 230 and 330 s. The daughter, carrying the accelerator, was separated axially from the mother in a forward direction at an altitude of 90 km. The VLF experiment, carried by the mother payload, recorded both electromagnetic and electrostatic waves. The receiving antenna was an electric dipole, 0.3 m tip-to-tip, oriented 90 degrees to the rocket spin axis. The onboard particle detector recorded increased electron fluxes in the two auroral regions. A double peaked structure was observed in the fluxes of 4-5 and 12-27 keV electrons within the northern auroral form. The number density of thermal plasma varied during the flight, with maximum density within the main auroral region. To the north of this aurora a slow, steady decrease in the density was observed, with no enhancement in the region of the second aurora.

  8. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    PubMed

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop.

  9. The discharge mode transition and O(5p1) production mechanism of pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Hu, J. T.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Shi, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The discharge mode transition from uniform plasma across the gas gap to the α mode happens at the rising phase of the pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (PRF CCP). This transition is attributed to the fast increasing stochastic heating at the edge of sheath. In the second stage with the stable current and voltage amplitude, the consistency between experimental and numerical spatial-temporal 777 nm emission profile suggests that He* and He2* dominate the production of O(5p1) through dissociation and excitation of O2. Finally, the sterilization efficiency of PRF CCP is found to be higher than that of plasma jet.

  10. High-quality lowest-frequency normal mode strain observations at the Black Forest Observatory (SW-Germany) and comparison with horizontal broad-band seismometer data and synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürn, W.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Widmer-Schnidrig, R.; Lentas, K.; Rivera, L.; Clévédé, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present spectra concentrating on the lowest-frequency normal modes of the Earth obtained from records of the invar-wire strainmeters and STS-1 broad-band seismometers located in the Black Forest Observatory, Germany after the disastrous earthquakes off the NW coast of Sumatra in 2004 and off the coast near Tohoku, Japan in 2011. We compare the spectra to ones obtained from synthetic seismograms computed using a mode summation technique for an anelastic, elliptical, rotating, spherically symmetric Earth model. The synthetics include strain-strain-coupling effects by using coupling coefficients obtained from comparisons between Earth tide signals recorded by the strainmeters and synthetic tidal records. We show that for the low-frequency toroidal and spheroidal modes up to 1 mHz, the strainmeters produce better signal-to-noise ratios than the broad-band horizontal seismometers. Overall, the comparison with the synthetics is satisfactory but not as good as for vertical accelerations. In particular, we demonstrate the high quality of the strainmeter data by showing the Coriolis splitting of toroidal modes for the first time in individual records, the first clear observation of the singlet _2S_1^0 and the detection of the fundamental radial mode 0S0 with good signal-to-noise ratio and with a strain amplitude of 10-11. We also identify the latter mode in a record of the Isabella strainmeter after the great Chilean quake in 1960, the detection of which was missed by the original studies.

  11. Dark current studies on a normal-conducting high-brightness very-high-frequency electron gun operating in continuous wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements and analysis of a field-emitted electron current in the very-high-frequency (VHF) gun, a room temperature rf gun operating at high field and continuous wave (CW) mode at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The VHF gun is the core of the Advanced Photo-injector Experiment (APEX) at LBNL, geared toward the development of an injector for driving the next generation of high average power x-ray free electron lasers. High accelerating fields at the cathode are necessary for the high-brightness performance of an electron gun. When coupled with CW operation, such fields can generate a significant amount of field-emitted electrons that can be transported downstream the accelerator forming the so-called "dark current." Elevated levels of a dark current can cause radiation damage, increase the heat load in the downstream cryogenic systems, and ultimately limit the overall performance and reliability of the facility. We performed systematic measurements that allowed us to characterize the field emission from the VHF gun, determine the location of the main emitters, and define an effective strategy to reduce and control the level of dark current at APEX. Furthermore, the energy spectra of isolated sources have been measured. A simple model for energy data analysis was developed that allows one to extract information on the emitter from a single energy distribution measurement.

  12. Electron Gyroharmonic Effects in Ionization and Electron Acceleration during High-Frequency Pumping in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, B.; Leyser, T. B.; Kosch, M.; Rietveld, M. T.; Steen, A.; Braendstroem, B. U. E.; Aso, T.

    2006-11-10

    Optical emissions and incoherent scatter radar data obtained during high-frequency electromagnetic pumping of the ionospheric plasma from the ground give data on electron energization in an energy range from 2 to 100 eV. Optical emissions at 4278 A ring from N{sub 2}{sup +} that require electrons with energies above the 18 eV ionization energy give the first images ever of pump-induced ionization of the thermosphere. The intensity at 4278 A ring is asymmetric around the ionospheric electron gyroharmonic, being stronger above the gyroresonance. This contrasts with emissions at 6300 A ring from O({sup 1}D) and of electron temperature enhancements, which have minima at the gyroharmonic but have no apparent asymmetry. This direct evidence of pump-induced ionization contradicts previous indirect evidence, which indicated that ionization is most efficiently produced when the pump frequency was below the gyroharmonic.

  13. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  14. Acceleration of electrons in the near field of lower hybrid frequency grills

    SciTech Connect

    Goniche, M.; Mailloux, J.; Demers, Y.; Jacquet, P.; Bibet, P.; Froissard, P.; Rey, G.; Surle, F.; Tareb, M.; Guilhem, D.; Harris, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    On Tore Supra, during lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments, localized heat flux deposition is observed on plasma facing components such as the guard limiters of the LH grills or any object which is magnetically connected to the LH launching waveguides : modular low-field side limiters, ion cyclotron heating antennas, inner first wall. Similar observations have been made on the divertor plates and limiters of TdeV. In particular, by alternating the rf powers of the 2 grills of Tore Supra, it was shown that the heat flux on the tiles of the guard limiters is related to the local electric field but not with the convective power. We present here a model of acceleration of electrons in the near field of LH antennas. Results of this model are compared to experimental results.

  15. A study of ion acceleration, asymmetric optical pumping and low frequency waves in two expanding helicon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan

    This work concerns measurements of parallel ion flow, optical pumping, and low frequency waves in expanding plasmas generated by two different helicon plasma sources. The measurements confirm numerical predictions of the formation of a current-free double layer in a region of diverging magnetic field. With laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), the double layer structure in both helicon plasma sources was investigated through measurements of the bulk parallel ion flow speed. Both double layers have a total potential drop of 3-4 kTe and length scales smaller than ion-neutral mean-free-path. A stronger double layer, with a potential drop of ˜ 6kTe , was created in a uniform magnetic field region with a plasma limiting aperture plate. During the investigations of ion acceleration in expanding plasmas, a new phenomenon, asymmetrical optical pumping (AOP) due to the acceleration of ions in magnetic field gradient, was observed. The signature of AOP is a difference in the LIF emission amplitude from a pair of Zeeman-split ion states. A model that reproduces the dependence of the AOP on magnetic-field and ion-velocity gradients is described. With magnetic fluctuation probes, low frequency, transverse, electromagnetic waves were also identified in the expanding helicon plasma. The wave is localized to the vicinity of the maximum plasma density gradient and appears only at low neutral pressure. Based on the scaling of the wave frequency and amplitude with magnetic field strength, the wave was identified as the resistive drift Alfven wave.

  16. High-frequency normal-mode statistics in shallow water: the combined effect of random surface and internal waves.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2015-05-01

    In an earlier article, the statistical properties of mode propagation were studied at a frequency of 1 kHz in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves, using a hybrid transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulations. Here, the analysis is extended to include the effects of random linear surface waves, in isolation and in combination with internal waves. Mode coupling rates for both surface and internal waves are found to be significant, but strongly dependent on mode number. Mode phase randomization by surface waves is found to be dominated by coupling effects, and therefore a full transport theory treatment of the range evolution of the cross mode coherence matrix is needed. The second-moment of mode amplitudes is calculated using transport theory, thereby providing the mean intensity while the fourth-moment is calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, which provides the scintillation index. The transport theory results for second-moment statistics are shown to closely reproduce Monte Carlo simulations. Both surface waves and internal waves strongly influence the acoustic field fluctuations.

  17. Centaur feedline dynamics study using power spectral methods. [fundamental mode resonant frequencies of RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feed lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the dynamic characteristics of the Centaur/RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feedlines. The fundamental-mode resonant frequencies were determined by applying power spectral methods to noise-generated data from hot firings of the RL-10 engine. The effect of net positive suction pressure of the main feed pumps on resonant frequency characteristics was determined to be a straight-line relation. Power spectral methods were also used to determine the dynamic characteristics of the boost pumps.

  18. Q-switching and mode-locking in a diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd : YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Donin, Valerii I; Yakovin, Dmitrii V; Gribanov, A V

    2012-02-28

    A new method for obtaining Q-switching simultaneously with mode-locking using one travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator in a frequency-doubled Nd : YAG laser cavity is described. Further shortening of output laser pulses (from 40 to 3.25 ps) is achieved by forming a Kerr lens in the frequency-doubling crystal. At an average power of {approx} 2 W and a Q-switching rate of 2 kHz, the peak power of the stably operating reached {approx} 50 MW.

  19. Tunable UV generation at 286 nm by frequency tripling of a high-power mode-locked semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.; Kliner, D.A.V.

    1995-08-01

    We produced ultraviolet radiation by frequency tripling the mode-locked emission of an external cavity laser containing a tapered GaAlAs amplifier gain element. The 429-nm second harmonic produced by a KNbO{sub 3} crystal was sum-frequency mixed with the 858-nm fundamental in a Li{sub 3}BO{sub 5} crystal, generating as much as 50{mu}W of power at 286 nm. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  20. On the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a multispan Timoshenko beam carrying a number of various concentrated elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to utilize the numerical assembly method (NAM) to determine the exact natural frequencies and mode shapes of the multispan Timoshenko beam carrying a number of various concentrated elements including point masses, rotary inertias, linear springs, rotational springs and spring-mass systems. First, the coefficient matrices for an intermediate pinned support, an intermediate concentrated element, left- and right-end support of a Timoshenko beam are derived. Next, the overall coefficient matrix for the whole structural system is obtained using the numerical assembly technique of the finite element method. Finally, the exact natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the vibrating system are determined by equating the determinant of the last overall coefficient matrix to zero and substituting the corresponding values of integration constants into the associated eigenfunctions, respectively. The effects of distribution of in-span pinned supports and various concentrated elements on the dynamic characteristics of the Timoshenko beam are also studied.

  1. Radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in α and γ modes between two coaxial electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Wang, Dezhen; Zhang, Yuantao

    2008-09-01

    The discharge in pure helium and the influence of small nitrogen impurities at atmospheric pressure are investigated based on a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model controlled by a dielectric barrier between two coaxial electrodes. The simulation of the radiofrequency (rf) discharge is based on the one-dimensional continuity equations for electrons, ions, metastable atoms, and molecules, with the much simpler current conservation law replacing the Poisson equation for electric field. Through a computational study of rf atmospheric glow discharges over a wide range of current density, this paper presents evidence of at least two glow discharge modes, namely the α mode and the γ mode. The simulation results show the asymmetry of the discharge set exercises great influence on the discharge mechanisms compared to that with parallel-plane electrodes. It is shown that the particle densities are not uniform in the discharge region but increase gradually from the outer to the inner electrode in both modes. The contrasting dynamic behaviors of the two glow modes are studied. Secondary electron emission strongly influences gas ionization in the γ mode yet matters little in the α mode.

  2. High-frequency acousto-optic mode locker for picosecond pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, U.; Li, K.D.; Khuri-Yakub, P.T.; Bloom, D. ); Gerstenberger, D.C.; Weingarten, K.J. )

    1990-01-01

    We modeled, designed, and built a 500-MHz acousto-optic mode locker with a diffraction efficiency of 28% per 1 W drive power. The transducer is zinc oxide sputtered onto a sapphire substrate. A new figure of merit is defined for the mode-locker design, which indicates that sapphire is a good substrate material. Pulse widths of less than 10 psec with an average power of 150 mW were achieved from a 500-MHz pulse-rate, diode-pumped, cw mode-locked Nd:YLF laser using a pump power of 700 mW.

  3. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Gluckstern, R.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N. |

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  4. Polarisation dependence of the squash mode in the extreme low frequency vibrational region of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Quirke, N.; Zerulla, D.

    2015-05-01

    There is considerable interest in the vibrational modes of carbon nanotubes as they can be used to determine interaction potentials. In particular, theory predicts the appearance of so called squash modes (SMs, with E2g symmetry representation) at very low frequencies. These SMs are expected to be extremely sensitive to environmental changes and thus ideal as nanoscale probes. Here, we report clear experimental evidence for the existence of SMs of ordered, dry, single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays with peaks as close as 18 cm-1 to the laser excitation. Furthermore, we confirm the theoretical predictions regarding the angular and polarisation dependent variations of the SM's intensity with respect to the excitation. Additionally, using both SM and radial breathing mode data, we unambiguously assign the chirality and diameter of the SWNTs in our sample.

  5. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  6. Quasinormal modes of charged scalars around dilaton black holes in 2+1 dimensions: Exact frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2008-06-15

    We have studied the charged scalar perturbation around a dilaton black hole in 2+1 dimensions. The wave equations of a massless charged scalar field are shown to be exactly solvable in terms of hypergeometric functions. The quasinormal frequencies are computed exactly. The relation between the quasinormal frequencies and the charge of the black hole, charge of the scalar, and the temperature of the black hole are analyzed. The asymptotic form of the real part of the quasinormal frequencies is evaluated exactly.

  7. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Frequency and force modulation atomic force microscopy: low-impact tapping-mode imaging without bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2007-07-01

    Since the 1980s, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has rapidly developed into a versatile, high-resolution characterization technique, available in a variety of imaging modes. Within intermittent-contact tapping-mode, imaging bistability and sample mechanical damage continue to be two of the most important challenges faced daily by AFM users. Recently, a new double-control-loop tapping-mode imaging algorithm (frequency and amplitude modulation AFM, FAM-AFM) was proposed and evaluated within numerical simulations, demonstrating a reduction in the repulsive tip sample forces and the absence of bistability. This article presents a much simpler algorithm, frequency and force modulation AFM (FFM-AFM), which requires only a single control loop and offers the same benefits as FAM-AFM. The concept is applied to calculate the cross-sectional scan of a carbon nanotube sample resting on a silicon surface, which is then compared to a previously reported image obtained in conventional amplitude-modulation tapping-mode, shown to be in agreement with the experimental result.

  8. An experimental contribution to the interpretation of mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar echoes in frequency domain interferometric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Kubo, K.; Fukao, S.

    2001-09-01

    Studies of atmospheric structures and dynamics at small scales require high resolution observations in space and time. Stratosphere-troposphere radars offer high potentialities for such studies, in particular, with the dual-frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique used for tracking thin atmospheric layers. In the present paper, attention is drawn to the performances of this technique, discussed in light of comparisons between data sets collected in different radar configurations with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan, 34.85°N, 136.10°E). Measurements in FDI mode with two range resolutions (300 and 600 m) and two frequency differences (0.50 and 0.25 MHz) have been conducted, interleaved with measurements in Doppler-beam-swinging mode performed at a range resolution of 150 m. From the data comparisons it is found that the thickness of the echoing layers in FDI mode strongly depends on the initial range resolution used. Thus, even if the FDI mode is believed to give a better description of the stable layers, the FDI-deduced thickness with an initial range resolution of 300 m may not be consistent with the true thickness of the atmospheric layers. It could then be misleading to use FDI observations in order to estimate the thickness of atmospheric layers. However, it is also shown that under some circumstances, FDI can provide reliable information on the characteristics of the atmospheric structures which cannot be available with "non-FDI" techniques.

  9. Low-frequency vibrational modes of benzoic acid investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Fan, Wen-hui; Zheng, Zhuan-ping

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the low-frequency vibrational modes of crystalline benzoic acid (BA) have been investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and theoretical simulations based on the linearity combination of atomic orbital within the Density Functional Theory (DFT) as well as ab initio molecular orbital method at second-order Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory (MP2) level for single molecule and dimer. Experimentally, a series of prominent absorption features of pure benzoic acid relevant to intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes have been obtained below 4 THz at room temperature. For the theoretical simulations, geometry-optimization results of bond lengths and dihedral angles in both BA monomer and dimer are very close to experimental neutron diffraction measurements. Furthermore, the simulation results demonstrate absorption profile centered at 1.89 THz contains low-frequency modes of Ph-COOH twisting due to intramolecular motion and cogwheel owing to intermolecular motion. All the intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes measured have also been assigned.

  10. Observations and transport theory analysis of low frequency, acoustic mode propagation in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K; Colosi, John A; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Howe, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    Second order mode statistics as a function of range and source depth are presented from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX). During LOAPEX, low frequency broadband signals were transmitted from a ship-suspended source to a mode-resolving vertical line array. Over a one-month period, the ship occupied seven stations from 50 km to 3200 km distance from the receiver. At each station broadband transmissions were performed at a near-axial depth of 800 m and an off-axial depth of 350 m. Center frequencies at these two depths were 75 Hz and 68 Hz, respectively. Estimates of observed mean mode energy, cross mode coherence, and temporal coherence are compared with predictions from modal transport theory, utilizing the Garrett-Munk internal wave spectrum. In estimating the acoustic observables, there were challenges including low signal to noise ratio, corrections for source motion, and small sample sizes. The experimental observations agree with theoretical predictions within experimental uncertainty.

  11. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  12. Performance analysis of low-complexity adaptive frequency-domain equalization and MIMO signal processing for compensation of differential mode group delay in mode-division multiplexing communication systems using few-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission systems utilizing few-mode fibers (FMF) have been intensively explored to sustain continuous traffic growth. The key challenges of MDM systems are inter-modal crosstalk due to random mode coupling (RMC), and largely-accumulated differential mode group delay (DMGD), whilst hinders mode-demultiplexer implementation. The adaptive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can dynamically compensate DMGD using digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. The frequency-domain least-mean squares (FD-LMS) algorithm has been universally adopted for high-speed MDM communications, mainly for its relatively low computational complexity. However, longer training sequence is appended for FD-LMS to achieve faster convergence, which incurs prohibitively higher system overhead and reduces overall throughput. In this paper, we propose a fast-convergent single-stage adaptive frequency-domain recursive least-squares (FD-RLS) algorithm with reduced complexity for DMGD compensation at MDM coherent receivers. The performance and complexity comparison of FD-RLS, with signal-PSD-dependent FD-LMS method and conventional FD-LMS approach, are performed in a 3000 km six-mode transmission system with 65 ps/km DMGD. We explore the convergence speed of three adaptive algorithms, including the normalized mean-square-error (NMSE) per fast Fourier transform (FFT) block at 14-30 dB OSNR. The fast convergence of FD-RLS is exploited at the expense of slightly-increased necessary tap numbers for MIMO equalizers, and it can partially save the overhead of training sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate adaptive FD-RLS can also be used for chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation without increasing the filter tap length, thus prominently reducing the DSP implementation complexity for MDM systems.

  13. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  14. Amplitude and frequency variations of oscillation modes in the pulsating DB white dwarf star KIC 08626021. The likely signature of nonlinear resonant mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W.; Charpinet, S.; Vauclair, G.; Giammichele, N.; Van Grootel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The signatures of nonlinear effects affecting stellar oscillations are difficult to observe from ground observatories because of the lack of continuous high-precision photometric data spanning extended enough time baselines. The unprecedented photometric quality and coverage provided by the Kepler spacecraft offers new opportunities to search for these phenomena. Aims: We use the Kepler data accumulated on the pulsating DB white dwarf KIC 08626021 to explore in detail the stability of its oscillation modes, searching, in particular, for evidence of nonlinear behaviors. Methods: We analyze nearly two years of uninterrupted short-cadence data, concentrating on identified triplets that are caused by stellar rotation and that show intriguing behaviors during the course of the observations. Results: We find clear signatures of nonlinear effects that could be attributed to resonant mode coupling mechanisms. These couplings occur between the components of the triplets and can induce different types of behaviors. We first notice that a structure at 3681 μHz, identified as a triplet in previous published studies, is in fact forming a doublet, with the third component being an independent mode. We find that a triplet at 4310 μHz and this doublet at 3681 μHz (most likely the two visible components of an incomplete triplet) have clear periodic frequency and amplitude modulations, which are typical of the so-called intermediate regime of the resonance, with timescales consistent with theoretical expectations. Another triplet at 5073 μHz is likely in a narrow transitory regime in which the amplitudes are modulated while the frequencies are locked. Using nonadiabatic pulsation calculations, based on a model representative of KIC 08626021 to evaluate the linear growth rates of the modes in the triplets, we also provide quantitative information that could be useful for future comparisons with numerical solutions of the amplitude equations. Conclusions: The observed

  15. Relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves: Evidence from correlated Cluster, Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft, and ground-based magnetometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Fung, Shing F.

    2011-07-01

    Simultaneous observations by Cluster and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft and Canadian Array for Real-Time Investigations of Magnetic Activity and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects magnetometer arrays during a sudden storm commencement on 25 September 2001 show evidence of relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves. The waves are driven by the quasiperiodic solar wind dynamical pressure fluctuations that continuously buffet the magnetosphere for ˜3 h. The compressional-mode ULF waves are identified by comparing the power of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations with the total magnetic field power. The radial distribution and azimuthal propagation of both toroidal and poloidal-mode ULF waves are derived from ground-based magnetometer data. The energetic electron fluxes measured by LANL show modulation of low-energy electrons and acceleration of high-energy electrons by the compressional poloidal-mode electric field oscillations. The energy threshold of accelerated electrons at the geosynchronous orbit is ˜0.4 MeV, which is roughly consistent with drift-resonant interaction of magnetospheric electrons with compressional-mode ULF waves.

  16. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M; Shinton, Ian R R; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  17. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R.; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  18. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONG-QIANG; QI, MENG-CHUN; XU, JIANG; XU, JUAN; LIU, HUA-WEI; DONG, WEI; LI, JIN-YUAN; HU, MIN

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri-implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole-body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone-to-implant contact, peri-implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4-week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

  19. Experimental entanglement of 60 modes of the quantum optical frequency comb and application to generating hypercubic-lattice cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Olivier; Chen, Moran; Wang, Pei; Fan, Wenjiang; Menicucci, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In the race to build a practical quantum computer in the laboratory, the ability to create very large quantum registers and entangle them is paramount, along with the ability to address the issue of decoherence. With particular regard to scalability, the field-based, continuous-variable (CV) flavor of quantum optics offers notable promise, in particular by enabling ``top down,'' rather than ``bottom up,'' entangling approaches of quantum field modes. It is also important to note the relevance of continuous variables to universal quantum computing, with the recent discovery of a fault tolerance threshold for quantum computing with CV cluster states and nonGaussian error correction. In 2011, some of us generated simultaneously 15 independent 4-mode cluster states over 60 modes of the quantum optical frequency comb (QOFC) of a single optical parametric oscillator (OPO). In this work, we used a single OPO to generate a 60-mode dual-rail cluster state, which is the largest entangled system to date whose subsystems are all simultaneously available. Using the exact same setup, we also generated two copies of a 30-mode dual-rail cluster state. We will then present a new proposal to ``weave'' such massively scalable continuous-variable cluster states into hypercubic-lattice quantum graphs Work supported by NSF grants PHY-0855632 and PHY-1206029.

  20. Compressive sensing of the Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 earthquake: Frequency-dependent rupture modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huajian; Gerstoft, Peter; Shearer, Peter M.; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique for finding sparse signal representations to underdetermined linear measurement equations. We use CS to locate seismic sources during the rupture of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Mw9.0 earthquake in Japan from teleseismic P waves recorded by an array of stations in the United States. The seismic sources are located by minimizing the ℓ2-norm of the difference between the observed and modeled waveforms penalized by the ℓ1-norm of the seismic source vector. The resulting minimization problem is convex and can be solved efficiently. Our results show clear frequency-dependent rupture modes with high-frequency energy radiation dominant in the down-dip region and low-frequency radiation in the updip region, which may be caused by differences in rupture behavior (more intermittent or continuous) at the slab interface due to heterogeneous frictional properties.

  1. Mixed-mode fatigue-crack growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V at high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-22

    Multiaxial loading conditions exist at fatigue-critical locations within turbine engine components, particularly in association with fretting fatigue in the blade dovetail/disk contact section. For fatigue-crack growth in such situations, the resultant crack-driving force is a combination of the influence of a mode I (tensile opening) stress-intensity range, {Delta}K{sub I}, as well as mode II (in-plane shear) and/or mode III (anti-plane shear) stress-intensity ranges, {Delta}K{sub II} and {Delta}K{sub III}, respectively. For the case of the high-cycle fatigue of turbine-engine alloys, it is critical to quantify such behavior, as the extremely high cyclic loading frequencies ({approximately}1--2 kHz) and correspondingly short times to failure may necessitate a design approached based on the fatigue-crack growth threshold. Moreover, knowledge of such thresholds is required for accurate prediction of fretting fatigue failures. Accordingly, this paper presents the mixed-mode fatigue crack growth thresholds for mode I + II loading (phase angles from 0{degree} to 82{degree}) in a Ti-6Al-4V blade alloy. These results indicate that when fatigue-crack growth in this alloy is characterized in terms of the crack-driving force {Delta}G, which incorporates both the applied tensile and shear loading, the mode 1 fatigue-crack growth threshold is a lower bound (worst case) with respect to mixed-mode (I + II) crack-growth behavior.

  2. High frequency electromagnetic modes in a weakly magnetized relativistic electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Gohar; Murtaza, G.; Kingham, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Using the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell model, the polarization tensor for a weakly magnetized electron plasma is derived. For isotropic relativistic Maxwellian velocity distribution function, dispersion relations are obtained for both parallel and perpendicular propagations. The integrals (called Meijer G functions) that arise due to relativistic effects are examined in various limits and dispersion relations are derived for the nonrelativistic, weakly, strongly, and ultrarelativistic Maxwellian velocity distributions. It is generally observed that the propagation domains of the modes are enlarged as one proceeds from the nonrelativistic to the highly relativistic regime. Resultantly, due to the relativistic effects, the Whistler mode is suppressed in the R-wave, the nonpropagation band of X-mode is reduced, and the X-mode itself approaches the O-mode. Further, the results derived in the ultra- and nonrelativistic limits found to be in agreement with the earlier calculations [G. Abbas et al. Phys. Scr. 76, 649 (2007); F. F. Chen, Introduction to Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plenum, New York, 1984), Vol. 1].

  3. Low-frequency variability of Western Boundary Currents in the turbulent ocean: intrinsic modes and atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sérazin, Guillaume; Penduff, Thierry; Terray, Laurent; Grégorio, Sandy; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes are particularly strong in Western Boundary Current (WBC) regions where SST front variations influence basin-scale climate variability. Observed low-frequency fluctuations in latitude and strength of these oceanic jets are classically thought to be essentially atmospherically-driven by wind stress curl variability via the oceanic Rossby wave adjustment. Yet academic eddy-resolving process-oriented models with double-gyre configurations have revealed that an idealized WBC may exhibit low-frequency intrinsic fluctuations without low-frequency external forcing (e.g. Berloff et al., 2007, Dijkstra and Ghil, 2005, etc). Experiments with eddying Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) have also shown that the amount of low-frequency Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) variability is largely intrinsic in WBCs (Penduff et al. 2011; Sérazin et al 2014) and that the frontal-scale (<10°) pattern of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) variability is similar to intrinsic modes (Taguchi et al. 2010). Based on a pair of atmospherically-forced 1/12° OGCM experiments that simulate with accuracy either the intrinsic variability (seasonally-forced) or the observed total variability (forced with the full range of atmospheric timescales), Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis is performed on zonally-averaged SLA fields of four main WBCs (e.g. Gulf Stream, Kuroshio Extension, Agulhas Current and East Australian Current). The first two modes of the KE and GS exhibit a similar spatial structure that is shaped by oceanic intrinsic processes. The frequency content is however different between the intrinsic and total Principal Components, the former containing a wide range of timescales similar to a red noise and the latter being more autocorrelated at interannual-to-decadal timescales. These modes are compared with those obtained from the 20 years of altimetry observation and relationships with low-frequency westward propagative features in the respective oceanic basin are

  4. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  5. Wide frequency range capacitive detection of loss in a metallic cantilever using resonance and relaxation modes.

    PubMed

    Richert, Ranko

    2007-05-01

    The impedance of a capacitor which embraces a charged cantilever is used to measure the mechanical properties of the cantilever material. The technique has been tested with an amorphous metallic specimen, but is applicable for many other solids. The material damping can be measured at the resonance frequency of the cantilever via the width of the resonance curve or by recording the ring-down behavior. Additionally, several decades in frequency are accessible below the resonance frequency, where values as low as nu=0.03 Hz are achieved easily. The data are analyzed with a single equation that captures the damping at all frequencies in terms of the material specific Young's modulus E and its loss angle tan delta=E"/E'.

  6. X-mode HF Pump-induced Phenomena at High Heater Frequencies in the High Latitude Ionosphere F-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Kalishin, A. S.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results concentrating on X-mode HF-induced phenomena in the high latitude ionosphere F region are discussed. Experiments have been carried out at the HF Heating facility at Tromsø with an effective radiated power of 450 - 650 MW at high heater frequencies of 6.2 - 8.0 MHz. Multi-instriment diagnostics included the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) UHF radar at 931 MHz at Tromsø, the Finland CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System) radar, the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) equipment at Tromsø, and the HF receiver near St. Petersburg for the observations of narrow band SEE features. The key parameter considered is the ratio between the heater frequency and critical frequency of the F2 layer (fH/foF2). We have analyzed the behaviors of small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) and HF-enhanced plasma and ion lines (HFPLs and HFILs) depending on the pump proximity to the critical frequency. It was shown that the HFPLs and HFILs coexisted with FAIs throughout the whole heater pulse when fH/foF2 > 1 as well as fH/foF2 ≤ 1. It is indicative that parametric decay instability was not quenched by fully developed FAIs. The comparison between contrasting O/X mode HF-induced phenomena, when the heater frequency is below or near the critical frequency of F2 layer, is made. It was found that an X-mode HF pumping is able to excite different narrow band spectral components in the SEE spectra (within 1 kHz of pump frequency), such as ion acoustic, electrostatic ion cyclotron, and electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves (otherwise known as neutralized ion Bernstein waves) observed at a long distance from the HF Heating facility. It was suggested that these spectral component can be attributed to the stimulated Brillion scatter (SBS) process. The results obtained show that an X-polarized electromagnetic wave scattered by SBS can propagate more than one thousand km without significant attenuation.

  7. Detecting the thickness mode frequency in a concrete plate using backward wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Bjurström, Henrik; Ryden, Nils

    2016-02-01

    Material stiffness and plate thickness are the two key parameters when performing quality assurance/quality control on pavement structures. In order to estimate the plate thickness non-destructively, the Impact Echo (IE) method can be utilized to extract the thickness resonance frequency. An alternative to IE for estimating the thickness resonance frequency of a concrete plate, and to subsequently enable thickness determination, is presented in this paper. The thickness resonance is often revealed as a sharp peak in the frequency spectrum when contact receivers are used in seismic testing. Due to a low signal-to-noise ratio, IE is not ideal when using non-contact microphone receivers. In studying the complex Lamb wave dispersion curves at a frequency infinitesimally higher than the thickness frequency, it is seen that two counter-directed waves occur at the same frequency but with phase velocities in opposite directions. Results show that it is possible to detect the wave traveling with a negative phase velocity using both accelerometers and air-coupled microphones as receivers. This alternative technique can possibly be used in non-contact scanning measurements based on air-coupled microphones. PMID:26936549

  8. Noise amplitude measurements of single-mode CW lasers at radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Hillard, M. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This letter presents the results of noise measurements for a variety of single-longitudinal-mode CW lasers (Ar/+/, standing-wave-dye, and ring-dye) that are commercially available. A quantitative comparison of the total output power fluctuations detected over the 7-300 MHz region (3 dB points) is presented.

  9. Magnetic activity cycles in solar-like stars: The cross-correlation technique of p-mode frequency shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régulo, C.; García, R. A.; Ballot, J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We set out to study the use of cross-correlation techniques to infer the frequency shifts that are induced by changing magnetic fields in p-mode frequencies and to provide a precise estimation of error bars. Methods: This technique and the calculation of the associated errors is first tested and validated on the Sun where p-mode magnetic behaviour is very well known. These validation tests are performed on 6000-day time series of Sun-as-a-star observations delivered by the SoHO spacecraft. Errors of the frequency shifts are quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The same methodology is then applied to three solar-like oscillating stars: HD 49933, observed by CoRoT, as well as KIC 3733735 and KIC 7940546, observed by Kepler. Results: We first demonstrate the reliability of the error bars computed with the Monte Carlo simulations using the Sun. From the three stars analyzed, we confirm the presence of a magnetic activity cycle in HD 49933 with this methodology and we unveil the seismic signature of ongoing magnetic variations in KIC 3733735. Finally, the third star, KIC 7940546, seems to be in a quiet regime.

  10. Modified TM and TE waveguide modes and reflectivity by graphene layer in coupled-graphene-metal multilayer structure in sub-terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkerdin, Gennady; Alkorre, Hameda; Stiens, Johan; Vounckx, Roger

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the dispersion characteristics of TM and TE waveguide modes and the reflectivity of plane waves, incident on the four-layer structure consisting of air/graphene monolayer/dielectric buffer layer/metal substrate. The TM waveguide modes split up into two branches for small frequencies, one of the branches (cutoff waveguide branch) undergoes cutoff at a certain cutoff buffer thicknesses. There is no splitting of TE waveguide modes. However, these modes can be converted into short-range waves for smaller buffer thickness with subsequent modes cutoff depending on frequency and graphene electron concentration. Reflection coefficients of the TM polarized incident electromagnetic waves from air on the multi-layer structure vanish in the vicinity of cutoff buffer thicknesses. It is demonstrated that waveguide mode propagation constants and reflectivity in the multilayer structure can be considerably influenced by the presence of a graphene layer in the vicinity of the cutoff thicknesses of the waveguide modes.

  11. Eliminating bistability and reducing sample damage through frequency and amplitude modulation in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2007-03-01

    Since its invention, amplitude-modulation tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has rapidly developed into a common high-resolution surface characterization tool. However, despite the technical advances, imaging bistability caused by the coexistence of the so-called attractive and repulsive imaging regimes, and potential sample damage in the repulsive regime (often critical in biological and other soft-sample applications) still remain as fundamental barriers which prevent users from consistently obtaining high-quality images. This report proposes a new intermittent-contact AFM imaging concept, frequency- and amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (FAM-AFM), which offers the potential to overcome both issues. This imaging method combines existing knowledge from non-contact frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) and AM-AFM in a new control scheme involving the use of variable excitation force amplitude and frequency to control the cantilever effective frequency and limit the magnitude of the tip-sample repulsive forces. As in FM-AFM, within the new scheme the cantilever is continuously excited at its (variable) effective frequency so it is not prone to bistability. Control of the repulsive forces is achieved through the adjustment of the excitation force amplitude, so that the effective frequency always remains below the free resonant frequency. Promising results from numerical simulations are presented for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and silicon tips interacting with a Si(100)-OH surface, and for SWNT tips interacting with the same surface while intermittently forming and breaking covalent bonds, and while experiencing attractive electrostatic interactions.

  12. Excitation of azimuthal surface modes by relativistic flows of electrons in the high-frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.; Pavlenko, I. V.

    2011-05-15

    Excitation of extraordinarily polarized azimuthal surface eigenwaves is shown to be possible in the frequency range above the upper hybrid resonance in waveguides with metal walls which are partially filled by cold magnetoactive plasma. Interaction of these waves with flows of electrons which rotate around the plasma column in the narrow gap separating the plasma from the wall of the waveguide is studied. Conditions of resonant interaction of the beam with the mentioned high-frequency azimuthal surface waves are shown by numerical methods to be reachable ones in the case of enough strong external magnetic fields without passing to the field of ultra-relativistic velocities of the beam.

  13. Broadband frequency-domain near-infrared spectral tomography using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-domain near-infrared (NIR) diffuse spectral tomography with a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is presented, providing tunable multiwavelength quantitative spectroscopy with maximal power for thick tissue imaging. The system was developed to show that intrinsically high stability can be achieved with many wavelengths in the NIR range, using a mode-locked signal of 80 MHz with heterodyned lock-in detection. The effect of cumulative noise from multiple wavelengths of data on the reconstruction process was studied, and it was shown that inclusion of more wavelengths can reduce skew in the noise distribution. This normalization of the data variance then minimizes errors in estimation of chromophore concentrations. Simulations and tissue phantom experiments were used to quantify this improvement in image accuracy for recovery of tissue hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. PMID:19340109

  14. Magnetic structure and frequency scaling of limit-cycle oscillations close to L- to H-mode transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkenmeier, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Manz, P.; Stroth, U.; Fischer, R.; Fuchert, G.; Happel, T.; Laggner, F. M.; Maraschek, M.; Medvedeva, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Shao, L. M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Zohm, H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    Limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) close to the power threshold of L- to H-mode transitions are investigated in plasmas of ASDEX Upgrade. During this phase, referred to as I-phase, a strong magnetic activity in the poloidal magnetic field {{\\overset{\\centerdot}{{B}} }θ} with an up–down asymmetry is found. In some cases, the regular LCOs during I-phase transition smoothly into a phase with intermittent bursts which have similar properties to type-III edge localised modes (ELMs). Indications of precursors during the intermittent phase as well as in the regular LCO phase point to a common nature of the I-phase and type-III ELMs. The LCO frequency measured in a set of discharges with different plasma currents and magnetic fields scales as f∼ ≤ft(B\\text{t}1/2I\\text{p}3/2\\right)/(nT) .

  15. Radio Frequency Ablation in the Rabbit Lung Using Wet Electrodes: Comparison of Monopolar and Dual Bipolar Electrode Mode

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hee; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Jeon, Soo bin; Lee, Yong Chul

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of radio frequency ablation (RFA) on the dimensions of radio frequency coagulation necrosis in a rabbit lung using a wet electrode in monopolar mode with that in dual electrode bipolar mode at different infusion rates (15 mm/hr versus 30 ml/hr) and saline concentrations (0.9% normal versus 5.8% hypertonic saline). Materials and Methods Fifty ablation zones (one ablation zone in each rabbit) were produced in 50 rabbits using one or two 16-guage wet electrodes with a 1-cm active tip. The RFA system used in the monopolar and dual electrode wet bipolar RFA consisted of a 375-kHz generator (Elektrotom HiTT 106, Berchtold, Medizinelektronik, Germany). The power used was 30 watts and the exposure time was 5 minutes. The rabbits were assigned to one of five groups. Group A (n = 10) was infused with 0.9% NaCl used at a rate of 30 ml/hr in a monopolar mode. Groups B (n = 10) and C (n = 10) were infused with 0.9% NaCl at a rate of 15 and 30 ml/hr, respectively in dual electrode bipolar mode; groups D (n = 10) and E (n = 10) were infused with 5.8% NaCl at a rate of 15 and 30 ml/hr, respectively in a dual electrode bipolar mode. The dimensions of the ablation zones in the gross specimens from the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance by means of the Scheffe test (post-hoc testing). Results The mean largest diameter of the ablation zones was larger in dual electrode bipolar mode (30.9±4.4 mm) than in monopolar mode (22.5±3.5 mm). The mean smallest diameter of the ablation zones was larger in dual electrode bipolar mode (22.3±2.5 mm) than in monopolar mode (19.5±3.5 mm). There were significant differences in the largest and smallest dimension between the monopolar (group A) and dual electrode wet bipolar mode (groups B-E). In dual electrode bipolar mode, the mean largest diameter of the ablation zones was larger at an infusion rate of 15 ml/hr (34.2±4.0 mm) than at 30 ml/hr (27.6±0.1 mm), and the mean smallest diameter of

  16. Observation of Ω mode electron heating in dusty argon radio frequency discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Killer, Carsten; Bandelow, Gunnar; Schneider, Ralf; Melzer, André; Matyash, Konstantin

    2013-08-15

    The time-resolved emission of argon atoms in a dusty plasma has been measured with phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy using an intensified charge-coupled device camera. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a capacitively coupled rf argon discharge with the help of thermophoretic levitation. While electrons are exclusively heated by the expanding sheath (α mode) in the dust-free case, electron heating takes place in the entire plasma bulk when the discharge volume is filled with dust particles. Such a behavior is known as Ω mode, first observed in electronegative plasmas. Furthermore, particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out, which reproduce the trends of the experimental findings. These simulations support previous numerical models showing that the enhanced atomic emission in the plasma can be attributed to a bulk electric field, which is mainly caused by the reduced electrical conductivity due to electron depletion.

  17. HIGHER MODE FREQUENCY EFFECTS ON RESONANCE IN MACHINERY, STRUCTURES, AND PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.

    2010-05-02

    The complexities of resonance in multi-degree of freedom systems (multi-DOF) may be clarified using graphic presentations. Multi-DOF systems represent actual systems, such as beams or springs, where multiple, higher order, natural frequencies occur. Resonance occurs when a cyclic load is applied to a structure, and the frequency of the applied load equals one of the natural frequencies. Both equations and graphic presentations are available in the literature for single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems, which describe the response of spring-mass-damper systems to harmonically applied, or cyclic, loads. Loads may be forces, moments, or forced displacements applied to one end of a structure. Multi-DOF systems are typically described only by equations in the literature, and while equations certainly permit a case by case analysis for specific conditions, graphs provide an overall comprehension not gleaned from single equations. In fact, this collection of graphed equations provides novel results, which describe the interactions between multiple natural frequencies, as well as a comprehensive description of increased vibrations near resonance.

  18. Excitation of high frequency pressure driven modes by non-axisymmetric equilibrium at high {beta}{sub pol} in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Okabayashi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M.S.; Hatcher, R.E.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.F.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Holland, A.; Asakura, N.; Duperrex, P.A.; Fonck, R.J.; Gammel, G.M.; Greene, G.J.; Jiang, T.W.; Levinton, F.M.; Powell, E.T.; Roberts, D.W.; Qin, Y.

    1993-06-01

    High-frequency pressure-driven modes have been observed in high-poloidal-{beta} discharges in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). These modes are excited in a non-axisymmetric equilibrium characterized by a large, low frequency m{sub 1}=1/n{sub 1}=1 island, and they are capable of expelling fast ions. The modes reside on or very close to the q=1 surface, and have mode numbers with either m{sub h}=n{sub h} or (less probably) m{sub h}/n{sub h}=m{sub h}/(m{sub h}-1), with m{sub h} varying between 3 and 10. Occasionally, these modes are, simultaneously localized in the vicinity of the m{sub 1}=2/n{sub 1}=1 island. The high frequency modes near the q=1 surface also exhibit a ballooning character, being significantly stronger on the large major radius side of the plasma. When a large m{sub 1}=1/n{sub 1}=1 island is present the mode is poloidally localized in the immediate vicinity of the x-point of the island. The modes, which occur exclusively in high-{beta} discharges, appear to be driven by the plasma pressure or pressure gradient. They can thus be a manifestation of either a toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmode (TAE) at q=(2m{sub h}+ 1)/2n{sub h}, a kinetic ballooning mode (KBM), or some other type of pressure-driven mode. Theory predicts that the TAE mode is a gap mode, but the high frequency modes in PBX-M are found exclusively on or in the immediate neighborhood of magnetic surfaces with low rational numbers.

  19. Initial high-degree p-mode frequency splittings from the 1988 Mt. Wilson 60-foot Tower Solar Oscillation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    1988-01-01

    The initial frequency splitting results of solar p-mode oscillations obtained from the 1988 helioseismology program at the Mt. Wilson Observatory are presented. The frequency splittings correspond to the rotational splittings of sectoral harmonics which range in degree between 10 and 598. They were obtained from a cross-correlation analysis of the prograde and retrograde portions of a two-dimensional (t - v) power spectrum. This power spectrum was computed from an eight-hour sequence of full-disk Dopplergrams obtained on July 2, 1988, at the 60-foot tower telescope with a Na magneto-optical filter and a 1024x1024 pixel CCD camera. These frequency splittings have an inherently larger scatter than did the splittings obtained from earlier 16-day power spectra. These splittings are consistent with an internal solar rotational velocity which is independent of radius along the equatorial plane. The normalized frequency splittings averaged 449 + or - 3 nHz, a value which is very close to the observed equatorial rotation rate of the photospheric gas of 451.7 nHz.

  20. Different modes of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge in methane.

    PubMed

    Schweigert, I V

    2004-04-16

    The transition between different regimes of a capacitevely coupled radio-frequency gas discharge in methane is studied with a combined particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision algorithm over a wide range of gas pressure P and discharge current j. The results of this study are compared with known experimental and numerical results and summarized on a P-j phase diagram, which constitutes the areas of existence of different discharge regimes.

  1. Different Modes of a Capacitively Coupled Radio-Frequency Discharge in Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.

    2004-04-01

    The transition between different regimes of a capacitevely coupled radio-frequency gas discharge in methane is studied with a combined particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision algorithm over a wide range of gas pressure P and discharge current j. The results of this study are compared with known experimental and numerical results and summarized on a P-j phase diagram, which constitutes the areas of existence of different discharge regimes.

  2. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  3. Low-Magnitude High-Frequency Mechanical Signals Accelerate and Augment Endochondral Bone Repair: Preliminary Evidence of Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Goodship, Allen E.; Lawes, Timothy J.; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2010-01-01

    Fracture healing can be enhanced by load bearing, but the specific components of the mechanical environment which can augment or accelerate the process remain unknown. The ability of low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical signals, anabolic in bone tissue, are evaluated here for their ability to influence fracture healing. The potential for short duration (17 min), extremely low-magnitude (25 μm), high-frequency (30 Hz) interfragmentary displacements to enhance fracture healing was evaluated in a mid-diaphyseal, 3-mm osteotomy of the sheep tibia. In a pilot study of proof of concept and clinical relevance, healing in osteotomies stabilized with rigid external fixation (Control: n = 4), were compared to the healing status of osteotomies with the same stiffness of fixation, but supplemented with daily mechanical loading (Experimental: n = 4). These 25-μm displacements, induced by a ferroactive shape-memory alloy (“smart” material) incorporated into the body of the external fixator, were less than 1% of the 3-mm fracture gap, and less than 6% of the 0.45-mm displacement measured at the site during ambulation (p <0.001). At 10-weeks post-op, the callus in the Experimental group was 3.6-fold stiffer (p <0.03), 2.5-fold stronger (p =0.05), and 29% larger (p <0.01) than Controls. Bone mineral content was 52% greater in the Experimental group (p <0.02), with a 2.6-fold increase in bone mineral content (BMC) in the region of the periosteum (p <0.001). These data reinforce the critical role of mechanical factors in the enhancement of fracture healing, and emphasize that the signals need not be large to be influential and potentially clinically advantageous to the restoration of function. PMID:19117066

  4. A continuous-discrete approach for evaluation of natural frequencies and mode shapes of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekinejad, Mohsen; Rahgozar, Reza; Malekinejad, Ali; Rahgozar, Peyman

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a continuous-discrete approach based on the concept of lumped mass and equivalent continuous approach is proposed for free vibration analysis of combined system of framed tube, shear core and outrigger-belt truss in high-rise buildings. This system is treated as a continuous system (i.e., discrete beams and columns are replaced with equivalent continuous membranes) and a discrete system (or lumped mass system) at different stages of dynamic analysis. The structure is discretized at each floor of the building as a series of lumped masses placed at the center of shear core. Each mass has two transitional degrees of freedom (lateral and axial( and one rotational. The effect of shear core and outrigger-belt truss on framed tube system is modeled as a rotational spring placed at the location of outrigger-belt truss system along structure's height. By solving the resulting eigen problem, natural frequencies and mode-shapes are obtained. Numerical examples are presented to show acceptable accuracy of the procedure in estimating the fundamental frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the combined system as compared to finite element analysis of the complete structure. The simplified proposed method is much faster and should be more suitable for rapid interactive design.

  5. Evaluation of the Propensity of Niobium to Absorb Hydrogen During Fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for Particle Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Ricker, R E; Myneni, G R

    2010-01-01

    During the fabrication of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavities procedures are used that chemically or mechanically remove the passivating surface film of niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). Removal of this film will expose the underlying niobium metal and allow it to react with the processing environment. If these reactions produce hydrogen at sufficient concentrations and rates, then hydrogen will be absorbed and diffuse into the metal. High hydrogen activities could result in supersaturation and the nucleation of hydride phases. If the metal repassivates at the conclusion of the processing step and the passive film blocks hydrogen egress, then the absorbed hydrogen or hydrides could be retained and alter the performance of the metal during subsequent processing steps or in-service. This report examines the feasibility of this hypothesis by first identifying the postulated events, conditions, and reactions and then determining if each is consistent with accepted scientific principles, literature, and data. Established precedent for similar events in other systems was found in the scientific literature and thermodynamic analysis found that the postulated reactions were not only energetically favorable, but produced large driving forces. The hydrogen activity or fugacity required for the reactions to be at equilibrium was determined to indicate the propensity for hydrogen evolution, absorption, and hydride nucleation. The influence of processing conditions and kinetics on the proximity of hydrogen surface coverage to these theoretical values is discussed. This examination found that the hypothesis of hydrogen absorption during SRF processing is consistent with published scientific literature and thermodynamic principles.

  6. Frequency stabilization of a single mode terahertz quantum cascade laser to the kilohertz level.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy A; Goyette, Thomas M; Waldman, Jerry; Coulombe, Michael J; Gatesman, Andrew J; Giles, Robert H; Goodhue, William D; Qian, Xifeng; Nixon, William E

    2009-04-27

    A simple analog locking circuit was shown to stabilize the beat signal between a 2.408 THz quantum cascade laser and a CH(2)DOH THz CO(2) optically pumped molecular laser to 3-4 kHz (FWHM). This is approximately a tenth of the observed long-term (t approximately sec) linewidth of the optically pumped laser showing that the feedback loop corrects for much of the mechanical and acoustic-induced frequency jitter of the gas laser. The achieved stability should be sufficient to enable the use of THz quantum cascade lasers as transmitters in short-range coherent transceivers.

  7. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  8. Variability of heavy duty vehicle operating mode frequencies for prediction of mobile emissions. Report for March 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.D.; Guensler, R.; Meyer, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses a new geographic information system (GIS)-based modal emissions model being developed with EPA and Georgia Tech to account for vehicle load conditions that will significantly improve the spatial resolution of emissions estimates. The GIS-based modal research model employs detailed subfleet engine and emissions characteristics and the speed/acceleration profiles for vehicle activity along links in the transportation system. Composition of the vehicle subfleet affects the amount of emissions produced under various operating conditions, dependent upon the load induced by the vehicle and driver, and the physical constraints of the vehicle. The aggregate modal frequencies are compared across vehicle classes to show differences in how heavy duty vehicles are operated.

  9. A study of the eigenvectors of low frequency vibrational modes in crystalline cytidine via high pressure infrared absorption and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Carl; Woods, Kristina; Lee, Scott

    High-pressure infrared absorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline cytidine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: 1/ωdω/dP . Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as cytidine have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit (``internal'' modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other (``external'' modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes, making high pressure experiments a very useful probe for such studies. Internal stretching modes have low logarithmic derivatives while external as well as internal torsional and bending modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Modes at about 503, 757, 795, 3093 and 3351 cm-1 are found to have negative logarithmic pressure derivatives, indicating a weakening of the effective force constants associated with those modes. The two modes above 3000 cm-1 are hydrogen-bond-stretching modes. The identity of all of these modes will be determined via molecular dynamical simuations.

  10. Joint inversion of normal-mode and finite-frequency S-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, Christophe; Lambotte, Sophie; Lévêque, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale tomographic models should aim at satisfying the full seismic spectrum. For this purpose, and to better constrain isotropic 3-D variations of shear velocities in the mantle, we tackle a joint inversion of spheroidal normal-mode structure coefficients and multiple-frequency S-wave delay times. In all previous studies for which normal modes were jointly inverted for, with body and/or surface waves, the mantle was laterally parametrized with uniform basis functions, such as spherical harmonics, equal-area blocks and evenly spaced spherical splines. In particular, spherical harmonics naturally appear when considering the Earth's free oscillations. However, progress towards higher resolution joint tomography requires a movement away from such uniform parametrization to overcome its computational inefficiency to adapt to local variations in resolution. The main goal of this study is to include normal modes into a joint inversion based upon a non-uniform parametrization that is adapted to the spatially varying smallest resolving length of the data. Thus, we perform the first joint inversion of normal-mode and body-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid, optimized according to ray density. We show how to compute the projection of 3-D sensitivity kernels for both data sets onto our parametrization made up of spherical layers spanned with irregular Delaunay triangulations. This approach, computationally efficient, allows us to map into the joint model multiscale structural informations from data including periods in the 10-51 s range for body waves and 332-2134 s for normal modes. Tomographic results are focused on the 400-2110 km depth range, where our data coverage is the most relevant. We discuss the potential of a better resolution where the grid is fine, compared to spherical harmonics up to degree 40, as the number of model parameters is similar. Our joint model seems to contain coherent structural components beyond degree 40, such as those related

  11. Task-Related, Low-Frequency Task-Residual, and Resting State Activity in the Default Mode Network Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-Shan R.

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis of a default mode network (DMN) of brain function is based on observations of task-independent decreases of brain activity during effort as participants are engaged in tasks in contrast to resting. On the other hand, studies also showed that DMN regions activate rather than deactivate in response to task-related events. Thus, does DMN “deactivate” during effort as compared to resting? We hypothesized that, with high-frequency event-related signals removed, the task-residual activities of the DMN would decrease as compared to resting. We addressed this hypothesis with two approaches. First, we examined DMN activities during resting, task residuals, and task conditions in the stop signal task using independent component analysis (ICA). Second, we compared the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) signals of DMN in resting, task residuals, and task data. In the results of ICA of 76 subjects, the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) showed increased activation during task as compared to resting and task residuals, indicating DMN responses to task events. Precuneus but not the PCC showed decreased activity during task residual as compared to resting. The latter finding was mirrored by fALFF, which is decreased in the precuneus during task residuals, as compared to resting and task. These results suggested that the low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent signals of the precuneus may represent a useful index of effort during cognitive performance. PMID:22661964

  12. Frequency-domain identification of aircraft structural modes from short-duration flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssettes, J.; Mercère, G.; Vacher, P.; De Callafon, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    This article presents identification algorithms dedicated to the modal analysis of civil aircraft structures during in-flight flutter tests. This particular operational framework implies several specifications for the identification procedure. To comply with these requirements, the identification problem is formulated in the frequency domain as an output-error problem. Iterative identification methods based on structured matrix fraction descriptions are used to solve this problem and to identify a continuous-time model. These iterative methods are specifically designed to deal with experiments where short-duration tests with multiple-input excitations are used. These algorithms are first discussed and then evaluated through a simulation example illustrative of the in-flight modal analysis of a civil aircraft. Based on these evaluation results, an efficient iterative algorithm is suggested and applied to real flight-test data measured on board a military aircraft.

  13. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    =Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a rf signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a consistent electric field level in the cavity, which is important for controlling the filament heating and temperature. The system design will be discussed along with application data for commercial ceramic samples.

  14. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode-cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.T.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a RF signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the electric field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a constant absorbed power in a fiber tow, which is important for controlling the tow heating and temperature. The system design will be discussed along with application data for commercial ceramic samples.

  15. Far Infrared High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR Spectroscopy of the Low Frequency Bending Modes of Dmso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    In addition to its importance for industrial and environmental studies, the monitoring of DiMethylSulfOxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) concentrations is of considerable interest for civil protection. The existing high resolution gas phase spectroscopic data of DMSO only concerned the pure rotational transitions in the ground state. In the Far-IR domain, the low-frequency rovibrational transitions have never previously resolved. The high brightness of the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL and the instrumental sensitivity provided by the multipass cell allowed to measure for the first time these transitions. 1581 A-type and C-type transitions in the ν11 band have been assigned and 25 molecular constants of Watson's s-form hamiltonian developed to degree 8 have been fitted within the experimental accuracy. The use of then synchrotron radiation has opened many possibilities for new spectroscopic studies. Together with several other recent studies, our successful measurement and analysis of DMSO convincingly demonstrates the potential of the AILES beamline for high resolution FIR spectroscopy. Thus our present work is just at the beginning of unraveling the rovibrational structure of low frequency bending and torsional vibrational states of DMSO and yielding important comprehensive structural and spectroscopic information on this molecule. L. Margules, R. A. Motienko, E. A. Alekseev, J. Demaison, J. Molec. Spectrosc., 260(23),2009 V. Typke, M. Dakkouri, J. Molec. Struct., 599(177),2001 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii, Chem. Phys. Lett., accepted for publication

  16. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  17. Thermally accelerated life testing of single mode, double-heterostructure, AlGaAs laser diodes operated pulsed at 50 mW peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, J.D.; Archambeault, W.J.; Dye, R.A.; Einhorn, A.J.; Mecherle, G.S.; Nelson, P.

    1985-04-01

    Single spatial mode, double-heterostructure, channel-substrate-planar AlGaAs laser diodes have been life tested under thermally accelerated conditions to characterize the reliability of the diodes in a digital, optical communication system intended for space application. The diodes were operated pulsed under constant drive current conditions at 50 mW peak power, 25 ns pulse width, and 1 percent duty cycle in a dry, inert environment at ambient test temperatures at 40, 55, and 70/sup 0/C. Diode performance parameters as related to the space application, such as pulsewidth, peak power, wavelength spectrum, spatial mode, and threshold current, were periodically monitored. Tests have continued for over 14 000 h. The test results for all diodes with failure defined by power degradation alone is compared to the test results for single mode diodes with failure defined by power degradation, wavelength shift and spatial mode changes. It is found that the life test results are substantially equivalent but differ from earlier published reports for laser diodes operated CW. An activation energy of about 0.39 eV is deduced with a predicted median life of about 5 X 10/sup 4/ h at 20/sup 0/C. These values are somewhat lower than those found for diodes operated CW and are attributed to the use of single mode laser diodes here. It is concluded that thermally accelerated life testing for single spatial mode laser diodes must incorporate a means to separate bulk material, current, and optical density induced degradation effects. A test scheme is proposed.

  18. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  19. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Wukitch, S.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-01

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with HIPB98(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  20. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  1. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  2. Low-frequency vibrational modes of DL-homocysteic acid and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Limin; Zhao, Guozhong; Li, Weihong; Liu, Yufeng; Shi, Xiaoxi; Jia, Xinfeng; Zhao, Kui; Lu, Xiangyang; Xu, Yizhuang; Xie, Datao; Wu, Jinguang; Chen, Jia'er

    2009-09-01

    In this paper several polycrystalline molecules with sulfonate groups and some of their metal complexes, including DL-homocysteic acid (DLH) and its Sr- and Cu-complexes, pyridine-3-sulphonic acid and its Co- and Ni-complexes, sulfanilic acid and L-cysteic acid were investigated using THz time-domain methods at room temperature. The results of THz absorption spectra show that the molecules have characteristic bands in the region of 0.2-2.7 THz (6-90 cm -1). THz technique can be used to distinguish different molecules with sulfonate groups and to determine the bonding of metal ions and the changes of hydrogen bond networks. In the THz region DLH has three bands: 1.61, 1.93 and 2.02 THz; and 0.85, 1.23 and 1.73 THz for Sr-DLH complex, 1.94 THz for Cu-DLH complex, respectively. The absorption bands of pyridine-3-sulphonic acid are located at 0.81, 1.66 and 2.34 THz; the bands at 0.96, 1.70 and 2.38 THz for its Co-complex, 0.76, 1.26 and 1.87 THz for its Ni-complex. Sulphanilic acid has three bands: 0.97, 1.46 and 2.05 THz; and the absorption bands of L-cysteic acid are at 0.82, 1.62, 1.87 and 2.07 THz, respectively. The THz absorption spectra after complexation are different from the ligands, which indicate the bonding of metal ions and the changes of hydrogen bond networks. M-O and other vibrations appear in the FIR region for those metal-ligand complexes. The bands in the THz region were assigned to the rocking, torsion, rotation, wagging and other modes of different groups in the molecules. Preliminary assignments of the bands were carried out using Gaussian program calculation.

  3. New Trends in Induction Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-12-05

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  4. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-3He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-3He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ˜50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  5. Low-frequency wiggler modes in the free-electron laser with a dusty magnetoplasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S.

    2015-07-01

    An advanced incremental scheme for generating tunable coherent radiation in a free-electron laser has been presented: the basic concept is the use of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma channel where dust helicon, dust Alfven and coupled dust cyclotron-Alfven waves can play a role as a low-frequency wiggler, triggering coherent emissions. The wiggler wavelength at the sub-mm level allows one to reach the wavelength range from a few nm down to a few Å with moderately relativistic electrons of kinetic energies of a few tens/hundreds of MeV. The laser gain and the effects of beam self-electric and self-magnetic fields on the gain have been estimated and compared with findings of the helical magnetic and electromagnetic wigglers in vacuum. To study the chaotic regions of the electron motion in the dusty plasma wave wiggler, a time independent Hamiltonian has been obtained. The Poincare surface of a section map has been used numerically to analyze the nonintegrable system where chaotic regions in phase-space emerge. This concept opens a path toward a new generation of synchrotron sources based on compact plasma structures.

  6. Evaluation of the Propensity of Niobium to Absorb Hydrogen During Fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for Particle Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, R. E.; Myneni, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    During the fabrication of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavities procedures are used that chemically or mechanically remove the passivating surface film of niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). Removal of this film will expose the underlying niobium metal and allow it to react with the processing environment. If these reactions produce hydrogen at sufficient concentrations and rates, then hydrogen will be absorbed and diffuse into the metal. High hydrogen activities could result in supersaturation and the nucleation of hydride phases. If the metal repassivates at the conclusion of the processing step and the passive film blocks hydrogen egress, then the absorbed hydrogen or hydrides could be retained and alter the performance of the metal during subsequent processing steps or in-service. This report examines the feasibility of this hypothesis by first identifying the postulated events, conditions, and reactions and then determining if each is consistent with accepted scientific principles, literature, and data. Established precedent for similar events in other systems was found in the scientific literature and thermodynamic analysis found that the postulated reactions were not only energetically favorable, but produced large driving forces. The hydrogen activity or fugacity required for the reactions to be at equilibrium was determined to indicate the propensity for hydrogen evolution, absorption, and hydride nucleation. The influence of processing conditions and kinetics on the proximity of hydrogen surface coverage to these theoretical values is discussed. This examination found that the hypothesis of hydrogen absorption during SRF processing is consistent with published scientific literature and thermodynamic principles. PMID:27134791

  7. Finite element analysis and frequency shift studies for the bridge coupler of the coupled cavity linear accelerator of the spallation neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron scattering research facility. The linear accelerator (linac) is the principal accelerating structure and divided into a room-temperature linac and a superconducting linac. The normal conducting linac system that consists of a Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and a Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) is to be built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The CCL structure is 55.36-meters long. It accelerates H- beam from 86.8 Mev to 185.6 Mev at operating frequency of 805 MHz. This side coupled cavity structure has 8 cells per segment, 12 segments and 11 bridge couplers per module, and 4 modules total. A 5-MW klystron powers each module. The number 3 and number 9 bridge coupler of each module are connected to the 5-MW RF power supply. The bridge coupler with length of 2.5 {beta}{gamma} is a three-cell structure and located between the segments and allows power flow through the module. The center cell of each bridge coupler is excited during normal operation. To obtain a uniform electromagnetic filed and meet the resonant frequency shift, the RF induced heat must be removed. Thus, the thermal deformation and frequency shift studies are performed via numerical simulations in order to have an appropriate cooling design and predict the frequency shift under operation. The center cell of the bridge coupler also contains a large 4-inch slug tuner and a tuning post that used to provide bulk frequency adjustment and field intensity adjustment, so that produce the proper total field distribution in the module assembly.

  8. Effect of Intramolecular High-Frequency Vibrational Mode Excitation on Ultrafast Photoinduced Charge Transfer and Charge Recombination Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Alexey E; Barykov, Vadim Yu; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2016-03-31

    A model of photoinduced ultrafast charge separation and ensuing charge recombination into the ground state has been developed. The model includes explicit description of the formation and evolution of nonequilibrium state of both the intramolecular vibrations and the surrounding medium. An effect of the high-frequency intramolecular vibrational mode excitation by a pumping pulse on ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination kinetics has been investigated. Simulations, in accord with experiment, have shown that the effect may be both positive (the vibrational mode excitation increases the charge-transfer rate constant) and negative (opposite trend). The effect on charge separation kinetics is predicted to be bigger than that on the charge recombination rate but nevertheless the last is large enough to be observable. The amplitude of both effects falls with decreasing vibrational relaxation time constant, but the effects are expected to be observable up to the time constants as short as 200 fs. Physical interpretation of the effects has been presented. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that the simulations, in whole, provide results close to that obtained in the experiment. The reasons of the deviations have been discussed. PMID:26953595

  9. Large Frequency Change with Thickness in Interlayer Breathing Mode--Significant Interlayer Interactions in Few Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-06-10

    Bulk black phosphorus (BP) consists of puckered layers of phosphorus atoms. Few-layer BP, obtained from bulk BP by exfoliation, is an emerging candidate as a channel material in post-silicon electronics. A deep understanding of its physical properties and its full range of applications are still being uncovered. In this paper, we present a theoretical and experimental investigation of phonon properties in few-layer BP, focusing on the low-frequency regime corresponding to interlayer vibrational modes. We show that the interlayer breathing mode A(3)g shows a large redshift with increasing thickness; the experimental and theoretical results agree well. This thickness dependence is two times larger than that in the chalcogenide materials, such as few-layer MoS2 and WSe2, because of the significantly larger interlayer force constant and smaller atomic mass in BP. The derived interlayer out-of-plane force constant is about 50% larger than that of graphene and MoS2. We show that this large interlayer force constant arises from the sizable covalent interaction between phosphorus atoms in adjacent layers and that interlayer interactions are not merely of the weak van der Waals type. These significant interlayer interactions are consistent with the known surface reactivity of BP and have been shown to be important for electric-field induced formation of Dirac cones in thin film BP.

  10. Large dynamic Stokes shift of DNA intercalation dye Thiazole Orange has contribution from a high-frequency mode.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Pérez Lustres, J Luis; Zhao, Lijuan; Ernsting, Nikolaus P; Seitz, Oliver

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescence of the cyanine dye Thiazole Orange (TO) is quenched by intramolecular twisting in the excited state. In polypeptide nucleic acids, a vibrational progression in a 1400 cm(-1) mode depends on base pairing, from which follows that the high-frequency displacement is coupled to the twist coordinate. The coupling is intrinsic to TO. This is shown by femtosecond fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption spectroscopy with the dye in methanol solution. Narrow emission from the Franck-Condon state shifts to the red and broadens within 100 fs. The radiative rate does not decrease during this process. Vibrational structure builds up on a 200 fs time scale; it is assigned to asymmetric stretching activity in the methine bridge. Further Stokes shift and decay are observed over 2 ps. Emission from the global S(1) minimum is discovered in an extremely wide band around 12 000 cm(-1). As the structure twists away from the Franck-Condon region, the mode becomes more displaced and overlap with increasingly higher vibrational wave functions of the electronic ground state is achieved. Twisting motion is thus leveraged into a fast-shrinking effective energy gap between the two electronic states, and internal conversion ensues.

  11. Statistics of low-frequency normal-mode amplitudes in an ocean with random sound-speed perturbations: shallow-water environments.

    PubMed

    Colosi, John A; Duda, Timothy F; Morozov, Andrey K

    2012-02-01

    Second- and fourth-moment mode-amplitude statistics for low-frequency ocean sound propagation through random sound-speed perturbations in a shallow-water environment are investigated using Monte Carlo simulations and a transport theory for the cross-mode coherence matrix. The acoustic observables of mean and mean square intensity are presented and the importance of adiabatic effects and cross-mode coherence decay are emphasized. Using frequencies of 200 and 400 Hz, transport theory is compared with Monte Carlo simulations in a canonical shallow-water environment representative of the summer Mid-Atlantic Bight. Except for ranges less than a horizontal coherence length of the sound structure, the intensity moments from the two calculations are in good agreement. Corrections for the short range behavior are presented. For these frequencies the computed mode coupling rates are extremely small, and the propagation is strongly adiabatic with a rapid decay of cross-mode coherence. Coupling effects are predicted to be important at kilohertz frequencies. Decay of cross-mode coherence has important implications for acoustic interactions with nonlinear internal waves: For the case in which the acoustic path is not at glancing incidence with a nonlinear internal-wave front, adiabatic phase randomizing effects lead to a significantly reduced influence of the nonlinear waves on both mean and mean square intensity.

  12. Comparison of experiment and models of geodesic acoustic mode frequency and amplitude geometric scaling in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, P.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Biancalani, A.; Palermo, F.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    In a set of dedicated ASDEX Upgrade shape-scan experiments, the influence of plasma geometry on the frequency and amplitude behaviour of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), measured by Doppler reflectometry, is studied. In both limiter and divertor configurations, the plasma elongation was varied between circular and highly elongated states (1.1<κ <1.8 ). Also, the edge safety factor was scanned between 3  <  q  <  5. The GAM frequency {ω\\text{GAM}} and amplitude are used to test several models (heuristic, fluid and gyrokinetic based), which incorporate various plasma geometry effects. The experimentally observed effect of decreasing {ω\\text{GAM}} with increasing κ is predicted by most models. Other geometric factors, such as inverse aspect ratio ε and Shafranov shift gradient {Δ\\prime} are also seen to be influential in determining a reliable lower {ω\\text{GAM}} boundary. The GAM amplitude is found to vary with boundary elongation {κ\\text{b}} and safety factor q. The collisional damping is compared to multiple models for the collisionless damping. Collisional damping appears to play a stronger role in the divertor configuration, while collisional and collisionless damping both may contribute to the GAM amplitude in the limiter configuration.

  13. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  14. MIPAS observations of longitudinal oscillations in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere: climatology of odd-parity daily frequency modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Comas, Maya; González-Galindo, Francisco; Funke, Bernd; Gardini, Angela; Jurado-Navarro, Aythami; López-Puertas, Manuel; Ward, William E.

    2016-09-01

    MIPAS global Sun-synchronous observations are almost fixed in local time. Subtraction of the descending and ascending node measurements at each longitude only includes the longitudinal oscillations with odd daily frequencies nodd from the Sun's perspective at 10:00. Contributions from the background atmosphere, daily-invariant zonal oscillations and tidal modes with even-parity daily frequencies vanish. We have determined longitudinal oscillations in MIPAS temperature with nodd and wavenumber k = 0-4 from the stratosphere to 150 km from April 2007 to March 2012. To our knowledge, this is the first time zonal oscillations in temperature have been derived pole to pole in this altitude range from a single instrument. The major findings are the detection of (1) migrating tides at northern and southern high latitudes; (2) significant k = 1 activity at extratropical and high latitudes, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere; (3) k = 3 and k = 4 eastward-propagating waves that penetrate the lower thermosphere with a significantly larger vertical wavelength than in the mesosphere; and (4) a migrating tide quasi-biennial oscillation in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere. MIPAS global measurements of longitudinal oscillations are useful for testing tide modeling in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region and as a lower boundary for models extending higher up in the atmosphere.

  15. Fiber-based photon-pair source capable of hybrid entanglement in frequency and transverse mode, controllably scalable to higher dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Delgado, D.; Ramirez-Alarcon, R.; Ortiz-Ricardo, E.; Monroy-Ruz, J.; Dominguez-Serna, F.; Cruz-Ramirez, H.; Garay-Palmett, K.; U’Ren, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a photon-pair source, based on the spontaneous four wave mixing (SFWM) process in a few-mode fiber, in a geometry which permits multiple, simultaneous SFWM processes, each associated with a distinct combination of transverse modes for the four participating waves. In our source: i) each process is group-velocity-matched so that it is, by design, nearly-factorable, and ii) the spectral separation between neighboring processes is greater than the marginal spectral width of each process. Consequently, there is a direct correspondence between the joint amplitude of each process and each of the Schmidt mode pairs of the overall two-photon state. Our approach permits hybrid entanglement in discrete frequency and in transverse mode, whereby control of the number of supported fiber transverse modes allows scalability to higher dimensions while spectral filtering may be used for straightforward Schmidt mode discrimination. PMID:27271284

  16. Fiber-based photon-pair source capable of hybrid entanglement in frequency and transverse mode, controllably scalable to higher dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Delgado, D; Ramirez-Alarcon, R; Ortiz-Ricardo, E; Monroy-Ruz, J; Dominguez-Serna, F; Cruz-Ramirez, H; Garay-Palmett, K; U'Ren, A B

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a photon-pair source, based on the spontaneous four wave mixing (SFWM) process in a few-mode fiber, in a geometry which permits multiple, simultaneous SFWM processes, each associated with a distinct combination of transverse modes for the four participating waves. In our source: i) each process is group-velocity-matched so that it is, by design, nearly-factorable, and ii) the spectral separation between neighboring processes is greater than the marginal spectral width of each process. Consequently, there is a direct correspondence between the joint amplitude of each process and each of the Schmidt mode pairs of the overall two-photon state. Our approach permits hybrid entanglement in discrete frequency and in transverse mode, whereby control of the number of supported fiber transverse modes allows scalability to higher dimensions while spectral filtering may be used for straightforward Schmidt mode discrimination. PMID:27271284

  17. Fiber-based photon-pair source capable of hybrid entanglement in frequency and transverse mode, controllably scalable to higher dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Delgado, D; Ramirez-Alarcon, R; Ortiz-Ricardo, E; Monroy-Ruz, J; Dominguez-Serna, F; Cruz-Ramirez, H; Garay-Palmett, K; U'Ren, A B

    2016-06-07

    We have designed and implemented a photon-pair source, based on the spontaneous four wave mixing (SFWM) process in a few-mode fiber, in a geometry which permits multiple, simultaneous SFWM processes, each associated with a distinct combination of transverse modes for the four participating waves. In our source: i) each process is group-velocity-matched so that it is, by design, nearly-factorable, and ii) the spectral separation between neighboring processes is greater than the marginal spectral width of each process. Consequently, there is a direct correspondence between the joint amplitude of each process and each of the Schmidt mode pairs of the overall two-photon state. Our approach permits hybrid entanglement in discrete frequency and in transverse mode, whereby control of the number of supported fiber transverse modes allows scalability to higher dimensions while spectral filtering may be used for straightforward Schmidt mode discrimination.

  18. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shichun; Geng, Rongli

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  19. Identifying Kinetic Plasma Wave Modes Observed in the Acceleration Regions in the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding plasma heating and transport across fluid, ion and electron scales is currently not well understood in astrophysical plasmas. We have recently identified (by determining the observational dispersion relation using multi-point spacecraft measurements) an ion-scale, large amplitude fast mode wave observed inside a fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex. The Poyinting flux of the fast mode wave packet was sufficient to produce the observed ~5 keV energy increase of ions of magnetosheath origin. In this followup work, we analyze in detail the other intervals with similar characteristics, where the cold magnetosheath population becomes significantly energized. We identify the plasma wave modes present and discuss whether their energy budget is sufficient for the observed level of energization.

  20. Real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain OCT system using graphics processing unit accelerated 4D signal processing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We realized a real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system using graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated 4D (3D+time) signal processing and visualization. For both standard and complex FD-OCT modes, the signal processing tasks were implemented on a dual-GPUs architecture that included λ-to-k spectral re-sampling, fast Fourier transform (FFT), modified Hilbert transform, logarithmic-scaling, and volume rendering. The maximum A-scan processing speeds achieved are >3,000,000 line/s for the standard 1024-pixel-FD-OCT, and >500,000 line/s for the complex 1024-pixel-FD-OCT. Multiple volumerendering of the same 3D data set were preformed and displayed with different view angles. The GPU-acceleration technique is highly cost-effective and can be easily integrated into most ultrahigh speed FD-OCT systems to overcome the 3D data processing and visualization bottlenecks.

  1. Greater Repertoire and Temporal Variability of Cross-Frequency Coupling (CFC) Modes in Resting-State Neuromagnetic Recordings among Children with Reading Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Cross-frequency, phase-to-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations at rest may serve as the substrate that supports information exchange between functionally specialized neuronal populations both within and between cortical regions. The study utilizes novel algorithms to identify prominent instantaneous modes of cross-frequency coupling and their temporal stability in resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from 25 students experiencing severe reading difficulties (RD) and 27 age-matched non-impaired readers (NI). Phase coherence estimates were computed in order to identify the prominent mode of PAC interaction for each sensor, sensor pair, and pair of frequency bands (from δ to γ) at successive time windows of the continuous MEG record. The degree of variability in the characteristic frequency-pair PAC(f1-f2) modes over time was also estimated. Results revealed a wider repertoire of prominent PAC interactions in RD as compared to NI students, suggesting an altered functional substrate for information exchange between neuronal assemblies in the former group. Moreover, RD students showed significant variability in PAC modes over time. This temporal instability of PAC values was particularly prominent: (a) within and between right hemisphere temporo-parietal and occipito-temporal sensors and, (b) between left hemisphere frontal, temporal, and occipito-temporal sensors and corresponding right hemisphere sites. Altered modes of neuronal population coupling may help account for extant data revealing reduced, task-related neurophysiological and hemodynamic activation in left hemisphere regions involved in the reading network in RD. Moreover, the spatial distribution of pronounced instability of cross-frequency coupling modes in this group may provide an explanation for previous reports suggesting the presence of inefficient compensatory mechanisms to support reading. PMID:27199698

  2. Greater Repertoire and Temporal Variability of Cross-Frequency Coupling (CFC) Modes in Resting-State Neuromagnetic Recordings among Children with Reading Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I.; Laskaris, Nikolaos A.; Simos, Panagiotis G.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-frequency, phase-to-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations at rest may serve as the substrate that supports information exchange between functionally specialized neuronal populations both within and between cortical regions. The study utilizes novel algorithms to identify prominent instantaneous modes of cross-frequency coupling and their temporal stability in resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from 25 students experiencing severe reading difficulties (RD) and 27 age-matched non-impaired readers (NI). Phase coherence estimates were computed in order to identify the prominent mode of PAC interaction for each sensor, sensor pair, and pair of frequency bands (from δ to γ) at successive time windows of the continuous MEG record. The degree of variability in the characteristic frequency-pair PACf1−f2 modes over time was also estimated. Results revealed a wider repertoire of prominent PAC interactions in RD as compared to NI students, suggesting an altered functional substrate for information exchange between neuronal assemblies in the former group. Moreover, RD students showed significant variability in PAC modes over time. This temporal instability of PAC values was particularly prominent: (a) within and between right hemisphere temporo-parietal and occipito-temporal sensors and, (b) between left hemisphere frontal, temporal, and occipito-temporal sensors and corresponding right hemisphere sites. Altered modes of neuronal population coupling may help account for extant data revealing reduced, task-related neurophysiological and hemodynamic activation in left hemisphere regions involved in the reading network in RD. Moreover, the spatial distribution of pronounced instability of cross-frequency coupling modes in this group may provide an explanation for previous reports suggesting the presence of inefficient compensatory mechanisms to support reading. PMID:27199698

  3. Waveguide for transmitting and radiating high-frequency, high-power ultrasound using higher mode vibrations of a cylindrical rod.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hajime

    2005-04-01

    It was shown that a cylindrical solid rod, with a diameter several times larger than the wavelength, can be used as an efficient waveguide for transmitting and radiating high-power ultrasound at higher frequencies. A number of cylindrical rods of varying size and material were tested, and their efficiency as a waveguide was evaluated by the measurements of mechanoacoustic efficiency when the radiating end of the rod was immersed in water for an acoustical load. As an example of waveguide application, a mock-up water atomizer was constructed and shown to work stably at a continuous input of 200 W at 500 kHz. As a consequence of analytical and experimental considerations of the higher mode vibrations of cylindrical rods, a diagram for the optimal design of the waveguides was constructed. For instance, an aluminum alloy rod 6.9 cm in diameter and 23.3 cm in length yielded a mechanoacoustic efficiency as high as 88% at 500 kHz. For high temperature applications, the cylindrical rod can be used as a radiator of heat, as well as for a separator of the piezoelectric transducer from the hot object.

  4. Tunable, Low Frequency Microwave Generation from AWG Based Closely-Spaced Dual-Wavelength Single Longitudinal-Mode Fibre Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Latif, A. A.; Talib, J. M.; Harun, S. W.

    2013-06-01

    Stable, closely-spaced Dual-Wavelength Fibre Lasers (DWFLs) have high potential for applications such as Radio-over-Fibre and optical sensing. In this work, a DWFL using two Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWGs) to generate a closely-spaced dual-wavelength output is proposed and demonstrated. A 1 m long highly doped Leikki Er80-8/125 Erbium Doped Fibre (EDF) is used as the linear gain medium, while two AWGs are used to generate the closely-spaced lasing wavelengths. A Mach-Zehnder modulator, driven at 180 kHz, splits the closely spaced wavelengths into two clearly defined wavelengths, while a 7 cm long un-pumped Leikki Er80-8/125 EDF and sub-ring cavity is used to suppress unwanted side-modes. Close spacing of between 0.01 to 0.03 nm are obtained, with beating frequencies of between 1.4 to 3.2 GHz. The output is highly stable, with almost no fluctuations over the test period.

  5. Frequency tuning of single photons from a whispering-gallery mode resonator to MHz-wide transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, G.; Vogl, U.; Sedlmeir, F.; Strekalov, D. V.; Otterpohl, A.; Averchenko, V.; Schwefel, H. G. L.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum repeaters rely on interfacing flying qubits with quantum memories. The most common implementations include a narrowband single photon matched in bandwidth and central frequency to an atomic system. Previously, we demonstrated the compatibility of our versatile source of heralded single photons, which is based on parametric down-conversion in a triply resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator, with alkaline transitions [Schunk et al., Optica 2015, 2, 773]. In this paper, we analyse our source in terms of phase matching, available wavelength-tuning mechanisms and applications to narrowband atomic systems. We resonantly address the D1 transitions of caesium and rubidium with this optical parametric oscillator pumped above its oscillation threshold. Below threshold, the efficient coupling of single photons to atomic transitions heralded by single telecom-band photons is demonstrated. Finally, we present an accurate analytical description of our observations. Providing the demonstrated flexibility in connecting various atomic transitions with telecom wavelengths, we show a promising approach to realize an essential building block for quantum repeaters.

  6. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  7. Effects of impedance matching network on the discharge mode transitions in a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Yuan, G. Y.; Gao, W.; Sun, J. C.

    2008-06-15

    In inductively coupled plasma sources, discharge transitions from electrostatic mode (E mode) to electromagnetic mode (H mode) and from H mode to E mode occur. In previous studies, only a few works paid attention to the effects of the impedance matching network. Cunge et al. [Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 8, 576 (1999)] investigated the E-H and H-E mode transitions under two different impedance matching situations, but no physical mechanism or interpretation was presented. This issue is remained to be systematically and quantitatively investigated, and the underlying mechanism to be unveiled. In this paper, the effects of the impedance matching network were experimentally studied in electropositive argon gas by varying the series capacitance in an inversely L-shaped matching network. The positive and negative feedback regions are established according to the effect of varying the series capacitance on the output power of the rf power supply. It was found that under the same experimental parameters, the discharge mode transitions are apt to be discontinuous and continuous in the positive and negative feedback regions, respectively. In addition, the critical coil rf current (or applied power) at the mode transition, the hysteretic loop width, and the difference in applied power during the discharge mode transition vary with the series capacitance. The critical coil rf current at the E-H mode transition is not always higher than that at the H-E mode transition.

  8. Dual-polarization modes and self-heterodyne noise in a single-frequency 2.1-microm microchip Ho,Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    He, C; Killinger, D K

    1994-03-15

    We have observed, for the first time to our knowledge, residual stress-induced birefringent dual-polarization modes in a diode-pumped, single-frequency, microchip cw 2.0914-microm Ho,Tm:YAG laser. The two orthogonally polarized modes were separated in frequency by approximately 12 MHz and, when photodetected, produced a 12-MHz self-heterodyne beat signal. The self-heterodyne signal could be eliminated by an external lambda/4 plate and a polarizer to filter out one of the modes, but this required regulation of the pump laser power to better than 1%. These results have important implications for use of the microchip Ho,Tm:YAG laser in a heterodyne detection coherent lidar.

  9. Improving the Out-Coupling of a Metal-Metal Terahertz Frequency Quantum Cascade Laser Through Integration of a Hybrid Mode Section into the Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fobbe, Tobias; Nong, Hanond; Schott, Rüdiger; Pal, Shovon; Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Zhu, Jingxuan; Han, Yingjun; Li, Lianhe; Dean, Paul; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Wieck, Andreas D.; Jukam, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    A hybrid mode section is integrated into the end of the metal-metal waveguide of a terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) by removing sub-wavelength portions of the top metal layer. This allows a hybrid mode to penetrate into the air, which reduces the effective index of the mode and improves the out-coupling performance at the facet. The transmission of the hybrid section is further increased by ensuring its length fulfills the criterion for constructive interference. These simple modifications to a 2.5-THz metal-metal QCL waveguide result in a significant increase in the output emission power. In addition, simulations show that further improvements in out-coupling efficiency can be achieved for lower frequencies with effective refractive indices close to the geometric mean of the indices of the metal-metal waveguide and air.

  10. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  11. A robust method for analyzing the instantaneous attributes of seismic data: The instantaneous frequency estimation based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangfang; Chen, Wenchao; Zhou, Yanhui

    2014-12-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) includes two procedures. First, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to decompose signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) before the Hilbert transform (HT) of these IMFs are calculated. Compared to the conventional Hilbert transform (HT), HHT is more sensitive to thickness variations of seismic beds. However, random noise in seismic signal may cause the mixture of the modes from HHT. The recent ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) presents the advantages in decreasing mode mixture and has the promising potential in seismic signal analysis. Currently, EEMD is mainly used in seismic spectral decomposition and noise attenuation. We extend the application of EEMD based instantaneous frequency to the analysis of bed thickness. The tests on complex Marmousi2 model and a 2D field data show that EEMD is more effective in weakening mode mixtures contained in the IMFs, compared with that calculated by EMD. Furthermore, the EEMD based instantaneous frequency is more sensitive to the seismic thickness variation than that based on EMD and more consistent with the stratigraphic structure, which means that E-IFPs are more advantageous in characterizing reservoirs.

  12. A new efficient method for determining weighted power spectra: detection of low-frequency solar p-modes by analysis of BiSON data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. T.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; New, R.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new and highly efficient algorithm for computing a power spectrum made from evenly spaced data which combines the noise-reducing advantages of the weighted fit with the computational advantages of the fast Fourier transform. We apply this method to a 10-yr data set of the solar p-mode oscillations obtained by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) and thereby uncover three new low-frequency modes. These are the ℓ= 2, n= 5 and n= 7 modes and the ℓ= 3, n=7 mode. In the case of the ℓ= 2, n= 5 mode, this is believed to be the first such identification of this mode in the literature. The statistical weights needed for the method are derived from a combination of the real data and a sophisticated simulation of the instrument performance. Variations in the weights are due mainly to the differences in the noise characteristics of the various BiSON instruments, the change in those characteristics over time and the changing line-of-sight velocity between the stations and the Sun. It should be noted that a weighted data set will have a more time-dependent signal than an unweighted set and that, consequently, its frequency spectrum will be more susceptible to aliasing.

  13. Characterization of the strongly coupled, low-frequency vibrational modes of the special pair of photosynthetic reaction centers via isotopic labeling of the cofactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, K.; Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F.; Chynwat, V.; Erickson, J.P.; Frank, H.A.

    1997-01-15

    Low-frequency (50-425-cm{sup -1}), near-infrared-excitation resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides in which the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) cofactors are labeled with {sup 15}N or {sup 26}Mg. The focus of the study is the identification of the very low-frequency modes of the dimer of BChls (P) which are strongly coupled to the P{sup *} electronic transition which initiates the primary charge separation process in RCs. In order to gain a complete picture of the vibrational characteristics, the low-frequency RR spectra of the accessory BChls and the BPhs were examined in addition to those of P. The RR spectra of the isotopically labeled cofactors in the RCs were compared with one another and with the spectra obtained for solid-film samples of isolated, isotopically labeled BChl and BPh. Based on these comparisons and the predictions of semiempirical normal coordinate calculations, a self-consistent set of assignments has been developed for all the RR active modes of the different BChl and BPh cofactors in the RC which are observed in the very low-frequency regime (50-250 cm{sup -1}). The assignments indicate that the strongly coupled, low-frequency modes of P all involve either deformations localized on pyrrole ring I or the macrocycle core. 45 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Accelerate the transition of radioisotopes or unwanted weapons-grade ^239Pu into stable nuclei with a system of high frequency modulation for a net energy gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2006-10-01

    A process of high frequency stimulation of nucleons can be utilized for the accelerated fission, decay or controlled transition of unstable isotopes. For example ^238U could be persuaded to transition promptly into ^206Pb, where portions of the total mass difference of 29873.802 MeV per nucleus becomes available energy. The proposals of this paper describe an effective system for nuclei stimulation configured to accelerate such a series of 14 transitions over several milliseconds, instead of 4.47 x 10^9 years. Positive ions or ionized capsules of fuel suspended by magnetic fields and subjected to the system of correlated frequency modulation of multiple beam lines, tailored to the specific target, will emit sufficient energy to stimulate subsequent targets. The system can be applied to all radioisotopes, including ^232Th, nuclear waste product isotopes such as ^239Pu, and a variety of other suitable unstable or stable nuclei. Through the proposed confinement system and application of high frequency stimulation in the 10^22 to 10^24 Hz regime, the change in rest mass can be applied to both the fragmentation of subsequent, periodically injected targets, and the production of heat, making a continuous supply of energy possible. The system allows the particle fragmentation process to be brought into the laboratory and provides potential solutions to the safe disposal of fissile material.

  15. Accelerate the transition of radioisotopes and unwanted weapons-grade ^239Pu into stable nuclei with a system of high frequency modulation for a net energy gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2006-10-01

    A process of high frequency stimulation of nucleons can be utilized for the accelerated fission, decay or controlled transition of unstable isotopes. ^238U could be persuaded to transition promptly into the stable ^206Pb isotope, where a portion of the total mass difference of 29873.802 MeV per nucleus becomes available energy. The proposals of this paper describe an effective system for nuclei stimulation configured to accelerate such a series of 14 transitions over several milliseconds, instead of 4.47 x 10^9 years. Positive ions or ionized capsules of fuel suspended by magnetic fields and subjected to the system of correlated frequency modulation of multiple beam lines, tailored to the specific target, will emit sufficient energy to stimulate subsequent targets. The system can be applied to all radioisotopes, nuclear waste product isotopes such as ^239Pu, and a variety of other suitable unstable or stable nuclei. Through the proposed confinement system and application of high frequency stimulation in the 10^22 to 10^24 Hz regime, the change in mass can be applied to both the fragmentation of subsequent, periodically injected targets, and the production of heat, making a continuous supply of energy possible. The system allows the particle fragmentation process to be brought into the lab and provides potential solutions to the safe disposal of fissile material.

  16. Accelerate the transition of radioisotopes and unwanted weapons-grade ^239Pu into stable nuclei with a system of high frequency modulation for a net energy gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamfiloff, Eugene

    2006-11-01

    A process of high frequency stimulation of nucleons can be utilized for the accelerated fission, decay or controlled transition of unstable isotopes. ^238U could be persuaded to transition promptly into the stable ^206Pb isotope, where a portion of the total mass difference of 29873.802 MeV per nucleus becomes available energy. The proposals of this paper describe an effective system for nuclei stimulation configured to accelerate such a series of 14 transitions over several milliseconds, instead of 4.47 x 10^9 years. Positive ions or ionized capsules of fuel suspended by magnetic fields and subjected to the system of correlated frequency modulation of multiple beam lines, tailored to the specific target, will emit sufficient energy to stimulate subsequent targets. The system can be applied to all radioisotopes, nuclear waste product isotopes such as ^239Pu, and a variety of other suitable unstable or stable nuclei. Through the proposed confinement system and application of high frequency stimulation in the 10^22 to 10^24 Hz regime, the change in mass can be applied to both the fragmentation of subsequent, periodically injected targets, and the production of heat, making a continuous supply of energy possible. The system allows the particle fragmentation process to be brought into the lab and provides potential solutions to the safe disposal of fissile material.

  17. Observation of Self-Frequency Doubling in Diode-Pumped Mode-Locked Nd-Doped La3Ga5SiO14 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Xing; Wang, Zhao-Hua; Tian, Wen-Long; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Yu, Hao-Hai; Zhang, Huai-Jin; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2015-01-01

    A diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd-doped La3Ga5SiO14 (Nd:LGS) laser is realized by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. With the pump power of 2 W, we obtain a 532 nm self-frequency doubling (SFD) laser together with a 10.9 ps fundamental laser at the repetition rate of 173.7 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time for self-frequency doubling in the diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:LGS laser. Benefited from the diode lasers and its self-frequency doubling property, Nd:LGS could be a potential candidate for compact, stable and cheap ultrafast green laser sources.

  18. Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution from a high frequency mode in the presence of an internal rotor: Classical thick-layer diffusion and quantum localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Keshavamurthy, Srihari

    2007-08-01

    We study the effect of an internal rotor on the classical and quantum intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) dynamics of a model system with three degrees of freedom. The system is based on a Hamiltonian proposed by Martens and Reinhardt [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5621 (1990)] to study IVR in the excited electronic state of para-fluorotoluene. We explicitly construct the state space and show, confirming the mechanism proposed by Martens and Reinhardt, that an excited high frequency mode relaxes via diffusion along a thick layer of chaos created by the low frequency-rotor interactions. However, the corresponding quantum dynamics exhibits no appreciable relaxation of the high frequency mode. We attribute the quantum suppression of the classical thick-layer diffusion to the rotor selection rules and, possibly, dynamical localization effects.

  19. Two-mode injection-locked FP laser receiver: a regenerator for long-distance stable fiber delivery of radio-frequency standards.

    PubMed

    Nikas, Thomas; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-03-15

    We propose and experimentally validate a new cost-effective optical receiver-regenerator scheme for long-distance microwave-frequency standard dissemination, based on the properties of dual-wavelength injection locked Fabry-Perot (FP) lasers. The regenerator FP laser is injection locked to one of its longitudinal modes by the incoming intensity-modulated light carrying the microwave-frequency standard. The light of a local CW laser is also injected in the regenerator FP, locking it to an adjacent mode. The dual-injection locked laser reproduces the sinusoidal microwave-frequency standard on both wavelengths. The regenerated original signal is transmitted to the next node, whilst the local wavelength is fed back to the previous node for phase error extraction and link compensation. The performance of the proposed regenerator is demonstrated with Allan deviation and phase-noise measurements. PMID:25768138

  20. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation.