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Sample records for accelerating polarized protons

  1. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  2. Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, Thomas

    2008-02-06

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  3. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN AGS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2007-09-10

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  4. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  5. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  6. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  7. ACCELERATING AND COLLIDING POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC WITH SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE - WANG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.D.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180{sup o} about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. We report on our experiences during commissioning and operation of collider with polarized protons.

  8. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION AT THE BROOKHAVEN AGS - AN UPDATE.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BROWN,K.A.; GLENN,W.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; MONTAG,C.; PTITSYN,V.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; ZELENSKI,A.; ZENO,K.; CADMAN,B.; SPINKA,H.; UNDERWOOD,D.; RANJBAR,V.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC spin design goal assumes 2 x 10{sup 11} proton/bunch with 70% polarization. As the injector to RHIC, polarized protons have been accelerated at the AGS for years to increase the polarization transmission efficiency. Several novel techniques have been applied in the AGS to overcome the intrinsic and imperfection resonances. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. Progress on understanding the beam polarization behavior is presented. The outlook and future plan are also discussed.

  9. Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-06-01

    Presented is an overview of the program for acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS and their injection into the RHIC collider. The problem of depolarizing resonances in strong focusing circulator accelerators is discussed. The intrinsic resonances are jumped over by the fast tune jump, and a partial Siberian Snake is used to compensate for over forty imperfection resonances in the AGS. Two sets of full Siberian Snake and spin rotators will be employed in RHIC.

  10. Acceleration of polarized protons at Saturne: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Arvieu, J.

    1982-03-20

    The accelertor SATURNE is a synchrotron which accelerates particles up to P/Z = 3.8 GeV/c. Thus the maximum energy for protons T/sub p/ is about 3 GeV, and for deuterons T/sub d/ is about 2.3 GeV. It is equipped with a polarized ion source (HYPERION, the name of a satellite of the Saturne planet) of the ''atomic beam'' type producing either protons or deuterons with either vector or tensor polarization. A heavy-ion source (CREYBIS) for production of ions up to mass 40 is now being tested.

  11. A Study of Polarized Proton Acceleration in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A. U.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Molodojentsev, A.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.; Hatanaka, K.

    2007-06-13

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductve partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  12. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  13. First test of a partial Siberian snake for acceleration of polarized protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caussyn, D. D.; Baiod, R.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Minty, M. G.; Nurushev, T. S.; Ohmori, C.; Phelps, R. A.; Raczkowski, D. B.; Ratner, L. G.; Schwandt, P.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sperisen, F.; Przewoski, B. von; Wienands, U.; Wong, V. K.

    1995-09-01

    We recently studied the first acceleration of a spin-polarized proton beam through a depolarizing resonance using a partial Siberian snake. We accelerated polarized protons from 95 to 140 MeV with a constant 10% partial Siberian snake obtained using rampable solenoids. The 10% partial snake suppressed all observable depolarization during acceleration due to the Gγ=2 imperfection depolarizing resonance which occurred near 108 MeV. However, 20% and 30% partial Siberian snakes apparently moved an intrinsic depolarizing resonance, normally near 177 MeV, into our energy range; this caused some interesting, although not-yet-fully understood, depolarization.

  14. Enhancement of proton energy by polarization switch in laser acceleration of multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2013-10-15

    We present a scheme to significantly increase the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by a laser beam without increasing the input power. This improvement is accomplished by first irradiating the foil several wave periods with circular polarization and then switching the laser to linear polarization. The polarization switch increases the electron temperature and thereby moves more electrons ahead of the proton layer, resulting in a space charge electric field pushing the protons forwards. The scaling of the proton energy evolution with respect to the switching time is studied, and an optimal switching time is obtained. The proton energy for the case with optimal switching time can reach about 80 MeV with an input laser power of 70 TW, an improvement of more than 30% compared to the case without polarization switch.

  15. Double-Relativistic-Electron-Layer Proton Acceleration with High-Contrast Circular-Polarization Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Nai-Yan; Tang, Xiu-Zhang; Shi, Yi-Jin; Zhang, Shan

    2013-02-01

    A new laser-proton acceleration scheme consisting of two relativistic electron layers, a suprathermal electron layer and a thermal electron cloud is proposed for a0 ≳ 80σ0, where a0 is the normalized laser field and σ0 is the normalized plasma surface density. This is essentially different from target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration. The persistent opaqueness of the first relativistic electron layer for the incident circular-polarization laser pulse and electron recirculation are key points in forming the new acceleration scheme. A proton beam with a uniform energy distribution in the energy range 1-2 GeV and a monoenergetic proton beam with hundreds of MeV have been predicted for a0 = 39.5.

  16. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The RHIC spin program requires 2 x 10{sup 11} proton/bunch with 70% polarization. As the injector to RHIC, AGS is the bottleneck for preserving polarization: there is no space for a full snake to overcome numerous depolarizing resonances. An ac dipole and a partial snake have been used to preserve beam polarization in the past few years. Two helical snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate all depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the setup and preliminary results.

  17. Polarized Proton Acceleration in the AGS with Two Helical Partial Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Takano, J.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2007-06-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  18. Polarized Proton Acceleration in the AGS with Two Helical Partial Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Lin, F.; Okamura, M.

    2007-06-13

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  19. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TSOUPAS, N.; WOOD, J.; YIP, K.; ZELENSKI, A.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-26

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes with double pitch design have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  20. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  1. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; MacLellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources.

  2. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  3. THE POLARIZATION PARAMETER IN ELASTIC PROTON-PROTON SCATTERING FROM .75 TO 2.84 GEV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PROTON SCATTERING, POLARIZATION), (*NUCLEAR SPINS, POLARIZATION), PROTON REACTIONS, ELASTIC SCATTERING, MEASUREMENT, PARTICLE ACCELERATOR TARGETS, LIQUEFIED GASES, HELIUM, CARBON, ANTIPARTICLES , PROTON CROSS SECTIONS

  4. First Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fliller, R.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; van Zeijts, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Deshpande, A.; Kurita, K.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Syphers, M.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.; Ranjbar, V.; Tojo, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Okamura, M.; Saito, N.

    2003-05-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180° about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

  5. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  6. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  7. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T.; Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.

    2013-01-15

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate {approx}200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  8. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-04

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  10. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  11. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  12. Polarized proton beams since the ZGS

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses research involving polarized proton beams since the ZGS`s demise. He begins by reminding the attendee that in 1973 the ZGS accelerated the world`s first high energy polarized proton beam; all in attendance at this meeting can be proud of this accomplishment. A few ZGS polarized proton beam experiments were done in the early 1970`s; then from about 1976 until 1 October 1979, the majority of the ZGS running time was polarized running. A great deal of fundamental physics was done with the polarized beam when the ZGS ran as a dedicated polarized proton beam from about Fall 1977 until it shut down on 1 October 1979. The newly created polarization enthusiats then dispersed; some spread polarized seeds al over the world by polarizing beams elsewhere; some wound up running the High Energy and SSC programs at DOE.

  13. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  14. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  15. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  16. Proton acceleration from magnetized overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, Deep Kumar; Das, Nilakshi; Patel, Kartik

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration by an ultraintense short pulse circularly polarized laser from an overdense three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) 3D-PIC simulations. The axial magnetic field modifies the dielectric constant of the plasma, which causes a difference in the behaviour of ponderomotive force in case of left and right circularly polarized laser pulse. When the laser is right circularly polarized, the ponderomotive force gets enhanced due to cyclotron effects generating high energetic electrons, which, on reaching the target rear side accelerates the protons via target normal sheath acceleration process. On the other hand, in case of left circular polarization, the effects get reversed causing a suppression of the ponderomotive force at a short distance and lead towards a rise in the radiation pressure, which results in the effective formation of laser piston. Thus, the axial magnetic field enhances the effect of radiation pressure in case of left circularly polarized laser resulting in the generation of high energetic protons at the target front side. The transverse motion of protons get reduced as they gyrate around the axial magnetic field which increases the beam collimation to some extent. The optimum thickness of the overdense plasma target is found to be increased in the presence of an axial magnetic field.

  17. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-19

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  18. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-11

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  19. Status of Proton Polarization in Rhic and AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, W. W.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Gupta, R.; Igo, G.; Iriso, U.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kurita, K.; Luccio, A. U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Montag, C.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Okamura, M.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satogata, T.; Spinka, H.; Stephenson, E. J.; Svirida, D. N.; Takano, J.; Tepikian, S.; Tomas, R.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Whitten, C.; Wood, J.; Zeijts, J. Van; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2005-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has collided protons with both transverse and longitudinal polarization at a centre-of-mass energy of 200 GeV. Future running will extend this to 500 GeV. This paper describes the methods used to accelerate and manipulate polarized proton beams in RHIC and its injectors. Special techniques include the use of a partial Siberian snake and an AC dipole in the AGS. In RHIC we use superconducting helical Siberian snakes for acceleration, and eight superconducting helical rotators for independent control of polarization directions at two interaction regions. The present status and future plans for the polarized proton program will be reviewed.

  20. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  1. Study of the Polarization Deterioration During Physics Stores in RHIC Polarized Proton Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Qin, Q.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2016-02-01

    As the only high energy polarized proton collider in the world, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has achieved a great success in colliding polarized proton beams up to 255GeV per beam energy with over 50% average store polarizations for spin physics studies. With the help of Siberian snakes as well as outstanding beam control during the acceleration, polarization loss during acceleration up to 100 GeV is negligible. However, about 10% polarization loss was observed between acceleration from 100 GeV to 255 GeV. In addition, a mild polarization deterioration during long store for physics data taking was also observed. In this paper, studies in understanding the store depolarizing mechanism is reported, including the analysis of polarization deterioration data based on the past couple of RHIC polarized proton runs.

  2. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined.

  3. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  4. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils.

  5. Polarized Proton Collisions at 205GeV at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J. M.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Courant, E.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gill, R.; Glenn, J.; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kewisch, J.; Luccio, A.; Luo, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Okada, H.; Pilat, F.; Mackay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wise, T.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2006-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions.

  6. Polarized proton collisions at 205 GeV at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Bai, M; Roser, T; Ahrens, L; Alekseev, I G; Alessi, J; Beebe-Wang, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Bravar, A; Brennan, J M; Bruno, D; Bunce, G; Courant, E; Drees, A; Fischer, W; Gardner, C; Gill, R; Glenn, J; Haeberli, W; Huang, H; Jinnouchi, O; Kewisch, J; Luccio, A; Luo, Y; Nakagawa, I; Okada, H; Pilat, F; Mackay, W W; Makdisi, Y; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Satogata, T; Stephenson, E; Svirida, D; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Wise, T; Zelenski, A; Zeno, K; Zhang, S Y

    2006-05-05

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions.

  7. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  8. AGS polarized proton operation in run 8.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.A.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A.U.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.

    2008-06-23

    Dual partial snake scheme has been used for the Brookhaven AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss. Several schemes such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, and injection-on-the-fly were tested in the AGS to mitigate the loss. This paper presents the experiment results and analysis.

  9. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  10. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H2-O2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  11. Explore the possibility of accelerating polarized He-3 beam in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2012-05-20

    As the world's first high energy polarized proton collider, RHIC has made significant progresses in measuring the proton spin structure in the past decade. In order to have better understanding of the contribution of up quarks and down quarks to the proton spin structure, collisions of high energy polarized neutron beams are required. Polarized He-3 beams offer an effectiveway to provide polarized neutron beams. In this paper, we present studies of accelerating polarized He-3 in RHIC with the current dual snake configuration. Possibilities of adding two more pairs of snakes for accelerating polarized He-3 were explored. Results of six snake configuration in RHIC are also reported in the paper.

  12. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  13. NICA Facility in Polarized Proton and Deuteron Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    NICA project at JINR is aimed at the experiments with polarized protons and deuterons at both as fixed target and colliding mode over beam momentum range from 2 to 13.5GeV/c. Polarized beams are injected into collider from the Nuclotron-superconducting synchrotron. Dynamic solenoid “Siberian snakes” are proposed to prevent resonance depolarization of proton beam during acceleration in the Nuclotron up to momentum of 6 GeV/c and further in the collider up to the maximum momentum after storage and stochastic cooling of necessary number of particles in each ring. By means of pair of the Snakes placed in the opposite collider straight sections “spin transparency” mode is provided. Stabilization and control of the polarization is reached due to “weak field” solenoids integrated in the lattice. The proposed scheme of the polarization control is universal and can be used for different ion spices (p, d, t, He3…).

  14. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  15. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  16. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  17. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  18. Improvement Plans of Fermilab's Proton Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The flagship of Fermilab's long term research program is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, which will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of the DUNE require a proton beam with a power of some 2.4 MW at 120 GeV, which is roughly four times the current maximum power. Here I discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, our plans for construction of the SRF proton linac as key part of the Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), outline the main challenges toward multi-MW beam power operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex and the staged plan to achieve the required performance over the next 15 years.

  19. Neutrino mixing in accelerated proton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Dharam Vir; Labun, Lance; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the inverse β-decay of accelerated protons in the context of neutrino flavor superpositions (mixings) in mass eigenstates. The process p→ n ℓ+ ν_{ℓ} is kinematically allowed because the accelerating field provides the rest energy difference between initial and final states. The rate of p→ n conversions can be evaluated in either the laboratory frame (where the proton is accelerating) or the co-moving frame (where the proton is at rest and interacts with an effective thermal bath of ℓ and ν_{ℓ} due to the Unruh effect). By explicit calculation, we show that the rates in the two frames disagree when taking into account neutrino mixings, because the weak interaction couples to charge eigenstates whereas gravity couples to neutrino mass eigenstates (D.V. Ahluwalia et al., arXiv:1505.04082 [hep-ph]). The contradiction could be resolved experimentally, potentially yielding new information on the origins of neutrino masses.

  20. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  1. Studies of polarized beam acceleration and Siberian Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    We studied depolarization mechanisms of polarized proton acceleration in high energy accelerators with snakes and found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two. Thus the available betatron tune space becomes smaller. Some constraints on polarized beam colliders were also examined.

  2. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe the electrical and mechanical properites of particle accelerator rf cavities in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion will be limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common pratice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text.

  3. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  4. Spin flipping a stored polarized proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caussyn, D. D.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Ellison, T. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Ohmori, C.

    1994-11-01

    We recently studied the spin flipping of a vertically polarized, stored 139-MeV proton beam. To flip the spin, we induced an rf depolarizing resonance by sweeping our rf solenoid magnet's frequency through the resonance frequency. With multiple spin flips, we found a polarization loss of 0.0000+/-0.0005 per spin flip under the best conditions; this loss increased significantly for small changes in the conditions. Minimizing the depolarization during each spin flip is especially important because frequent spin flipping could significantly reduce the systematic errors in stored polarized-beam experiments.

  5. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  6. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  7. Laser wakefield acceleration of polarized electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, D. V.; Andreev, N. E.; Cros, B.

    2016-11-01

    The acceleration of highly polarized electron beams are widely used in state-of-the-art high-energy physics experiments. In this work, a model for investigation of polarization dynamics of electron beams in the laser-plasma accelerator depending on the initial energy of electrons was developed and tested. To obtain the evolution of the trajectory and momentum of the electron for modeling its acceleration the wakefield structure was determined. The spin precession of the beam electron was described by Thomas-Bargman-Michel-Telegdi equations. The evolution of the electron beam polarization was investigated for zero-emittance beams with zero-energy spread.

  8. Proton tautomerism for strong polarization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroelectrics based on proton tautomerism are promising in low-field and above-room-temperature operations. Here seven organic ferroelectric crystals are examined to search for efficient switching of strong spontaneous polarization on proton tautomerism. Solution-grown crystals exhibit strong pinning of ferroelectric domain walls, but excellent switching performance is awakened by depinning domain walls under thermal annealing and/or repetitive bipolar pulses with a high voltage. Compared with ferroelectric polymers such as polyvinylidefluoride, the optimized polarizations are comparable or stronger in magnitude whereas the coercive fields are two orders of magnitude weaker. The polarization of croconic acid, in particular, breaks its own record for organic systems in increasing from 21 to 30 μC cm-2 and now exceeds those of some commercial ferroelectric materials such as SrBi2Ta2O9 and BaTiO3. Optimization reduces the discrepancy of the spontaneous polarization with the results of the first-principles calculations to less than 15%. The cooperative roles of proton transfer and π-bond switching are discussed by employing the point-charge model and hydrogen-bond geometry.

  9. Proton tautomerism for strong polarization switching

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Ferroelectrics based on proton tautomerism are promising in low-field and above-room-temperature operations. Here seven organic ferroelectric crystals are examined to search for efficient switching of strong spontaneous polarization on proton tautomerism. Solution-grown crystals exhibit strong pinning of ferroelectric domain walls, but excellent switching performance is awakened by depinning domain walls under thermal annealing and/or repetitive bipolar pulses with a high voltage. Compared with ferroelectric polymers such as polyvinylidefluoride, the optimized polarizations are comparable or stronger in magnitude whereas the coercive fields are two orders of magnitude weaker. The polarization of croconic acid, in particular, breaks its own record for organic systems in increasing from 21 to 30 μC cm−2 and now exceeds those of some commercial ferroelectric materials such as SrBi2Ta2O9 and BaTiO3. Optimization reduces the discrepancy of the spontaneous polarization with the results of the first-principles calculations to less than 15%. The cooperative roles of proton transfer and π-bond switching are discussed by employing the point-charge model and hydrogen-bond geometry. PMID:28205550

  10. RHIC: The World's First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider (423rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Mei

    2007-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has been colliding polarized proton at a beam energy of 100 billion electron volts (GeV) since 2001. In addition to reporting upon the progress of RHIC polarized-proton program, this talk will focus upon the mechanisms that cause the beam to depolarize and the strategies developed to overcome this. As the world first polarized-proton collider, RHIC is designed to collide polarized protons up to an energy of 250 GeV, thereby providing an unique opportunity to measure the contribution made by the gluon to a proton's spin and to study the spin structure of proton. Unlike other high-energy proton colliders, however, the challenge for RHIC is to overcome the mechanisms that cause partial or total loss of beam polarization, which is due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. In RHIC, two Siberian snakes have been used to avoid these spin depolarizing resonances, which are driven by vertical closed-orbit distortion and vertical betatron oscillations. As a result, polarized-proton beams have been accelerated to 100 GeV without polarization loss, although depolarization has been observed during acceleration from 100 GeV to 205 GeV.

  11. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  12. Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Protons: The First 10 Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chee K.; Reames, Donald V.

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration at a parallel coronal shock is modeled with self-consistent Alfven wave excitation and shock transmission. 18 - 50 keV seed protons at 0.1% of plasma proton density are accelerated in 10 minutes to a power-law intensity spectrum rolling over at 300 MeV by a 2500km s-1 shock traveling outward from 3.5 solar radius, for typical coronal conditions and low ambient wave intensities. Interaction of high-energy protons of large pitch-angles with Alfven waves amplified by low-energy protons of small pitch angles is key to rapid acceleration. Shock acceleration is not significantly retarded by sunward streaming protons interacting with downstream waves. There is no significant second-order Fermi acceleration.

  13. RHIC Proton Luminosity and Polarization Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    The RHIC proton beam polarization can be improved by raising the Booster scraping, which also helps to reduce the RHIC transverse emittance, and therefore to improve the luminosity. By doing this, the beam-beam effect would be enhanced. Currently, the RHIC working point is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10, the 2/3 resonance would affect intensity and luminosity lifetime, and the working point close to 7/10 would enhance polarization decay in store. Run 2013 shows that average polarization decay is merely 1.8% in 8 hours, and most fills have the luminosity lifetime better than 14 hours, which is not a problem. Therefore, even without beam-beam correction, there is room to improve for RHIC polarization and luminosity. The key to push the Booster scraping is to raise the Booster input intensity; for that, two approaches can be used. The first is to extend the LINAC tank 9 pulse width, which has been successfully applied in run 2006. The second is to raise the source temperature, which has been successfully applied in run 2006 and run 2012.

  14. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  15. Acceleration of polarized electrons UPTO ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, I.; Otboev, A.; Shatunov, P.; Shatunov, Yu.; Mane, S.

    2016-12-01

    A wide world discussion have been opened few years ago about future e + e - collider after the Higgsboson discovery. Besides utterly high luminosity this machine has to operate with polarized beams. We shall overview in this paper problems and practical possibilities to satisfy second requirements of the future collider. The radiative beam polarization at this 100 km machine will be very long procedure. On other side, at the present time there are developed intensive polarized electron sources based on ArGa photo cathodes with polarization about 90 percents. We show, that fast electron synchrotron equipped pair Siberian Snake is able to provide to accelerate polarized electrons up to the top energy of the collider.

  16. Acceleration of Polarized Beams Using Multiple Strong Partial Siberian Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Gupta, R. C.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Okamura, M.; Takano, J.

    2005-08-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization, but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20 - 30 % partial Siberian snake, both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical super-conducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  17. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  18. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; COURANT,E.; GLENN,J.W.; GUPTA,R.C.; HUANG,H.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; WILLEN,E.; OKAMURA,M.; TAKANO,J.

    2004-10-10

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  19. Double-polarization observable G in neutral-pion photoproduction off the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, A.; Eberhardt, H.; Lang, M.; Afzal, F.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Bichow, M.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Böse, S.; Crede, V.; Dieterle, M.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Friedrich, St.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Goertz, St.; Gottschall, M.; Gridnev, A.; Grüner, M.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hammann, Ch.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Honisch, Ch.; Jude, T.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Kammer, S.; Keshelashvili, I.; Klassen, P.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Klempt, E.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Kube, M.; Lopatin, I.; Mahlberg, Ph.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Meyer, W.; Müller, J.; Müllers, J.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V.; Piontek, D.; Reeve, S.; Reicherz, G.; Runkel, S.; Sarantsev, A.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; van Pee, H.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Wilson, A.; Winnebeck, A.; Witthauer, L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a measurement of the double-polarization observable G in π^0 photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn. The observable G is determined from reactions of linearly polarized photons with longitudinally polarized protons. The polarized photons are produced by bremsstrahlung off a diamond radiator of well-defined orientation. A frozen spin butanol target provides the polarized protons. The data cover the photon energy range from 617 to 1325 MeV and a wide angular range. The experimental results for G are compared to predictions by the Bonn-Gatchina (BnGa), Jülich-Bonn (JüBo), MAID and SAID partial wave analyses. Implications of the new data for the pion photoproduction multipoles are discussed.

  20. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-12-31

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam.

  1. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  2. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-06-15

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10{sup 8} protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen.

  3. Spin Tracking of Polarized Protons in the Main Injector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Aldred, C.

    2016-07-01

    The Main Injector (MI) at Fermilab currently produces high-intensity beams of protons at energies of 120 GeV for a variety of physics experiments. Acceleration of polarized protons in the MI would provide opportunities for a rich spin physics program at Fermilab. To achieve polarized proton beams in the Fermilab accelerator complex, shown in Fig.1.1, detailed spin tracking simulations with realistic parameters based on the existing facility are required. This report presents studies at the MI using a single 4-twist Si-berian snake to determine the depolarizing spin resonances for the relevant synchrotrons. Results will be presented first for a perfect MI lattice, followed by a lattice that includes the real MI imperfections, such as the measured magnet field errors and quadrupole misalignments. The tolerances of each of these factors in maintaining polariza-tion in the Main Injector will be discussed.

  4. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-04

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  5. Simultaneous acceleration of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic quasiparallel collisionless shocks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-27

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲10^{-2} of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks.

  6. Possible parameters of proton acceleration using backward traveling wave harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis shows that, when accelerating protons of intermediate energy range using the field of backward harmonic of the traveling wave, a range of practically accessible parameters of accelerating structure exists, where it is possible to provide simultaneously the stability of longitudinal and transverse particle motion and high rates of acceleration. The focusing effect is provided by the field of slow fundamental harmonic. The calculated characteristics of accelerating structure and the assessment of parameters of the proton linac are obtained in a range of 15-230 MeV.

  7. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  8. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  9. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  10. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masao; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Miyajima, Satoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiko; Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Daido, Hiroyuki; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Koga, James; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Tajima, Toshiki

    2008-06-24

    Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. Because of its compactness and other novel characteristics, the laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities.

  11. Proton acceleration with a table-top TW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimetz, M.; Bellido, P.; Lera, R.; Ruiz-de la Cruz, A.; Mur, P.; Sánchez, I.; Galán, M.; Sánchez, F.; Roso, L.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the recent demonstration of proton acceleration from a purpose-made Ti:Sapphire laser system. In the first successful series of autumn 2015, running at 2 TW peak power and 100 Hz diode pump rate, protons up to 0.7 MeV have been spectrally characterised. Subsequently, at increased laser pulse energy and improved contrast, we have obtained maximum particle energies around 1.7 MeV. These results, achieved in single-shot mode with a variety of thin foil targets, are an important step towards our aim of a stable, compact proton accelerator with high rate capacity.

  12. First polarized proton collision at a beam energy of 250 GeV in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    After providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL had its first opportunity to collide polarized protons at its maximum beam energy of 250 GeV in the 2009 polarized proton operations. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes [1] in each ring, RHIC preserves polarization during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with precise control of the betatron tunes and vertical orbit distortions. However, the strong intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are more than two times stronger than those below 100 GeV, requiring much tighter tolerances on vertical orbit distortions and betatron tunes. With the currently achieved orbit correction and tune control, average polarizations of {approx_equal} 42% at top energy and average polarizations of {approx_equal} 55% at injection energy were achieved. Polarization measurements as a function of beam energy also indicated aU polarization losses occurred around three strong intrinsic resonances at 136 GeV, 199.3 GeV and 220.8 GeV Peak luminosity of 122 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} was also demonstrated. This paper presents the performance of the first RHIC 250 GeV operation and discusses the depolarization issues encountered during the run.

  13. Proton polarization from π+ absorption in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aclander, J.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Altman, A.; Ashery, D.; Hahn, H.; Moinester, M. A.; Rahav, A.; Feltham, A.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Smith, G. R.; Niskanen, J. A.

    1993-02-01

    The polarization of protons resulting from π+ absorption in 4He was measured at bombarding energies of 120 MeV and 250 MeV. Events arising from absorption in a quasi-deuteron were analysed by using kinematical constraints. The apparatus was tested by measuring the polarization of protons resulting from π +d→ overline→pp . Differences observed between polarization measured for pion absorption in the deuteron and in quasi-deuterons inside 3He and 4He suggest that the density of the absorbing nucleon pair affects this observable. There is however a large discrepancy between the experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  14. Fermilab's Proton Accelerator Complex : World Record Performance and Upgrade Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The flagship of Fermilab's long term research program is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, which will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of the DUNE require a proton beam with a power of some 2.4 MW at 120 GeV, which is roughly four times the current maximum power. Here I discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, our plans for construction of the SRF proton linac as key part of the Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), outline the main challenges toward multi-MW beam power operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex and the staged plan to achieve the required performance over the next 15 years.

  15. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Proton orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    Proton orbits are calculated in the electromagnetic vacuum field of a magnetic point dipole rotating with its angular velocity omega perpendicular to its dipole moment mu by numerical integration of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. Trajectories are shown and discussed for various initial conditions. A critical surface is shown separating initial positions of protons which finally hit the pulsar in the polar region from those which finally recede to infinity.

  16. Proton linear accelerators: A theoretical and historical introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lapostolle, P.M.

    1989-07-01

    From the beginning, the development of linear accelerators has followed a number of different directions. This report surveys the basic ideas and general principles of such machines, pointing out the problems that have led to the various improvements, with the hope that it may also aid further progress. After a brief historical survey, the principal aspects of accelerator theory are covered in some detail: phase stability, focusing, radio-frequency accelerating structures, the detailed calculation of particle dynamics, and space-charge effects at high intensities. These developments apply essentially to proton and ion accelerators, and only the last chapter deals with a few aspects relative to electrons. 134 refs.

  17. Acceleration of Thermal Protons by Generic Phenomenological Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kang, Byungwoo

    2015-11-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was done by Petrosian & East for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton-electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker-Planck equations and compute the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high-energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of the nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas, and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that the emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence needed for scattering and acceleration is steeper than Kolmogorov and the acceleration parameters, the duration of the acceleration, and/or the initial distributions are significantly fine-tuned. These results severely constrain the feasibility of the nonthermal inverse bremsstrahlung process producing hard X-ray emissions. However, the nonthermal tail may be the seed particles for further re-acceleration to relativistic energies, say by a shock. In the Appendix we present some tests of the integrity of the algorithm used and present a new formula for the energy loss rate due to inelastic proton-proton interactions.

  18. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  19. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  20. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A.; Toncian, T.; Fiksel, G.

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic field impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT-level magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The possibility of improving characteristics of laser-driven proton beams using such fields is a strong motivation for further development of laser-driven magnetic field capabilities.

  1. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncian, Toma; Arefiev, Alexey; Fiksel, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The predicted improved characteristics of laser-driven proton beams would be critical for a number of applications. The work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy - National Nuclear Security Administration Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002008. HPC resources were provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas.

  2. Radiative corrections to polarization observables in electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisyuk, Dmitry; Kobushkin, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    We consider radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic electron-proton scattering, in particular, for the polarization transfer measurements of the proton form factor ratio μGE/GM. The corrections are of two types: two-photon exchange (TPE) and bremsstrahlung (BS); in the present work we pay special attention to the latter. Assuming small missing energy or missing mass cutoff, the correction can be represented in a model-independent form, with both electron and proton radiation taken into account. Numerical calculations show that the contribution of the proton radiation is not negligible. Overall, at high Q2 and energies, the total correction to μGE/GM grows, but is dominated by TPE. At low energies both TPE and BS may be significant; the latter amounts to ˜0.01 for some reasonable cut-off choices.

  3. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  4. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, David J.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Brennaman, M. Kyle; Binstead, Robert A.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)2RuaII(L)RubII(bpy)(OH2)4+] (bpy is 2,2′-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L−•)RubIII-OH2 with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near–diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO42− and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc−) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern–Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc− gave a quenching rate constant of kq = 4.1 × 108 M−1⋅s−1 and an estimated pKa* value of ∼5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)2RuaII(L•−)RubIII(bpy)(OH2)4+]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)2RuaII(L)RubII(bpy)(OH)3+] in a H2PO4−/HPO42− buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H2PO4− to give [(bpy)2RuaII(L)Rub(bpy)(OH2)4+] with kPT,2 = 4.4 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. From the intercept of a plot of kobs vs. [H2PO4−], k = 2.1 × 106 s−1 for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pKa values intermediate between pKa(H3O+) = −1.74 and pKa(H2O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  5. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  6. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  7. Ozone depletion over the polar caps caused by solar protons

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.A.E.; Scourfield, M.W.J. )

    1992-12-24

    Energetic solar protons are a natural source of ozone depletion due to nitric oxides they produce in the earth's atmosphere. In March 1989, following a period of intense solar activity, the TOMS instrument aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite recorded very similar ozone losses over both polar caps for areas extending from 90[degrees] to 70[degrees]. Ozone depletions of 7.4 [times] 10[sup 9] kg for the south polar cap and 8.0 [times] 10[sup 9] kg for the north polar cap indicate the degree of symmetry over the polar caps. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-05-04

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US).

  9. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  10. Empirical Determination of Solar Proton Access to the Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Jason; Rodger, Craig; Green, Janet; Whittaker, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Violent expulsions on the Sun's surface release high energy solar protons that ultimately affect ionization levels and the local chemical composition in the upper atmosphere as well as High Frequency (HF) communication used by aircraft. The geomagnetic field screens the low altitude equatorial region, but these protons can access the atmosphere over the poles. The latitudes over which the solar protons can reach vary with geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. In this study we use observations from Low Earth Orbit to determine the atmospheric access of solar protons and hence the flights paths most likely to be affected. Observations taken by up to six polar orbiting satellites during 15 solar proton events are analyzed. From this we determine 16,850 proton rigidity cutoff estimates across 3 energy channels. Empirical fits are undertaken to estimate the most likely behavior of the cutoff dependence with geomagnetic activity. We provide simple equations by which the geomagnetic latitude (spatial extent) at which the protons impact the atmosphere can be determined from a given Kp or Dst value. The variation found in the cutoff with Kp is similar to that used in existing operational models, although the changing Kp value is found to lead the variation in the cutoffs by ~3 hours .We also suggest a ~1-2° equatorward shift in latitude would provide greater accuracy. This solar proton access can be used as an input into coupled chemistry climate models and give the likely polar regions to be effected by Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) which causes HF radio 'blackout zones'. We find that a Kp predictive model can provide additional warning to the variation in proton cutoffs. Hence a prediction of the cutoff latitudes can be made ~3 hours to as much as 7 hours into the future, meeting suggested minimum planning times required by the aviation industry.

  11. Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio: the JLab Polarization Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2003-07-30

    The ratio of the electric and magnetic proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been obtained in two Hall A experiments, from measurements of the longitudinal and transverse polarization of the recoil proton, P{sub l} and P{sub t}, respectively, in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons, {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p}. Together these experiments cover the Q{sup 2}-range 0.5 to 5.6 GeV{sup 2}. A new experiment is currently being prepared, to extend the Q{sup 2}-range to 9 GeV{sup 2} in Hall C.

  12. Proton polarization from π+ absorption in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal-Beck, S.; Aclander, J.; Altman, A.; Ashery, D.; Hahn, H.; Moinester, M. A.; Rahav, A.; Feltham, A.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Smith, G. R.; Niskanen, J. A.

    1992-05-01

    We present the first polarization measurements for pion absorption on a nucleus heavier than the deuteron. The polarization of protons resulting from π+ absorption in the 3He was measured at bombarding energies of 120 and 250 MeV. Protons from absorption in a quasideuteron were selected by applying kinematical constraints. A significant discrepancy was observed between the experimental results and theoretical predictions. At 120 MeV the measured polarizations for 3He are consistent with those of the deuteron. At 250 MeV the angular distribution of the polarization is significantly different than for the deuteron, showing sensitivity to the nuclear density, and thus may be sensitive to short range correlations between nucleons.

  13. Acceleration of electrons by the wake field of proton bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel idea to accelerate low-intensity bunches of electrons (or positrons) by the wake field of intense proton bunches travelling along the axis of a cylindrical rf structure. Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/m and large ''transformer ratios'', which allow for acceleration of electrons to energies in the TeV range, are calculated. A possible application of the method is an electron-positron linear collider with luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. The relatively low cost and power consumption of the method is emphasized.

  14. Fast scaling of energetic protons generated in the interaction of linearly polarized femtosecond petawatt laser pulses with ultrathin targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration is a rapidly developing research field attractive for both fundamental physics and applications such as hadron therapy, radiography, inertial confinement fusion, and nuclear/particle physics. Laser-driven proton/ion beams, compared to those obtained in conventional accelerators, have outstanding features such as low emittance, small source size, ultra-short duration and huge acceleration gradient of ∼1 MeV μm-1. We report proton acceleration from ultrathin polymer targets irradiated with linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW Ti:sapphire laser pulses. A maximum proton energy of 45 MeV with a broad and modulated profile was obtained when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated at a laser intensity of 3.3 × 1020 W/cm2. The transition from slow (I1/2) to fast scaling (I) of maximum proton energy with respect to laser intensity I was observed and explained by the hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration in the acceleration stage and Coulomb-explosion-assisted free expansion in the post acceleration stage.

  15. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  16. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of an electrostatic shock wave and ensuing ion acceleration is studied on the OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Previous work using a 10- μm CO2 laser in a H2 gas jet shows promising results for obtaining narrow spectral features in the accelerated proton spectra. Scaling the shock-wave acceleration mechanism to the 1- μm-wavelength drive laser makes it possible to use petawatt-scale laser systems such as OMEGA-EP, but involves tailoring of the plasma profile. To accomplish the necessitated sharp rise to near-critical plasma density and a long exponential fall, an 1- μm-thick CH foil is illuminated on the back side by thermal x rays produced from an irradiated gold foil. The plasma density is measured using the fourth-harmonic probe system, the accelerating fields are probed using an orthogonal proton source, and the accelerated protons and ions are detected with a Thomson parabola. These results will be presented and compared with particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and LLNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program under project 15-LW-095.

  17. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  18. ACCELERATION OF THERMAL PROTONS BY GENERIC PHENOMENOLOGICAL MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kang, Byungwoo E-mail: redcrux8@stanford.edu

    2015-11-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was done by Petrosian and East for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton–electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker–Planck equations and compute the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high-energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of the nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas, and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that the emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence needed for scattering and acceleration is steeper than Kolmogorov and the acceleration parameters, the duration of the acceleration, and/or the initial distributions are significantly fine-tuned. These results severely constrain the feasibility of the nonthermal inverse bremsstrahlung process producing hard X-ray emissions. However, the nonthermal tail may be the seed particles for further re-acceleration to relativistic energies, say by a shock. In the Appendix we present some tests of the integrity of the algorithm used and present a new formula for the energy loss rate due to inelastic proton–proton interactions.

  19. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-07-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported.

  20. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage.

    PubMed

    Barberio, M; Veltri, S; Scisciò, M; Antici, P

    2017-03-07

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient.

  1. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient.

  2. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient. PMID:28266496

  3. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Luo, W; Fourkal, E; Lin, T; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2007-07-07

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 x 10(21) W cm(-2). Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage <0.1% of therapeutic absorbed dose. A layer of polyethylene enclosing the whole particle selection and collimation device was used to shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  4. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Luo, W.; Fourkal, E.; Lin, T.; Li, J.; Veltchev, I.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 × 1021 W cm-2. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage <0.1% of therapeutic absorbed dose. A layer of polyethylene enclosing the whole particle selection and collimation device was used to shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  5. Probing the Spin Structure of the Proton Using Polarized Proton-Proton Collisionsand the Production of W Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumier, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    This thesis discusses the process of extracting the longitudinal asymmetry, A$W±\\atop{L}$ describing W → μ production in forward kinematic regimes. This asymmetry is used to constrain our understanding of the polarized parton distribution functions characterizing $\\bar{u}$ and $\\bar{d}$ sea quarks in the proton. This asymmetry will be used to constrain the overall contribution of the sea-quarks to the total proton spin. The asymmetry is evaluated over the pseudorapidity range of the PHENIX Muon Arms, 2.1 < |η| 2.6, for longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at 510 GeV √s. In particular, I will discuss the statistical methods used to characterize real muonic W decays and the various background processes is presented, including a discussion of likelihood event selection and the Extended Unbinned Maximum Likelihood t. These statistical methods serve estimate the yields of W muonic decays, which are used to calculate the longitudinal asymmetry.

  6. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  7. Transversity Measurement with Polarized Proton and Antiproton Interactions at Gsi:. the Pax Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, P. F.

    2006-02-01

    It has recently been suggested by the PAX collaboration that collisions of transversely polarized protons and antiprotons at the GSI-FAIR can be used to determine the nucleon's transversity densities from measurements of the double-spin asymmetry for the Drell-Yan process. The theoretical expectations for this observable are in the 0.3-0.4 range at the FAIR-HESR enrgies. PAX therefore proposes to build a polarized antiproton stored beam suitable for this measurament. Polarized antiprotons will be produced by spin filtering with an internal polarized gas target in a storage ring. The design and performance of the accelerator setup, and of the the detector will be briefly outlined.

  8. Acceleration tests of a 3 GHz proton linear accelerator (LIBO) for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martinis, C.; Giove, D.; Amaldi, U.; Berra, P.; Crandall, K.; Mauri, M.; Weiss, M.; Zennaro, R.; Rosso, E.; Szeless, B.; Vretenar, M.; Masullo, M. R.; Vaccaro, V.; Calabretta, L.; Rovelli, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the acceleration tests performed at the Catania LNS Laboratory on a 3 GHz linac module of the side coupled type, which boosts the proton energy of a beam extracted from a cyclotron from 62 to 72 MeV. The output proton energy was measured with two devices: a NaI(Tl) crystal and a bending magnet. The experimental spectra are in good agreement with the calculated ones. From their shape it is obtained that (18±3.0)% of the transmitted protons fall in a ±2 MeV interval centered around 72 MeV. This result is in good agreement with the 20% value derived from the simulation of the acceleration process. The measured energy of the accelerated protons was used to check that the shunt impedance of the structure is equal to the computed one within 3%. This was the first time that a 3 GHz structure has been used to accelerate protons, and the results of the tests have demonstrated that a high frequency linac can be used as a cyclotron booster.

  9. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  10. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  11. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Proton Spin Polarizabilities with Polarized Compton Scattering at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Dilli; A2 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, which describe its response to an applied electric or magnetic field. While the electric and magnetic scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These leading order spin dependent terms of the nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract these spin polarizabilities of the proton using real polarised Compton scattering off the proton at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the single and double polarization observables which are sensitive to these polarizabilities. The double polarization observables ∑2 x, ∑2 z are measured via a circulary polarized photon beam and a transversely and a linearly polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). This presentation will be focused on the status and analyis of an experiment completed at MAMI in 2014 and 2015 for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  13. Spin-Dependent Electron Scattering from Polarized Protons and Deuterons with the BLAST Experiment at MIT-Bates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasell, Douglas K.; Milner, Richard G.; Redwine, Robert P.; Alarcon, Ricardo; Gao, Haiyan; Kohl, Michael; Calarco, John R.

    2011-11-01

    The Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) experiment was operated at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center from 2003 until 2005. The experiment was designed to exploit the power of a polarized electron beam incident on polarized targets of hydrogen and deuterium to measure, in a systematic manner, the neutron, proton, and deuteron form factors as well as other aspects of the electromagnetic interaction on few-nucleon systems. We briefly describe the experiment, and present and discuss the numerous results obtained.

  14. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  15. The effect of stochastic re-acceleration on the energy spectrum of shock-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami; Kocharov, Leon

    2014-07-20

    The energy spectra of particles in gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events do not always have a power-law form attributed to the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In particular, the observed spectra in major SEP events can take the form of a broken (double) power law. In this paper, we study the effect of a process that can modify the power-law spectral form produced by the diffusive shock acceleration: the stochastic re-acceleration of energetic protons by enhanced Alfvénic turbulence in the downstream region of a shock wave. There are arguments suggesting that this process can be important when the shock propagates in the corona. We consider a coronal magnetic loop traversed by a shock and perform Monte Carlo simulations of interactions of shock-accelerated protons with Alfvén waves in the loop. The wave-particle interactions are treated self-consistently, so the finiteness of the available turbulent energy is taken into account. The initial energy spectrum of particles is taken to be a power law. The simulations reveal that the stochastic re-acceleration leads either to the formation of a spectrum that is described in a wide energy range by a power law (although the resulting power-law index is different from the initial one) or to a broken power-law spectrum. The resulting spectral form is determined by the ratio of the energy density of shock-accelerated protons to the wave energy density in the shock's downstream region.

  16. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  17. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  18. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser–plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck.

  19. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser–plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck. PMID:28290479

  20. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  1. The polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Mulhollan, G.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Witte, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator has been running with polarized electrons both in the collider (SLC) mode and in the fixed target mode. The accelerators polarized electron source is based on a thin, strained GaAs photocathode, which is held at a negative high voltage and illuminated by a Titanium Sapphire laser. The reliability of the source was better than 95% during the eight-month-long 1993 SLC run. A beam polarization of 63% was measured by the SLD experiment at the SLC interaction point in the 1993 data run. The fixed-target experiment E143 measured a beam polarization of 85% in its 1993--94 run. These polarization measurements, made at high energy, are in good agreement with measurements made at low energy on a calibrated Mott polarimeter. The higher beam polarization in the fixed target experiment is due to a thinner, more highly strained GaAs photocathode than had been used earlier, and to the experiment`s low beam current requirements. The SLC is now running with the high polarization photocathode. Details of the source, and experience with the high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on the accelerator in the current SLC run, will be presented.

  2. Measurement of Polarization Observables in the Electro-Excitation of the Proton to its First Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, Rikki

    2003-08-01

    This thesis reports results from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Hall A experiment E91-011, which measured double-polarization observables in the pion electroproduction reaction from the proton. Specifically, the experiment measured the recoil proton polarization, polarized response functions, and cross section for the p($\\vec{e}$, e' $\\vec{p}$) π° reaction at a center-of-mass energy centered at W = 1232 MeV--the peak of the Δ(1232) resonance--and at a four-momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 1.0 GeV2/c2. Both the recoil proton polarization and polarized response function results will be presented in this thesis. Data were collected at Jefferson Lab, located in Newport News, Virginia during the summer of 2000. A 4.53 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off of a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton polarization was measured in the Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP), located in one of the two High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) in Hall A. A maximum likelihood method was used to determine the polarized response functions directly from the measured polarizations and cross sections. A simultaneous fit of the cross sections, the recoil proton polarizations, and angular distributions of the polarized response functions will provide a determination of individual multipole amplitudes. Some of these multipole amplitudes are related to the concept of proton deformation. Both the recoil proton polarizations and polarized response functions were compared to two phenomenological models: MAID and SAID, which have all free parameters fixed, based on fits to previous world data. The measured helicity dependent observables, which are dominated by imaginary parts of Δ(1232)-resonance excitation multipole amplitudes, agree very well with the two models. The measured helicity independent observables, which are dominated by real parts of background multipole amplitudes, do not agree completely with either

  3. Proton Polarization Angular Distribution in Deuteron Photo-Disintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Sarty, Adam; Fox, Brendan; Meekins, David; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Kinney, Edward; Garibaldi, Franco; Gao, Juncai; Aniol, Konrad; Epstein, Martin; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Markowitz, Pete; Bosted, Peter; Roche, Rikki; Gilman, Ronald; Frullani, Salvatore; Churchwell, Steve

    1999-12-01

    The apparent scaling in 90 cm deuteron photodisintegration, first observed several years ago at SLAC, has lead to several related experiments and a number ot theoretical calculations.We have in the past year measured in Hall A, with up to 2.5-GeV photons, cross sections at large angles and the proton polarization at 90cm.Verypreliminary online analysis of the induced polarizations yields the very surprising result that theinduced polarizations apparently vanish starting at about the same energy at whichthe existing cross section data start to scale, to follow the constituent countingrules.Given this result, we propose further measurements to see if this observationholds at other angles.

  4. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, Eric; Antipov, Sergey; Piekarz, Henryk; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  5. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Accelerated Proton Beams for First Radiobiological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kluge, T.; Kraft, S.; Metzkes, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Richter, C.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Karsch, L.; Laschinsky, L.; Naumburger, D.

    2010-11-04

    We report on the generation of proton pulses with maximum energies exceeding 15 MeV by means of the irradiation of few micron thick metal foils by ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses at a power level of 100 TW. In contrast to the well known situation for longer laser pulses, here, a near linear scaling of the maximum proton energy with laser power can be found. Aiming for radiobiological applications the long and short term stability of the laser plasma accelerator as well as a compact energy selection and dosimetry system is presented. The first irradiation of in vitro tumour cells showing dose dependent biological damage is demonstrated paving the way for systematic radiobiological studies.

  6. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  7. Correlation of solar energetic protons and polar cap absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Armstrong, T. P.; Laird, C. M.; Detrick, D. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    This study shows the results of a model of polar cap absorption events (PCAs) using solar energetic proton flux as an input. The proton data are recorded by the Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) on board the IMP 8 satellite and are collected by the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. The IMP 8 satellite orbits the Earth at distances between 30 and 35 Earth radii, which places it in the solar energetic particle environment throughout most of its orbit. It has been shown in previous studies that these solar energetic particles have direct and immediate access to the polar atmosphere [Reid, 1970]. Our model shows that the majority of the ionization resulting from the influx of solar energetic protons occurs in the altitude range from ~50-90 km. Excess ionization at these altitudes causes enhanced absorption of cosmic HF radio waves. The levels of absorption used for comparison in this study were measured directly by the riometer at South Pole station, Antarctica. The results show a very strong correlation between the incident proton flux and measured path-integrated cosmic HF radio noise absorption for significant events, involving absorptions greater than 1.0 dB. For absorption levels lower than this it is obvious that other phenomena dominate. For HF radio waves the primary contributors to PCA are protons with energies near 20 MeV. This study extends the correlated observations of interplanetary particles and PCA throughout a 9-year period. The close quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated values of absorption supports the validity of the assumptions and suppositions made by this model. The data also suggest a method by which the path-integrated cosmic noise absorption may be used to probe the E and D layers of the ionosphere to determine the effective ion-electron recombination coefficients within these regions.

  8. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P R

    2008-01-01

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  9. Plasma block acceleration via double targets driven by an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Jiaxiang; Qi, Xin; Li, Meng; Xing, Yifan; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, plasma block acceleration via radiation pressure from an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity I ≈ 10 22 W / cm 2 is investigated based on a double-target scheme, in which the targets are composed of a pre-target with a relatively low plasma density and a main target with a high plasma density. It has been demonstrated that an appropriately selected pre-target can help to greatly enhance the charge separation field in the main target, which then leads to generation of a strongly accelerated and well directed plasma block with proton energy in GeV magnitude. This result can have potential applications in the plasma block ignition of proton-born fusion.

  10. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  11. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  12. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    2016-03-24

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 10(15) electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators ('PeVatrons'), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 10(13) electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators--not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays--has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 10(6)-10(7) years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  13. Laser-accelerated proton conversion efficiency thickness scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, D. S.; Foord, M. E.; Key, M. H.; LePape, S. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Fedosejevs, R.; Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion efficiency from laser energy into proton kinetic energy is measured with the 0.6 ps, 9x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility as a function of target thickness in Au foils. For targets thicker than 20 {mu}m, the conversion efficiency scales approximately as 1/L, where L is the target thickness. This is explained by the domination of hot electron collisional losses over adiabatic cooling. In thinner targets, the two effects become comparable, causing the conversion efficiency to scale weaker than 1/L; the measured conversion efficiency is constant within the scatter in the data for targets between 5 and 15 {mu}m, with a peak conversion efficiency of 4% into protons with energy greater than 3 MeV. Depletion of the hydrocarbon contaminant layer is eliminated as an explanation for this plateau by using targets coated with 200 nm of ErH{sub 3} on the rear surface. The proton acceleration is modeled with the hybrid-particle in cell code LSP, which reproduced the conversion efficiency scaling observed in the data.

  14. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global...the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO) Eric P. Chassignet Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies Florida State University phone: (850...architectures. These codes form the ocean and sea ice components of the Navy’s Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS) and the Navy Global Ocean

  15. Polarimeters for the AGS polarized-proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Crabb, D.G.; Bonner, B.; Buchanan, J.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the three polarimeters which will be used to measure the beam polarization at the AGS polarized beam facility. The beam polarization will be measured before injection into the AGS, during acceleration, and after extraction from the AGS. The 200-MeV polarimeter uses scintillation-counter telescopes to measure the asymmetry in p-carbon inclusive scattering. The internal polarimeter can measure the beam polarization at up to five selected times during acceleration. A continuously spooled nylon filament is swung into the beam at the appropriate time and the asymmetry in pp elastic scattering measured by two scintillation-counter telescopes. This is a relative polarimeter which can be calibrated by the absolute external polarimeter located in the D extracted-beam line. This polarimeter uses scintillation counters in two double-arm magnetic spectrometers to measure clearly the asymmetry in pp elastic scattering from a liquid hydrogen target. The specific features and operation of each polarimeter will be discussed.

  16. Leading neutrons from polarized proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Leading neutron production on protons is known to be subject to strong absorptive corrections, which have been under debate for a long time. On nuclear targets these corrections are significantly enhanced and push the partial cross sections of neutron production to the very periphery of the nucleus. As a result, the A-dependences of inclusive and diffractive neutron production turn out to be similar. The mechanism of π-a1 interference, which successfully explained the observed single-spin asymmetry of neutrons in polarized pp interactions, is extended here to polarized pA collisions. Corrected for nuclear effects it explains quite well the magnitude and sign of the asymmetry AN observed in inelastic events, resulting in a violent break up of the nucleus. However the excessive magnitude of AN observed in the diffractive sample, remains a challenge.

  17. Modifying proton fluence spectra to generate spread-out Bragg peaks with laser accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Schell, S; Wilkens, J J

    2009-10-07

    Currently, energy spectra of laser accelerated proton beams are far from being monoenergetic. For their application in radiation therapy, energy selection systems using magnetic fields have been proposed to single out particles with the desired energy. These systems allow the choice of protons between a lowest and a highest energy. In this work, we present a slight modification that allows us to influence the relative number of particles per energy bin. In fact, the transmitted spectrum can be shaped in such a way that it corresponds to a full spread out Bragg peak delivered simultaneously. This change of the spectrum can be achieved by inserting suitably formed scattering material at the central plane of the energy selection system where the particles are separated in space depending on their energy. With the help of Monte Carlo simulations we analysed both simple wedge geometries and various stacks of lead slices. We found that these configurations can provide energy spectra that naturally produce spread out Bragg peaks within one laser shot. This increases the particle efficiency of the whole system and makes laser accelerated protons more suitable for radiation therapy.

  18. Acceleration of petaelectronvolt protons in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dewilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemiére, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Lui, R.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Valerius, K.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Żywucka, N.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic cosmic rays reach energies of at least a few petaelectronvolts (of the order of 1015 electronvolts). This implies that our Galaxy contains petaelectronvolt accelerators (‘PeVatrons’), but all proposed models of Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators encounter difficulties at exactly these energies. Dozens of Galactic accelerators capable of accelerating particles to energies of tens of teraelectronvolts (of the order of 1013 electronvolts) were inferred from recent γ-ray observations. However, none of the currently known accelerators—not even the handful of shell-type supernova remnants commonly believed to supply most Galactic cosmic rays—has shown the characteristic tracers of petaelectronvolt particles, namely, power-law spectra of γ-rays extending without a cut-off or a spectral break to tens of teraelectronvolts. Here we report deep γ-ray observations with arcminute angular resolution of the region surrounding the Galactic Centre, which show the expected tracer of the presence of petaelectronvolt protons within the central 10 parsecs of the Galaxy. We propose that the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* is linked to this PeVatron. Sagittarius A* went through active phases in the past, as demonstrated by X-ray outburstsand an outflow from the Galactic Centre. Although its current rate of particle acceleration is not sufficient to provide a substantial contribution to Galactic cosmic rays, Sagittarius A* could have plausibly been more active over the last 106-107 years, and therefore should be considered as a viable alternative to supernova remnants as a source of petaelectronvolt Galactic cosmic rays.

  19. Proton conduction related electrical dipole and space charge polarization in hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, A.; Katayama, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), well known as a biomaterial, is also known as a proton conductor. Its electrical properties are related strongly to its stability and surface properties. In particular, persistent electrical polarization related to proton conductivity of hydroxyapatite has a substantial influence on hydroxyapatite surface properties. The origins of polarizations were investigated in proton-defect-induced HAp ceramics using thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) measurements. Two peaks were observed, indicating that the persistent polarization comprises polarization elements of two kinds. The TSDC response as a function of the applied electric field in polarization treatments indicated that the persistent polarization is dipole polarization and space charge polarization. The former, dipole polarization, increased continuously with increased defect concentration. The activation energies were 0.67-0.86 eV, which are comparable to proton conduction activation energy. Results show that dipole polarization consists of electrical dipoles of the defect pairs, which are formed through proton conduction. The activation energies of 1.01 ± 0.01 eV for space charge polarization are independent of the defect concentration, suggesting that these originated from protons trapped at the grain boundaries as a result of long-range proton conduction. The polarization of two different types is expected to exert different effects on the HAp surface properties.

  20. Two-stage acceleration of protons from relativistic laser-solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jinlu; Sheng, Z. M.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W. M.; Yu, M. Y.; Liu, C. S.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-21

    A two-stage proton acceleration scheme using present-day intense lasers and a unique target design is proposed. The target system consists of a hollow cylinder, inside which is a hollow cone, which is followed by the main target with a flat front and dish-like flared rear surface. At the center of the latter is a tapered proton layer, which is surrounded by outer proton layers at an angle to it. In the first acceleration stage, protons in both layers are accelerated by target normal sheath acceleration. The center-layer protons are accelerated forward along the axis and the side protons are accelerated and focused towards them. As a result, the side-layer protons radially compress as well as axially further accelerate the front part of the accelerating center-layer protons in the second stage, which are also radially confined and guided by the field of the fast electrons surrounding them. Two-dimensional particle-incell simulation shows that a 79fs 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse can produce a proton bunch with {approx} 267MeV maximum energy and {approx} 9.5% energy spread, which may find many applications, including cancer therapy.

  1. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  2. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| < 0.35. This range of eta is referred to as mid-rapidity. These mid-rapidity measurements, like the polarized DIS measurements, suffer from a limited kinematic reach. Final states containing a measured particle with pT [special character omitted] 1 GeV/c are considered to have occurred in the hard scattering domain where the pp interaction is well approximated as an interaction of a quark or gluon in one proton and a quark or gluon in the second proton. Each of these interacting particles has a momentum fraction, x, of its parent proton's momentum. The gluon polarization is dependent on the momentum fraction and the net gluon polarization can be written as the integral of the momentum fraction dependent polarization: DeltaG = f(1,0)Delta g(x)dx. The momentum fractions of the two interacting particles give information about the final state

  3. Theoretical estimate on tensor-polarization asymmetry in proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, S.; Song, Qin-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Tensor-polarized parton distribution functions are new quantities in spin-1 hadrons such as the deuteron, and they could probe new quark-gluon dynamics in hadron and nuclear physics. In charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering, they are studied by the twist-2 structure functions b1 and b2. The HERMES Collaboration found unexpectedly large b1 values compared to a naive theoretical expectation based on the standard deuteron model. The situation should be significantly improved in the near future by an approved experiment to measure b1 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). There is also an interesting indication in the HERMES result that finite antiquark tensor polarization exists. It could play an important role in solving a mechanism on tensor structure in the quark-gluon level. The tensor-polarized antiquark distributions are not easily determined from the charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering; however, they can be measured in a proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process with a tensor-polarized deuteron target. In this article, we estimate the tensor-polarization asymmetry for a possible Fermilab Main-Injector experiment by using optimum tensor-polarized parton distribution functions to explain the HERMES measurement. We find that the asymmetry is typically a few percent. If it is measured, it could probe new hadron physics, and such studies could create an interesting field of high-energy spin physics. In addition, we find that a significant tensor-polarized gluon distribution should exist due to Q2 evolution, even if it were zero at a low Q2 scale. The tensor-polarized gluon distribution has never been observed, so it is an interesting future project.

  4. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy.

  5. Proton and Ion Acceleration on the Contrast Upgraded Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Roycroft, Rebecca; Jiao, Xuejing; Kupfer, Rotem; Tiwari, Ganesh; Wagner, Craig; Yandow, Andrew; Franke, Philip; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard; Toncian, Toma; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Bjorn; CenterHigh Energy Density Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser system have eliminated pre-pulses and reduced the laser pedestal, resulting in improved laser contrast. Previously unwanted pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) would ionize targets thinner than 1 micron, leaving an under-dense plasma which was not capable of accelerating ions to high energies. After the upgrade the contrast was drastically improved allowing us to successfully shoot targets as thin as 20 nm without plasma mirrors. We have also observed evidence of relativistic transparency and Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration when shooting ultra-thin, nanometer scale targets. Data taken with a wide angle ion spectrometer (IWASP) showed the characteristic asymmetry of BOA in the plane orthogonal to the laser polarization on thin targets but not on micron scale targets. Thick micron scale targets saw improvement as well; shots on 2 μm thick gold targets saw ions with energies up to 100 MeV, which broke the former record proton energy on the TPW. Switching the focusing optic from an f/3 parabolic mirror to an f/40 spherical mirror showed improvement in the number of low energy protons created, and provided a source for hundreds of picosecond heating of aluminum foils for warm dense matter measurements.

  6. Measurement of the ratio of the proton's electric to magnetic form factors by recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Jones; Hall A Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    The longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the outgoing proton were measured for the reaction {sup 1}H(e,e' p) at four-momentum transfer squared of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. The ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton is proportional to the ratio of the transverse to longitudinal polarizations.

  7. Search for effect of longitudinally polarized protons on optically active amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of irradiation by longitudinally polarized protons on the differential decomposition of amino acid is investigated in a test of the Vester Ulbricht hypothesis that L-amino acids were produced in preference to the D isomers on the primitive earth due to the effects of parity violation in beta decay. Samples of DL-leucine were irradiated with protons of both positive and negative longitudinal polarization, then analyzed by gas chromatography. Despite advantages of higher polarization, lower velocity and higher ionization density of protons with respect to electrons, proton irradation is found to lead to no detectable asymmetries in DL-leucine degradation, even at 50% gross degradation.

  8. RHIC polarized proton-proton operation at 100 GeV in Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Schoefer, V.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; D Ottavio, T.; Drees, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, W. B.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-05-03

    The first part of RHIC Run 15 consisted of ten weeks of polarized proton on proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV at two interaction points. In this paper we discuss several of the upgrades to the collider complex that allowed for improved performance. The largest effort consisted in commissioning of the electron lenses, one in each ring, which are designed to compensate one of the two beam-beam interactions experienced by the proton bunches. The e-lenses raise the per bunch intensity at which luminosity becomes beam-beam limited. A new lattice was designed to create the phase advances necessary for a beam-beam compensation with the e-lens, which also has an improved off-momentum dynamic aperture relative to previous runs. In order to take advantage of the new, higher intensity limit without suffering intensity driven emittance deterioration, other features were commissioned including a continuous transverse bunch-by-bunch damper in RHIC and a double harmonic RF cature scheme in the Booster. Other high intensity protections include improvements to the abort system and the installation of masks to intercept beam lost due to abort kicker pre-fires.

  9. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  10. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    optimizations, to tune the standard 0.04 degree global HYCOM benchmark case described above for the Cray XC40 and the Intel fortran compiler. At Navy...then transferred with MPI, and copied back to the device memory on the recipient host. A new approach called GPUDirect now provides a mechanism that...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean

  11. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Hyde, C.; Kuhn, S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Sargsian, M.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  12. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    DOE PAGES

    Cosyn, W.; Guzey, V.; Higinbotham, D. W.; ...

    2014-10-27

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Thus, traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < pR << several 100 MeV in the nucleusmore » rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.« less

  13. Analyzing Powers and Differential Cross Sections for Polarized Proton Neutron Going to Negative Pion Proton Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Fraser Andrew

    There is considerable interest in the pn to pi^-pp reaction which can proceed by a nonresonant channel from the isospin 0 pn initial state (an NDelta intermediate state cannot be formed). This thesis describes a measurement of analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections for a subset of this reaction, pn to pi^-pp(^1S_0) by isolating the quasifree process in pd to pi^-ppp_{s}. The experimental arrangement selects the relative S-wave component of the outgoing "diproton". The experiment was done on TRIUMF beam line 1B using a LD_2 target; the pion was detected in a magnetic spectrometer, the two outgoing protons in a scintillator bar array. The spectator proton was undetected. Data were taken in August 1989 at 353, 403 and 440 MeV beam energies. Of these the 403 and 440 MeV data are analysed in this thesis and analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections as a function of pion scattering angle extracted at centre of mass kinetic energies, T_{CM}, of 55 and 70 MeV (corresponding to the 403 and 440 MeV beam energies respectively). Partial wave analysis of the data shows that, while the isospin 0 channel dominates the reaction, contributing approximately 75% of the cross section at the energies studied here, there are significant contributions from the s and d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels. Of particular importance is the contribution from the s-wave pion, isospin 1, channel whose interference with the isospin 0 channels produces the characteristic shapes of the cross sections and analyzing powers observed in the data. The d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels, are also required to fully explain the observed analyzing power distributions, and are essential for the T_{CM} = 70MeV data. Comparisons of the pion production data measured in this experiment with pion absorption measurements on ^3He, where the absorption process is pi^-pp(^1S_0) to pn, show a shift in the shape of the differential cross section which can be interpreted as due to differences in

  14. Circular polarization effects in ion acceleration from high intensity, short pulse laser interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Petrov, G.; Davis, J.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate ion acceleration effects from circular polarization from thin targets, using a high contrast, ultra-short laser pulse from the HERCULES laser facility at the Univ. of Michigan. Experiments were performed with 50 TW, 35 fs pulses at an intensity of >1021Wcm-2 on Si3N4 and Mylar targets of 30 nm to 1 μm thickness with contrast <10-13 . Protons with maximum energy 18 MeV and Carbon ions with energies of up to 10 MeV per nucleon were measured. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the acceleration mechanism will be presented as well. Supported by NSF Physics Frontier Center FOCUS (Grant PHY-0114336), Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and Naval Research Laboratory. We acknowledge the OSIRIS consortium for the use of OSIRIS.

  15. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  16. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms 12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy ( 15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  17. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  18. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  19. DEAD ZONE IN THE POLAR-CAP ACCELERATOR OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-01-10

    We study plasma flows above pulsar polar caps using time-dependent simulations of plasma particles in the self-consistent electric field. The flow behavior is controlled by the dimensionless parameter {alpha} = j/c{rho}{sub GJ}, where j is the electric current density and {rho}{sub GJ} is the Goldreich-Julian charge density. The region of the polar cap where 0 < {alpha} < 1 is a {sup d}ead zone{sup -}in this zone, particle acceleration is inefficient and pair creation is not expected even for young, rapidly rotating pulsars. Pulsars with polar caps near the rotation axis are predicted to have a hollow-cone structure of radio emission, as the dead zone occupies the central part of the polar cap. Our results apply to charge-separated flows of electrons (j < 0) or ions (j > 0). In the latter case, we consider the possibility of a mixed flow consisting of different ion species, and observe the development of two-stream instability. The dead zone at the polar cap is essential for the development of an outer gap near the null surface {rho}{sub GJ} = 0.

  20. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  1. Dynamics of laser-driven proton acceleration exhibited by measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, J. H.; Allinger, K.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Bolton, P. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration from nanometer thin foils with intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. We analyzed the laser absorptivity by parallel monitoring of laser transmissivity and reflectivity with different laser intensities when moving the targets along the laser axis. A direct correlation between laser absorptivity and maximum proton energy is observed. Experimental results are interpreted in analytical estimation, exhibiting a coexistence of plasma expansion and light-sail form of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA-LS) mechanisms during the entire proton acceleration process based on the measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity. PMID:28272471

  2. Dynamics of laser-driven proton acceleration exhibited by measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, J. H.; Allinger, K.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Bolton, P. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2017-03-01

    Proton acceleration from nanometer thin foils with intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. We analyzed the laser absorptivity by parallel monitoring of laser transmissivity and reflectivity with different laser intensities when moving the targets along the laser axis. A direct correlation between laser absorptivity and maximum proton energy is observed. Experimental results are interpreted in analytical estimation, exhibiting a coexistence of plasma expansion and light-sail form of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA-LS) mechanisms during the entire proton acceleration process based on the measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity.

  3. Accelerated prompt gamma estimation for clinical proton therapy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Brent F. B.; Létang, J. M.; Testa, É.; Sarrut, D.

    2016-11-01

    There is interest in the particle therapy community in using prompt gammas (PGs), a natural byproduct of particle treatment, for range verification and eventually dose control. However, PG production is a rare process and therefore estimation of PGs exiting a patient during a proton treatment plan executed by a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation converges slowly. Recently, different approaches to accelerating the estimation of PG yield have been presented. Sterpin et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 4915-46) described a fast analytic method, which is still sensitive to heterogeneities. El Kanawati et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8067-86) described a variance reduction method (pgTLE) that accelerates the PG estimation by precomputing PG production probabilities as a function of energy and target materials, but has as a drawback that the proposed method is limited to analytical phantoms. We present a two-stage variance reduction method, named voxelized pgTLE (vpgTLE), that extends pgTLE to voxelized volumes. As a preliminary step, PG production probabilities are precomputed once and stored in a database. In stage 1, we simulate the interactions between the treatment plan and the patient CT with low statistic MC to obtain the spatial and spectral distribution of the PGs. As primary particles are propagated throughout the patient CT, the PG yields are computed in each voxel from the initial database, as a function of the current energy of the primary, the material in the voxel and the step length. The result is a voxelized image of PG yield, normalized to a single primary. The second stage uses this intermediate PG image as a source to generate and propagate the number of PGs throughout the rest of the scene geometry, e.g. into a detection device, corresponding to the number of primaries desired. We achieved a gain of around 103 for both a geometrical heterogeneous phantom and a complete patient CT treatment plan with respect to analog MC, at a convergence level of 2% relative

  4. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  5. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  6. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (∼100–1000 m)

  7. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of High-energy Protons in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 105) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ˜2 × 103, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20-W90) SEP events.

  8. Surfatron acceleration of protons by an electromagnetic wave at the heliosphere periphery

    SciTech Connect

    Loznikov, V. M. Erokhin, N. S.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A.

    2013-10-15

    The trapping and subsequent efficient surfatron acceleration of weakly relativistic protons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across an external magnetic field in plasma at the heliosphere periphery is considered. The problem is reduced to analysis of a second-order time-dependent nonlinear equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory. The conditions of proton trapping by the wave, the dynamics of the components of the particle momentum and velocity, the structure of the phase plane, the particle trajectories, and the dependence of the acceleration rate on initial parameters of the problem are analyzed. The asymptotic behavior of the characteristics of accelerated particles for the heliosphere parameters is investigated. The optimum conditions for surfatron acceleration of protons by an electromagnetic wave are discussed. It is demonstrated that the experimentally observed deviation of the spectra of cosmic-ray protons from standard power-law dependences can be caused by the surfatron mechanism. It is shown that protons with initial energies of several GeV can be additionally accelerated in the heliosphere (the region located between the shock front of the solar wind and the heliopause at distances of about 100 astronomical units (a.u.) from the Sun) up to energies on the order of several thousands of GeV. In order to explain the proton spectra in the energy range of ∼20–500 GeV, a two-component phenomenological model is proposed. The first component corresponds to the constant (in this energy range) galactic contribution, while the second (variable) component corresponds to the heliospheric contribution, which appears due to the additional acceleration of soft cosmic-ray protons at the heliosphere periphery. Variations in the proton spectra measured on different time scales between 1992 and 2008 in the energy range from several tens to several hundred GeV, as well as the dependence of these spectra on the heliospheric weather, can be explained

  9. The R/D of high power proton accelerator technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xialing, Guan

    2002-12-01

    In China, a multipurpose verification system as a first phase of our ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton LINAC) and a swimming pool light water subcritical reactor. In this paper the activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described.

  10. Laser acceleration of protons with an optically shaped, near-critical hydrogen gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Dover, Nicholas; Ettlinger, Oliver; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    We report our recent experimental results on CO2 laser acceleration of protons, with a near-critical hydrogen gas target tailored by a Nd:YAG laser-produced blast wave. Monoenergetic protons with energies up to 2.5 MeV were observed.

  11. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of >100 MeV Protons in Large Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-05-01

    Recently several studies have presented correlative evidence for a significant-to-dominant role for a flare-resident process in the acceleration of high-energy protons in large solar particle events. In one of these investigations, a high correlation between >100 MeV proton fluence and 35 GHz radio fluence is obtained by omitting large proton events associated with relatively weak flares; these outlying events are attributed to proton acceleration by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We argue that the strong CMEs and associated shocks observed for proton events on the main sequence of the scatter plot are equally likely to accelerate high-energy protons. In addition, we examine ratios of 0.5 MeV electron to >100 MeV proton intensities in large SEP events, associated with both well-connected and poorly-connected solar eruptions, to show that scaled-up versions of the small flares associated with classical impulsive SEP events are not significant accelerators of >100 MeV protons.

  12. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  13. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  14. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-15

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  15. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-01

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  16. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Aluminum setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-10-02

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Aluminum stores.

  17. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  18. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ˜1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called "bucket jumping" where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  19. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  20. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  1. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  2. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  3. Accelerating protons to therapeutic energies with ultraintense, ultraclean, and ultrashort laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Brantov, Andrei; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Rousseau, Pascal; Reed, Stephen; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Litzenberg, Dale William; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration by high-intensity laser pulses from ultrathin foils for hadron therapy is discussed. With the improvement of the laser intensity contrast ratio to 10−11 achieved on the Hercules laser at the University of Michigan, it became possible to attain laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 1022 W∕cm2 that allows an efficient regime of laser-driven ion acceleration from submicron foils. Particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations of proton acceleration in the directed Coulomb explosion regime from ultrathin double-layer (heavy ions∕light ions) foils of different thicknesses were performed under the anticipated experimental conditions for the Hercules laser with pulse energies from 3 to 15 J, pulse duration of 30 fs at full width half maximum (FWHM), focused to a spot size of 0.8 μm (FWHM). In this regime heavy ions expand predominantly in the direction of laser pulse propagation enhancing the longitudinal charge separation electric field that accelerates light ions. The dependence of the maximum proton energy on the foil thickness has been found and the laser pulse characteristics have been matched with the thickness of the target to ensure the most efficient acceleration. Moreover, the proton spectrum demonstrates a peaked structure at high energies, which is required for radiation therapy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that a 150–500 TW laser pulse is able to accelerate protons up to 100–220 MeV energies. PMID:18561651

  4. Capture and Control of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nurnberg, F; Alber, I; Harres, K; Schollmeier, M; Roth, M; Barth, W; Eickhoff, H; Hofmann, I; Friedman, A; Grote, D; Logan, B G

    2009-05-13

    This paper summarizes the ongoing studies on the possibilities for transport and RF capture of laser-accelerated proton beams in conventional accelerator structures. First results on the capture of laser-accelerated proton beams are presented, supported by Trace3D, CST particle studio and Warp simulations. Based on these results, the development of the pulsed high-field solenoid is guided by our desire to optimize the output particle number for this highly divergent beam with an exponential energy spectrum. A future experimental test stand is proposed to do studies concerning the application as a new particle source.

  5. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed.

  6. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  7. Results on transverse spin asymmetries in the polarized proton-proton elastic scattering in the CNI region at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Svirida, D.

    2011-07-15

    Elastic scattering of polarized protons at small four momentum transfer squared t is described by interference of Coulomb and nuclear amplitudes. Coulomb amplitude is well calculable by QED and such interference provides a unique opportunity to study the nuclear amplitude. At high energies this amplitude is believed to be dominated by Pomeron exchange. Measurement of asymmetries can provide evidence for contribution of other Reggeons, including hypothetical Odderon. Polarized proton collider at RHIC facility is a perfect place for such experiment.A one-week dedicated run with special beam optics in June 2009 allowed us to collect statistics of more than 30 millions of elastic triggers with transversely polarized beams in the -t range 0.005-0.035 (GeV/c){sup 2} at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV. In this paper we present preliminary results of single and double transverse spin asymmetries.

  8. Nonlinear Accelerator with Transverse Motion Integrable in Normalized Polar Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Kharkov, Y.; Morozov, I.A.; Zolkin, T.V.; /Chicago U.

    2012-05-01

    Several families of nonlinear accelerator lattices with integrable transverse motion were suggested recently. One of the requirements for the existence of two analytic invariants is a special longitudinal coordinate dependence of fields. This paper presents the particle motion analysis when a problem becomes integrable in the normalized polar coordinates. This case is distinguished from the others: it yields an exact analytical solution and has a uniform longitudinal coordinate dependence of the fields (since the corresponding nonlinear potential is invariant under the transformation from the Cartesian to the normalized coordinates). A number of interesting features are revealed: while the frequency of radial oscillations is independent of the amplitude, the spread of angular frequencies in a beam is absolute. A corresponding spread of frequencies of oscillations in the Cartesian coordinates is evaluated via the simulation of transverse Schottky noise.

  9. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  10. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Hamilton, D J; Salmé, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-10-09

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θ_{cm}^{p}=70°. The longitudinal transfer K_{LL}, measured to be 0.645±0.059±0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  11. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  12. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGES

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  13. Experimental investigation of picosecond dynamics following interactions between laser accelerated protons and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senje, L.; Coughlan, M.; Jung, D.; Taylor, M.; Nersisyan, G.; Riley, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Lundh, O.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2017-03-01

    We report direct experimental measurements with picosecond time resolution of how high energy protons interact with water at extreme dose levels (kGy), delivered in a single pulse with the duration of less than 80 ps. The unique synchronisation possibilities of laser accelerated protons with an optical probe pulse were utilized to investigate the energy deposition of fast protons in water on a time scale down to only a few picoseconds. This was measured using absorbance changes in the water, induced by a population of solvated electrons created in the tracks of the high energy protons. Our results indicate that for sufficiently high doses delivered in short pulses, intertrack effects will affect the yield of solvated electrons. The experimental scheme allows for investigation of the ultrafast mechanisms occurring in proton water radiolysis, an area of physics especially important due to its relevance in biology and for proton therapy.

  14. Increased laser-accelerated proton energies via direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons in microcone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Gall, B.; Lockard, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present experimental results showing a laser-accelerated proton beam maximum energy cutoff of 67.5 MeV, with more than 5 x 10{sup 6} protons per MeV at that energy, using flat-top hollow microcone targets. This result was obtained with a modest laser energy of {approx}80 J, on the high-contrast Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2D particle-in-cell simulations, we attribute the source of these enhanced proton energies to direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons along the inner cone wall surface, where the laser light wave accelerates electrons just outside the surface critical density, in a potential well created by a shift of the electrostatic field maximum with respect to that of the magnetic field maximum. Simulations show that for an increasing acceleration length, the continuous loading of electrons into the accelerating phase of the laser field yields an increase in high-energy electrons.

  15. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  16. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  17. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  18. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  19. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  20. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  1. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  2. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  3. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  4. Particle selection and beam collimation system for laser-accelerated proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Fourkal, Eugene; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2005-03-01

    In a laser-accelerated proton therapy system, the initial protons have broad energy and angular distributions, which are not suitable for direct therapeutic applications. A compact particle selection and collimation device is needed to deliver small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra. In this work, we characterize a superconducting magnet system that produces a desired magnetic field configuration to spread the protons with different energies and emitting angles for particle selection. Four magnets are set side by side along the beam axis; each is made of NbTi wires which carry a current density of approximately 10(5) A/cm2 at 4.2 K, and produces a magnetic field of approximately 4.4 T in the corresponding region. Collimation is applied to both the entrance and the exit of the particle selection system to generate a desired proton pencil beam. In the middle of the magnet system, where the magnetic field is close to zero, a particle selection collimator allows only the protons with desired energies to pass through for therapy. Simulations of proton transport in the presence of the magnetic field show that the selected protons have successfully refocused on the beam axis after passing through the magnetic field with the optimal magnet system. The energy spread for any given characteristic proton energy has been obtained. It is shown that the energy spread is a function of the magnetic field strength and collimator size and reaches the full width at half maximum of 25 MeV for 230 MeV protons. Dose distributions have also been calculated with the GEANT3 Monte Carlo code to study the dosimetric properties of the laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy applications.

  5. Efficient laser-proton acceleration from an insulating foil with an attached small metal disk

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Kazuto; Tokita, Shigeki; Nishoji, Toshihiko; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2011-10-17

    Efficient proton acceleration by the interaction of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with a solid foil has been demonstrated. An aluminum coating (thickness: 0.2 {mu}m) on a polyethylene (PE) foil was irradiated at 2 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. The protons from the aluminum-disk (diameter: 150 {mu}m to 15 mm) foil were accelerated to much higher energy in comparison with conventional targets such as PE and aluminum-coated PE foils. The fast electron signal along the foil surface was significantly higher from the aluminum-coated PE foil. The laser-proton acceleration appeared to be affected to the size of surrounding conductive material.

  6. Mass Limited Target Effects on Proton Acceleration with Femtosecond Laser Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulick, Calvin; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Willingale, L.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at the HERCULES laser facility have been performed to measure the effect of reduced mass targets on proton acceleration through the use of foil, grid, and wire targets in femtosecond laser plasma interactions. The target thickness was held approximately constant at 12 . 5 μm, while the lateral extent of the target was varied. The electron current density was measured with an imaging Cu Kα crystal. Higher current densities were observed as the target mass was reduced which corresponded to an increase in the temperature of the accelerated proton beam. Additionally, a line focusing feature was observed in the spatial distribution of protons accelerated to from the wire target, believed to be a result of azimuthal magnetic fields generated by electron currents in the wire. Particle-in-cell and Vlasov-Fokker-Plank simulations were performed in order to investigate the focusing magnetic field as well as the complex sheath formation dynamics on the mesh target.

  7. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  8. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  9. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  10. SOLAR INTERACTING PROTONS VERSUS INTERPLANETARY PROTONS IN THE CORE PLUS HALO MODEL OF DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AND STOCHASTIC RE-ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, L.; Laitinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Afanasiev, A.; Mursula, K.; Ryan, J. M.

    2015-06-10

    With the first observations of solar γ-rays from the decay of pions, the relationship of protons producing ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the Earth to those of similar energies producing the γ-rays on the Sun has been debated. These two populations may be either independent and simply coincident in large flares, or they may be, in fact, the same population stemming from a single accelerating agent and jointly distributed at the Sun and also in space. Assuming the latter, we model a scenario in which particles are accelerated near the Sun in a shock wave with a fraction transported back to the solar surface to radiate, while the remainder is detected at Earth in the form of a GLE. Interplanetary ions versus ions interacting at the Sun are studied for a spherical shock wave propagating in a radial magnetic field through a highly turbulent radial ray (the acceleration core) and surrounding weakly turbulent sector in which the accelerated particles can propagate toward or away from the Sun. The model presented here accounts for both the first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock front and the second-order, stochastic re-acceleration by the turbulence enhanced behind the shock. We find that the re-acceleration is important in generating the γ-radiation and we also find that up to 10% of the particle population can find its way to the Sun as compared to particles escaping to the interplanetary space.

  11. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential.

  13. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  14. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  16. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  17. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  18. Physics of Double Pulse Irradiation of Targets For Proton Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M.; Masud, R.; Manzoor, L.; Tiedje, H.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out on double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets with varying preplasma conditions. Our experiment at the Titan Laser facility utilized two 700 fs, 1054 nm pulses, separated by 1 to 5 ps with a total energy of 100 J, and with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. The proton spectra were measured with radiochromic film stacks and magnetic spectrometers. The prepulse energy was on the order of 10 mJ, which appears to have a moderating effect on the double pulse enhancement of proton beam. We have performed LSP PIC simulations to understand the double pulse enhancement mechanism, as well as the role of preplasma in modifying the interaction. A 1D parameter study was done to isolate various aspects of the interaction, while 2D simulations provide more detailed physical insight and a better comparison with experimental data. Work by the Univ. of Alberta was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Identification of major proton fluence events from nitrates in polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Shea, M A; Smart, D F; Dreschhoff, G A

    1999-06-01

    Large transient concentrations of nitrates in polar ice cores have been identified as the signature of some major solar proton fluence events between 1940 and 1991. We review this solar proton proxy identification technique using nitrate concentration measurements in ice cores from the Arctic and Antarctic. Using this identification technique we go back in time in an attempt to identify major solar proton events during the past several centuries. There is a very large nitrate increase corresponding to the Carrington flare of 1859 evident in the Arctic ice core. Other significant nitrate increases may indicate that major solar proton events occurred toward the end of the last century. The problems associated with this new technique of using nitrates as proxies to identify solar proton events are discussed.

  20. Proton transfer in nanoconfined polar solvents. II. Adiabatic proton transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ward H

    2005-09-29

    The reaction dynamics for a model phenol-amine proton transfer system in a confined methyl chloride solvent have been simulated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. In this approach, the proton vibration is treated quantum mechanically (and adiabatically), while the rest of the system is described classically. Nonequilibrium trajectories are used to determine the proton transfer reaction rate constant. The reaction complex and methyl chloride solvent are confined in a smooth, hydrophobic spherical cavity, and radii of 10, 12, and 15 A have been considered. The effects of the cavity radius and the heavy atom (hydrogen bond) distance on the reaction dynamics are considered, and the mechanism of the proton transfer is examined in detail by analysis of the trajectories.

  1. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  2. Physics with a high-intensity proton accelerator below 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The types of physics that would be pursued at a high-intensity, moderate-energy proton accelerator are discussed. The discussion is drawn from the deliberations of the 30-GeV subgroup of the Fixed-Target Group at this workshop.

  3. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N.

    2016-08-01

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituing the spin physics program at NICA.

  4. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  5. RHIC Performance with polarized protons in run-6

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn,V.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, S.; Brown, K.A.; et al.

    2006-10-02

    In this study, an array of vibration measurements at the undisturbed NSLS II site has been performed in order to establish the 'green-field' vibration environment and its spectral characteristics. The interaction of the green-field vibration environment with the NSLS II accelerator structure and the quantification of the storage ring vibration, both in terms of amplitude and spectral content have been assessed through a state-of-the-art wave propagation and scattering analysis. This paper focuses on the wave propagation and scattering aspect as well as on the filtering effects of accelerator structural parameters.

  6. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-01

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  7. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  8. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  9. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  10. Empirical determination of solar proton access to the atmosphere: Impact on polar flight paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Jason J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Green, Janet C.

    2013-07-01

    Violent expulsions on the Sun's surface release high energy solar protons that ultimately affect HF communication used by aircraft. The geomagnetic field screens the low altitude equatorial region, but these protons can access the atmosphere over the poles. The latitudes over which the solar protons can reach vary with geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. In this study we use observations from low Earth orbit to determine the atmospheric access of solar protons and hence the flights paths most likely to be affected. Observations taken by up to six polar orbiting satellites during 15 solar proton events are analyzed. From this we determine 16,850 proton rigidity cutoff estimates across three energy channels. Empirical fits are undertaken to estimate the most likely behavior of the cutoff dependence with geomagnetic activity. The changing Kp value is found to lead the variation in the cutoffs by ~3 h. We provide simple equations by which the geomagnetic latitude at which the protons impact the atmosphere can be determined from a given Kp or Dst value. The variation found in the cutoff with Kp is similar to that used in existing operational models, although we suggest that a ~1-2° equatorward shift in latitude would provide greater accuracy. We find that a Kp predictive model can provide additional warning to the variation in proton cutoffs. Hence, a prediction of the cutoff latitudes can be made ~3 h to as much as 7 h into the future, meeting suggested minimum planning times required by the aviation industry.

  11. Radiative Capture of Polarized Protons by Tritium at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas Jay

    A study of the ('3)H((')p,(gamma))('4)He reaction was made at low proton energies in order to better understand the multipole nature of the emitted (gamma)-rays. Angular distributions of cross section and analyzing power were measured for incident proton energies of 2.0, 5.0, and 9.0 MeV. In addition, the analyzing power at 90(DEGREES) was measured at eleven proton bombarding energies ranging from 0.8 to 9.0 MeV. The coefficients a(,k) and b(,k) were determined from fitting Legendre and associated Legendre polynomial series, respectively, to the angular distributions. The extracted b(,1)-coefficients showed energy structure suggestive of multipole contributions from other than E1 or E2 radiations. A transition matrix element (T-matrix) analysis of the three angular distributions was performed to extract the relative E1 and E2 cross sections and their component singlet and triplet strengths. The triplet (or spin-flip) E2 strength was found to be large (albeit with large error) at 5.0 and 9.0 MeV and negligible at 2.0 MeV. The T-matrix analysis was expanded to include the possibilities of E3, M1, and M2 matrix elements. The E3 and M2 matrix elements failed to give reasonable fits to the data when they were combined with the E1 and E2 elements. Only when M1 strength was included in the T-matrix analysis could viable fits be found at all angular distribution energies. A direct-capture model calculation was performed for the ('3)H((')p,(gamma))- ('4)He reaction for proton energies up to 9.0 MeV. Good agreement was achieved with all experimental a(,k)- and b(,k)-coefficients except b(,1). The model also failed to predict the behavior of the A(90(DEGREES)) data. When M1 was added to the calculation in strengths comparable to those found in the T-matrix analysis, however, good agreement with the b(,1)-coefficient and the A(90(DEGREES)) curve resulted. It was concluded that M1 strengths of 0.5 to 1% of the total cross section are present in the ('3)H(p,(gamma))('4)He

  12. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on deuterium at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, G.S.

    1984-07-01

    A specific set of spin transfer coefficients has been measured for proton-deuteron elastic scattering at 800 MeV using an unpolarized liquid deuterium target. The experiment was done using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) with a polarized proton beam. The scattered proton spin direction was determined using the Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP) of the HRS, which employs a carbon analyzer. Some of the spin dependent parameters measured in this experiment are of considerable interest because they provide selective information about the nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitude. Since the deuteron is the simplest bound nucleus, pd elastic scattering is particularly well suited for testing multiple scattering theories. These measurements will also be used to eventually determine the full pd collision matrix, which contains all possible information about the scattering process. In addition, the experimental setup is described for a polarized proton-polarized deuterium target spin transfer experiment also done at the HRS at 800 MeV incident proton energy. 71 references.

  13. Polarization of Pc1/EMIC waves and related proton auroras observed at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the polarization of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations and related proton auroras at subauroral latitudes, using an induction magnetometer and an all-sky camera at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude (mlat) 61.7°N). Isolated proton auroras often appear in association with Pc1 pulsations, because of proton scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the magnetosphere. We used the proton aurora as a proxy for the location and size of the Pc1 ionospheric source. For 27 Pc1 events with simultaneously observed proton auroras over 4 years from September 7, 2005 to September 6, 2009, we calculated the distances between the Pc1 ionospheric source and the observation site, normalized by the scale size of the source. We tried three different definitions of the scale size of Pc1 ionospheric source to calculate the normalized distances. We found that the rotation angle θ between the Pc1 polarization ellipse and the direction to the proton aurora changes from 90° to 0° as the normalized distance increases. For the definition of the scale sizes that gives most clear θ-transition from 90° to 0°, the transition occurs at the normalized distance ˜2.0-4.0, while it was ˜1.0-2.0 by the model calculation of Fujita and Tamao (1988). The averaged major axes tend to point toward the proton aurora at larger distances. The difference of the transition location may imply that the Pc1 ionospheric sources are larger than the isolated proton auroras, or that the inhomogenuity of the ionospheric conductivity by the proton precipitation affects the transition distances.

  14. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  15. Transversity in Drell-Yan Process of Polarized Protons and Antiprotons in Pax Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, A. V.; Goeke, K.; Schweitzer, P.

    2005-08-01

    Estimates are given for the double-spin asymmetry in lepton-pair production from collisions of transversely polarized protons and antiprotons for the kinematics of the recently proposed PAX experiment at GSI, on the basis of predictions for the transversity distribution from the chiral quark soliton model.

  16. Probing non polar interstellar molecules through their protonated form: Detection of protonated cyanogen (NCCNH(+)).

    PubMed

    Agúndez, M; Cernicharo, J; de Vicente, P; Marcelino, N; Roueff, E; Fuente, A; Gerin, M; Guélin, M; Albo, C; Barcia, A; Barbas, L; Bolaño, R; Colomer, F; Diez, M C; Gallego, J D; Gómez-González, J; López-Fernández, I; López-Fernández, J A; López-Pérez, J A; Malo, I; Serna, J M; Tercero, F

    2015-07-01

    Cyanogen (NCCN) is the simplest member of the series of dicyanopolyynes. It has been hypothesized that this family of molecules can be important constituents of interstellar and circumstellar media, although the lack of a permanent electric dipole moment prevents its detection through radioastronomical techniques. Here we present the first solid evidence of the presence of cyanogen in interstellar clouds through the detection of its protonated form toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L483. Protonated cyanogen (NCCNH(+)) has been identified through the J = 5 - 4 and J = 10 - 9 rotational transitions using the 40m radiotelescope of Yebes and the IRAM 30m telescope. We derive beam averaged column densities for NCCNH(+) of (8.6 ± 4.4) × 10(10) cm(-2) in TMC-1 and (3.9 ± 1.8) × 10(10) cm(-2) in L483, which translate to fairly low fractional abundances relative to H2, in the range (1-10) × 10(-12). The chemistry of protonated molecules in dark clouds is discussed, and it is found that, in general terms, the abundance ratio between the protonated and non protonated forms of a molecule increases with increasing proton affinity. Our chemical model predicts an abundance ratio NCCNH(+)/NCCN of ~ 10(-4), which implies that the abundance of cyanogen in dark clouds could be as high as (1-10) × 10(-8) relative to H2, i.e., comparable to that of other abundant nitriles such as HCN, HNC, and HC3N.

  17. Probing non polar interstellar molecules through their protonated form: Detection of protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+)★

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; de Vicente, P.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Guélin, M.; Albo, C.; Barcia, A.; Barbas, L.; Bolaño, R.; Colomer, F.; Diez, M. C.; Gallego, J. D.; Gómez-González, J.; López-Fernández, I.; López-Fernández, J. A.; López-Pérez, J. A.; Malo, I.; Serna, J. M.; Tercero, F.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanogen (NCCN) is the simplest member of the series of dicyanopolyynes. It has been hypothesized that this family of molecules can be important constituents of interstellar and circumstellar media, although the lack of a permanent electric dipole moment prevents its detection through radioastronomical techniques. Here we present the first solid evidence of the presence of cyanogen in interstellar clouds through the detection of its protonated form toward the cold dark clouds TMC-1 and L483. Protonated cyanogen (NCCNH+) has been identified through the J = 5 – 4 and J = 10 – 9 rotational transitions using the 40m radiotelescope of Yebes and the IRAM 30m telescope. We derive beam averaged column densities for NCCNH+ of (8.6 ± 4.4) × 1010 cm−2 in TMC-1 and (3.9 ± 1.8) × 1010 cm−2 in L483, which translate to fairly low fractional abundances relative to H2, in the range (1-10) × 10−12. The chemistry of protonated molecules in dark clouds is discussed, and it is found that, in general terms, the abundance ratio between the protonated and non protonated forms of a molecule increases with increasing proton affinity. Our chemical model predicts an abundance ratio NCCNH+/NCCN of ~ 10−4, which implies that the abundance of cyanogen in dark clouds could be as high as (1-10) × 10−8 relative to H2, i.e., comparable to that of other abundant nitriles such as HCN, HNC, and HC3N. PMID:26543239

  18. An overview of Booster and AGS polarized proton operation during Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2015-10-20

    This note is an overview of the Booster and AGS for the 2015 Polarized Proton RHIC run from an operations perspective. There are some notable differences between this and previous runs. In particular, the polarized source intensity was expected to be, and was, higher this year than in previous RHIC runs. The hope was to make use of this higher input intensity by allowing the beam to be scraped down more in the Booster to provide a brighter and smaller beam for the AGS and RHIC. The RHIC intensity requirements were also higher this run than in previous runs, which caused additional challenges because the AGS polarization and emittance are normally intensity dependent.

  19. Proton knock-out from tensor polarized deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    E. Passchier; M. Ferro-Luzzi; Z.-L. Zhou; T. Botto; M. Bouwhuis; J. F. J. van den Brand; D. Dimitroyannis; M. Doets; Kees de Jager; J. Konijn; D. J. J. de Lange; G. J. Nooren; N. Papadakis; I. Passchier; P. Salle; J. J. M. Steijger; N. Vodinas; H. de Vries; C. Zegers; Ricardo Alarcon; Seonho Choi; Joseph Comfort; D. M. Nikolenko; S. G. Popov; Igor Rachek; J. Lang; H. Arenhoevel; Rolf Ent; W. Leidemann; M. Bucholz; H. J. Bulten; Mike Miller; J. S. Neal; O. Unal

    1994-09-01

    A status report is given on experiment 91-12, which is the first internal target experiment performed at the internal target facility of NIKHEF. The aim of this experiment is to measure the asymmetry in the (e,e'p) reaction from a tensor polarized deuterium target with unpolarized electrons. An update on the experimental setup and results of an extensive set of test measurements are presented.

  20. From Particle Physics to Astroparticle Physics: Proton Decay and the Rise of Non-accelerator Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hinrich

    The search for proton decay was motivated by simple questions about the content of the observable universe. Why is matter so stable and why do we not see antimatter of primordial origin? The symmetry of the standard model of particle physics would have required that matter and antimatter annihilated in the early universe. In 1968, Sacharov showed that the matter-antimatter asymmetry could have formed in a state of thermal non-equilibrium of the universe, as given in big bang cosmology, together with the well-confirmed C and CP violations, and proton decay. The latter phenomenon could be only investigated in large none-accelerator experiments. The SU(5) extension of the standard model implied a proton lifetime of about 1029 years. With detectors consisting of 1 000 tons of matter and located deep under the Earth surface, such as the French-German Fréjus iron-calorimeter, in the mid 1980s one expected to detect several proton decays per year. Here, we report on the way leading from accelerator laboratories to underground physics, which paradoxically enough turned out to studying cosmic rays. There has not been any evidence for the instability of protons, and lifetime limits of more than 1034 years have been obtained. However, great progress in particle physics and in the physics of cosmic rays could be achieved with neutrinos.

  1. Warp simulations for capture and control of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nurnberg, F; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Harres, K; Logan, B G; Schollmeier, M; Roth, M

    2009-10-22

    The capture of laser-accelerated proton beams accompanied by co-moving electrons via a solenoid field has been studied with particle-in-cell simulations. The main advantages of the Warp simulation suite that was used, relative to envelope or tracking codes, are the possibility of including all source parameters energy resolved, adding electrons as second species and considering the non-negligible space-charge forces and electrostatic self-fields. It was observed that the influence of the electrons is of vital importance. The magnetic effect on the electrons out balances the space-charge force. Hence, the electrons are forced onto the beam axis and attract protons. Besides the energy dependent proton density increase on axis, the change in the particle spectrum is also important for future applications. Protons are accelerated/decelerated slightly, electrons highly. 2/3 of all electrons get lost directly at the source and 27% of all protons hit the inner wall of the solenoid.

  2. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  3. Stochastic Re-Acceleration of Protons in the Downstream Region of a Coronal Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, A. N.; Kocharov, L. G.; Vainio, R. O.

    2011-12-01

    Recent SDO/AIA observations of CME in the low corona have finally confirmed the formation of coronal shock waves in the low corona. This supports the viability of shock acceleration as the mechanism for the genesis of large gradual SEP events. However, a careful analysis of observational data of the early phases of large SEP events indicates that it might be hard to understand some of the spectral characteristics at deca-MeV energies in detail relying on a model of diffusive shock acceleration alone. We have recently presented a test-particle model where coronal shock acceleration and stochastic re-acceleration in the shock downstream region can account for the hard spectral features in the deca-MeV range. The problem of a test-particle calculation in the case of stochastic acceleration is, however, that a time-stationary wave field acts as an infinite energy reservoir for the particles being accelerated by turbulence. To account for this problem, we employ our self-consistent wave-particle interaction simulation code to compute the evolution of the wave frequency and proton energy spectra in the downstream region of a coronal shock. Parameter space allowed by different types of turbulence generation models is explored and regions favorable to explaining the proton energy spectra in large gradual events are identified.

  4. Proton acceleration by multi-terawatt interaction with a near-critical density hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy; Feder, Linus; Hine, George; Salehi, Fatholah; Woodbury, Daniel; Su, J. J.; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Zigler, Arie; Milchberg, Howard

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the high intensity laser interaction with thin, near critical density plasmas as a means of efficient acceleration of MeV protons. A promising mechanism is magnetic vortex acceleration, where the ponderomotive force of a tightly focused laser pulse drives a relativistic electron current which generates a strong azimuthal magnetic field. The rapid expansion of this azimuthal magnetic field at the back side of the target can accelerate plasma ions to MeV scale energies. Compared to typical ion acceleration experiments utilizing a laser- thin solid foil interaction, magnetic vortex acceleration in near critical density plasma may be realized in a high density gas jet, making it attractive for applications requiring high repetition rates. We present preliminary experiments studying laser-plasma interaction and proton acceleration in a thin (< 200 μm) near-critical density hydrogen gas jet delivering electron densities 1020 -1021 cm-3 . This research was funded by the United States Department of Energy and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) under Contract Number W911-NF-15-C-0217, issued by the Army Research Office.

  5. Equation of State Measurements of Dense Plasmas Heated by Laser Accelerated MeV Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Bernstein, Aaron; Cho, Byoung-Ick; Grigsby, Will; Dalton, Allen; Shepherd, Ronnie; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Hui; Widmann, Klaus; Ozterhoz, Jens; Ditmire, Todd

    2008-04-01

    Using a fast proton beam generated with an ultra intense laser we have generated and measured the equation of state of solid density plasma at temperatures near 20 eV, a regime in which there have been few previous experimental measurements. The laser accelerated a directional, short pulse of MeV protons, which isochorically heated a solid slab of aluminum. Using two simultaneous, temporally resolved measurements we observed the thermal emission and expansion of the heated foil with picosecond time resolution. With these data we were able to confirm, to within 10%, the SESAME equation-of-state table in this dense plasma region.

  6. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  7. Field-Guided Proton Acceleration at Reconnecting x-Points in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, B.; McCLEMENTS, K. G.; Fletcher, L.; Thyagaraja, A.

    2003-06-01

    An explicitly energy-conserving full orbit code CUEBIT, developed originally to describe energetic particle effects in laboratory fusion experiments, has been applied to the problem of proton acceleration in solar flares. The model fields are obtained from solutions of the linearised MHD equations for reconnecting modes at an X-type neutral point, with the additional ingredient of a longitudinal magnetic field component. To accelerate protons to the highest observed energies on flare timescales, it is necessary to invoke anomalous resistivity in the MHD solution. It is shown that the addition of a longitudinal field component greatly increases the efficiency of ion acceleration, essentially because it greatly reduces the magnitude of drift motions away from the vicinity of the X-point, where the accelerating component of the electric field is largest. Using plasma parameters consistent with flare observations, we obtain proton distributions extending up to γ-ray-emitting energies (>1 MeV). In some cases the energy distributions exhibit a bump-on-tail in the MeV range. In general, the shape of the distribution is sensitive to the model parameters.

  8. Letter of Intent for a Drell-Yan Experiment with a Polarized Proton Target

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Reimer, P.; Brown, C.; Christian, D.; Diefenthaler, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Chang, W. -C.; Chen, Y. -C.; Sawada, S.; Chang, T. -H.; Huang, J.; Jiang, X.; Leitch, M.; Klein, A.; Liu, K.; Liu, M.; McGaughey, P.; Beise, E.; Nakahara, K.; Aidala, C.; Lorenzon, W.; Raymond, R.; Badman, T.; Long, E.; Slifer, K.; Zielinski, R.; Guo, R. -S.; Goto, Y.; El Fassi, L.; Myers, K.; Ransome, R.; Tadepalli, A.; Tice, B.; Chen, J. -P.; Nakano, K.; Shibata, T. -A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Keller, D.; Rondon, O.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the proton is a spin-1/2 particle, but how the constituents (quarks and gluons) assemble to this quantized spin is still a mystery. There is a worldwide effort to map out the individual contributions to the proton spin. It is established that the quark spins contribute around 30%, while the gluon intrinsic angular momentum is still under active investigation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Fully resolving the proton spin puzzle requires information on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of both quarks and gluons. Recent studies have shown that the so-called transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) can inform us about the OAM of the partons. One of the most important TMDs, and the main focus of this LOI, is the so-called Sivers function. To summarize, we propose to make the first measurement of the Sivers function of sea quarks, which is expected to be non-zero if the sea quarks contribute orbital angular momentum to the proton spin, as expected from the pion cloud model, which also partially explains the E866 results. Thus, we will be able to deduce whether or not sea quark orbital motion contributes significantly to the proton spin. Specifically, we will determine the contribution from the anti-up quarks, with Bjorken-x in the range of ~ 0.1 to 0.5. Drell-Yan production off a polarized proton target has never been measured, and is complementary to the recently approved (stage-1) experiment E1027 at Fermilab, which will measure the Sivers function of the valence quarks using a polarized proton beam on an unpolarized proton target. If the measured sea quark Sivers function is non-zero, we will also determine its sign.

  9. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Li, J.; Fourkal, E.; Fan, J.; Xu, X.; Chen, Z.; Jin, L.; Price, R.; Ma, C.-M.

    2008-12-01

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying δE/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D5-D95)/D95) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V65) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V40) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser accelerator under development has a

  10. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Li, J; Fourkal, E; Fan, J; Xu, X; Chen, Z; Jin, L; Price, R; Ma, C-M

    2008-12-21

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying deltaE/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D5-D95)/D95) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V65) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V40) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser accelerator under development has

  11. Protons in polar media: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1998-10-01

    The hydrates of hydrogen chloride are ionic crystals that contain hydronium (H3O+). The hydronium in the monohydrate has been reported to be statistically disordered between two possible sites related by inversion symmetry. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are presented for the monohydrate, as well as the di-, and tri-hydrates, of hydrogen chloride using the density functional based Car-Parrinello technique. The simulations were carried out with the goal of investigating proton disorder in these crystals. The possible role of nuclear quantum effects has been explored via path integral molecular dynamic simulations. The present results suggest that the proposed disordered sites in the monohydrate are dynamically unstable and therefore unlikely to be responsible for the reported disorder. No useful information was obtained for the dihydrate because the large unit cell leads to difficulties in carrying out the simulations. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be important for characterizing the proton distributions in the trihydrate. The structure and dynamical behavior of liquid HF with dissolved KF have been investigated using the Car- Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. Specifically, a system with stoichiometry KFċ2HF was studied at temperatures of 400K and 1000K. This system, which was started from a phase separated mixture, rapidly formed into solvated potassium ions and HnFn+1/sp- polyfluoride anions with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The resulting polyfluoride anions were classified, and their structures and dynamical behavior were compared with the known structures and spectra of crystalline compounds KF/cdot xHF and with theoretical predictions of isolated gas phase species. The present study reveals dramatic frequency shifts in the H atom vibrational modes with variation in the HF coordination number of the polyfluoride anion. In particular the FH wagging motion red shifts while the FH stretch blue shifts as n increases. The present calculations

  12. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  13. Proton acceleration using doped Argon plasma density gradient interacting with relativistic CO2 -laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash; Ettlinger, Oliver; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We investigate proton and light-ion acceleration driven by the interaction of relativistic CO2 laser pulses with overdense Argon or other heavy-ion gas targets doped with lighter-ion species. Optically shaping the gas targets allows tuning of the pre-plasma scale-length from a few to several laser wavelengths, allowing the laser to efficiently drive a propagating snowplow through the bunching in the electron density. Preliminary PIC-based modeling shows that the lighter-ion species is accelerated even without any significant motion of the heavier ions which is a signature of the Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration mechanism. Some outlines of possible experiments at the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

  14. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  15. Phase Velocity and Particle Injection in a Self-Modulated Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pukhov, A.; Kumar, N.; Tueckmantel, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Lotov, K.; Muggli, P.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2011-09-30

    It is demonstrated that the performance of the self-modulated proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator is strongly affected by the reduced phase velocity of the plasma wave. Using analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the reduction is largest during the linear stage of self-modulation. As the instability nonlinearly saturates, the phase velocity approaches that of the driver. The deleterious effects of the wake's dynamics on the maximum energy gain of accelerated electrons can be avoided using side-injections of electrons, or by controlling the wake's phase velocity by smooth plasma density gradients.

  16. Protons acceleration in thin CH foils by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with the intensities 10{sup 21}, 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} with CH plastic foils is studied in the framework of kinetic theory of laser plasma based on the construction of propagators (in classical limit) for electron and ion distribution functions in plasmas. The calculations have been performed for real densities and charges of plasma ions. Protons are accelerated both in the direction of laser pulse (up to 1 GeV) and in the opposite direction (more than 5 GeV). The mechanisms of forward acceleration are different for various intensities.

  17. Phase velocity and particle injection in a self-modulated proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Pukhov, A; Kumar, N; Tückmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Lotov, K; Muggli, P; Khudik, V; Siemon, C; Shvets, G

    2011-09-30

    It is demonstrated that the performance of the self-modulated proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator is strongly affected by the reduced phase velocity of the plasma wave. Using analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the reduction is largest during the linear stage of self-modulation. As the instability nonlinearly saturates, the phase velocity approaches that of the driver. The deleterious effects of the wake's dynamics on the maximum energy gain of accelerated electrons can be avoided using side-injections of electrons, or by controlling the wake's phase velocity by smooth plasma density gradients.

  18. Effects of Booster Scraping in Polarized Proton Runs 2006 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

    2009-01-02

    Effects of the Booster vertical scraping on the RHIC beam polarization, the RHIC beam emittance, and on the Booster to AGS transfer efficiency and AGS transmission as well, are further studied. In [1], the strong dependence of the RHIC beam polarization and emittance on bunch intensity in proton run 2008 (pp08) is compared with the proton run 2006 (pp06), where the dependence is much weaker. The setting in the AGS Booster, mainly the vertical scraping, is suspected to having played a role in the different patterns in the two runs. In this note, we further study the effects of the Booster vertical scraping on the RHIC beam polarization, and on the RHIC beam emittance as well. With the improvement of the RHIC bunch intensity in mind, the Booster scraping effects on the Booster to AGS transfer (BtA) efficiency and the AGS transmission are also studied. For simplicity and to be more useful, only the RHIC fills after the one-week shutdown in pp06 and the fills using the AGS User 2 in pp08 are shown. For these fills, the machine settings in AGS are similar in pp06 and pp08 runs. Furthermore, this setting might be used for next polarized proton run, at least at the beginning of the run.

  19. Calculations of neutron shielding data for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Jian, S H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron sources and their attenuation in concrete were investigated in detail for protons with energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV striking on target materials of C, N, Al, Fe, Cu and W. A two-step approach was adopted: thick-target double-differential neutron yields were first calculated from the (p, xn) cross sections recommended in the ICRU Report 63; further, transport simulations of those neutrons in concrete were performed by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The purpose of this study is to provide reasonably accurate parameters for shielding design for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators. Source terms and the corresponding attenuation lengths in concrete for several target materials are given as a function of proton energies and neutron emission angles.

  20. Shock wave acceleration of protons in inhomogeneous plasma interacting with ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lecz, Zs.; Andreev, A.

    2015-04-15

    The acceleration of protons, triggered by solitary waves in expanded solid targets is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The near-critical density plasma is irradiated by ultrashort high power laser pulses, which generate the solitary wave. The transformation of this soliton into a shock wave during propagation in plasma with exponentially decreasing density profile is described analytically, which allows to obtain a scaling law for the proton energy. The high quality proton bunch with small energy spread is produced by reflection from the shock-front. According to the 2D simulations, the mechanism is stable only if the laser pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic development time of the parasitic Weibel instability.

  1. Recent results from polarization experiments at the LHEP-JINR Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygin, V. P.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Krasnov, V. A.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kiselev, A. S.; Kizka, V. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Livanov, A. N.; Ladygina, N. B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Piyadin, S. M.; Reznikov, S. G.; Shikhalev, M. A.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Uesaka, T.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.

    2008-10-13

    The review of recent results from polarization experiments performed at LHEP-JINR Accelerator Complex in a GeV range is given. The current status of the spin program at Nuclotron as well as its further continuation with new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source is discussed.

  2. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  3. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  4. Polarization of cumulative protons produced in the reaction p+A. -->. p'+X at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Belostotskii, S.L.; Vol'nin, E.N.; Vorob'ev, A.A.; Dotsenko, Y.V.; Kudin, L.G.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lobodenko, A.A.; Miklukho, O.V.; Nikulin, V.N.; Prokof'ev, O.E.

    1985-12-01

    Polarization of protons produced in the reaction p+A..-->..p'+X on the nuclei /sup 2/H, /sup 4/He, Be, C, Al, Cu, and Pb has been measured at 59, 109, and 145/sup 0/ lab angles at an incident-proton energy 1 GeV, and at a secondary-proton momentum up to 0.9 GeV/c. For all nuclei studied with exception of deuterium the polarization of protons turned out to be close to zero.

  5. Spin flipping a stored vertically polarized proton beam with an RF solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, R. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Caussyn, D. D.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; Przewoski, B. von; Ohmori, C.

    1995-09-01

    A recent experiment in the IUCF cooler ring studied the spin flip of a stored vertically polarized 139 MeV proton beam. This spin flip was accomplished by using an RF solenoid to induce an artificial depolarizing resonance in the ring, and then varying the solenoid's frequency through this resonance value to induce spin flip. We found a polarization loss after multiple spin flips of about 0.00±0.05% per flip and also losses for very long flip times. This device will be useful for reducing systematic errors in polarized beam-internal target scattering asymmetry experiments by enabling experimenters to perform frequent beam polarization reversals in the course of the experiment.

  6. Fast fingerprinting of arson accelerants by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Christopher; Wyche, Kevin P.; Kholia, Mitesh; Ellis, Andrew M.; Monks, Paul S.

    2007-06-01

    Current techniques for the forensic analysis of fire debris as a means to detect the presence of arson accelerants normally use off-line sampling with the collection of accelerant vapours on activated charcoal strips and further pre-chemistry prior to analysis. An alternative method for the direct detection of arson accelerants that requires no sample pre-treatment is described here. The analysis uses proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), incorporating a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for rapid multichannel compound detection. It is demonstrated that using PTR-MS volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprints of a given fire accelerant can be collected by simple head space analysis of accelerant burned materials. Using a set of the four most common arson accelerants and four common household building materials, characteristic VOC fingerprints are shown to provide successful identification of the accelerant used to burn each material. There is the potential to develop this methodology for the rapid screening of large numbers of samples.

  7. Constraints on Solar Wind Acceleration Mechanisms from Ulysses Plasma Observations: The First Polar Pass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron; Gazis, Paul R.; Phillips, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The mass flux density and velocity of the solar wind at polar latitudes can provide strong constraints on solar wind acceleration mechanisms. We use plasma observations from the first polar passage of the Ulysses spacecraft to investigate this question. We find that the mass flux density and velocity are too high to reconcile with acceleration of the solar wind by classical thermal conduction alone. Therefore acceleration of the high-speed must involve extended deposition of energy by some other mechanism, either as heat or as a direct effective pressure, due possibly to waves and/or turbulence, or completely non-classical heat transport.

  8. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  9. Computational simulations of hydrogen circular migration in protonated acetylene induced by circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xuetao; Li, Wen; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    The hydrogens in protonated acetylene are very mobile and can easily migrate around the C2 core by moving between classical and non-classical structures of the cation. The lowest energy structure is the T-shaped, non-classical cation with a hydrogen bridging the two carbons. Conversion to the classical H2CCH+ ion requires only 4 kcal/mol. The effect of circularly polarized light on the migration of hydrogens in oriented C2H3+ has been simulated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Classical trajectory calculations were carried out with the M062X/6-311+G(3df,2pd) level of theory using linearly and circularly polarized 32 cycle 7 μm cosine squared pulses with peak intensity of 5.6 × 1013 W/cm2 and 3.15 × 1013 W/cm2, respectively. These linearly and circularly polarized pulses transfer similar amounts of energy and total angular momentum to C2H3+. The average angular momentum vectors of the three hydrogens show opposite directions of rotation for right and left circularly polarized light, but no directional preference for linearly polarized light. This difference results in an appreciable amount of angular displacement of the three hydrogens relative to the C2 core for circularly polarized light, but only an insignificant amount for linearly polarized light. Over the course of the simulation with circularly polarized light, this corresponds to a propeller-like motion of the three hydrogens around the C2 core of protonated acetylene.

  10. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  11. Conceptual design of a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator for protons and carbon ions for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, K. J.; Aslaninejad, M.; Barlow, R. J.; Beard, C. D.; Bliss, N.; Cobb, J. H.; Easton, M. J.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fenning, R.; Gardner, I. S. K.; Hill, M. A.; Owen, H. L.; Johnstone, C. J.; Jones, B.; Jones, T.; Kelliher, D. J.; Khan, A.; Machida, S.; McIntosh, P. A.; Pattalwar, S.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Prior, C. R.; Rochford, J.; Rogers, C. T.; Seviour, R.; Sheehy, S. L.; Smith, S. L.; Strachan, J.; Tygier, S.; Vojnovic, B.; Wilson, P.; Witte, H.; Yokoi, T.

    2013-03-01

    The conceptual design for a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator suitable for charged particle therapy (the use of protons and other light ions to treat some forms of cancer) is described.

  12. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  13. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  14. Proton and Helium Injection Into First Order Fermi Acceleration at Shocks: Hybrid Simulation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikova, Galina; Malkov, Mikhail; Sagdeev, Roald; Liseykina, Tatjana; Hanusch, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Elemental composition of galactic cosmic rays (CR) probably holds the key to their origin. Most likely, they are accelerated at collisionless shocks in supernova remnants, but the acceleration mechanism is not entirely understood. One complicated problem is ``injection'', a process whereby the shock selects a tiny fraction of particles to keep on crossing its front and gain more energy. Comparing the injection rates of particles with different mass to charge ratio is a powerful tool for studying this process. Recent advances in measurements of CR He/p ratio have provided particularly important new clues. We performed a series of hybrid simulations and analyzed a joint injection of protons and Helium, in conjunction with upstream waves they generate. The emphasis of this work is on the bootstrap aspects of injection manifested in particle confinement to the shock and, therefore, their continuing acceleration by the self-driven waves. The waves are initially generated by He and protons in separate spectral regions, and their interaction plays a crucial role in particle acceleration. The work is ongoing and new results will be reported along with their analysis and comparison with the latest data from the AMS-02 space-based spectrometer. Work supported Grant RFBR 16-01-00209, NASA ATP-program under Award NNX14AH36G, and by the US Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  15. A LOW GAMMA_T INJECTION LATTICE FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2007-06-25

    Polarized protons are injected into the Relativistic Heavy Jon Collider (RHIC) just above transition energy. When installation of a cold partial Siberian snake in the AGS required lowering the injection energy by {Delta}{gamma} = 0.56, the transition energy in RHIC had to be lowered accordingly to ensure proper longitudinal matching. This paper presents lattice modifications implemented to lower the transition energy by {Delta}{gamma}{sub t} = 0.8.

  16. Effective generation of the spread-out-Bragg peak from the laser accelerated proton beams using a carbon-proton mixed target.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Pae, Ki-Hong; Park, Sung Yong

    2014-12-01

    Conventional laser accelerated proton beam has broad energy spectra. It is not suitable for clinical use directly, so it is necessary for employing energy selection system. However, in the conventional laser accelerated proton system, the intensity of the proton beams in the low energy regime is higher than that in the high energy regime. Thus, to generate spread-out-Bragg peak (SOBP), stronger weighting value to the higher energy proton beams is needed and weaker weighting value to the lower energy proton beams is needed, which results in the wide range of weighting values. The purpose of this research is to investigate a method for efficient generating of the SOBP with varying magnetic field in the energy selection system using a carbon-proton mixture target. Energy spectrum of the laser accelerated proton beams was acquired using Particle-In-Cell simulations. The Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was implemented for energy selection, particle transportation, and dosimetric property measurement. The energy selection collimator hole size of the energy selection system was changed from 1 to 5 mm in order to investigate the effect of hole size on the dosimetric properties for Bragg peak and SOBP. To generate SOBP, magnetic field in the energy selection system was changed during beam irradiation with each beam weighting factor. In this study, our results suggest that carbon-proton mixture target based laser accelerated proton beams can generate quasi-monoenergetic energy distribution and result in the efficient generation of SOBP. A further research is needed to optimize SOBP according to each range and modulated width using an optimized weighting algorithm.

  17. The Proton Coulomb Form Factor from Polarized Inclusive e-p Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Christopher Matthew

    2001-05-01

    The proton form factors provide information on the fundamental properties of the proton and provide a test for models based on QCD. In 1998 at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) in Newport News, VA, experiment E93026 measured the inclusive e-p scattering cross section from a polarized ammonia (15NH3) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 0.5 (GeV/c)2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from the polarized target and the scattered electron was detected. Data has been analyzed to obtain the asymmetry from elastically scattered electrons from hydrogen in 15NH3. The asymmetry, Ap, has been used to determine the proton elastic form factor GEp. The result is consistent with the dipole model and data from previous experiments. However, due to the choice of kinematics, the uncertainty in the measurement is large.

  18. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  19. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  20. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, Primož; Podaru, Nicolae C.; Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka; Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina; Ondračka, Simon; Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H- ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H- ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1 at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV1/2. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of 3He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m-2 rad-2 eV-1, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  1. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P.; Firoz, Kazi A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  2. Multistaged acceleration of ions by circularly polarized laser pulse: Monoenergetic ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying; Wang Fengchao

    2007-07-15

    A multiple-staged ion acceleration mechanism in the interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse with a solid target is studied by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The ions are accelerated from rest to several MeV monoenergetically at the front surface of the target. After all the plasma ions are accelerated, the acceleration process is repeated on the resulting monoenergetic ions. Under suitable conditions multiple repetitions can be realized and a high-energy quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be obtained.

  3. BESS-Polar II Measurements of the Cosmic-ray Proton and Helium Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kenichi

    The energy spectra of cosmic-ray protons and helium near solar minimum were precisely measured with BESS-Polar II (Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer) during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in December 2007 and January 2008. The absolute fluxes and spectral shapes of primary protons and helium probe the origin and the propagation history of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The spectra are also essential as inputs to calculate the spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons, which are secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar gas. To optimize the measurement of the magnetic rigidity of incident particles, obtained from the curvature of their trajectories in a solenoidal magnetic field of 0.8 Tesla, an improved calibration of the central JET-type drift chamber and two inner drift chambers was developed. We report absolute spectra of primary cosmic-ray protons to ˜ 120 GeV and helium to ˜ 50 GeV/nucleon, and compare these to other current measurements. We also report antiproton/proton ratio in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV. The temporal variation of the antiproton/proton ratio, measured by BESS since 1993, covering solar minimum, solar maximum, and solar magnetic field reversal, provides a crucial test of charge-sign dependence of solar modulation.

  4. Physics and Novel Schemes of Laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration for Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi

    2016-06-14

    The main objective of our work is to provide theoretical basis and modeling support for the design and experimental setup of compact laser proton accelerator to produce high quality proton beams tunable with energy from 50 to 250 MeV using short pulse sub-petawatt laser. We performed theoretical and computational studies of energy scaling and Raleigh--Taylor instability development in laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) and developed novel RPA-based schemes to remedy/suppress instabilities for high-quality quasimonoenergetic proton beam generation as we proposed. During the project period, we published nine peer-reviewed journal papers and made twenty conference presentations including six invited talks on our work. The project supported one graduate student who received his PhD degree in physics in 2013 and supported two post-doctoral associates. We also mentored three high school students and one undergraduate student of physics major by inspiring their interests and having them involved in the project.

  5. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  6. Materials irradiation facilities at the high-power Swiss proton accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Werner; Dai, Yong; Glasbrenner, Heike; Aebersold, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-04-01

    Within the Swiss proton accelerator complex at the Paul-Scherrer-Institute (PSI), several irradiation facilities are operated for investigation of materials behavior under high-dose irradiation conditions as well as for neutron activation analysis and isotope production. In LiSoR (liquid solid reaction), a liquid metal loop connected to the 72 MeV proton accelerator Injector 1, steel samples are irradiated while being in contact with flowing lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE) at elevated temperatures and under tensile stress. In the spallation neutron source SINQ, the STIP program (SINQ Target Irradiation Program) allows materials irradiation under realistic spallation conditions, i.e. in a mixed spectrum of 570 MeV protons and spallation neutrons. Hundreds of samples, mainly austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels such as 316L, T91 or F82H, were irradiated to doses up to 20 dpa as part of STIP. These also included steel samples in contact with liquid Hg and liquid LBE. MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment), a liquid metal target employing LBE, operated in SINQ during the second half of 2006, can be taken as a materials irradiation facility on its own. Adjacent to the target position, SINQ houses a neutron irradiation rabbit system serving activation analysis and isotope production.

  7. INJECTION ACCELERATION AND EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTON BEAM FOR THE NEUTRINO FACILITY PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N; Barton, D; Ganetis, G; Jain, A; Lee, Y; Marneris, I; Meng, W; Raparia, D; Roser, T; Ruggiero, A; Tuozzolo, J; Wanderer, P; Weng, W

    2003-05-12

    The proposed ''neutrino-production'' project [1.2] to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) requires that the neutrino-production target be bombarded by a high intensity proton beam-pulse of {approx} 90 x 10{sup 12} protons of 28 GeV in energy and at a rate of 2.5 Hz, resulting in a 1 MW power of proton beam deposited on the target for the production of the neutrinos. In this paper we investigate the possibility of producing this high intensity proton beam, using as the main accelerator the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The following aspects of the project are reported in this paper: (a) The beam injection into the AGS synchrotron of 1.2 GeV H{sup -} beam produced by a super-conducting LINAC[3]; (b) The effect of the eddy currents induced on the vacuum chamber of the circulating beam during the ''ramping'' of the main magnets of the AGS; (c) The method of the beam extraction from the AGS and the optics of the 28 GeV beam extracted from the AGS.

  8. Lasers As Particle Accelerators In Medicine: From Laser-Driven Protons To Imaging With Thomson Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Yakimenko, V.; Dover, N. P.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.; Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Endrizzi, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report our recent progress using a high-power, picosecond CO{sub 2} laser for Thomson scattering and ion acceleration experiments. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO{sub 2} lasers, such as their high number of photons per energy unit and beneficial wavelength- scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma frequency. High X-ray fluxes produced in the interactions of the counter-propagating laser- and electron-beams for obtaining single-shot, high-contrast images of biological objects. The laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated a monoenergetic proton beam via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The energy of protons produced by this method scales linearly with the laser's intensity. We present a plan for scaling the process into the range of 100-MeV proton energy via upgrading the CO{sub 2} laser. This development will enable an advance to the laser-driven proton cancer therapy.

  9. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, M; Geissel, M; Sefkow, A B; Flippo, K A

    2014-04-01

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  10. SU-E-T-47: A Monte Carlo Model of a Spot Scanning Proton Beam Based On a Synchrotron Proton Therapy Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, C; Lin, H; Jing, J; Chen, C; Cao, R; Pei, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build the model of a spot scanning proton beam for the dose calculation of a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator, which is capable of accelerating protons from 50 up to 221 MeV. Methods: The spot scanning beam nozzle is modeled using TOPAS code, a simulation tool based on Geant4.9.6. The model contained a beam pipe vacuum window, a beam profile monitor, a drift chamber, two plane-parallel ionization chambers, and a spot-position monitor consisted of a multiwire ionization chamber. A water phantom is located with its upstream surface at the isocenter plane. The initial proton beam energy and anglar deflection are modeled using a Gaussian distribution with FWHM (Full Widths at Half Maximum) deponding on its beam energy. The phase space file (PSF) on a virtual surface located at the center between the two magnets is recorded. PSF is used to analyze the pencil beam features and offset the pencil beam position. The source model parameters are verificated by fitting the simulated Result to the measurement. Results: The simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) and lateral profiles of scanning pencil beams of various incident proton energies are verificated to the measurement. Generally the distance to agreement (DTA) of Bragg peaks is less than 0.2cm. The FWHM of Gaussian anglar distribution was adjusted to fit the lateral profile difference between the simulation and the measurement to less than 2∼3cm. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo model of a spot scanning proton beam was bullt based on a synchrotron proton therapy accelerator. This scanning pencil beam model will be as a block to build the broad proton beam as a proton TPS dose verification tool.

  11. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  12. Measuring the Spin-Polarizabilities of the Proton in Polarized Compton scattering at MAMI-Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskimen, Rory; A2 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    At O (ω3) four new structure constants are present in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude; these are the spin-polarizabilities γE 1 E 1, γM 1 M 1, γE 1 M 2, and γM 1 E 2. The most model independent way to determine the spin-polarizabilities is by measuring a double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetry with polarized target and circularly polarized photons, and by measuring an in-plane/transverse-plane Compton scattering asymmetry with linearly polarized photons (Σ3) . This talk will present new Compton scattering asymmetry data taken in the Δ region by the A2 Collaboration using the Crystal Ball at Mainz, with transverse polarized proton target and circularly polarized photons, the Σ2 x asymmetry (1). A dispersion model and an EFT calculation of Compton scattering are used to fit the four spin-polarizabilities to the new experimental data on Σ2 x, earlier results (2) on Σ3, and previous determinations of γ0 and γπ. The results of the fits are compared with theoretical calculations.

  13. Measurement of proton polarization in the d({gamma},p)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    A proposal was approved by CEBAF PAC7 to measure angular distributions of the proton polarization for the d({gamma},p)n reaction in the GeV region. This proposed measurement will test the validity of extensions of conventional nuclear-physics theories to the higher energy regime. The results of the experiment will further constrain the evidence from SLAC experiments NE8 and NE17 that asymptotic scaling was observed above a photon energy of 1.3 GeV. Photoproton polarization measurements at lower energy indicate that the magnitude of the polarization increases with energy. This is consistent with the observation that polarizations are large in high-energy processes, e.g. A{sub nn} in pp {yields} pp scattering or A{sub y} in pp {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X. However, the polarizations in hadron-hadron scattering are believed to arise from Landshoff mechanisms. The higher energy photoproton experiment will permit the first measurements of polarization for a reaction, {gamma}d {yields} pn, where there are no Landshoff terms. The experiment would make use of a polarimeter installed in either the High Resolution Spectrometer in Hall A or the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at CEBAF.

  14. Source terms and attenuation lengths for estimating shielding requirements or dose analyses of proton therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lai, Bo-Lun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-08-01

    Proton therapy accelerators in the energy range of 100-300 MeV could potentially produce intense secondary radiation, which must be carefully evaluated and shielded for the purpose of radiation safety in a densely populated hospital. Monte Carlo simulations are generally the most accurate method for accelerator shielding design. However, simplified approaches such as the commonly used point-source line-of-sight model are usually preferable on many practical occasions, especially for scoping shielding design or quick sensitivity studies. This work provides a set of reliable shielding data with reasonable coverage of common target and shielding materials for 100-300 MeV proton accelerators. The shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths, were derived from a consistent curve fitting process of a number of depth-dose distributions within the shield, which were systematically calculated by using MCNPX for various beam-target shield configurations. The general characteristics and qualities of this data set are presented. Possible applications in cases of single- and double-layer shielding are considered and demonstrated.

  15. Robust energy enhancement of ultrashort pulse laser accelerated protons from reduced mass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Metzkes, J.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kraft, S. D.; Sauerbrey, R.; Schmidt, B.; Zier, M.; Schramm, U.

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on a systematic investigation of the ultrashort pulse laser driven acceleration of protons from thin targets of finite size, so-called reduced mass targets (RMTs). Reproducible series of targets, manufactured with lithographic techniques, and varying in size, thickness, and mounting geometry, were irradiated with ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses of intensities of about 8 × 1020 W cm-2. A robust maximum energy enhancement of almost a factor of two was found when comparing gold RMTs to reference irradiations of plain gold foils of the same thickness. Furthermore, a change of the thickness of these targets has less influence on the measured maximum proton energy when compared to standard foils, which, based on detailed particle-in-cell simulations, can be explained by the influence of the RMT geometry on the electron sheath. The performance gain was, however, restricted to lateral target sizes of greater than 50 µm, which can be attributed to edge and mounting structure influences.

  16. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  17. Accelerators, Colliders, and Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, Ernest D.

    2003-12-01

    The author traces his involvement in the evolution of particle accelerators over the past 50 years. He participated in building the first billion-volt accelerator, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, which led to the introduction of the "strong-focusing" method that has in turn led to the very large accelerators and colliders of the present day. The problems of acceleration of spin-polarized protons are also addressed, with discussions of depolarizing resonances and "Siberian snakes" as a technique for mitigating these resonances.

  18. Quantum electrodynamics vacuum polarization modification of photon acceleration in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bu Zhigang; Ji Peiyong

    2010-07-15

    The modification of photon frequency shifting based on taking into account the nonlinear quantum electrodynamics vacuum properties in plasma is studied. Motion equations of a laser field propagating in a plasma are derived from the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian density. It is found that besides the classical density perturbation of the plasma electrons, the energy density perturbation of the laser field will induce the frequency shifting via the ponderomotive force of the laser field on the vacuum. In addition it is shown that the electron density will be suppressed, which is attributed to a screening effect on the plasma electrons via the quantum vacuum polarization.

  19. Ion dynamics during the parametric instabilities of a left-hand polarized Alfvén wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Hao, Yufei; Tao, Xin; Wang, Shui; Li, Xing

    2014-01-01

    The parametric instabilities of an Alfvén wave in a proton-electron plasma system are found to have great influence on proton dynamics, where part of the protons can be accelerated through the Landau resonance with the excited ion acoustic waves, and a beam component along the background magnetic field is formed. In this paper, with a one-dimensional hybrid simulation model, we investigate the evolution of the parametric instabilities of a monochromatic left-hand polarized Alfvén wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma with a low beta. When the drift velocity between the protons and alpha particles is sufficiently large, the wave numbers of the backward daughter Alfvén waves can be cascaded toward higher values due to the modulational instability during the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instabilities, and the alpha particles are resonantly heated in both the parallel and perpendicular direction by the backward waves. On the other hand, when the drift velocity of alpha particles is small, the alpha particles are heated in the linear growth stage of the parametric instabilities due to the Landau resonance with the excited ion acoustic waves. Therefore, the heating occurs only in the parallel direction, and there is no obvious heating in the perpendicular direction. The relevance of our results to the preferential heating of heavy ions observed in the solar wind within 0.3 AU is also discussed in this paper.

  20. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  1. On the non-thermal electron-to-proton ratio at cosmic ray acceleration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Lukas; Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The luminosity ratio of electrons to protons as it is produced in stochastic acceleration processes in cosmic ray sources is an important quantity relevant for several aspects of the modeling of the sources themselves. It is usually assumed to be around 1: 100 in the case of Galactic sources, while a value of 1: 10 is typically assumed when describing extragalactic sources. It is supported by observations that the average ratios should be close to these values. At this point, however, there is no possibility to investigate how each individual source behaves. When looking at the physics aspects, a 1: 100 ratio is well supported in theory when making the following assumptions: (1) the total number of electrons and protons that is accelerated are the same; (2) the spectral index of both populations after acceleration is αe =αp ≈ 2.2 . In this paper, we reinvestigate these assumptions. In particular, assumption (2) is not supported by observational data of the sources and PIC simulation yield different spectral indices as well. We present the detailed calculation of the electron-to-proton ratio, dropping the assumption of equal spectral indices. We distinguish between the ratio of luminosities and the ratio of the differential spectral behavior, which becomes necessary for cases where the spectral indices of the two particle populations are not the same. We discuss the possible range of values when allowing for different spectral indices concerning the spectral behavior of electrons and protons. Additionally, it is shown that the minimum energy of the accelerated population can have a large influence on the results. We find, in the case of the classical minimum energy of T0 , e =T0 , p = 10 keV, that when allowing for a difference in the spectral indices of up to 0.1 with absolute spectral indices varying between 2.0 < α < 2.3, the luminosity ratio varies between 0.008 < Kep < 0.12. The differential particle number ratio is in the range 0.008

  2. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  3. Electron self-injection in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-12-15

    The self-injection process of plasma electrons in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration scheme is investigated using a two-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell method. Plasma electrons are self-injected into the back of the first acceleration bucket during the initial bubble formation period, where the wake phase velocity is low enough to trap sufficient electrons. Most of the self-injected electrons are initially located within a distance of the skin depth c/ω{sub pe} to the beam axis. A decrease (or increase) in the beam radius (or length) leads to a significant reduction in the total charges of self-injected electron bunch. Compared to the uniform plasma, the energy spread, emittance and total charges of the self-injected bunch are reduced in the plasma channel case, due to a reduced injection of plasma electrons that initially located further away from the beam axis.

  4. Multiphysics Analysis of Frequency Detuning in Superconducting RF Cavities for Proton Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M. H.; Gonin, I.; Passarelli, D.; Sukanov, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Yakovlev, V.

    2016-01-22

    Multiphysics analyses for superconducting cavities are essential in the course of cavity design to meet stringent requirements on cavity frequency detuning. Superconducting RF cavities are the core accelerating elements in modern particle accelerators whether it is proton or electron machine, as they offer extremely high quality factors thus reducing the RF losses per cavity. However, the superior quality factor comes with the challenge of controlling the resonance frequency of the cavity within few tens of hertz bandwidth. In this paper, we investigate how the multiphysics analysis plays a major role in proactively minimizing sources of frequency detuning, specifically; microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) in the stage of RF design of the cavity and mechanical design of the niobium shell and the helium vessel.

  5. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on helium three at 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, A.

    1985-07-01

    A set of spin dependent parameters and cross sections has been measured for polarized p-/sup 3/He elastic scattering over the range of q .7 to 4.2 fm/sup -1/. The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) with a polarized proton beam at .8 GeV. The focal plane polarimeter of the HRS was used to determine the spin direction of the scattered proton. Since /sup 3/He is one of the simplest nuclei, polarized p-/sup 3/He scattering provides a very sensitive test of multiple scattering theories. The theoretical analysis was done by using two different wave functions for /sup 3/He as input to the multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations and experimental data together will give us useful information about nucleon-nucleon amplitudes and also help us to obtain a better understanding of the scattering process. 68 refs., 55 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Run05 Proton Beam Polarization Measurements by pC-Polarimeter (ver. 1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa,I.; Alekseev, I.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bravar, A.; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K.O.; Gill, R.; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.N.; Wise, T.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-07-01

    The polarization of the proton beams [1, 2] at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)[3] RHIC ring. The H-Jet polarimeter is located at the collision point allowing measurements of absolute normalization is provided by the hydrogen polarimeter, which measures over 1 {approx} 2 another measurement rather than measuring the absolute polarization. both beams. Two identical pC-polarimeters are equipped in the yellow and blue rings, where carbon ribbon target, providing fast feedback to beam operations and experiments. The days to obtain {approx} 5% statistical uncertainty (in Run05). Thus, the operation of the carbon is measured using both an atomic beam source hydrogen gas jet (H-Jet)[4, 5] and proton-carbon polarimeters was focused on better control of relative stability between one measurement to statistical accuracy within 20 to 30 seconds using an ultra-thin (typically 6 {approx} 8 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) the rings are separated. The pC-polarimeter measures relative polarization to a few percent.

  7. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Anti-Lambda Hyperons Produced in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Center of Mass Energy = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendejas, Ramon

    Studies on the spin structure of the proton have been an active area of research; after the EMC experiment and subsequent experiments found that only about 30% of the total proton spin is carried by quark spins. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the world's first and only polarized proton collider. The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) has full azimuthal acceptance and is ideally suited to advance studies of the proton spin. The longitudinal spin transfer, DLL, of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions is sensitive to quark and anti-quark polarization in the polarized proton; as well as to polarized fragmentation; and has been proposed as a possible probe of (anti-)strange quark polarization. The STAR collaboration has previously reported an initial proof-of-concept measurement of DLL of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons from a data sample obtained at sqr(s)=200 GeV in 2005. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2 pb- with 50% beam polarization. Considerably larger data samples corresponding to 6.5 pb- and 25 pb- with beam polarizations of 57% at sqr(s)=200 GeV were obtained in 2006 and 2009 using an upgraded instrument. Improvements were made on the analysis procedure to reduce background contribution to the lambda + anti-lambda measurements. These new measurements of DLL form the main topic of this dissertation. The sample of hyperons residing within a jet that triggered the experiment are classified as near-side hyperons, and are analyzed separately from an away-side sample that has similar precision. In addition to DLL, the double longitudinal spin asymmetry, A LL, for the production of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons has been extracted. The dependences of DLL on pseudo-rapidity, pT , and the fragmentation ratio, z, are studied. The stated DLL from lambda and anti-lambda each disfavor one of the published model predictions for DLL for a combined lambda and anti-lambda sample, and are

  8. Asymmetries in ozone depressions between the polar stratospheres following a solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Heath, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone depletions in the polar stratosphere during the energetic solar proton event on 4 August 1972 were observed by the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) experiments on the Nimbus 4 satellite. The observed ozone contents, the ozone depressions and their temporal variations above the 4 mb level exhibited distinct asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. Since the ozone destroying solar particles precipitate rather symmetrically into the two polar atmospheres, due to the geomagnetic dipole field, it is suggested that these asymmetries may be explained in terms of the differences in dynamics between the summer and the winter polar atmospheres. In the summer (northern) hemisphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric ozone depletion and recovery are smooth functions of time due to the preponderance of undistributed orderly flow in this region. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the upper stratospheric ozone in the winter polar atmosphere (southern hemisphere) exhibits large amplitude irregularities. These characteristic differences between the two polar atmospheres are also evident in the vertical distributions of temperatures and winds observed by balloons and rocket soundings.

  9. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  10. Laser acceleration of monoenergetic protons via a double layer emerging from an ultra-thin foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi; Sagdeev, Roald; Shukla, Padma K.; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, T. C.

    2009-11-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies are presented of the acceleration of monoenergetic protons in a double layer formed by the laser irradiation of an ultra-thin film. The ponderomotive force of the laser light pushes the electrons forward, and the induced space charge electric field pulls the ions and makes the thin foil accelerate as a whole. A stable double layer is formed, in which the ions are trapped by the combined electric field and inertial force in the accelerated frame, together with the electrons that are trapped in the well of the ponderomotive and ion electric field. The trapped ions reach monoenergetic energies up to 100 MeV and beyond, making them suitable for cancer treatment. We present an analytic theory for the laser-accelerated ion energy as a function of the laser intensity, foil thickness and the plasma number density. The underlying physics of the trapped and untrapped ions and of the stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed.

  11. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  12. Accelerating proton spin diffusion in perdeuterated proteins at 100 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Johannes J; Agarwal, Vipin; Hellwagner, Johannes; Lends, Alons; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Fast magic-angle spinning (>60 kHz) has many advantages but makes spin-diffusion-type proton-proton long-range polarization transfer inefficient and highly dependent on chemical-shift offset. Using 100%-HN-[(2)H,(13)C,(15)N]-ubiquitin as a model substance, we quantify the influence of the chemical-shift difference on the spin diffusion between proton spins and compare two experiments which lead to an improved chemical-shift compensation of the transfer: rotating-frame spin diffusion and a new experiment, reverse amplitude-modulated MIRROR. Both approaches enable broadband spin diffusion, but the application of the first variant is limited due to fast spin relaxation in the rotating frame. The reverse MIRROR experiment, in contrast, is a promising candidate for the determination of structurally relevant distance restraints. The applied tailored rf-irradiation schemes allow full control over the range of recoupled chemical shifts and efficiently drive spin diffusion. Here, the relevant relaxation time is the larger longitudinal relaxation time, which leads to a higher signal-to-noise ratio in the spectra.

  13. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  14. Spill-to-spill and daily proton energy consistency with a new accelerator control system.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Ghebremedhin, A

    2008-05-01

    The Loma Linda University proton accelerator has had several upgrades installed including synchrotron dipole power supplies and a system for monitoring the beam energy. The consistency of the energy from spill-to-spill has been tested by measuring the depth ionization at the distal edge as a function of time. These measurements were made with a minimally equipped beamline to reduce interference from confounding factors. The consistency of the energy over several months was measured in a treatment room beamline using an ionization chamber based daily quality assurance device. The results showed that the energy of protons delivered from the accelerator (in terms of water equivalent range) was consistent from spill-to-spill to better than +/-0.03 mm at 70, 155, and 250 MeV and that the energy check performed each day in the treatment room over a several month period was within +/-0.11 mm (+/-0.06 MeV) at 149 MeV. These results are within the tolerances required for the energy stacking technique.

  15. Proton and heavy ion acceleration by stochastic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Filomena; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella; Artemyev, Anton V.

    2016-10-01

    Spacecraft observations show that energetic ions are found in the Earth's magnetotail, with energies ranging from tens of keV to a few hundreds of keV. In this paper we carry out test particle simulations in which protons and other ion species are injected in the Vlasov magnetic field configurations obtained by Catapano et al. (2015). These configurations represent solutions of a generalized Harris model, which well describes the observed profiles in the magnetotail. In addition, three-dimensional time-dependent stochastic electromagnetic perturbations are included in the simulation box, so that the ion acceleration process is studied while varying the equilibrium magnetic field profile and the ion species. We find that proton energies of the order of 100 keV are reached with simulation parameters typical of the Earth's magnetotail. By changing the ion mass and charge, we can study the acceleration of heavy ions such as He+ + and O+, and it is found that energies of the order of 100-200 keV are reached in a few seconds for He+ + , and about 100 keV for O+.

  16. Proton Acceleration Driven by a Nanosecond Laser from a Cryogenic Thin Solid-Hydrogen Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Dostal, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Perin, J. P.; Chatain, D.; Garcia, S.; Bonnay, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Dudzak, R.; Rosinski, M.; Krasa, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Prokupek, J.; Scuderi, V.; Psikal, J.; Kucharik, M.; De Marco, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Krousky, E.; Kalinowska, Z.; Chodukowski, T.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    A high-power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid-hydrogen target to accelerate forward a collimated stream of protons in the range 0.1-1 MeV, carrying a very high energy of about 30 J (˜5 % laser-ion conversion efficiency) and extremely large charge of about ˜0.1 mC per laser pulse. This result is achieved for the first time through the combination of a sophisticated target system (H2 thin ribbon) operating at cryogenic temperature (˜10 K ) and a very hot H plasma (˜300 keV "hot electron" temperature) generated by a subnanosecond laser with an intensity of ˜3 ×1016 W /cm2 . Both the H plasma and the accelerated proton beam are fully characterized by in situ and ex situ diagnostics. Results obtained using the ELISE (experiments on laser interaction with solid hydrogen) H2 target delivery system at PALS (Prague) kJ-class laser facility are presented and discussed along with potential multidisciplinary applications.

  17. Normal-conducting scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, J. M.; Appleby, R. B.; Owen, H.; Tygier, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a new lattice design for a 30-350 MeV scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator for proton therapy and tomography—NORMA (NOrmal-conducting Racetrack Medical Accelerator). The energy range allows the realization of proton computed tomography and utilizes normal conducting magnets in both a conventional circular ring option and a novel racetrack configuration, both designed using advanced optimization algorithms we have developed in pyzgoubi. Both configurations consist of ten focusing-defocusing-focusing triplet cells and operate in the second stability region of Hills equation. The ring configuration has a circumference of 60 m, a peak magnetic field seen by the beam of <1.6 T , a maximum horizontal orbit excursion of 44 cm and a dynamic aperture of 68 mm mrad—determined using a novel dynamic aperture (DA) calculation technique. The racetrack alternative is realized by adding magnet-free drift space in between cells at two opposing points in the ring, to facilitate injection and extraction. Our racetrack design has a total magnet-free straight lengths of 4.9 m, a circumference of 71 m, a peak magnetic field seen by the beam of <1.74 T , a maximum horizontal orbit excursion of 50 cm and a DA of 58 mm mrad. A transverse magnet misalignment model is also presented for the ring and racetrack configurations where the DA remains above 40 mm mrad for randomly misaligned error distributions with a standard deviation up to 100 μ m .

  18. A compact linac for intensity modulated proton therapy based on a dielectric wall accelerator.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y-J; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2008-06-01

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  19. A Compact Linac for Proton Therapy Based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y -; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2007-10-29

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  20. Beyond the CMSSM without an accelerator: proton decay and direct dark matter detection.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John; Evans, Jason L; Luo, Feng; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A; Sandick, Pearl

    We consider two potential non-accelerator signatures of generalizations of the well-studied constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM). In one generalization, the universality constraints on soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters are applied at some input scale [Formula: see text]below the grand unification (GUT) scale [Formula: see text], a scenario referred to as 'sub-GUT'. The other generalization we consider is to retain GUT-scale universality for the squark and slepton masses, but to relax universality for the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the masses of the Higgs doublets. As with other CMSSM-like models, the measured Higgs mass requires supersymmetric particle masses near or beyond the TeV scale. Because of these rather heavy sparticle masses, the embedding of these CMSSM-like models in a minimal SU(5) model of grand unification can yield a proton lifetime consistent with current experimental limits, and may be accessible in existing and future proton decay experiments. Another possible signature of these CMSSM-like models is direct detection of supersymmetric dark matter. The direct dark matter scattering rate is typically below the reach of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment if [Formula: see text] is close to [Formula: see text], but it may lie within its reach if [Formula: see text] GeV. Likewise, generalizing the CMSSM to allow non-universal supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs offers extensive possibilities for models within reach of the LZ experiment that have long proton lifetimes.

  1. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Simulations of proton beam characteristics for ELIMED Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikal, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Vyskocil, Jiri; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    ELIMED Beamline should demonstrate the capability of laser-based particle accelerators for medical applications, mainly for proton radiotherapy of tumours which requires a sufficient number of accelerated protons with energy about 60 MeV at least. In this contribution, we study the acceleration of protons by laser pulse with parameters accessible for ELIMED Beamline (intensity ∼ 1022 W/cm2, pulse length ∼ 30 fs). In our two-dimensional particle-incell simulations, we observed higher energies of protons for linear than for circular polarization. Oblique incidence of the laser pulse on target does not seem to be favourable for proton acceleration at such high intensities as the accelerated protons are deflected from target normal axis and their energy and numbers are slightly decreased. The expected numbers of accelerated protons in the energy interval 60 MeV ± 5% are calculated between 109 and 1010 per laser shot with estimated proton beam divergence about 20° (FWHM).

  3. Correlation of pulsar radio emission spectrum with peculiarities of particle acceleration in a polar gap

    SciTech Connect

    Kontorovich, V. M. Flanchik, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The analytical expression for the frequency of radio emission intensity maximum in pulsars with free electron emission from the stellar surface has been found. Peculiarities of the electron acceleration in a polar gap are considered. The correlation between the high-frequency cutoff and low-frequency turnover in the radio emission spectrum of pulsars known from observations has been explained.

  4. Measurement of the Induced Proton Polarization Pn in the 12C(e, e', p) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R J; Barkhuff, David; Bertozzi, William; Chen, Jian-ping; Dale, Dan; Dodson, G; Dow, K A; Epstein, Marty; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Finn, Mike; Gilad, Shalev; Jones, Mark K; Joo, Kyungseon; Kelly, James; Kowalski, Stanley; Lourie, Bob; Madey, Richard; Margaziotis, Dimitri; Markowitz, Pete; McIntyre, Justin; Mertz, Christoph; Milbrath, Brian; Mitchell, Joseph; Perdrisat, Charles F; Punjabi, Vina; Rutt, Paul; Sarty, Adam; Tieger, D; Tschalaer, C; Turchinetz, William; Ulmer, Paul E; Van Verst, S P; Vellidis, C; Warren, Glen; Weinstein, Lawrence

    1998-01-19

    The first measurements of the induced proton polarization Pn for the 12C(e,e',p) reaction are reported. The experiment was performed at quasifree kinematics for energy and momentum transfer (w,q) = (294 MeV, 765 MeV/c) and sampled a missing momentum range of 0-250 MeV/c. The induced polarization arises from final-state interactions and for these kinematics is dominated by the real part of the spin-orbit optical potential. The distorted-wave impulse approximation provides good agreement with data for the 1 p3/2 shell. The data for the continuum suggest that both the 1s1/2 shell and underlying l > 1 configurations contribute.

  5. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  6. FAST/Polar Conjunction Study of Field-Aligned Auroral Acceleration and Corresponding Magnetotail Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Richard, R. L.; Klezting, C.; Dotan, Y.; Wygant, J.

    2002-01-01

    The discrete aurora results when energized electrons bombard the Earth's atmosphere at high latitudes. This paper examines the physical processes that can cause field-aligned acceleration of plasma particles in the auroral region. A data and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the acceleration mechanisms that operate in the auroral zone and to identity the magnetospheric drivers of these acceleration mechanisms. The observations used in the study were collected by the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) and Polar satellites when the two satellites were in approximate magnetic conjunction in the auroral region. During these events FAST was in the middle of the auroral zone and Polar was above the auroral zone in the near-Earth plasma sheet. Polar data was used to determine the conditions in the magnetotail at the time field-aligned acceleration was measured by FAST in the auroral zone. For each of the magnetotail drivers identified in the data study, the physics of field-aligned acceleration in the auroral region was examined using existing theoretical efforts and a long-system particle-in-cell simulation to model the magnetically connected region between the two satellites.

  7. Electrons and protons acceleration during the first GLE event of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Firoz, Kazi, A.; Sun, Lingpeng; Miroshnichenko, Leonty, I.

    2013-04-01

    High-energy particles were recorded by the near-Earth spacecraft particle detectors and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In present study, we try to identify the acceleration source of solar energetic particles (SEPs) by combining in-situ particle measurements from WIND/3DP, ACE/EPAM, GOES, and solar cosmic rays (SCRs) registered by several NMs, as well as the remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the path length (1.25 ± 0.05 AU) of SEPs in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar particle release (SPR) time (01:29 ± 1 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account the contamination effects. It is found that the electrons impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change of spectral index, is consistent with the flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. The potential field source surface (PFSS) modeled open-field lines rooted in the active region (AR) provide escaping channels for flare accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released ~10 min later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combing multi-wavelength imaging data on the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain some evidence of that GLE protons, with estimated kinetic energy of ~1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to ~3.07 solar radii.

  8. Recoil polarization observables in the electroproduction of K mesons and Λ's from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Oren V.

    2014-09-01

    A model developed previously to investigate the electromagnetic production of strangeness from the proton is used to investigate single and double recoil polarization observables in the reaction ep →e'K+Λ in the relativistic impulse approximation. The formalism is based on a tree-level, effective Lagrangian model, which incorporates a variety of baryon resonances with spins up to 5/2 and the two kaon resonances, K(892) and K1(1270). The parameters of the model were fit to a large pool of photoproduction data from the CLAS, GRAAL, SAPHIR, and LEPS collaborations and to CLAS data for the virtual photoproduction structure functions σU,σT,σL,σTT,σLT, and σLT'. Using two different versions of this model, results are presented for three recoil polarization asymmetries that have been measured recently at CLAS. A new fit is then presented which incorporates the new polarization data in the fitted data set. Results obtained with this new fit are presented for six recoil polarization asymmetries and compared with results from one of the previous fits.

  9. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Wu, S. Z.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-15

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  10. Investigation of the Effective NN Interaction in the Nuclear Medium Through SILICON-28(POLARIZED Proton, Polarized PROTON')SILICON-28 Polarization Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian

    1996-08-01

    Reaction cross section and spin polarization observables were measured for a number of transitions in ^{28}Si(vec p,vec p^ '){^{28}Si} using the K600 high-resolution spectrometer located at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. This information was used to check and expand on models of the effect of the nuclear medium on the NN interaction, and to examine the distribution of 6^- strength among the excited states of ^{28} Si. The spectrometer's resolution of 50 keV made possible the separation of the excited states needed for this study, and the number of polarization observables available was enhanced by the use of the focal plane polarimeter associated with the spectrometer. Four different experimental results are part of this thesis. Measurements were made of the p+^ {28}Si elastic scattering cross section (dsigma/dOmega) and analyzing power (A_{y}) in order to constrain the wave functions used to describe the projectile-target system. This provided information necessary for a subsequent distorted-wave Born approximation treatment of inelastic scattering transitions. Measurements were made in the angle range from 8^circ to 65^circ, and were well described using complex central and spin-orbit potentials within a Schrodinger-equation framework. A combination of polarization transfer observables (D_{c}) was observed at 19.8^circ and 24.0 ^circ to confirm earlier measurements of the in-medium corrections to the spin-independent, isoscalar central and spin-orbit portions of the effective NN interaction. These checks were performed for a number of low-lying, natural -parity transitions, and showed excellent agreement. To provide information on the spin-orbit and tensor portions of the effective NN interaction (both isoscalar and isovector), a detailed study of the T = 0 and T = 1 6^- states at 11.58 and 14.36 MeV was conducted. Constraints on the transition form factor were taken from electron scattering measurements, and pion scattering confirmed the isospin

  11. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 1019 W/cm2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ~ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum (Epmax) and the mean (langleEprangle) proton energy on |Δx| is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m Epmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = -100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness Ep changed only within ~ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  12. High-intensity polarized H-(proton), deuteron and 3He++ion source development at BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.

    2008-06-23

    New techniques for the production of polarized electron, H{sup -} (proton), D (D+) and {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beams are discussed. Feasibility studies of these techniques are in progress at BNL. An Optically Pumped Polarized H{sup -} Ion Source (OPPIS) delivers beam for polarization studies in RHIC. The polarized deuteron beam will be required for the deuteron Electron Dipole Moment (EDM) experiment, and the {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beam is a part of the experimental program for the future eRHIC (Electron Ion) collider.

  13. A laser accelerator. [interaction of polarized light beam with electrons in magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.; Ride, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a laser can efficiently accelerate charged particles if a magnetic field is introduced to improve the coupling between the particle and the wave. Solving the relativistic equations of motion for an electron in a uniform magnetic field and superposed, circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, it is found that in energy-position phase space an electron traces out a curtate cycloid: it alternately gains and loses energy. If, however, the parameters are chosen so that the electron's oscillations in the two fields are resonant, it will continually accelerate or decelerate depending on its initial position within a wavelength of light. A laboratory accelerator operating under these resonant conditions appears attractive: in a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss, and the fields of a 5 x 10 to the 12th W, 10 micron wavelength laser, an optimally positioned electron would accelerate to 700 MeV in only 10 m.

  14. Analyzing powers and proton spin transfer coefficients in the elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an L-type polarized deuteron target at small momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    Analyzing powers and spin transfer coefficients which describe the elastic scattering of polarized protons from a polarized deuteron target have been measured. The energy of the proton beam was 800 MeV and data were taken at laboratory scattering angles of 7, 11, 14, and 16.5 degrees. One analyzing power was also measured at 180 degrees. Three linearly independent orientations of the beam polarization were used and the target was polarized parallel and antiparallel to the direction of the beam momentum. The data were taken with the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (experiment 685). The results are compared with multiple scattering predictions based on Dirac representations of the nucleon-nucleon scattering matrices. 27 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Design Considerations of Fast Kicker Systems for High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Sandberg, J; Parson, W M; Walstrom, P; Murray, M M; Cook, E; Hartouni, E

    2001-06-12

    In this paper, we discuss the specific issues related to the design of the Fast Kicker Systems for high intensity proton accelerators. To address these issues in the preliminary design stage can be critical since the fast kicker systems affect the machine lattice structure and overall design parameters. Main topics include system architecture, design strategy, beam current coupling, grounding, end user cost vs. system cost, reliability, redundancy and flexibility. Operating experience with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection and extraction kicker systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory and their future upgrade is presented. Additionally, new conceptual designs of the extraction kicker for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility at Los Alamos are discussed.

  16. Energetics and energy scaling of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tungchang; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt; Tripathi, Vipin

    2011-12-15

    Theoretical and computational studies of the ion energy scaling of the radiation pressure acceleration of an ultra-thin foil by short pulse intense laser irradiation are presented. To obtain a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam with an energy spread of less than 20%, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum energy of the quasi-monoenergetic ion beam is limited by self-induced transparency at the density minima caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For foils of optimal thickness, the time over which Rayleigh-Taylor instability fully develops and transparency occurs is almost independent of the laser amplitude. With a laser power of about one petawatt, quasi-monogenetic protons with 200 MeV and carbon ions with 100 MeV per nucleon can be obtained, suitable for particle therapy applications.

  17. Acceleration toward polarization singularity inspired by relativistic E×B drift.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-11-24

    The relativistic trajectory of a charged particle driven by the Lorentz force is different from the classical one, by velocity-dependent relativistic acceleration term. Here we show that the evolution of optical polarization states near the polarization singularity can be described in analogy to the relativistic dynamics of charged particles. A phase transition in parity-time symmetric potentials is then interpreted in terms of the competition between electric and magnetic 'pseudo'-fields applied to polarization states. Based on this Lorentz pseudo-force representation, we reveal that zero Lorentz pseudo-force is the origin of recently reported strong polarization convergence to the singular state at the exceptional point. We also demonstrate the deterministic design of achiral and directional eigenstates at the exceptional point, allowing an anomalous linear polarizer which operates orthogonal to forward and backward waves. Our results linking parity-time symmetry and relativistic electrodynamics show that previous PT-symmetric potentials for the polarization singularity with a chiral eigenstate are the subset of optical potentials for the E×B "polarization" drift.

  18. Elastic Scattering of Neutron-Rich Helium Isotopes from Polarized Protons at 71 MeV/A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, S.; Uesaka, T.; Kawabata, T.; Wakui, T.; Aoi, N.; Hashimoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Kawahara, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kuboki, H.; Maeda, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakao, T.; Nakayama, Y.; Okamura, H.; Sakai, H.; Sasamoto, Y.; Sasano, M.; Satou, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Shimamura, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Shinohara, M.; Suda, K.; Suzuki, D.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yako, K.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2011-09-01

    The vector analyzing power has been measured for the elastic scattering of neutron-rich 6He and 8He from polarized protons at 71 MeV/A making use of a newly constructed solid polarized proton target operated in a low magnetic field of 0.1 T and at a relatively high temperature of 100 K. An optical model analysis revealed that the spin-orbit potentials for 6He and 8He are characterized by shallow and long-ranged shape compared with the global systematics of stable nuclei. Such a characteristics reflect a diffused density distribution of the neutron-rich isotopes.

  19. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  20. Clinical aspects and potential clinical applications of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, C.; Privitera, G.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT), as well as the other forms of hadrontherapy, is in use in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, to realize a high selective irradiation with maximum sparing of surrounding organs. The main characteristic of such a particles is to have an increased radiobiological effectiveness compared to conventional photons (about 10% more) and the advantage to deposit the energy in a defined space through the tissues (Bragg peak phenomenon). The goal of ELIMED Project is the realization of a laser accelerated proton beam line to prove its potential use for clinical application in the field of hadrontherapy. To date, there are several potential clinical applications of PBRT, some of which have become the treatment of choice for a specific tumour, for others it is under investigation as a therapeutic alternative to conventional X-ray radiotherapy, to increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the side effects. For almost half of cancers, an increased local tumour control is the mainstay for increased cancer curability.

  1. Electron acceleration by linearly polarized twisted laser pulse with narrow divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Mohammad Sohaily, Sozha; Golshani, Mojtaba; Bahrampour, Alireza

    2015-03-15

    We numerically investigate the vacuum electron acceleration by a high-intensity linearly polarized twisted laser pulse. It is shown that the inherent spiral structure of a Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulse leads to improvement in trapping and acceleration of an electron to energies of the order of GeV in the off-axis case. Also, it is demonstrated that by employing a proper choice of initial injection parameters, the high-energetic electrons with very small scattering angles can be produced.

  2. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams driven by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Steinke, S; Schnürer, M; Sokollik, T; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Jung, D; Schreiber, J; Hegelich, B M; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Tajima, T; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W; Habs, D

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10(19) W/cm2. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C6+ ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  3. Stable GeV Ion-Beam Acceleration from Thin Foils by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Geissler, M.

    2009-04-10

    A stable relativistic ion acceleration regime for thin foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses is suggested. In this regime, the 'light-sail' stage of radiation pressure acceleration for ions is smoothly connected with the initial relativistic 'hole-boring' stage, and a defined relationship between laser intensity I{sub 0}, foil density n{sub 0}, and thickness l{sub 0} should be satisfied. For foils with a wide range of n{sub 0}, the required I{sub 0} and l{sub 0} for the regime are theoretically estimated and verified with the particle-in-cell code ILLUMINATION. It is shown for the first time by 2D simulations that high-density monoenergetic ion beams with energy above GeV/u and divergence of 10 deg. are produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, which are within reach of current laser systems.0.

  4. ON THE RADIO POLARIZATION SIGNATURE OF EFFICIENT AND INEFFICIENT PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Reynoso, Estela M.; Hughes, John P.; Moffett, David A. E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.edu

    2013-04-15

    Radio polarization observations provide essential information on the degree of order and orientation of magnetic fields, which themselves play a key role in the particle acceleration processes that take place in supernova remnants (SNRs). Here we present a radio polarization study of SN 1006, based on combined Very Large Array and Australia Telescope Compact Array observations at 20 cm that resulted in sensitive images with an angular resolution of 10 arcsec. The fractional polarization in the two bright radio and X-ray lobes of the SNR is measured to be 0.17, while in the southeastern sector, where the radio and non-thermal X-ray emission are much weaker, the polarization fraction reaches a value of 0.6 {+-} 0.2, close to the theoretical limit of 0.7. We interpret this result as evidence of a disordered, turbulent magnetic field in the lobes, where particle acceleration is believed to be efficient, and a highly ordered field in the southeast, where the acceleration efficiency has been shown to be very low. Utilizing the frequency coverage of our observations, an average rotation measure of {approx}12 rad m{sup -2} is determined from the combined data set, which is then used to obtain the intrinsic direction of the magnetic field vectors. While the orientation of magnetic field vectors across the SNR shell appear to be radial, a large fraction of the magnetic vectors lie parallel to the Galactic plane. Along the highly polarized southeastern rim, the field is aligned tangent to the shock, and therefore also nearly parallel to the Galactic plane. These results strongly suggest that the ambient field surrounding SN 1006 is aligned with this direction (i.e., from northeast to southwest) and that the bright lobes are due to a polar cap geometry. Our study establishes that the most efficient particle acceleration and generation of magnetic turbulence in SN 1006 is attained for shocks in which the magnetic field direction and shock normal are quasi-parallel, while

  5. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  6. The AWAKE Proton-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric

    2012-10-01

    We are planning an experiment at CERN to accelerate externally injected electrons e^- on the wake driven by a long, self-modulated proton p^+ bunch. In the plan the 12cm-long bunch from the SPS with 10^11 p^+ experiences a two-stream transverse instability that modulates the bunch radius at the plasma wake period. The bunch is focused to 200μm into a plasma with density in the 10^14-10^15cm-3 range. The modulation instability is seeded by co-propagating with the p^+ bunch a short laser pulse that ionizes a gas or vapor. The modulation resonantly drives wakefields to large amplitude. The low energy e^- ( 5-20MeV) produced by a rf-photoinjector gun are injected after the instability has saturated, 3-5m into the plasma and is accelerated to the GeV energy range. The e^- energy spectrum is measured by a large energy acceptance magnetic spectrometer. Bunch modulation diagnostics such as time resolved OTR and electro-optic measurements are also included. The general plans for the experiment as well as the latest developments will be presented.

  7. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  8. Analyzing Powers and Cross Sections of Inclusive Polarized Proton Scattering on LEAD-208.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yan

    Inclusive polarized proton-nucleus scattering at 290 and 500 MeV was performed using a ^ {208}Pb(51 mg/cm^2) target. A broad range (0-250 MeV) of excitation energy has been studied over the 4^circ -27^circ angular range. The measured analyzing power and cross section of the continuum are compared with the recent DWIA model calculations. The analyzing power and cross section of low-lying states are compared with the DWBA model calculation. The cross section in the continuum region is found to be dominated by single -step quasifree scattering. The analyzing power angular distributions of continuum peaks support RIA model predictions, and indicate the presence of relativistic medium effects.

  9. Acceleration toward polarization singularity inspired by relativistic E×B drift

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The relativistic trajectory of a charged particle driven by the Lorentz force is different from the classical one, by velocity-dependent relativistic acceleration term. Here we show that the evolution of optical polarization states near the polarization singularity can be described in analogy to the relativistic dynamics of charged particles. A phase transition in parity-time symmetric potentials is then interpreted in terms of the competition between electric and magnetic ‘pseudo’-fields applied to polarization states. Based on this Lorentz pseudo-force representation, we reveal that zero Lorentz pseudo-force is the origin of recently reported strong polarization convergence to the singular state at the exceptional point. We also demonstrate the deterministic design of achiral and directional eigenstates at the exceptional point, allowing an anomalous linear polarizer which operates orthogonal to forward and backward waves. Our results linking parity-time symmetry and relativistic electrodynamics show that previous PT-symmetric potentials for the polarization singularity with a chiral eigenstate are the subset of optical potentials for the E×B “polarization” drift. PMID:27883043

  10. Controlling the Direct Laser Acceleration Inside a Plasma Bubble Using Lasers' Polarization and Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Bernstein, Aaron; Downer, Mike; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    The combination of the direct laser acceleration and laser wakefield acceleration (DLA and LWFA) mechanisms has been recently proposed for increasing the total electron energy gain. Here we will report on the effects of the polarization and wavelength of the DLA pulse on the properties of the accelerated beam. Specifically, we address the moderate-power regime, where the laser powers of the leading LWFA and the trailing DLA pulses are not very much larger than the critical power. Three cases will be discussed: (a) the DLA pulse has the same wavelength and polarization as the LWFA pulse, (b) the wavelengths are the same but the polarizations are orthogonal, and (c) the wavelength of the DLA pulse is twice shorter than that of the LWFA pulse. LWFA via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that both (b) and (c) scenarios result in higher tolerance to pulse-delay jitter. The most promising scenario is (c) because it enables higher final electron bunch energy and charge. This work is supported by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0007889 and the AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0045.

  11. Radio Frequency Quadrupole and Alternating Phase Focusing Methods Used in Proton Linear Accelerator Technology in the USSR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    percent (see Fig. 12). 16 mrad +0~--~--~~--~~-1----+ ---~ -O,G -0,¥ -0,2 0 0,2 0,¥ CH Abscissa- particle displacement from the accelarator axis...ARPA." 1. Proton accelerators. 2. Ion bombardment-Research -Soviet Union. 3. Linear accelerators. 4. Particle beams-Technique. I. United States...present author on the sub- ject of generating and accelerating intense ion and neutral particle beams. The first report was The Development of High

  12. Effects of nanosecond-scale prepulse on generation of high-energy protons in target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Xu, Y.; Li, Y. Y.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Shi, Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Lu, J. X.; Wang, N. Y.

    2013-06-03

    A pulse cleaner based on noncollinear optical-parametric amplification and second-harmonic generation processes is used to improve the contrast of a laser of peak intensity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} to {approx}10{sup 11} at 100 ps before the peak of the main pulse. A 7 MeV proton beam is observed when a 2.5 {mu}m-thick Al foil is irradiated by this high-contrast laser. The maximum proton energy decreases to 2.9 MeV when a low-contrast ({approx}10{sup 8}) laser is used. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations combined with MULTI simulations show that the maximum proton energy sensitively relies on the detecting direction. The ns-time-scale prepulse can bend a thin target before the main pulse arrives, which reduces maximum proton energy in the target normal sheath acceleration.

  13. FAST/Polar Conjunction Study of Field-Aligned Auroral Acceleration and Corresponding Magnetotail Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Richard, R. L.; Klezting, C.; Dotan, Y.; Wygant, J.

    2003-01-01

    The discrete aurora results when energized electrons bombard the Earth's atmosphere at high latitudes. This paper examines the physical processes that can cause field-aligned acceleration of plasma particles in the auroral region. A data and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the acceleration mechanisms that operate in the auroral zone and to identi@ the magnetospheric drivers of these acceleration mechanisms. The observations used in the study were collected by the Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) and Polar satellites when the two satellites were in approximate magnetic conjunction in the auroral region. During these events FAST was in the middle of the auroral zone and Polar was above the auroral zone in the near-Earth plasma sheet. Polar data were used to determine the conditions in the magnetotail at the time field-aligned acceleration was measured by FAST in the auroral zone. For each of the magnetotail drivers identified in the data study, the physics of field-aligned acceleration in the auroral region was examined using existing theoretical efforts and/or a long-system particle in cell simulation to model the magnetically connected region between the two satellites. Results from the study indicate that there are three main drivers of auroral acceleration: (1) field-aligned currents that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops (parallel electric fields), (2) earthward flow of high-energy plasma beams from the magnetotail into the auroral zone that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops, and (3) large-amplitude Alfven waves that propagate into the auroral region from the magnetotail. The events examined thus far confm the previously established invariant latitudinal dependence of the drivers and show a strong dependence on magnetic activity. Alfven waves tend to occur primarily at the poleward edge of the auroral region during more magnetically active times and are correlated with intense electron precipitation. At lower latitudes away

  14. Polarization effects in the quasielastic ( p, 2 p) reaction with the nuclear S-Shell Protons at 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklukho, O. V.; Kisselev, A. Yu.; Aksenov, D. A.; Amalsky, G. M.; Andreev, V. A.; Evstiukhin, S. V.; Fedorov, O. Ya.; Gavrilov, G. E.; Izotov, A. A.; Kochenda, L. M.; Levchenko, M. P.; Maysuzenko, D. A.; Murzin, V. A.; Novinsky, D. V.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Shvedchikov, A. V.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Trush, S. I.; Zhdanov, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The polarization of the secondary protons in the ( p, 2 p) reaction with the S-shell protons of nuclei 4He, 6Li, 12C, 28Si, 40Ca was measured at 1 GeV unpolarized proton beam. The spin correlation parameters C ij for the 4He and 12C targets also were for the first time obtained as well. The polarization measurements were performed by means of a two-arm magnetic spectrometer, each arm of which was equipped with the multiwire-proportional chamber polarimeter. This experiment was aimed to study a modification of the proton-proton scattering matrix in the nuclear medium.

  15. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  16. Effects of laser polarization on electrostatic shock ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless electrostatic shock ion acceleration has become a major regime of laser-driven ion acceleration owing to generation of quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from moderate parametric conditions of lasers and plasmas in comparison with target-normal-sheath-acceleration or radiation pressure acceleration. In order to construct the shock, plasma heating is an essential condition for satisfying Mach number condition 1.5 acceleration could be achieved via electron heating by relativistic transparency of a circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse. This is different from the usual method of shock generation via the electron heating by oscillating ponderomotive force of a linearly polarized laser pulse. In this poster we show one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation result to compare LP-shock with CP-shock ion acceleration for a broad range of parameters. As the main result, the CP-shock could be formed at lower density plasmas than the LP-shock due to the efficient density compression of CP pulses. This leads to higher shock velocity and ion energy. Comparison of other detailed characteristics such as transmittance, scale length dependence, and other results from the simulations is presented. In addition, two-dimensional simulation is also discussed in association with Weibel instability. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (NRF- 2013R1A1A2006353) and the Creative Allied Project (CAP-15-06-ETRI).

  17. Anomalous excited-state dynamics of lucifer yellow CH in solvents of high polarity: evidence for an intramolecular proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Panda, Debashis; Mishra, Padmaja P; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Koner, Apurba L; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Datta, Anindya

    2006-05-04

    The photophysics of the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow CH has been investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic and computational techniques. The nonradiative rate is found to pass through a minimum in solvents of intermediate empirical polarity. This apparently anomalous behavior is rationalized by considering the possibility of predominance of different kinds of nonradiative processes, viz. intersystem crossing (ISC) and excited-state proton transfer (ESPT), in solvents of low and high empirical polarity, respectively. The feasibility of the proton transfer is examined by the structure determined by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The predicted energy levels based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method in the gas phase identifies the energy gap between the S(1) and nearest triplet state to be close enough to facilitate ISC. Photophysical investigation in solvent mixtures and in deuterated solvents clearly indicates the predominance of the solvent-mediated intramolecular proton transfer in the excited state of the fluorophore in protic solvents.

  18. SU-E-T-528: Robustness Evaluation for Fiducial-Based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L; Rana, S; Zheng, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of the proton treatment plans in the presence of rotational setup error when patient is aligned with implanted fiducials. Methods: Five Stage I invasive breast cancer patients treated with the APBP protocol (PCG BRE007-12) were studied. The rotational setup errors were simulated by rotating the original CT images around the body center clockwise and counterclockwise 5 degrees (5CW and 5CCW). Manual translational registration was then performed to match the implanted fiducials on the rotated images to the original dataset. Patient contours were copied to the newly created CT set. The original treatment plan was applied to the new CT dataset with the beam isocenter placed at the geometrical center of PTV. The dose distribution was recalculated for dosimetric parameters comparison. Results: CTV and PTV (D95 and V95) coverages were not significantly different between the two simulated plans (5CW and 5CCW) and the original plan. PTV D95 and CTV D95 absolute difference among the three plans were relatively small, with maximum changes of 0.28 CGE and 0.15 CGE, respectively. PTV V95 and CTV V95 absolute differences were 0.79% and 0.48%. The dosage to the thyroid, heart, contralateral breast and lung remained zero for all three plans. The Dmax and Dmean to the volume of ipsilateral breast excluding CTV were compared, with maximum difference values of 1.02 CGE for Dmax and 3.56 CGE for Dmean. Ipsilateral lung Dmean maintained no significant changes through the three plan comparison, with the largest value 0.32 CGE. Ipsilateral lung Dmax was the most sensitive parameter to this simulation study, with a maximum difference at 20.2 CGE. Conclusion: Our study suggests that fiducial-based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy is robust with respect to +/− 5 degree patient setup rotational errors, as long as the internal fiducial markers are used for patient alignment.

  19. Guiding and collimation of laser-accelerated proton beams using thin foils followed with a hollow plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; He, X. T.

    2015-09-15

    It is proposed that guided and collimated proton acceleration by intense lasers can be achieved using an advanced target—a thin foil followed by a hollow plasma channel. For the advanced target, the laser-accelerated hot electrons can be confined in the hollow channel at the foil rear side, which leads to the formation of transversely localized, Gaussian-distributed sheath electric field and resultantly guiding of proton acceleration. Further, due to the hot electron flow along the channel wall, a strong focusing transverse electric field is induced, taking the place of the original defocusing one driven by hot electron pressure in the case of a purely thin foil target, which results in collimation of proton beams. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that collimated proton beams with energy about 20 MeV and nearly half-reduced divergence of 26° are produced at laser intensities 10{sup 20 }W/cm{sup 2} by using the advanced target.

  20. Cosmic-Ray Protons Accelerated at Cosmological Shocks and Their Impact on Groups and Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate the production of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at cosmological shocks by performing, for the first time, numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation that include directly the acceleration, transport, and energy losses of the high-energy particles. CRs are injected at shocks according to the thermal leakage model and, thereafter, accelerated to a power-law distribution as indicated by the test particle limit of the diffusive shock acceleration theory. The evolution of the CR protons accounts for losses owing to adiabatic expansion/compression, Coulomb collisions, and inelastic p-p scattering. Our results suggest that CR protons produced at shocks formed in association with the process of large-scale structure formation could amount to a substantial fraction of the total pressure in the intracluster medium. Their presence should be easily revealed by GLAST (Gamma-Ray Large-Area Space Telescope) through detection of γ-ray flux from the decay of π0 produced in inelastic p-p collisions of such CR protons with nuclei of the intracluster gas. This measurement will allow a direct determination of the CR pressure contribution in the intracluster medium. We also find that the spatial distribution of CR is typically more irregular than that of the thermal gas because it is more influenced by the underlying distribution of shocks. This feature is reflected in the appearance of our γ-ray synthetic images. Finally, the average CR pressure distribution appears statistically slightly more extended than the thermal pressure.

  1. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  2. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  3. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  4. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  5. Recovery mechanisms in proton exchange membrane fuel cells after accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of performance recovery after accelerated stress test (AST) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are systematically studied. Experiments are carried out by incorporating a well-designed performance recovery procedure right after the AST protocol. The experiment results show that the cell performance recovers significantly from the degraded state after the AST procedure. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements further show that the performance recovery can be divided into kinetic and mass transport recoveries. It is further determined that the kinetic recovery, i.e. the recovery of electrochemical active area (ECA), is due to two distinct mechanisms: the reduction of platinum oxide and the re-attachment of detached platinum nanoparticles onto the carbon surface. The mass transport resistance is probably due to reduction of hydrophilic oxide groups on the carbon surface and the microstructure change that alleviates flooding. Performance comparisons show that the recovery procedure is highly effective, indicating the results of AST significantly over-estimate the true degradation in a PEM fuel cell. Therefore, a recovery procedure is highly recommended when an AST protocol is used to evaluate cell degradations to avoid over-estimating true performance degradations in PEMFCs.

  6. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  7. A version of the Trasco Intense Proton Source optimized for accelerator driven system purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, XZh.; Consoli, F.; Chines, F.; Percolla, C.; Calzona, V.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A full set of measurements of the magnetic field has been carried out to define a different design of the TRASCO Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) magnetic system, based on permanent magnets, in order to increase the reliability of the source. The two coils of the source generate a maximum field of 150 mT and the optimum field was determined around 95 mT. The OPERA-3D package was used to simulate the magnetic field and a new magnetic system was designed as a combination of three rings of NdFeB magnets and soft iron. The high voltage insulation has been completely modified, in order to avoid any electronics at 80 kV voltage. The description of the magnetic measurements and the comparison with the simulations are presented, along with the mechanical design of the new version permanent magnet TRIPS (PM-TRIPS) and the new design of the extraction system. Finally the modification of the low energy beam transfer line (LEBT), which now includes a 30° bending magnet, will be outlined, with special regard to the accelerator availability improvement which can be obtained with the installation of two PM-TRIPS sources or more on the LEBT.

  8. Deuteron frozen-spin- polarized target for nd experiments at the VdG accelerator of Charles University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N. S.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Brož, J.; Černý, J.; Doležal, Z.; Fedorov, A. N.; Gurevich, G. M.; Ivanov, M. P.; Kodyš, P.; Kubík, P.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; Lukhanin, O. O.; Matafonov, V. N.; Neganov, A. B.; Pisarev, I. L.; Švejda, J.; Shilov, S. N.; Usov, Yu. A.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-08-01

    A frozen-spin- polarized deuteron target cooled by the 3He/ 4He dilution refrigerator is described. Fully deuterated 1,2-propanediol was used as a target material. Deuteron vector polarization about 40% was obtained for the target in the shape of a cylinder of 2-cm diameter and 6-cm length. The target is intended for a study of 3N interactions at the polarized neutron beam generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator at the Charles University in Prague.

  9. Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z

  10. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology.

  11. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-06-01

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon’s quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5  GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  12. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  13. Nonlaminar multicomponent models for electron flow in positive polarity multigap accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Church, B.W.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    Electron flow in multigap positive-polarity inductive accelerators is studied by numerical simulation and modeling. The objective of this work is to determine the operating principles of the electron flow such that an optimally efficient design of such machines can be achieved for intense ion beam generation. Because the electrons emitted in different gaps have different energies and canonical momenta, the theory of single-component magnetic insulation has to be extended in order to describe such multicomponent electron flows. A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code is used to simulate multicomponent electron flow in multigap accelerators with two, three, and four gaps. Observations from these simulations lead to new one-dimensional, time-independent models for these flows that incorporate the time-averaged effects of diamagnetic electron vortices. Equivalent circuits are constructed for simulated accelerators using voltage{endash}current relations predicted by the models. These circuit models are incorporated into a software package to aid in the design of multigap inductive accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Direct acceleration of electrons by a circular polarized laser pulse with phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lun-Wu; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-11-15

    Electron acceleration by transversely echelon phase-modulated (EPM) circularly polarized (CP) intense laser pulse is investigated. Solution of the relativistic electron equations of motion shows that the CP EPM light wave structure can disrupt the harmonic response of a trapped electron not only in the transverse direction but also in the direction of laser propagation. In each laser cycle, there can be a net gain in the electron's transverse momentum, which is promptly converted into the forward direction by the Lorentz force. As a result, the electron can be trapped and accelerated in the favorable phase of the laser for a rather long time. Its momentum gain then accumulates and can eventually reach high levels. It is also found that with the CP EPM laser, the net acceleration of the electron is not sensitive to its initial position and velocity relative to the phase of the laser fields, so that such a laser can also be useful for accelerating thermal electron bunches to high energies.

  15. On the acceleration of ions by interplanetary shock waves. 3: High time resolution observations of CIR proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Vanallen, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations within + or - 3 hours of corotating interaction region (CIR) shock waves of proton intensities, pitch angle distribution and crude differential energy spectra of the range of 0.6 E sub p 3.4 MeV are presented. The principle result is the evidence for the persistent flow of particles away from the shock. The observations are found to be in good agreement with the hypothesis of local interplanetary shock acceleration by the shock drift and compression mechanisms. The same set of observations strongly suggest that transit time damping does not play an important role in the acceleration of protons to 1 MeV in the immediate vicinity of CIR shocks.

  16. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  17. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  18. Medium-Energy Neutron Polarimetry and Spin Observables for the LEAD-208(POLARIZED Proton, Polarized Neutron) Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumley, Marco Roy

    Spin observables for the ^{208 }Pb(vec{rm p} ,vec{rm n}) ^{208}Bi reaction were measured at scattering angles of 0^circ, 3^circ, 6 ^circ, and 9^circ at an incident proton beam energy of 135 Mev. The spin observables investigated are: the transverse polarization -transfer coefficient D_{rm nn }(vartheta), the analyzing power A_{rm Y}( vartheta), and the polarization function P(vartheta). These spin observables were obtained using a calibrated high-performance neutron polarimeter which utilizes the characteristics of n-p scattering at medium energies. Specific to this polarimeter was the use of high-hydrogen-content liquid mineral-oil scintillator for its primary scatterers; this scintillator material has a 40% higher hydrogen density and 25% lower carbon density than conventional plastic scintillators. This is desirable since the preferred reaction in the polarimeter is ^1H( vec{rm n},n)^1 H; reactions on ^{12}C yields events that serve only to dilute the analyzing power. The polarimeter was calibrated with the ^{14 }C(vec{rm p} ,vec{rm n}) ^{14}N and ^ {12}C(vec{rm p},vec{rm n} )^{12}N reactions at 65, 100, and 135 MeV; the efficiency varepsilon , the effective analyzing power overline{A_ y} and the instrumental figure of merit eta^* = varepsilonoverline{A _ y}^2 were extracted from data for these reactions at 0^circ. A consistent set of optimum software parameters were found for all three energies. The resulting values of overline{A_ y} are consistent with Monte-Carlo predictions assuming n-p scattering alone. The values of eta^* are 50% larger than what was obtained in earlier experiments using only plastic scintillator. Experimental results for the ^ {208}Pb(vec{rm p},vec{rm n} )^{208}Bi reaction are compared with plane-wave-impulse approximation (PWIA) calculations, with an overall normalization factor consistent with the eikonal approximation. The nuclear response was obtained from particle-hole Green's functions calculated in the framework of the second

  19. Impact of the January 2012 solar proton event on polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C. G.; Marsh, D. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Hervig, M. E.; Randall, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    We use data from the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere mission and simulations using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model to determine the impact of the 23-30 January 2012 solar proton event (SPE) on polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) and mesospheric water vapor. We see a small heating and loss of ice mass on 26 January that is consistent with prior results but is not statistically significant. We also find a previously unreported but statistically significant ~10% increase in ice mass and in water vapor in the sublimation area in the model that occurs in the 7 to 14 days following the start of the event. The magnitude of the response to the January 2012 SPE is small compared to other sources of variability like gravity waves and planetary waves; however, sensitivity tests suggest that with larger SPEs this delayed increase in ice mass will increase, while there is little change in the loss of ice mass early in the event. The PMC response to SPEs in models is dependent on the gravity wave parameterization, and temperature anomalies from SPEs may be useful in evaluating and tuning gravity wave parameterizations.

  20. Polarizing matter and antimatter: A new method. The study of a repetitive Stern-Gerlach on stored polarized protons and the spin-splitter experiment: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Onel, Y.

    1992-02-01

    Several years ago a self-polarization effect for stored (anti)- protons and ions was investigated theoretically. The effect is based on the well-known Stern-Gerlach effect in gradient fields. The aim of the ongoing measurements at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) is to verify experimentally the various assumptions on which this effect is based. The final goal is to demonstrate this new polarization effect. The proposed effect could be a powerful tool to produce polarized stored hadron beams both in the low-energy range and at SSC and LHC energies. In this progress report we will describe our progress in three parts: (A) Experimental work at IUCF Cooler Ring; (B) Our extensive computer simulations of the spin stability for the IUCF Cooler Ring; and (C) Theoretical studies.

  1. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  2. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Arun

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  3. EPR detected polarization transfer between Gd3+ and protons at low temperature and 3.3 T: The first step of dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2010-06-01

    Electron-electron double resonance pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 95 GHz (3.3 T) is used to follow the dynamics of the electron spin polarization during the first stages of dynamic nuclear polarization in solids. The experiments were performed on a frozen solution of Gd+3 (S =7/2) in water/glycerol. Focusing on the central |-1/2⟩→|+1/2⟩ transition we measured the polarization transfer from the Gd3+ electron spin to the adjacent H1 protons. The dependence of the echo detected EPR signal on the length of the microwave irradiation at the EPR "forbidden" transition corresponding to an electron and a proton spin flip is measured for different powers, showing dynamics on the microsecond to millisecond time scales. A theoretical model based on the spin density matrix formalism is suggested to account for this dynamics. The central transition of the Gd3+ ion is considered as an effective S =1/2 system and is coupled to H1 (I =1/2) nuclei. Simulations based on a single electron-single nucleus four level system are shown to deviate from the experimental results and an alternative approach taking into account the more realistic multinuclei picture is shown to agree qualitatively with the experiments.

  4. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  5. Filamentation control and collimation of laser accelerated MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, B.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Mandal, T.; Upadhyay, A.; Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that the proton beam filamentation in dense plasma can be controlled in multi-layered (Al-CH-Al) sandwich targets. We observe up to three-fold reduction in the MeV proton beam divergence (~12°) from these targets as a result of decrease in filamentary structures in the proton beam profile. Strong self-generated resistive magnetic fields in targets with a high-Z transport layer are mainly responsible for this observed effect. Enhancement in the proton flux and energy is also observed from these targets. Supported by a matching 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that these targets can be very effectively implemented to collimate proton beams useful for ion oncology applications or advanced fast igniter approach of inertial confinement fusion (ICF).

  6. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 1016 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH3 coatings on 5 μm gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 ± 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020 W/cm2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and

  7. Polarization preservation and control in a figure-8 ring

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Lin, Fanglei; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete scheme for managing the polarization of ion beams in Jefferson Lab's proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC). It provides preservation of the ion polarization during all stages of beam acceleration and polarization control in the collider's experimental straights. We discuss characteristic features of the spin motion in accelerators with Siberian snakes and in accelerators of figure-8 shape. We propose 3D spin rotators for polarization control in the MEIC ion collider ring. We provide polarization calculations in the collider with the 3D rotator for deuteron and proton beams. The main polarization control features of the figure-8 design are summarized.

  8. Polarization Preservation and Control in a Figure-8 Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ya. S.; Morozov, V. S.; Lin, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present a complete scheme for managing the polarization of ion beams in Jefferson Lab’s proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC). It provides preservation of the ion polarization during all stages of beam acceleration and polarization control in the collider’s experimental straights. We discuss characteristic features of the spin motion in accelerators with Siberian snakes and in accelerators of figure-8 shape. We propose 3D spin rotators for polarization control in the MEIC ion collider ring. We provide polarization calculations in the collider with the 3D rotator for deuteron and proton beams. The main polarization control features of the figure-8 design are summarized.

  9. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  10. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ ˜1 μ m .

  11. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ∼1μm.

  12. About possibility of primary cosmic rays proton acceleration up to super-high relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, Nodar; Vanishvili, George; Bakradze, Themur; Kordzadze, Lia; Elizbarashvili, Misha; Bazerashvili, Eka

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations concerning of the charged particles acceleration in general, and in particular, the peculiarities of protons acceleration in the Neutral Layer of Cosmic Space, in the frame of Maxwell Electro-Magnetic Field Theory have been reviewed on the article. A brief historical review of events is given, indicating that protons can be speeding up to ultra-relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field, which is affirmed by anomalously high number of cosmic μ-mesons, generated by protons, through the decay of π- and -mesons, have been discovered in lower layers of the Earth's Atmosphere, as well as in a great depths of underground

  13. Characterization of electron flow in positive-polarity linear-induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, S. E.

    Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories have studied the operation of the linear-induction accelerators, HELIA and Hermes 3, in positive polarity. These experiments have provided a unique opportunity to explore the consequences of multiple-cathode electron emission in magnetically insulated transmission lines. An examination of the total energy-canonical momentum distribution of the electrons explains the features of the magnetically insulated flow exhibited by these systems. Simple analysis based on the basic concept of pressure balance, in conjunction with particle-in-cell numerical simulations, shows how the line voltage is related to the anode and cathode currents. Two flow designations are introduced that can apply to multiple-cathode magnetically insulated transmission lines: full-gap flow (FGF), and locally emitted flow (LEF).

  14. DNA-Accelerated Copper Catalysis of Friedel-Crafts Conjugate Addition/Enantioselective Protonation Reactions in Water.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Almudena; Megens, Rik P; Villarino, Lara; Roelfes, Gerard

    2016-12-21

    DNA-induced rate acceleration has been identified as one of the key elements for the success of the DNA-based catalysis concept. Here we report on a novel DNA-based catalytic Friedel-Crafts conjugate addition/enantioselective protonation reaction in water, which represents the first example of a reaction that critically depends on the >700- to 990-fold rate acceleration caused by the presence of a DNA scaffold. The DNA-induced rate acceleration observed is the highest reported due to the environment presented by a biomolecular scaffold for any hybrid catalyst, to date. Based on a combination of kinetics and binding studies, it is proposed that the rate acceleration is in part due to the DNA acting as a pseudophase, analogous to micelles, in which all reaction components are concentrated, resulting in a high effective molarity. The involvement of additional second coordination sphere interactions is suggested by the enantioselectivity of the product. The results presented here show convincingly that the DNA-based catalysis concept, thanks to the DNA-accelerating effect, can be an effective approach to achieving a chemically challenging reaction in water.

  15. The First Transverse Single Spin Measurement in High Energy Polarized Proton-Nucleus Collision at the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, I.

    2016-08-01

    Large single spin asymmetries in very forward neutron production seen using the PHENIX zero-degree calorimeters are a long established feature of transversely polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC. Neutron production near zero degrees is well described by the one-pion exchange framework. The absorptive correction to the OPE generates the asymmetry as a consequence of a phase shift between the spin flip and non-spin flip amplitudes. However, the amplitude predicted by the OPE is too small to explain the large observed asymmetries. A model introducing interference of pion and a 1-Reggeon exchanges has been successful in reproducing the experimental data. During the RHIC experiment in year 2015, RHIC delivered polarized proton collisions with Au and Al nuclei for the first time, enabling the exploration of the mechanism of transverse single-spin asymmetries with nuclear collisions. The observed asymmetries showed surprisingly strong A-dependence in the inclusive forward neutron production, while the existing framework which was successfull in p+p only predicts moderate A- dependence. Thus the observed data are absolutely unexpected and unpredicted. In this report, experimental and theoretical efforts are discussed to disentangle the observed A-dependence using somewhat semi-inclusive type measurements and Monte-Carlo study, respectively.

  16. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-30

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program.

  17. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  18. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  19. Generation of high-quality mega-electron volt proton beams with intense-laser-driven nanotube accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2013-04-22

    An ion acceleration scheme using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is proposed, in which embedded fragments of low-Z materials are irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser to eject substantial numbers of electrons. Due to the resultant characteristic electrostatic field, the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of the barrel and bullets of a gun, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic ion beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic MeV-order proton beams using nanometer-size CNT under a super-intense electrostatic field {approx}10{sup 14} V m{sup -1}.

  20. Possible production of high-energy gamma rays from proton acceleration in the extragalactic radio source markarian 501

    PubMed

    Mannheim

    1998-01-30

    The active galaxy Markarian 501 was discovered with air-Cerenkov telescopes at photon energies of 10 tera-electron volts. Such high energies may indicate that the gamma rays from Markarian 501 are due to the acceleration of protons rather than electrons. Furthermore, the observed absence of gamma ray attenuation due to electron-positron pair production in collisions with cosmic infrared photons implies a limit of 2 to 4 nanowatts per square meter per steradian for the energy flux of an extragalactic infrared radiation background at a wavelength of 25 micrometers. This limit provides important clues about the epoch of galaxy formation.

  1. ACCELERATING WAVES IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES AS SEEN BY EIS AND SUMER

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G. R.; Banerjee, D.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S.; Imada, S.

    2010-07-20

    We present EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO observations of propagating disturbances detected in coronal lines in inter-plume and plume regions of a polar coronal hole. The observation was carried out on 2007 November 13 as part of the JOP196/HOP045 program. The SUMER spectroscopic observation gives information about fluctuations in radiance and on both resolved (Doppler shift) and unresolved (Doppler width) line-of-sight velocities, whereas EIS 40'' wide slot images detect fluctuations only in radiance but maximize the probability of overlapping field of view between the two instruments. From distance-time radiance maps, we detect the presence of propagating waves in a polar inter-plume region with a period of 15-20 minutes and a propagation speed increasing from 130 {+-} 14 km s{sup -1} just above the limb to 330 {+-} 140 km s{sup -1} around 160'' above the limb. These waves can be traced to originate from a bright region of the on-disk part of the coronal hole where the propagation speed is in the range of 25 {+-} 1.3 to 38 {+-} 4.5 km s{sup -1}, with the same periodicity. These on-disk bright regions can be visualized as the base of the coronal funnels. The adjacent plume region also shows the presence of propagating disturbances with the same range of periodicity but with propagation speeds in the range of 135 {+-} 18 to 165 {+-} 43 km s{sup -1} only. A comparison between the distance-time radiance map of the two regions indicates that the waves within the plumes are not observable (may be getting dissipated) far off-limb, whereas this is not the case in the inter-plume region. A correlation analysis was also performed to find out the time delay between the oscillations at several heights in the off-limb region, finding results consistent with those from the analysis of the distance-time maps. To our knowledge, this result provides first spectroscopic evidence of the acceleration of propagating disturbances in the polar region close to the Sun (within 1.2 R/R{sub sun

  2. Insulin adsorption on crystalline SiO2: Comparison between polar and nonpolar surfaces using accelerated molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, Marjan A.; Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption of insulin on polar and nonpolar surfaces of crystalline SiO2 (cristobalite and α -quartz) is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. Acceleration techniques are used in order to sample adsorption phase space efficiently and to identify realistic adsorption conformations. We find major differences between the polar and nonpolar surfaces. Electrostatic interactions govern the adsorption on polar surfaces and can be described by the alignment of the protein dipole with the surface dipole; hence spreading of the protein on the surface is irrelevant. On nonpolar surfaces, on the other hand, van-der-Waals interaction dominates, inducing surface spreading of the protein.

  3. Measurement of DNA Double-Strand Break Yield in Human Cancer Cells by High-Current, Short-Duration Bunches of Laser-Accelerated Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, Akifumi; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Maeda, Takuya; Sakaki, Hironao; Hori, Toshihiko; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Bolton, Paul R.; Kawanishi, Shunichi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the radiobiological effects of high dose rates that are attributed to high current, short bunch beam generation with laser-dreven ion acceleration, we have developed an experimental setup that uses laser-accelerated protons. In-vitro human lung cancer cells: A549 pulmonary adenocarcinoma are irradiated with a laser-accelerated proton bunches with a duration of 2×10-8 s and flux of ˜1015 cm-2 s-1, amounting to single bunch absorbed dose at the 1 Gy level. The double-strand break (DSB) yield in cell DNA is analyzed for the laser-accelerated proton beam at an average LET of 41 keV/µm.

  4. Personal History of Nucleon Polarization Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, O.

    1984-09-01

    The history of nucleon scattering experiments is reviewed, starting with the observation of large proton polarizations in scattering from light elements such as carbon, and ending with the acceleration of polarized proton beams in high-energy synchrotrons. Special mention is made about significant contributions made by C.L. Oxley, L. Wolfenstein, R.D. Tripp, T. Ypsilantis, A. Abragam, M. Borghini, T. Niinikoski, Froissart, Stora, A.D. Krisch, and L.G. Ratner.

  5. Large-amplitude, circularly polarized, compressive, obliquely propagating electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves throughout the Earth's magnetosheath: low plasma β conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remya, B.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Falkowski, B. J.; Echer, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2014-09-20

    During 1999 August 18, both Cassini and WIND were in the Earth's magnetosheath and detected transverse electromagnetic waves instead of the more typical mirror-mode emissions. The Cassini wave amplitudes were as large as ∼14 nT (peak to peak) in a ∼55 nT ambient magnetic field B {sub 0}. A new method of analysis is applied to study these waves. The general wave characteristics found were as follows. They were left-hand polarized and had frequencies in the spacecraft frame (f {sub scf}) below the proton cyclotron frequency (f{sub p} ). Waves that were either right-hand polarized or had f {sub scf} > f{sub p} are shown to be consistent with Doppler-shifted left-hand waves with frequencies in the plasma frame f{sub pf} < f{sub p} . Thus, almost all waves studied are consistent with their being electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves. Most of the waves (∼55%) were found to be propagating along B {sub 0} (θ{sub kB{sub 0}}<30{sup ∘}), as expected from theory. However, a significant fraction of the waves were found to be propagating oblique to B {sub 0}. These waves were also circularly polarized. This feature and the compressive ([B {sub max} – B {sub min}]/B {sub max}, where B {sub max} and B {sub min} are the maximum and minimum field magnitudes) nature (ranging from 0.27 to 1.0) of the waves are noted but not well understood at this time. The proton cyclotron waves were shown to be quasi-coherent, theoretically allowing for rapid pitch-angle transport of resonant protons. Because Cassini traversed the entire subsolar magnetosheath and WIND was in the dusk-side flank of the magnetosheath, it is surmised that the entire region was filled with these waves. In agreement with past theory, it was the exceptionally low plasma β (0.35) that led to the dominance of the proton cyclotron wave generation during this interval. A high-speed solar wind stream ((V{sub sw} ) = 598 km s{sup –1}) was the source of this low-β plasma.

  6. Transforming in-situ observations of CME-driven shock accelerated protons into the shock's reference frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. M.; Simnett, G. M.

    2005-07-01

    We examine the solar energetic particle event following solar activity from 14, 15 April 2001 which includes a "bump-on-the-tail" in the proton energy spectra at 0.99 AU from the Sun. We find this population was generated by a CME-driven shock which arrived at 0.99 AU around midnight 18 April. As such this population represents an excellent opportunity to study in isolation, the effects of proton acceleration by the shock. The peak energy of the bump-on-the-tail evolves to progressively lower energies as the shock approaches the observing spacecraft at the inner Lagrange point. Focusing on the evolution of this peak energy we demonstrate a technique which transforms these in-situ spectral observations into a frame of reference co-moving with the shock whilst making allowance for the effects of pitch angle scattering and focusing. The results of this transform suggest the bump-on-the-tail population was not driven by the 15 April activity but was generated or at least modulated by a CME-driven shock which left the Sun on 14 April. The existence of a bump-on-the-tail population is predicted by models in Rice et al. (2003) and Li et al. (2003) which we compare with observations and the results of our analysis in the context of both the 14 April and 15 April CMEs. We find an origin of the bump-on-the-tail at the 14 April CME-driven shock provides better agreement with these modelled predictions although some discrepancy exists as to the shock's ability to accelerate 100 MeV protons. Keywords. Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (Energetic particles; Flares and mass ejections) Space plasma physics (Transport processes)

  7. NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD GRADIENT ACCELERATOR (FFAG) DESIGN FOR THE PROTON AND CARBON THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.

    2005-06-05

    The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG-from now on) accelerator provides few advantages with respect to the other fixed field accelerators like CYCLOTRONS or scaling-FFAG's. One of the advantages is smaller required aperture due to small orbit offsets during acceleration. The large and heavy magnets are avoided. The beam is very well controlled in a strong focusing regime. This concept has been extensively investigated during the last eight FFAG workshops in Japan, USA, Canada, and CERN in Europe.

  8. Acceleration of protons at 32 Jovian radii in the outer magnetosphere of jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    During the inbound pass of Pioneer 10, a rapid ten-fold increase of the 0.2 to MeV proton flux was observed at 32 Jovian radii (R sub J). The total event lasted for 30 minutes and was made up of a number of superimposed individual events. At the time, the spacecraft was in the outer magnetosphere about 7 R sub J below the magnetic equator. Before and after the event, the proton flux was characteristic of the low flux level normally encountered between crossings of the magnetic equator. Flux changes at different energies were coherent within 1 minute; a time comparable to the time resolution of the data. The angular distributions were highly anisotropic with protons streaming towards Jupiter. A field-aligned dumbbell distribution was observed initially, and a pancake distribution just before the flux decayed to its pre-event value. The alpha particle flux changed as rapidly as the proton flux but peaked at different times. The energetic electron flux behaved differently; it increased gradually throughout the period.

  9. Anti-proton tune measurements for the Fall 1995 accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, john; /Fermilab

    1996-04-01

    A system to measure the tunes of a single antiproton (or proton) bunch was built and has been commissioned. The system achieved high sensitivity with a novel closed-orbit suppression system. The use of high bandwidth directional pickpus and kickers in conjunction with precise timing gates enabled the measurement of the tune of a single bunch.

  10. Table-top laser-based proton acceleration in nanostructured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, M.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Ruiz, C.; Vranic, M.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of ultrashort, high intensity laser pulses with thin foil targets leads to ion acceleration on the target rear surface. To make this ion source useful for applications, it is important to optimize the transfer of energy from the laser into the accelerated ions. One of the most promising ways to achieve this consists in engineering the target front by introducing periodic nanostructures. In this paper, the effect of these structures on ion acceleration is studied analytically and with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We assessed the role of the structure shape, size, and the angle of laser incidence for obtaining the efficient energy transfer. Local control of electron trajectories is exploited to maximize the energy delivered into the target. Based on our numerical simulations, we propose a precise range of parameters for fabrication of nanostructured targets, which can increase the energy of the accelerated ions without requiring a higher laser intensity.

  11. Vector and Tensor Polarization Measurements for Deuteron-Proton and Deuteron-Neutron Quasifree Scattering Using the Polarized Deuteron + Deuteron Going to Deuteron + Proton + Neutron Breakup Reaction at 12 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felsher, Paul Daniel

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of vector and tensor analyzing powers A_{y}, A_ {yy} and A_{zz} for dp and dn quasifree scattering (QFS) have been made using the vec d+dto d+p+n breakup reaction at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. The experiment was conducted with a 12-MeV tensor-polarized deuteron beam incident on a gas cell filled with one bar deuterium. The momenta of two (deuteron-neutron, deuteron -proton or proton-neutron) of the three outgoing particles were measured simultaneously, thereby completely defining the reaction kinematics. Deuteron-proton coincidence data were taken at five laboratory angle pairs: (theta _{d},theta_{p}) = (+/-10.0^circ, mp10.0^circ), (+/-10.0, mp41.2 ^circ), (+/-17.0 ^circ,mp17.0 ^circ), (+/-17.0 ^circ,mp34.5 ^circ) and (+/-19.4 ^circ,mp19.4 ^circ). Deuteron-neutron and proton -neutron coincidence data were taken at three laboratory angle pairs: (theta_{d}, theta_{n}) = (theta _{n},theta_{n}) = (+/-17.0^ circ,mp17.0^circ ), (+/-17.0^ circ,mp34.5^circ ) and (+/-19.4^ circ,mp28.9^circ ). The angle pairs (theta_ {d},theta_{n}), (theta_{p},theta_ {n}) and (theta_ {d},theta_{p}) were chosen such that the reaction would be well-suited for observing dn and dp QFS. Deuteron-proton coincidence data were sorted into two-dimensional (2D) spectra of deuteron energy versus proton energy, while proton-neutron and deuteron -neutron data were sorted into 2D spectra of neutron time -of-flight versus proton energy and deuteron energy, respectively. Each 2D spectrum was projected onto the kinematically allowed locus. Analyzing powers were computed as a function of arc length S along the locus for A_{y }, A_{yy} and A_{zz}. Since four-nucleon calculations involving polarization observables for the vec d+dto d+p+n breakup reaction are not yet available, the data are compared to Impulse-Approximation (IA) calculations. The IA calculations included off-the-energy-shell deuteron -nucleon (dN) amplitudes as well as on-the-energy-shell dN amplitudes and also

  12. SU-E-T-495: Neutron Induced Electronics Failure Rate Analysis for a Single Room Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, N; DeWees, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the failure rate as a function of neutron dose of the range modulator's servo motor controller system (SMCS) while shielded with Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and unshielded in a single room proton accelerator. Methods: Two experimental setups were constructed using two servo motor controllers and two motors. Each SMCS was then placed 30 cm from the end of the plugged proton accelerator applicator. The motor was then turned on and observed from outside of the vault while being irradiated to known neutron doses determined from bubble detector measurements. Anytime the motor deviated from the programmed motion a failure was recorded along with the delivered dose. The experiment was repeated using 9 cm of BPE shielding surrounding the SMCS. Results: Ten SMCS failures were recorded in each experiment. The dose per monitor unit for the unshielded SMCS was 0.0211 mSv/MU and 0.0144 mSv/MU for the shielded SMCS. The mean dose to produce a failure for the unshielded SMCS was 63.5 ± 58.3 mSv versus 17.0 ±12.2 mSv for the shielded. The mean number of MUs between failures were 2297 ± 1891 MU for the unshielded SMCS and 2122 ± 1523 MU for the shielded. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked test showed the dose between failures were significantly different (P value = 0.044) while the number of MUs between failures were not (P value = 1.000). Statistical analysis determined a SMCS neutron dose of 5.3 mSv produces a 5% chance of failure. Depending on the workload and location of the SMCS, this failure rate could impede clinical workflow. Conclusion: BPE shielding was shown to not reduce the average failure of the SMCS and relocation of the system outside of the accelerator vault was required to lower the failure rate enough to avoid impeding clinical work flow.

  13. Fighting the Residual Polarization Loss in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2009-08-04

    A dual partial snake scheme has been used for AGS polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5x10{sup 11} protons per bunch and 65% polarization for the RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss due to both snake resonances and horizontal resonances as shown in the data. Several schemes were tested or proposed in the AGS to mitigate the loss, such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, injection into a accelerating bucket, and tune jump across the horizontal resonances. This paper presents the experiment and simulation results and analyses.

  14. Performance degradation studies on an poly 2,5-benzimidazole high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell using an accelerated degradation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Guo-Bin; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Yan, Wei-Mon

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the performance degradation of a poly 2,5-benzimidazole (ABPBI) based high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) was examined using an accelerated degradation technique (ADT). Experiments using an ADT with 30 min intervals were performed by applying 1.5 V to a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with hydrogen and nitrogen feeding to the anode and cathode, respectively, to simulate the high voltage generated during fuel cell shutdown and restart. The characterization of the MEAs was performed using in-situ and ex-situ electrochemical methods, such as polarization curves, AC impedance, and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and TEM imaging before and after the ADT experiments. The measured results demonstrated that the ADT testing could be used to dramatically reduce the duration of the degradation. The current output at 0.4 V decreased by 48% after performing ADT testing for 30 min. From the AC impedance, CV and RTGA measurements, the decline in cell performance was found to be primarily due to corrosion and thinning of the catalyst layer (or carbon support) during the first 30 min, leading to the dissolution and agglomeration of the platinum catalyst.

  15. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Study of Inhibitor Binding to the M218–60 Proton Transporter from Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Loren B.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Corzilius, Björn; Chou, James J.; Miller, Eric A.; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to elucidate ligand binding to a membrane protein using dipolar recoupling magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In particular, we detect drug binding in the proton transporter M218–60 from influenza A using recoupling experiments at room temperature and with cryogenic DNP. The results indicate that the pore binding site of rimantadine is correlated with previously reported widespread chemical shift changes, suggesting functional binding in the pore. Futhermore, the 15N labeled ammonium of rimantadine was observed near A30 13Cβ and G34 13Cα suggesting a possible hydrogen bond to A30 Carbonyl. Cryogenic DNP was required to observe the weaker external binding site(s) in a ZF-TEDOR spectrum. This approach is generally applicable, particularly for weakly bound ligands, in which case the application of MAS NMR dipolar recoupling requires the low temperatures to quench dynamic exchange processes. For the fully protonated samples investigated, we observed DNP signal enhancements of ~10 at 400 MHz using only 4–6 mM of the polarizing agent TOTAPOL. At 600 MHz and with DNP, we measured a distance between the drug and the protein to a precision of 0.2 Å. PMID:23480101

  16. TDDFT study of the polarity controlled ion-pair separation in an excited-state proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Mehata, Mohan Singh; Lan, Sheng-Cheng

    2014-07-15

    6-Hydroxyquinoline (6HQ) is an ideal photoacid system for exploring excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. We have previously (Mahata et al. (2002)) shown that the ESPT reaction between 6HQ and trimethylamine (TMA) leads to an "unusual" emission in the 440-450 nm range, containing two decay components (∼5 ns and ∼12 ns). The observed results suggest the presence of a contact ion-pair and a solvent separated ion-pair. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) have been employed to study the nature of the contact ion-pair formed between 6HQ and TMA and to determine why the decay component ∼12 ns is absent in a non-polar solvent. Calculations of the hydrogen-bonded complexes formed between 6HQ and TMA and its ESPT reaction product, namely 6HQ-TMA and 6HQ-TMA-PT, respectively, have been carried out, both in the electronic ground and excited states. Moreover, by using the CPCM model, different dielectric constants have been introduced into the calculations. On increasing the dielectric constant, the hydrogen bond in 6HQ-TMA-PT becomes weaker and the hydrogen bond length becomes larger; this effectively facilitates the proton transfer reaction and formation of separated ion-pair. Thus, the separation and diffusion of the contact ion-pair can be controlled by changing the polarity of the surroundings.

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization study of inhibitor binding to the M2(18-60) proton transporter from influenza A.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Barnes, Alexander B; Corzilius, Björn; Chou, James J; Miller, Eric A; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-04-23

    We demonstrate the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to elucidate ligand binding to a membrane protein using dipolar recoupling magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In particular, we detect drug binding in the proton transporter M2(18-60) from influenza A using recoupling experiments at room temperature and with cryogenic DNP. The results indicate that the pore binding site of rimantadine is correlated with previously reported widespread chemical shift changes, suggesting functional binding in the pore. Futhermore, the (15)N-labeled ammonium of rimantadine was observed near A30 (13)Cβ and G34 (13)Cα, suggesting a possible hydrogen bond to A30 carbonyl. Cryogenic DNP was required to observe the weaker external binding site(s) in a ZF-TEDOR spectrum. This approach is generally applicable, particularly for weakly bound ligands, in which case the application of MAS NMR dipolar recoupling requires the low temperatures to quench dynamic exchange processes. For the fully protonated samples investigated, we observed DNP signal enhancements of ~10 at 400 MHz using only 4-6 mM of the polarizing agent TOTAPOL. At 600 MHz and with DNP, we measured a distance between the drug and the protein to a precision of 0.2 Å.

  18. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  19. The use of ionization electron columns for space-charge compensation in high intensity proton accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  20. The Use of Ionization Electron Columns for Space-Charge Compensation in High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2009-01-22

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  1. Microscopic description of 295 MeV polarized protons incident on Sn isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, W.; Sharma, Manjari; Gambhir, Y. K.; Kailas, S.

    2010-03-15

    We present a Brueckner theory analysis of proton-scattering data from Sn isotopes at 295 MeV. A soft-core Urbana v{sub 14} internucleon potential has been used to calculate reaction matrices that are folded with point-nucleon (both proton and neutron) densities obtained in the relativistic mean field (RMF) framework to calculate the optical potential. We get reasonably satisfactory agreement with the differential cross-section and analyzing-power data using only three scaling parameters for all isotopes. It is observed that the calculated neutron skin increases smoothly as the neutron number increases, in conformity with earlier findings.

  2. The short-lived (<2 minutes) acceleration of protons to >13 GeV in association with solar flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Ken; Shea, Margaret Ann; Smart, Don

    2016-04-01

    There have been 72 occasions in the past 75 years when solar cosmic rays have been accelerated to >1 GeV in association with large solar flares. The largest such so called "ground level enhancement" (GLE) occurred on 23 February, 1956. We have recently gained access to the original real-time photographic record for that GLE obtained by the recording ionization meter located at Huancayo, Peru. The geomagnetic field excludes all cosmic rays <13GeV from this location, and consequently this record provides a record of the arrival at earth of the highly relativistic 13-20 GeV particles accelerated at the sun. While all previous studies have used 6 minute average data, examination shows that the original record is capable of providing 1 minute time resolution of the cosmic ray intensity during the GLE . The resulting dependence of intensity upon time shows considerable detail that was obscured by the coarser time resolution used in the past. Thus (1) The GLE commenced only 3 minutes after the peak flare intensity in Hα , this being consistent with the 4 minute delay associated with propagation along the "Parker" heliospheric field; (2) the cosmic ray intensity rose to within 10% of its peak in 2 minutes; (3) Peak intensity persisted for only 1 minute; and (4) the intensity had decreased to 50% of the peak value 5 minutes after the commencement of the GLE. There being no velocity dispersion at these energies, and little pitch angle scattering, we take the view that the intensity profile at earth is a close representation of the intensity-time profile of these newly accelerated cosmic rays at the sun. If so, these data impose strict tests on any putative acceleration model, and provide information on the physical properties in the vicinity of the source. In particular, the data show that the model must predict (a) that ambient protons can be accelerated to >13GeV in < 2 minutes; (b) that the protons have easy access to open solar fields; and (c) that the acceleration (or

  3. Deficiency in the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 increases M2 polarization of microglia and attenuates brain damage from photothrombotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Li, Chun-Yu; Qin, Chuan; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Liu, Jun-Li

    2016-10-01

    Microglia become activated during cerebral ischemia and exert pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory role dependent of microglial polarization. NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in microglia plays an important role in neuronal damage after ischemic stroke. Recently, NOX and ROS are consistently reported to participate in the microglial activation and polarization; NOX2 inhibition or suppression of ROS production are shown to shift the microglial polarization from M1 toward M2 state after stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. However, the effect of Hv1 proton channel on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of microglial Hv1 proton channel in modulating microglial M1/M2 polarization during the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebral injury using a mouse model of photothrombosis. Following photothrombotic ischemic stroke, wild-type mice presented obvious brain infarct, neuronal damage, and impaired motor coordination. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1(-/-)) were partially protected from brain damage and motor deficits compared to wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1(-/-) mice in ischemic stroke is accompanied by reduced ROS production, shifted the microglial polarization from M1 to M2 state. Hv1 deficiency was also found to shift the M1/M2 polarization in primary cultured microglia. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for modulation of microglial M1/M2 polarization in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. ROS participate in microglial activation and polarization. However, the effect of Hv1 on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after

  4. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  5. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  6. Neutral transition metal hydrides as acids in hydrogen bonding and proton transfer: media polarity and specific solvation effects.

    PubMed

    Levina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2010-08-18

    Structural, spectroscopic, and electronic features of weak hydrogen-bonded complexes of CpM(CO)(3)H (M = Mo (1a), W (1b)) hydrides with organic bases (phosphine oxides R(3)PO (R = n-C(8)H(17), NMe(2)), amines NMe(3), NEt(3), and pyridine) are determined experimentally (variable temperature IR) and computationally (DFT/M05). The intermediacy of these complexes in reversible proton transfer is shown, and the thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH degrees , DeltaS degrees ) of each reaction step are determined in hexane. Assignment of the product ion pair structure is made with the help of the frequency calculations. The solvent effects were studied experimentally using IR spectroscopy in CH(2)Cl(2), THF, and CH(3)CN and computationally using conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) calculations. This complementary approach reveals the particular importance of specific solvation for the hydrogen-bond formation step. The strength of the hydrogen bond between hydrides 1 and the model bases is similar to that of the M-H...X hydrogen bond between 1 and THF (X = O) or CH(3)CN (X = N) or between CH(2)Cl(2) and the same bases. The latter competitive weak interactions lower the activities of both the hydrides and the bases in the proton transfer reaction. In this way, these secondary effects shift the proton transfer equilibrium and lead to the counterintuitive hampering of proton transfer upon solvent change from hexane to moderately polar CH(2)Cl(2) or THF.

  7. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  8. Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. P.

    2006-08-15

    Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of a short duration intense axial magnetic field has been studied. Resonance occurs between the electrons and the laser field for an optimum magnetic field leading to effective energy transfer from laser to electrons. The value of optimum magnetic field is independent of the laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy. The electrons rotate around the axis of the laser pulse with small angle of emittance and small energy spread. Acceleration gradient increases with laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy.

  9. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma is accelerated by NASH involving M2 macrophage polarization mediated by hif-1αinduced IL-10.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Saha, Banishree; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related inflammation promotes cancer development. Tissue resident macrophages affect tumor progression and the tumor micro-environment favors polarization into alternatively activated macrophages (M2) that facilitate tumor invasiveness. Here, we dissected the role of western diet-induced NASH in inducing macrophage polarization in a carcinogen initiated model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Adult C57BL/6 male mice received diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 24 weeks of high fat-high cholesterol-high sugar diet (HF-HC-HSD). We assessed liver MRI and histology, serum ALT, AFP, liver triglycerides, and cytokines. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-12/TNFα (M1) and CD163/CD206 (M2) expression using flow cytometry. Role of hif-1α-induced IL-10 was dissected in hepatocyte specific hif-1αKO and hif-1αdPA (over-expression) mice. The western diet-induced features of NASH and accelerated HCC development after carcinogen exposure. Liver fibrosis and serum AFP were significantly increased in DEN + HF-HC-HSD mice compared to controls. Western diet resulted in macrophage (F4/80(+)CD11b(+)) infiltration to liver and DEN + HF-HC-HSD mice showed preferential increase in M2 macrophages. Isolated hepatocytes from western diet fed mice showed significant upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, hif-1α, and livers from hif-1α over-expressing mice had increased proportion of M2 macrophages. Primary hepatocytes from wild-type mice treated with DEN and palmitic acid in vitro showed activation of hif-1α and induction of IL-10, a M2 polarizing cytokine. IL-10 neutralization in hepatocyte-derived culture supernatant prevented M2 macrophage polarization and silencing hif-1α in macrophages blocked their M2 polarization. Therefore, our data demonstrate that NASH accelerates HCC progression via upregulation of hif-1α mediated IL-10 polarizing M2 macrophages.

  11. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  12. Induced Proton Polarization for pi0 Electroproduction at Q2 = 0.126 GeV2/c2 Around the Delta(1232) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Warren; Ricardo Alarcon; Christopher Armstrong; Burin Asavapibhop; David Barkhuff; William Bertozzi; Volker Burkert; J. Chen; Jian-Ping Chen; Joseph Comfort; Daniel Dale; George Dodson; S. Dolfini; K. Dow; Martin Epstein; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; John Finn; Shalev Gilad; Ralf Gothe; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Kyungseon Joo; A. Karabarbounis; James Kelly; Stanley Kowalski; C. Kunz; D. Liu; R.W. Lourie; Richard Madey; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; C. Mertz; Brian Milbrath; Rory Miskimen; Joseph Mitchell; S. Mukhopadhyay; Costas Papanicolas; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Liming Qin; Paul Rutt; Adam Sarty; Jeffrey Shaw; S.B. Soong; D. Tieger; Christoph Tschalaer; William Turchinetz; Paul Ulmer; Scott Van Verst; C. Vellidis; Lawrence Weinstein; Steven Williamson; Rhett Woo; Alaen Young

    1998-12-01

    We present a measurement of the induced proton polarization P{sub n} in {pi}{sup 0} electroproduction on the proton around the {Delta} resonance. The measurement was made at a central invariant mass and a squared four-momentum transfer of W = 1231 MeV and Q{sup 2} = 0.126 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, respectively. We measured a large induced polarization, P{sub n} = -0.397 {+-} 0.055 {+-} 0.009. The data suggest that the scalar background is larger than expected from a recent effective Hamiltonian model.

  13. Experimental study of stochastic cooling in the NAP-M proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, E.N.; Zinevich, N.I.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1982-10-01

    Experimental results are reported for stochastic cooling of the energy spread in a proton beam. The behavior of the damping rates is studied as a function of the beam phase density, number of working harmonics, and feedback circuit gain. The steady-state energy spread in the beam was determined by the noise in the electronic equipment. Coherent beam instability was found to be associated with movement of the beam in the pickup electrode. The limitations of the experimental method due to noise from the electronic equipment and collective effects in intense beams are discussed.

  14. Preferential positron heating and acceleration by synchrotron maser instabilities in relativistic positron-electron-proton plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Arons, Jonathan

    1991-01-01

    A new process of the preferential strong heating of positrons through the ion synchrotron maser instability in positron-electron-proton magnetized plasmas is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the positrons form a nonthermal power-law-like energy distribution via their gyroresonant interaction with the extraordinary modes emitted by the ions. It is noted that this process may be of significance in connection with the shock excitation of nonthermal synchrotron radiation from astrophysical systems powered by relativistic outflows from compact central objects, e.g., supernova remnants powered by pulsars and jets from active galactic nuclei.

  15. Summary of recent experiments on focusing of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam with a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Alexander, N.; Barnard, J. J.; Lund, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a summary of recent experiments on focusing of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated (TNSA) proton beam with a stack of thin conducting foils. The experiments were performed using the Phelix laser (GSI-Darmstadt) and the Titan laser, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of TNSA protons were experimentally observed for the first time at the Phelix laser user facility, in a specially engineered structure ('lens') consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. Follow up experiments using the Titan laser obtained results consistent with the collimation/focusing observed in the initial experiments using the Phelix. The Titan experiments employed improved, 25 μm- and 50 μm-gap targets and the new fine mesh diagnostic. All the experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields were applied, and no neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. A plausible interpretation of the observed phenomena is that the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the conducting foils inhibits radial expansion of the beam.

  16. Direct Solar Wind Proton Access into Permanently Shadowed Lunar Polar Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent analyses of Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (LPNS) data have suggested that high abundances of hydrogen exist within cold traps at the lunar poles, and it has often been assumed that hydrogen-bearing volatiles sequestered in permanent shadow are topographically shielded from sputtering by solar wind protons. However, recent simulation results are presented showing that solar wind protons clearly access the floor of an idealized, shadowed lunar crater through a combination of thermal and ambipolar processes, in effect creating a plasma "miniwake". These simulations are the first to model the mini-wake environment in two spatial dimensions with a self-consistent lunar surface-plasma interaction. Progress is reported on constraining the nonzero particle fluxes and energies incident on kilometer-scale shadowed topography, such as a small crater embedded within a larger one. The importance of direct solar wind proton bombardment is discussed within the context of understanding the stability and inventory of hydrogen-bearing volatiles in shadow at the lunar poles. The support of the National Lunar Science institute, the DREAM institute, LPROPS, and the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center administered by ORAU are gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Electron trapping and acceleration by the plasma wakefield of a self-modulating proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Petrenko, A. V.; Amorim, L. D.; Vieira, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Muggli, P.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that co-linear injection of electrons or positrons into the wakefield of the self-modulating particle beam is possible and ensures high energy gain. The witness beam must co-propagate with the tail part of the driver, since the plasma wave phase velocity there can exceed the light velocity, which is necessary for efficient acceleration. If the witness beam is many wakefield periods long, then the trapped charge is limited by beam loading effects. The initial trapping is better for positrons, but at the acceleration stage a considerable fraction of positrons is lost from the wave. For efficient trapping of electrons, the plasma boundary must be sharp, with the density transition region shorter than several centimeters. Positrons are not susceptible to the initial plasma density gradient.

  18. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  19. Ion-acoustic Shocks with Reflected Ions: Implications for laser-based proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeev, Roald; Malkov, Mikhail; Dudnikova, Galina; Liseykina, Tatyana; Diamond, Patrick; Liu, C.-S.; Su, J.-J.

    2014-10-01

    Analytic solution for an ion-acoustic collisionless shock with reflected ions is obtained. Its relation to classical non-reflecting solitons propagating at Mach numbers strictly limited by M accelerate whereas their distribution becomes noteworthily monoenergetic. The obtained solution may thus have interesting implications for the laser-based ion accelerators. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed. Partially supported by NASA, ATP NNX14AH36G, and the US DoE.

  20. Non-planar electron motion during direct laser acceleration by a linearly/circularly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alexey; Zhang, Xi; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) of electrons in plasma bubbles or ion channels is investigated in the general case of arbitrary polarization of laser pulse. When the laser pulse is linearly polarized, the laser electromagnetic field drives electron oscillations in the polarization plane, intuitively suggesting that the electron trajectory lies in the same plane. We show that strong modulations of the relativistic gamma-factor cause the free oscillations perpendicular to the plane of the driven motion to become unstable. As a consequence, out of plane displacements grow and the electron trajectory becomes strongly three-dimensional, even if it starts out planar during the early stage of the acceleration. For a circularly polarized laser pulse, electron end up moving along a helical trajectory with slowly changing helix radius. By deriving a set of dimensionless equations for paraxial ultra-relativistic electron motion, we have found an estimate for the maximum attainable electron energy for arbitrary laser and plasma parameters. This work was supported by DOE Grants DESC0007889 and DE-SC0010622, and by an AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0045.

  1. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jiasen Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  2. Experimental studies with two novel silicon detectors for the development of time-of-flight spectrometry of laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würl, M.; Reinhardt, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M.; Tran, L.; Karsch, S.; Assmann, W.; Schreiber, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-accelerated proton beams exhibit remarkably different beam characteristics as compared to conventionally accelerated ion beams. About 105 to 107 particles per MeV and msr are accelerated quasi-instantaneously within about 1 ps. The resulting energy spectrum typically shows an exponentially decaying distribution. Our planned approach to determine the energy spectrum of the particles generated in each pulse is to exploit the time-of-flight (TOF) difference of protons with different kinetic energies at 1 m distance from the laser-target interaction. This requires fast and sensitive detectors. We therefore tested two prototype silicon detectors, developed at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics at the University of Wollongong with a current amplifier, regarding their suitability for TOF-spectrometry in terms of sensitivity and timing properties. For the latter, we illuminated the detectors with short laser pulses, measured the signal current and compared it to the signal of a fast photodiode. The comparison revealed that the timing properties of both prototypes are not yet sufficient for our purpose. In contrast, our results regarding the detectors’ sensitivity are promising. The lowest detectable proton flux at 10 MeV was found to be 25 protons per ns on the detector. With this sensitivity and with a smaller pixelation of the detectors, the timing properties can be improved for new prototypes, making them potential candidates for TOF-spectrometry of laser-accelerated particle beams.

  3. In-situ diagnostics and degradation mapping of a mixed-mode accelerated stress test for proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing availability of more durable membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells, there is a need for a more stressful test that combines chemical and mechanical stressors to enable accelerated screening of promising membrane candidates. Equally important is the need for in-situ diagnostic methods with sufficient spatial resolution that can provide insights into how membranes degrade to facilitate the development of durable fuel cell systems. In this article, we report an accelerated membrane stress test and a degradation diagnostic method that satisfy both needs. By applying high-amplitude cycles of electrical load to a fuel cell fed with low-RH reactant gases, a wide range of mechanical and chemical stressful conditions can be created within the cell which leads to rapid degradation of a mechanically robust Ion Power™ N111-IP membrane. Using an in-situ shorting/crossover diagnostic method on a segmented fuel cell fixture that provides 100 local current measurements, we are able to monitor the progression and map the degradation modes of shorting, thinning, and crossover leak over the entire membrane. Results from this test method have been validated by conventional metrics of fluoride release rates, physical crossover leak rates, pinhole mapping, and cross-sectional measurements.

  4. Time-dependent energetic proton acceleration and scaling laws in ultraintense laser-pulse interactions with thin foils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongsheng; Bi, Yuanjie; Shi, Yijin; Wang, Naiyan; Tang, Xiuzhang; Gao, Zhe

    2009-03-01

    A two-phase model, where the plasma expansion is an isothermal one when laser irradiates and a following adiabatic one after laser ends, has been proposed to predict the maximum energy of the proton beams induced in the ultraintense laser-foil interactions. The hot-electron recirculation in the ultraintense laser-solid interactions has been accounted in and described by the time-dependent hot-electron density continuously in this model. The dilution effect of electron density as electrons recirculate and spread laterally has been considered. With our model, the scaling laws of maximum ion energy have been achieved and the dependence of the scaling coefficients on laser intensity, pulse duration, and target thickness have been obtained. Some interesting results have been predicted: the adiabatic expansion is an important process of the ion acceleration and cannot be neglected; the whole acceleration time is about 10-20 times of laser-pulse duration; the larger the laser intensity, the more sensitive the maximum ion energy to the change of focus radius, and so on.

  5. Complete dipole strength distributions in 208Pb from high-resolution polarized proton scattering at 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Neumann-Cosel, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Small-angle polarized proton scattering including 0° at incident energies of a few 100 MeV/nucleon is established as a new spectrospcopic tool for the study of E1 and M1 strength distributions. Experiments of this type have been realized recently at RCNP, Osaka, Japan with high energy resolution of the order 25 - 30 keV (FWHM). Using 208Pb as an example, the physics potential of such data is discussed. It includes information on the properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance but also on complete E1 and M1 strength distributions and thus the gamma strength function. The E1 polarizability can be extracted with a precision of about 4% providing important experimental constraints on the neutron skin thickness in 208Pb.

  6. On the retention of high-energy protons and nuclei with charges Z or equal to 2 in large solar flares after the process of their acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volodichev, N. N.; Kuzhevsky, B. M.; Nechaev, O. Y.; Savenko, I. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data which suggest that the protons with energies of up to several GeV should be retained on the Sun after the process of their acceleration are presented. The protons are on the average retained for 15 min, irrespectively of the solar flare heliolatitude and of the accelerated particle energy ranging from 100 MeV to several GeV. It is suggested that the particles are retained in a magnetic trap formed in a solar active region. No Z or = 2 nuclei of solar origin during large solar flares. The absence of the 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may be due to their retention in the magnetic trap which also retains the high-energy protons. During the trapping time the approx. 500 MeV/nucleon nuclei with Z or = 2 may escape due to nuclear interactions and ionization loss.

  7. Radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Akushevich, Alexander Ilyichev

    2012-03-01

    Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated in the leading log approximation and analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Radiative corrections to the cross sections, their azimuthal distributions and Fourier coefficients are in particular focus. Kinematical regions where the radiative corrections are considerable are identified.

  8. Polarization observables in the elastic scattering of protons from {sup 4,6,8}He

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Moro, A. M.

    2007-11-15

    We have calculated the p-{sup 4,6,8}He elastic scattering differential cross section and polarizations at 297 MeV using the Multiple Scattering expansion of the Optical potential (MSO) reaction scattering framework. The role of the core and valence neutrons contribution to the interaction in the description of the elastic scattering observables is analyzed.

  9. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Van Hoek, A. N.; Haines, T. H.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths.

  10. Accelerated proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) using GRAPPA with a 32-channel phased-array coil.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2008-05-01

    Parallel imaging has been demonstrated to reduce the encoding time of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Here we investigate up to 5-fold acceleration of 2D proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T using generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with a 32-channel coil array, 1.5 cm(3) voxel size, TR/TE of 15/2000 ms, and 2.1 Hz spectral resolution. Compared to an 8-channel array, the smaller RF coil elements in this 32-channel array provided a 3.1-fold and 2.8-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the peripheral region and the central region, respectively, and more spatial modulated information. Comparison of sensitivity-encoding (SENSE) and GRAPPA reconstruction using an 8-channel array showed that both methods yielded similar quantitative metabolite measures (P > 0.1). Concentration values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and the sum of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both methods were consistent with previous studies. Using the 32-channel array coil the mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) were less than 8% for NAA, tCr, and Cho and less than 15% for mI and Glx at 2-fold acceleration. At 4-fold acceleration the mean CRLB for NAA, tCr, and Cho was less than 11%. In conclusion, the use of a 32-channel coil array and GRAPPA reconstruction can significantly reduce the measurement time for mapping brain metabolites.

  11. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Igo, G.

    2011-07-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} 0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized DIS measurements.

  12. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon.

  13. Improvement the equation of polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at different channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-12-01

    The polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is an important parameter which is expressed by the change of voltage and current of it that indicates the performance of the cell. The voltage of the cell is a function of temperature that is expressed by the Nernst equation and the equation of voltage losses such as activation loss, ohmic loss and concentration loss. In this study a new correlation for polarization curve is obtained that it in addition to temperature, a new parameter is involved in it that shows the effect of the geometry of cross-section area of channels. For this purpose three PEM fuel cells with different channels geometry of rectangular, elliptical and triangular have constructed. The active area of each cell is 25 cm2 that its weight is 1300 g. The material of the gas diffusion layer is carbon clothes, the membrane is nafion 117 and the catalyst layer is a plane with 0.004 g/cm2 platinum. Also a test bench designed and constructed for testing the cell and a series of experiments are carried out to investigate the influence of the geometry of the cell on performance of the cell. The results show that when the geometry of channel is rectangular the performance of the cell is better than the triangular and elliptical channel.

  14. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer as a fluorescence probe for protein binding-site static polarity.

    PubMed Central

    Sytnik, A; Kasha, M

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescence probe is introduced for protein conformation and binding-site monitoring as the proton-transfer (PT) tautomer fluorescence by using 4-hydroxy-5-azaphenanthrene (HAP) as a prototype. A typical grossly-wavelength-shifted PT fluorescence for HAP is observed in the 600-nm spectral region for this UV-absorbing molecule (absorption onset, 400 nm), for which case PT occurs even in protic solvents. It is shown that PT fluorescence of HAP can serve as a protein-binding-site static-polarity calibrator, shifting from a lambda max of 612 nm in cyclohexane to 585 nm in ethanol at 298 K, contrary to the usual dispersion red shift. A small mechanical solvent-cage effect is noted in ethanol at 77 K, but solvent dielectric relaxation is not apparent from the fluorescence spectrum. Thus, HAP serves to distinguish static solvent-cage polarity from dynamical solvent dielectric relaxation and other solvent-cage effects (mechanical restriction of molecular conformation). HAP as a PT-fluorescence probe is applied to human serum albumin (HSA) and beaver apomyoglobin. PMID:8078934

  15. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst. PMID:26365764

  16. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  17. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; ...

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, althoughmore » the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.« less

  18. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D; Peters, Aaron W; Kubiak, Cliff P; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm(-2). Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  19. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm-2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  20. Design of high power radio frequency radial combiner for proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P R

    2009-01-01

    A simplified design method has been proposed for systematic design of novel radio frequency (rf) power combiner and divider, incorporating radial slab-line structure, without using isolation resistor and external tuning mechanism. Due to low insertion loss, high power capability, and rigid mechanical configuration, this structure is advantageous for modern solid state rf power source used for feeding rf energy to superconducting accelerating structures. Analysis, based on equivalent circuit and radial transmission line approximation, provides simple design formula for calculating combiner parameters. Based on this method, novel 8-way and 16-way power combiners, with power handling capability of 4 kW, have been designed, as part of high power solid state rf amplifier development. Detailed experiments showed good performance in accordance with theory.

  1. Examination of the relationship between riometer-derived absorption and the integral proton flux in the context of modeling polar cap absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, R. A. D.; Danskin, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    Energetic protons can penetrate into the ionosphere increasing ionization in the D region causing polar cap absorption that may potentially block high-frequency radio communications for transpolar flights. The protons are guided by the geomagnetic field into the high-latitude polar cap region. Riometers monitor variations in ionospheric absorption by observing the level of background cosmic radio noise. Current polar cap absorption modeling techniques are based on the linear relationship between absorption and the square root of the integral proton flux, which has previously only been demonstrated using data from a single high-latitude polar station. The proportionality constant describing this relationship is evaluated for two different polar cap absorption events occurring 7-11 March 2012 and 23 January 2012 to 1 February 2012. Examination of the proportionality constant using data from riometers distributed between 60° and 90° magnetic latitude reveals a previously unreported latitudinal dependence for data at magnetic latitudes of ≤66.8° on the dayside and ≤70.8° on the nightside. Incorporating the latitudinal dependence into the current D Region Absorption Prediction absorption model improves the agreement between measurement-derived and modeled parameters by increasing the correlation coefficient between data sets, reducing the root-mean-square error, and reducing the bias.

  2. Convection and electrodynamic signatures in the vicinity of a Sun-aligned arc: Results from the Polar Acceleration Regions and Convection Study (Polar ARCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, L. A.; Weber, E. J.; Reiff, P. H.; Sharber, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.; Primdahl, F.; Mikkelsen, I. S.; Seifring, C.; Wescott, Eugene M.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental campaign designed to study high-latitude auroral arcs was conducted in Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, on February 26, 1987. The Polar Acceleration Regions and Convection Study (Polar ARCS) consisted of a coordinated set of ground-based, airborne, and sounding rocket measurements of a weak, sun-aligned arc system within the duskside polar cap. A rocket-borne barium release experiment, two DMSP satellite overflights, all-sky photography, and incoherent scatter radar measurements provided information on the large-scale plasma convection over the polar cap region while a second rocket instrumented with a DC magnetometer, Langmuir and electric field probes, and an electron spectrometer provided measurements of small-scale electrodynamics. The large-scale data indicate that small, sun-aligned precipitation events formed within a region of antisunward convection between the duskside auroral oval and a large sun-aligned arc further poleward. This convection signature, used to assess the relationship of the sun-aligned arc to the large-scale magnetospheric configuration, is found to be consistent with either a model in which the arc formed on open field lines on the dusk side of a bifurcated polar cap or on closed field lines threading an expanded low-latitude boundary layer, but not a model in which the polar cap arc field lines map to an expanded plasma sheet. The antisunward convection signature may also be explained by a model in which the polar cap arc formed on long field lines recently reconnected through a highly skewed plasma sheet. The small-scale measurements indicate the rocket passed through three narrow (less than 20 km) regions of low-energy (less than 100 eV) electron precipitation in which the electric and magnetic field perturbations were well correlated. These precipitation events are shown to be associated with regions of downward Poynting flux and small-scale upward and downward field-aligned currents of 1-2 micro-A/sq m. The paired field

  3. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  4. Baryon Spectroscopy with Polarization Observables from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  5. Beam polarization asymmetry and the electromagnetic production of kaons from protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Oren V.

    2012-12-01

    The beam polarization asymmetry in the reaction ep→e'K+Λ has been investigated in a tree-level effective Lagrangian model. The model incorporates most of the well-established baryon resonances with spins up to (5)/(2), four less well-established nucleon resonances with larger mass, and the two kaon resonances K(892) and K1(1270). The off-shell structure of the electromagnetic vertices was accounted for by the inclusion of electromagnetic form factors at those vertices. The free parameters of the model were fitted in a previous study to a large pool of photoproduction data from the CLAS, GRAAL, SAPHIR, and LEPS collaborations and to CLAS data for the virtual photoproduction structure functions σU, σT, σL, σTT, and σLT. Using this model, results were obtained for the beam polarization asymmetry structure function σLT' and compared with CLAS data. Two new fits to the combined photoproduction and electroproduction data with the σLT' data included were then generated. The first of these includes contributions from all of the resonances included in the previous study; the second excludes contributions from the N(2080) and N(2200) resonances. The results of both fits for both photoproduction and electroproduction observables are compared with the results of the previous fit and the data.

  6. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique.

  7. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Red Wine Samples Using the Union College Pelletron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott

    2010-11-01

    A 1-megavolt tandem electrostatic Pelletron particle accelerator housed at Union College was used to measure the elemental composition and concentration of homemade Cabernet and Merlot red wine samples. A beam of 1.8-MeV protons directed at an approximately 12-μm thin Mylar substrate onto which 8-μL of concentrated red wine was dried caused inner shell electrons to be ejected from the target nuclei and these vacancies are filled through electronic transitions of higher orbital electrons accompanied by the production of an x-ray photon characteristic of the elemental composition of the target. This is the PIXE Method. Data on the intensity versus energy of the x-rays were collected using an Amptek silicon drift detector and were analyzed to determine the elemental composition and the samples were found to contain P, S, K, Cl, Ca, Sc, Mn, Al, Fe, & Co. Elemental concentrations were determined using the analysis package GUPIX. It is hypothesized that the cobalt seen is a direct result of the uptake by the grapes and as a product of the fermentation process a complex of vitamin B12 is produced.

  8. Path integral evaluation of the quantum instanton rate constant for proton transfer in a polar solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miller, William H.

    2005-01-01

    The quantum instanton approximation for thermal rate constants, a type of quantum transition state theory (QTST), is applied to a model proton transfer reaction in liquid methyl chloride developed by Azzouz and Borgis. Monte Carlo path integral methods are used to carry out the calculations, and two other closely related QTST's, namely, the centroid-density and Hansen-Andersen QTST, are also evaluated for comparison using the present path integral approach. A technique is then introduced that calculates the kinetic isotope effect directly via thermodynamic integration of the rate with respect to hydrogen mass, which has the practical advantage of avoiding costly evaluation of the activation free energy. The present application to the Azzouz-Borgis problem shows that the above three types of QTST provide very similar results for the rate, within 30% of each other, which is nontrivial considering the totally different derivations of these QTSTs; the latter rates are also in reasonable agreement with some other previous results (e.g., obtained via molecular dynamics with quantum transitions), within a factor of ˜2(7) for the H(D) transfer, thus significantly diminishing the possible range of the exact rates. In addition, it is revealed that a small but nonnegligible inconsistency exists in the parametrization of the Azzouz-Borgis model employed in previous studies, which resulted in the large apparent discrepancy in the calculated rates.

  9. Measurement of deeply virtual compton scattering with a polarized-proton target.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Avakian, H; Burkert, V D; Eugenio, P; Adams, G; Amarian, M; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bosted, P; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cazes, A; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; DeMasi, R; DeVita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gonenc, A; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Keith, C; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lu, H; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Markov, N; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Natasha, N; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z

    2006-08-18

    The longitudinal target-spin asymmetry AUL for the exclusive electroproduction of high-energy photons was measured for the first time in ep-->e;'pgamma. The data have been accumulated at JLab with the CLAS spectrometer using 5.7 GeV electrons and a longitudinally polarized NH3 target. A significant azimuthal angular dependence was observed, resulting from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The amplitude of the sinvarphi moment is 0.252+/-0.042stat+/-0.020sys. Theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the magnitude and the kinematic dependence of the target-spin asymmetry, which is sensitive to the generalized parton distributions H and H.

  10. Measurement of Longitudinal Single-Spin Asymmetries at Forward Rapidity for W Boson Production in Polarized proton+proton Collisions at √ s =510 GeV at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Amani; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of W- (+) bosons in polarized proton collisions provides an ideal tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton sea quark distributions profiting from the parity violating nature of weak interactions. W- (+) bosons are produced in u + d (d + u) annihilation and can be detected through their leptonic decay mode. The STAR experiment has the ability to detect charged leptons e- (+) at mid and forward rapidity regions. In this analysis we focus on the forward region (1 < η < 2). The analysis status of the measurement of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetries at forward rapidity for W boson production will be presented based on a data sample collected in 2013 corresponding to an integrated luminosity 250 pb-1 with an average beam polarization 54%.

  11. Polarized-target asymmetry in pion-proton bremsstrahlung at 298 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Bistirlich, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Crowe, K.M.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Haddock, R.P.; Konter, J.A.; Ljungfelt, S.; Loude, J.F.; Mango, S.; Meyer, C.A.; Perroud, J.P.; Riedlberger, J.; Renker, D.; Schaad, M.; Sober, D.I.; Truoel, P.; Weymuth, P. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California 94720 Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 10024 )

    1990-05-28

    First data are presented for the polarized-target asymmetry in the reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{ital p}{gamma} at an incident pion energy of 298 MeV. The geometry was chosen to maximize the sensitivity to the radiation of the magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub {Delta}} of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232 MeV). A fit of the asymmetry in the cross section {ital d}{sup 5}{sigma}/{ital d}{Omega}{sub {pi}} {ital d}{Omega}{sub {gamma}} {ital dk} as a function of the photon energy {ital k} to predictions from a recent isobar-model calculation with {mu}{sub {Delta}} as the only free parameter yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=1.64({plus minus}0.19exp{Delta},{plus minus}0.14 theor){mu}{sub {ital p}}. Though this value agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}, further clarifications on the model dependence of the result are needed, in particular since the isobar model fails to describe both the cross section and the asymmetry at the highest photon energies.

  12. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  13. Effects of laser polarizations on shock generation and shock ion acceleration in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-09-01

    The effects of laser-pulse polarization on the generation of an electrostatic shock in an overdense plasma were investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. We found, from one-dimensional simulations, that total and average energies of reflected ions from a circular polarization- (CP) driven shock front are a few times higher than those from a linear polarization- (LP) driven one for a given pulse energy. Moreover, it was discovered that the pulse transmittance is the single dominant factor for determining the CP-shock formation, while the LP shock is affected by the plasma scale length as well as the transmittance. In two-dimensional simulations, it is observed that the transverse instability, such as Weibel-like instability, can be suppressed more efficiently by CP pulses.

  14. Accelerator measurement of the energy spectra of neutrons emitted in the interaction of 3-GeV protons with several elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalesnik, W. J.; Devlin, T. J.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The application of time of flight techniques for determining the shapes of the energy spectra of neutrons between 20 and 400 MeV is discussed. The neutrons are emitted at 20, 34, and 90 degrees in the bombardment of targets by 3 GeV protons. The targets used are carbon, aluminum, cobalt, and platinum with cylindrical cross section. Targets being bombarded are located in the internal circulating beam of a particle accelerator.

  15. Search for accelerated electron anisotropy signatures based on observed polarization of the flaring loop microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Melnikov, V. F.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution maps of the circular polarization degree and radio brightness have been analyzed for more than 40 flares based on the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. It has been shown that the observed microwave emission is polarized in the ordinary mode in some flaring loop parts in six events. Based on a joint analysis of the photospheric magnetic field maps obtained from the HMI/SDO and MDI/SOHO magnetograph's and the radio emission dynamics in different source parts, it has been concluded that the ordinary mode predominance in all six selected events can be connected with implementation of the longitudinal pitch-angle anisotropy of emitting electrons.

  16. DE-1 observations of polar O(+) stream bulk parameters and comparison with a model of the centrifugally-accelerated polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. Wing; Horwitz, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of bulk parameters of analyzable O(+) outward streams in the mid-altitude (3-4.7 R(sub E) geocentric distance) polar cap magnetosphere is obtained from measurements by the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) aboard the Dynamics Explorer-1 (DE-1) spacecraft. There is wide scatter in the obtained densities, but they do display discernible trends: the average O(+) density in these streams decreases from about 60 ions/cc at 3.5 R(sub E) to about 1 ion/cc at 4.6 R(sub E). The streaming velocities are somewhat more defined, and their average increases from about 8 km/s at 3.5 R(sub E) to about 12 km/s at 4.6 R(sub E). The densities and bulk velocities are inversely correlated. We have further compared these observational trends with model profiles for the centrifugally-accelerated polar wind as recently described by Horwitz et al. (1994). The large outflow velocities observed can be understood in part as centrifugally-driven by convection with ionospheric electric field magnitudes of the order 50-70 mV/m, perhaps including plasma expansion effects.

  17. Polarization of Lambda0 and anti-Lambda0 inclusively produced by 610-GeV/c Sigma- and 525-GeV/c proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Lopez, J.L.; Nelson, K.D.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the polarization of {Lambda}{sup 0} and {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} inclusively produced by 610 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and 525 GeV/c proton beams in the experiment SELEX during the 1996/7 fixed target run at Fermilab. The polarization was measured as a function of the {Lambda} longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and transverse momentum p{sub t}. For the {Lambda}{sup 0} produced by {Sigma}{sup -} the polarization is increasing with x{sub F} , from slightly negative at x{sub F} {approx} 0 to about 15% at large x{sub F} ; it shows a non-monotonic behavior as a function of p{sub t}. For the proton beam, the {Lambda}{sup 0} polarization is negative and decreasing as a function of x{sub F} and p{sub t}. The {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} polarization is compatible with 0 for both beam particles over the full kinematic range. The target dependence was examined but no statistically significant difference was found.

  18. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5polarization in the polarizednucleon.

  19. Probing the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution function h1T⊥ via the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiacai; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2010-12-01

    We show that the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process is ideal to probe the pretzelosity distribution (h1T⊥), which is one of the new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions of the nucleon. We present predictions of the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the transversely polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process at PAX kinematics and find that the results are significantly larger compared with those of the sin⁡(3ϕh-ϕS) asymmetry in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process at HERMES, COMPASS, and JLab kinematics. We conclude that the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the PAX experiment can probe the new physical quantity of the pretzelosity distribution.

  20. Walking Drosophila align with the e-vector of linearly polarized light through directed modulation of angular acceleration.

    PubMed

    Velez, Mariel M; Wernet, Mathias F; Clark, Damon A; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that link sensory stimuli to animal behavior is a central challenge in neuroscience. The quantitative description of behavioral responses to defined stimuli has led to a rich understanding of different behavioral strategies in many species. One important navigational cue perceived by many vertebrates and insects is the e-vector orientation of linearly polarized light. Drosophila manifests an innate orientation response to this cue ('polarotaxis'), aligning its body axis with the e-vector field. We have established a population-based behavioral paradigm for the genetic dissection of neural circuits guiding polarotaxis to both celestial as well as reflected polarized stimuli. However, the behavioral mechanisms by which flies align with a linearly polarized stimulus remain unknown. Here, we present a detailed quantitative description of Drosophila polarotaxis, systematically measuring behavioral parameters that are modulated by the stimulus. We show that angular acceleration is modulated during alignment, and this single parameter may be sufficient for alignment. Furthermore, using monocular deprivation, we show that each eye is necessary for modulating turns in the ipsilateral direction. This analysis lays the foundation for understanding how neural circuits guide these important visual behaviors.