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Sample records for acceleration feedback control

  1. Dynamic behavior of time-delayed acceleration feedback controller for active vibration control of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fang; Chen, Wei-dong; Shao, Min-qiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the design problem of the controller with time-delayed acceleration feedback. On the basis of the reduction method and output state-derivative feedback, a time-delayed acceleration feedback controller is proposed. Stability boundaries of the closed-loop system are determined by using Hurwitz stability criteria. Due to the introduction of time delay into the controller with acceleration feedback, the proposed controller has the feature of not only changing the mass property but also altering the damping property of the controlled system in the sense of equivalent structural modification. With this feature, the closed-loop system has a greater logarithmic decrement than the uncontrolled one, and in turn, the control behavior can be improved. In this connection, the time delay in the acceleration feedback control is a positive factor when satisfying some given conditions and it could be actively utilized. On the ground of the analysis, the developed controller is implemented on a cantilever beam for different controller gain-delay combinations, and the control performance is evaluated with the comparison to that of pure acceleration feedback controller. Simulation and experimental results verify the ability of the controller to attenuate the vibration resulting from the dominant mode.

  2. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Wang, Yong-Ji; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to [Formula: see text] at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a [Formula: see text] uncertainty to the G value.

  3. Tangential acceleration feedback control of friction induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jyayasi; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    Tangential control action is studied on a phenomenological mass-on-belt model exhibiting friction-induced self-excited vibration attributed to the low-velocity drooping characteristics of friction which is also known as Stribeck effect. The friction phenomenon is modelled by the exponential model. Linear stability analysis is carried out near the equilibrium point and local stability boundary is delineated in the plane of control parameters. The system is observed to undergo a Hopf bifurcation as the eigenvalues determined from the linear stability analysis are found to cross the imaginary axis transversally from RHS s-plane to LHS s-plane or vice-versa as one varies the control parameters, namely non-dimensional belt velocity and the control gain. A nonlinear stability analysis by the method of Averaging reveals the subcritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation. Thus, a global stability boundary is constructed so that any choice of control parameters from the globally stable region leads to a stable equilibrium. Numerical simulations in a MATLAB SIMULINK model and bifurcation diagrams obtained in AUTO validate these analytically obtained results. Pole crossover design is implemented to optimize the filter parameters with an independent choice of belt velocity and control gain. The efficacy of this optimization (based on numerical results) in the delicate low velocity region is also enclosed.

  4. Basis function repetitive and feedback control with application to a particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akogyeram, Raphael Akuete

    2002-09-01

    The thesis addresses three problem areas within repetitive control. Firstly, it addresses issues concerning the ability of repetitive control and feedback control systems to eliminate periodic disturbances occurring above the Nyquist frequency of the hardware. Methods are developed for decomposing and unfolding notch filter or comb filter feedback control so that disturbances above Nyquist frequency can be canceled. Phenomena affecting final error levels are discussed, including error in unfolding, coarseness of zero-order hold cancellation, and waterbed effects in the feedback control system frequency response for different sample rates. Secondly, matched basis function repetitive control laws are developed for batch mode and real time implementation to converge to zero tracking error in the presence of periodic disturbances. For both control methods, conditions are given that guarantee asymptotic and monotonic convergence. Stability tests are formulated to examine stability when the period of a disturbance is not an integer number of sample times, and when there are multiple unrelated periods whose common period is too long to use. Thirdly, an understanding is developed of the optimum division of labor between the objectives accomplished by feedback and the objectives accomplished by repetitive control action. Some experimental results of the particle accelerator testbed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, are reported.

  5. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential efficacy of total body center of mass (COM) acceleration for feedback control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) following spinal cord injury (SCI) was investigated. COM acceleration may be a viable alternative to conventional joint kinematics due to its rapid responsiveness, focal representation of COM dynamics, and ease of measurement. A computational procedure was developed using an anatomically-realistic, three-dimensional, bipedal biomechanical model to determine optimal patterns of muscle excitations to produce targeted effects upon COM acceleration from erect stance. The procedure was verified with electromyographic data collected from standing able-bodied subjects undergoing systematic perturbations. Using 16 muscle groups targeted by existing implantable neuroprostheses, data were generated to train an artificial neural network (ANN)-based controller in simulation. During forward simulations, proportional feedback of COM acceleration drove the ANN to produce muscle excitation patterns countering the effects of applied perturbations. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the clinical case of maximum constant excitation, the controller reduced UE loading by 43% in resisting external perturbations and by 51% during simulated one-arm reaching. Future work includes performance assessment against expected measurement errors and developing user-specific control systems. PMID:22773529

  6. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small

  7. Active vibration control with optimized modified acceleration feedback equipped with adaptive line enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, S. Nima; Craft, Michael J.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-04-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuator actuators and sensors is improved using an optimal controller. The controller consists of two main parts: 1) Frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE), and 2) an optimal controller. Frequency adaptation tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MPPF compensators and the optimal controller. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling tonal vibrations to broad band disturbances. The optimal controller consists of a set of optimal gains for wide range of frequencies that is provided, related to the characteristics of the system. Based on the tracked frequency, the optimal control system decides to use which set of gains for the MAF controller. The gains are optimal for the frequencies close to the tracked frequency. The numerical results show that the frequency tracking method that is derived has worked quite well. In addition, the frequency tracking is fast enough to be used in real-time controller. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimal controller.

  8. Active vibration control using optimized modified acceleration feedback with Adaptive Line Enhancer for frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nima Mahmoodi, S.; Craft, Michael J.; Southward, Steve C.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-03-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuators and accelerometer is developed and its gains optimized using an optimal controller. The control system consists of two main parts: (1) frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) and (2) an optimized controller. Frequency adaptation method tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MAF compensators. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling a certain mode of vibrations to any excited mode. The optimized MAF controller can provide optimal sets of gains for a wide range of frequencies, based on the characteristics of the system. The experimental results show that the frequency tracking method works quite well and fast enough to be used in a real-time controller. ALE parameters are numerically and experimentally investigated and tuned for optimized frequency tracking. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimized controller. The control power varies for vibration suppression at different resonance frequencies; however, it is always optimized.

  9. Active vibration control of structure by Active Mass Damper and Multi-Modal Negative Acceleration Feedback control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Don-Ho; Shin, Ji-Hwan; Lee, HyunWook; Kim, Seoug-Ki; Kwak, Moon K.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an Active Mass Damper (AMD) consisting of an AC servo motor, a movable mass connected to the AC servo motor by a ball-screw mechanism, and an accelerometer as a sensor for vibration measurement were considered. Considering the capability of the AC servo motor which can follow the desired displacement accurately, the Negative Acceleration Feedback (NAF) control algorithm which uses the acceleration signal directly and produces the desired displacement for the active mass was proposed. The effectiveness of the NAF control was proved theoretically using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. It was found that the stability condition for the NAF control is static and it can effectively increase the damping of the target natural mode without causing instability in the low frequency region. Based on the theoretical results of the SDOF system, the Multi-Modal NAF (MMNAF) control is proposed to suppress the many natural modes of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems using a single AMD. It was proved both theoretically and experimentally that the MMNAF control can suppress vibrations of the MDOF system.

  10. Simultaneous Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency and Power by PID Double Feedback Control on the Acceleration and Anode Voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present the results of simultaneous stabilization of both the frequency and the output power by a double PID feedback control on the acceleration and anode voltages in the 460-GHz gyrotron FU CW GVI, also known as "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" (according to the nomenclature adopted at Osaka University). The approach used in the experiments is based on the modulation of the cyclotron frequency and the pitch factor (velocity ratio) of the electron beam by varying the acceleration and the anode voltages, respectively. In a long-term experiment, the frequency and power stabilities were made to be better than ±10-6 and ±1%, respectively.

  11. Feedback implementation options and issues for B factory accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Briggs, D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Hosseini, W.; Oxoby, G.; Linscott, I.; Coiro, O.; Ghigo, A.; Serio, M.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.

    1992-09-01

    The proposed B factory accelerator facilities will require active feedback systems to control multibunch instabilities. These feedback systems must operate in machines with thousands of circulating bunches and with short (2--4 ns) interbunch intervals. The functional requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback systems are presented. Several possible implementation options are discussed and system requirements developed. Conceptual designs are presented for the PEP II transverse and longitudinal feedback systems.

  12. Stability and chaotic dynamics of a rate gyro with feedback control under uncertain vehicle spin and acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng-Hui

    2004-06-01

    An analysis of stability and chaotic dynamics is presented by a single-axis rate gyro subjected to linear feedback control loops. This rate gyro is supposed to be mounted on a space vehicle which undergoes an uncertain angular velocity ωZ( t) around its spin axis. And simultaneously acceleration ω˙X(t) occurs with respect to the output axis. The necessary and sufficient conditions of stability for the autonomous case, whose vehicle undergoes a steady rotation, were provided by Routh-Hurwitz theory. Also, the degeneracy conditions of the non-hyperbolic point were derived and the dynamics of the resulting system on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using center manifold and normal form methods were examined. The stability of the non-linear non-autonomous system was investigated by Liapunov stability and instability theorems. As the electrical time constant is much smaller than the mechanical time constant, the singularly perturbed system can be obtained by the singular perturbation theory. The Liapunov stability of this system by studying the reduced and boundary-layer systems was also analyzed. Numerical simulations were performed to verify the analytical results. The stable regions of the autonomous system were obtained in parametric diagrams. For the non-autonomous case in which ωZ( t) oscillates near boundary of stability, periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic motions were demonstrated by using time history, phase plane and Poincaré maps.

  13. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller.

  14. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  15. Feedback in Flow for Accelerated Reaction Development.

    PubMed

    Reizman, Brandon J; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-09-20

    The pharmaceutical industry is investing in continuous flow and high-throughput experimentation as tools for rapid process development accelerated scale-up. Coupled with automation, these technologies offer the potential for comprehensive reaction characterization and optimization, but with the cost of conducting exhaustive multifactor screens. Automated feedback in flow offers researchers an alternative strategy for efficient characterization of reactions based on the use of continuous technology to control chemical reaction conditions and optimize in lieu of screening. Optimization with feedback allows experiments to be conducted where the most information can be gained from the chemistry, enabling product yields to be maximized and kinetic models to be generated while the total number of experiments is minimized. This Account opens by reviewing select examples of feedback optimization in flow and applications to chemical research. Systems in the literature are classified into (i) deterministic "black box" optimization systems that do not model the reaction system and are therefore limited in the utility of results for scale-up, (ii) deterministic model-based optimization systems from which reaction kinetics and/or mechanisms can be automatically evaluated, and (iii) stochastic systems. Though diverse in application, flow feedback systems have predominantly focused upon the optimization of continuous variables, i.e., variables such as time, temperature, and concentration that can be ramped from one experiment to the next. Unfortunately, this implies that the screening of discrete variables such as catalyst, ligand, or solvent generally does not factor into automated flow optimization, resulting in incomplete process knowledge. Herein, we present a system and strategy developed for optimizing discrete and continuous variables of a chemical reaction simultaneously. The approach couples automated feedback with high-throughput reaction screening in droplet flow

  16. Tuneable vibration absorber using acceleration and displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alujević, N.; Tomac, I.; Gardonio, P.

    2012-06-01

    This study is concerned with the analysis and design of a tuneable vibration absorber, which is composed by a flexible beam with a clamping block in the middle and two masses symmetrically mounted at the two ends. The free length of the beam is used to accommodate piezoelectric strain actuators. The two masses at the ends are equipped with inertial accelerometers. This arrangement is used to generate two independent acceleration feedback control loops that produce virtual mass effects, which shift the absorbing frequency of the device. Another arrangement is also studied where the two accelerometer outputs are time-integrated twice in order to implement displacement feedback loops that change the beam stiffness to shift the characteristic frequency of the device. The two feedback approaches are first analysed theoretically, using a mobility-impedance model, and then experimentally on a prototype absorber unit. The stability of the feedback loops is studied using the Nyquist criterion in order to estimate the limits on the tuneable range of frequencies which are set by the maximum stable feedback gains. The study indicates that the stability margins for the acceleration feedback loops substantially depend on the application of an appropriate low-pass filter. On the contrary, the implementation of displacement feedback gives better stability margins.

  17. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  18. The fast correction coil feedback control system

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.; Caporaso, G.; Zentler, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model-based feedback control system has been developed to correct beam displacement errors in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) electron beam accelerator. The feedback control system drives an X/Y dipole steering system that has a 40-MHz bandwidth and can produce {+-}300-Gauss-cm dipole fields. A simulator was used to develop the control algorithm and to quantify the expected performance in the presence of beam position measurement noise and accelerator timing jitter. The major problem to date has been protecting the amplifiers from the voltage that is inductively coupled to the steering bars by the beam. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  20. Feedbacks and Acceleration of Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, William

    2014-05-01

    The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the Industrial revolution has increased the level of atmospheric CO2 by about 45 % over that of earlier times. The increasing greenhouse effect is augmented by a series of feedbacks; most have been positive, but a few are negative. The most important are 1) Slowing of the thermohaline circulation system; 2) Decreasing Atlantic to Pacific vapor transport; 3) Increasing Arctic river runoff; 4) Melting of Arctic sea ice; 5) Periodic replacement of the Arctic atmospheric high by a cyclonic low pressure system; 6) Increased exchange of waters between the Arctic and North Atlantic; 7) Lessening of the Northern Hemisphere ice-albedo feedback effect; 8) Addition of methane from melting permafrost; 9) Overall changes in the rate of ocean mixing; 10) Overall changes in vegetation cover of land; 11) Increase in the area covered by C4 vegetation; 12) Addition of nitrous oxide from agricultural practices; 13) Changes in insect populations and their effect on vegetation; 14) Wildfires; 15) Soot accumulation on snow and ice; 16) Accelerated melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet; 17) Changes in the East Antarctic Ice Sheet; 18) Closing of the ozone hole over Antarctica; 19) Decay of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet; 20) Expansion of Southern Ocean sea ice; 21) Slowing of the rate of organic matter sinking into the deep ocean; 22) Decrease in insolation reaching the surface of the Earth as a result of introduction of aerosols into the atmosphere; 23) Depletion of stratospheric ozone by nitrous oxide. The global and regional effects and relative importance of many of these feedbacks are uncertain, and they may change both in magnitude and sign with time. New and unexpected mechanisms are constantly being discovered. The uncertainties and complexity associated with climate system feedbacks are responsible for the acceleration of climate change beyond the rates predicted by numerical modeling. To add to the difficulties inherent in

  1. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  2. Feedback Control for Aerodynamics (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TP-2006-348 FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR AERODYNAMICS (PREPRINT) R. Chris Camphouse, Seddik M. Djouadi, and James H. Myatt...CONSTRUCTION FOR THE DESIGN OF BOUNDARY FEEDBACK CONTROLS FROM REDUCED ORDER MODELS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0601102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...

  3. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  4. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  5. Thermodynamics of feedback controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F. J.; Feito, M.

    2009-04-01

    We compute the entropy reduction in feedback controlled systems due to the repeated operation of the controller. This was the lacking ingredient to establish the thermodynamics of these systems, and in particular of Maxwell’s demons. We illustrate some of the consequences of our general results by deriving the maximum work that can be extracted from isothermal feedback controlled systems. As a case example, we finally study a simple system that performs an isothermal information-fueled particle pumping.

  6. Robust Control Feedback and Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-30

    98-1-0026 5b. GRANT NUMBER Robust Control, Feedback and Learning F49620-98-1-0026 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Michael G...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report: ROBUST CONTROL FEEDBACK AND LEARNING AFOSR Grant F49620-98-1-0026 October 1...Philadelphia, PA, 2000. [16] M. G. Safonov. Recent advances in robust control, feedback and learning . In S. 0. R. Moheimani, editor, Perspectives in Robust

  7. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  8. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  9. Laser Ion Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    An intense femtosecond pulsed laser is employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, the ion particle energy control, etc. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. Partly supported by JSPS, MEXT, CORE, Japan/US Cooperation program, ASHULA and ILE/Osaka University.

  10. Delayed feedback control of chaos.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, Kestutis

    2006-09-15

    Time-delayed feedback control is well known as a practical method for stabilizing unstable periodic orbits embedded in chaotic attractors. The method is based on applying feedback perturbation proportional to the deviation of the current state of the system from its state one period in the past, so that the control signal vanishes when the stabilization of the target orbit is attained. A brief review on experimental implementations, applications for theoretical models and most important modifications of the method is presented. Recent advancements in the theory, as well as an idea of using an unstable degree of freedom in a feedback loop to avoid a well-known topological limitation of the method, are described in detail.

  11. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  12. Adaptive-feedback control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Debin

    2006-06-01

    This paper is motivated by giving the detailed proofs and some interesting remarks on the results the author obtained in a series of papers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 214101 (2004); Phys. Rev. E 71, 037203 (2005); 69, 067201 (2004)], where an adaptive-feedback algorithm was proposed to effectively stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems. This note proves in detail the strictness of this algorithm from the viewpoint of mathematics, and gives some interesting remarks for its potential applications to chaos control & synchronization. In addition, a significant comment on synchronization-based parameter estimation is given, which shows some techniques proposed in literature less strict and ineffective in some cases.

  13. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  14. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  15. Control system modeling for superconducting accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2006-10-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. FPGA based controller supported by MATLAB system was developed to investigate the novel firmware implementation. Algebraic model in complex domain is proposed for the system analyzing. Calibration procedure of a signal path is considered for a multi-channel control. Identification of the system parameters is carried out by the least squares method application. Control tables: Feed-Forward and Set-Point are determined for the required cavity performance, according to the recognized process. Feedback loop is tuned by fitting a complex gain of a corrector unit. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for feed-forward and feedback modes. Experimental results are presented for a cavity representative operation.

  16. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  17. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  18. Feedback Control Analysis Using Parameter Plane Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    compensation of linear control systems. General equations have been derived for the cases of feedback, cascade, and combination feedback-cascade...Bode and root-locus analyses, the program provides the capability to investigate ř% the entire gamut of linear control system architecture. A basis

  19. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Control of robot dynamics using acceleration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Prateru, S.; Li, W.; Hinman, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    Acceleration control of robotic devices can provide improvements to many space-based operations using flexible manipulators and to ground-based operations requiring better precision and efficiency than current industrial robots can provide. This paper reports on a preliminary study of acceleration measurement on robotic motion during parabolic flights on the NASA KC-135 and a parallel study of accelerations with and without gravity arising from computer simulated motions using TREETOPS software.

  1. Stalling chaos control accelerates convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Since chaos control has found its way into many applications, the development of fast, easy-to-implement and universally applicable chaos control methods is of crucial importance. Predictive feedback control has been widely applied but suffers from a speed limit imposed by highly unstable periodic orbits. We show that this limit can be overcome by stalling the control, thereby taking advantage of the stable directions of the uncontrolled chaotic map. This analytical finding is confirmed by numerical simulations, giving a chaos-control method that is capable of successfully stabilizing periodic orbits of high period.

  2. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.A. III

    1997-06-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development.

  3. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  4. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  5. Personal computers in accelerator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderssen, P. S.

    1988-07-01

    The advent of the personal computer has created a popular movement which has also made a strong impact on science and engineering. Flexible software environments combined with good computational performance and large storage capacities are becoming available at steadily decreasing costs. Of equal importance, however, is the quality of the user interface offered on many of these products. Graphics and screen interaction is available in ways that were only possible on specialized systems before. Accelerator engineers were quick to pick up the new technology. The first applications were probably for controllers and data gatherers for beam measurement equipment. Others followed, and today it is conceivable to make personal computer a standard component of an accelerator control system. This paper reviews the experience gained at CERN so far and describes the approach taken in the design of the common control center for the SPS and the future LEP accelerators. The design goal has been to be able to integrate personal computers into the accelerator control system and to build the operator's workplace around it.

  6. Modal self-excitation by nonlinear acceleration feedback in a class of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, Anindya; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-08-01

    The article proposes an acceleration feedback based technique for exciting modal self-oscillation in a class of multi degrees-of-freedom mechanical systems. The controller comprises a bank of second-order filters and the control law is formulated as the nonlinear function of the filter output. A design methodology is developed to excite self-oscillation in any desired mode or combination of modes (mixed-mode oscillation). The choice of control parameters takes into account the control cost and robustness of the controller. The effects of structural damping on the system performance are also studied. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. An adaptive control is proposed to maintain the oscillation amplitude at the desired level.

  7. Self-controlled feedback: does it enhance learning because performers get feedback when they need it?

    PubMed

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele

    2002-12-01

    This paper examines whether self-controlled feedback schedules enhance learning, because they are more tailored to the performers' needs than externally controlled feedback schedules. Participants practiced a sequential timing task. One group of learners (self-control) was provided with feedback whenever they requested it, whereas another group (yoked) had no influence on the feedback schedule. The self-control group showed learning benefits on a delayed transfer test. Questionnaire results revealed that self-control learners asked for feedback primarily after good trials and yoked learners preferred to receive feedback after good trials. Analyses demonstrated that errors were lower on feedback than no-feedback trials for the self-control group but not for the yoked group. Thus, self-control participants appeared to use a strategy for requesting feedback. This might explain learning advantages of self-controlled practice.

  8. Balanced-Bridge Feedback Control Of Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity to variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics reduced. Proposed control system for motor-driven rotary actuator includes three nested feedback loops which, when properly designed, decoupled from each other. Intended to increase accuracy of control by mitigating such degrading effects as vibrations and variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics of structure rotated. Lends itself to optimization of performance via independent optimization of each of three loops. Includes outer, actuator, and driver feedback loops, configured so that actuator is subsystem, and driver is subsystem of actuator.

  9. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a study of the application of H infinity and mu synthesis techniques to the design of feedback control laws for the longitudinal dynamics of the High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are presented. The objective of this study is to develop methods for the design of feedback control laws which cause the closed loop longitudinal dynamics of the HARV to meet handling quality specifications over the entire flight envelope. Control law designs are based on models of the HARV linearized at various flight conditions. The control laws are evaluated by both linear and nonlinear simulations of typical maneuvers. The fixed gain control laws resulting from both the H infinity and mu synthesis techniques result in excellent performance even when the aircraft performs maneuvers in which the system states vary significantly from their equilibrium design values. Both the H infinity and mu synthesis control laws result in performance which compares favorably with an existing baseline longitudinal control law.

  10. Rapid control and feedback rates enhance neuroprosthetic control

    PubMed Central

    Shanechi, Maryam M.; Orsborn, Amy L.; Moorman, Helene G.; Gowda, Suraj; Dangi, Siddharth; Carmena, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) create novel sensorimotor pathways for action. Much as the sensorimotor apparatus shapes natural motor control, the BMI pathway characteristics may also influence neuroprosthetic control. Here, we explore the influence of control and feedback rates, where control rate indicates how often motor commands are sent from the brain to the prosthetic, and feedback rate indicates how often visual feedback of the prosthetic is provided to the subject. We developed a new BMI that allows arbitrarily fast control and feedback rates, and used it to dissociate the effects of each rate in two monkeys. Increasing the control rate significantly improved control even when feedback rate was unchanged. Increasing the feedback rate further facilitated control. We also show that our high-rate BMI significantly outperformed state-of-the-art methods due to higher control and feedback rates, combined with a different point process mathematical encoding model. Our BMI paradigm can dissect the contribution of different elements in the sensorimotor pathway, providing a unique tool for studying neuroprosthetic control mechanisms. PMID:28059065

  11. Rapid control and feedback rates enhance neuroprosthetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanechi, Maryam M.; Orsborn, Amy L.; Moorman, Helene G.; Gowda, Suraj; Dangi, Siddharth; Carmena, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) create novel sensorimotor pathways for action. Much as the sensorimotor apparatus shapes natural motor control, the BMI pathway characteristics may also influence neuroprosthetic control. Here, we explore the influence of control and feedback rates, where control rate indicates how often motor commands are sent from the brain to the prosthetic, and feedback rate indicates how often visual feedback of the prosthetic is provided to the subject. We developed a new BMI that allows arbitrarily fast control and feedback rates, and used it to dissociate the effects of each rate in two monkeys. Increasing the control rate significantly improved control even when feedback rate was unchanged. Increasing the feedback rate further facilitated control. We also show that our high-rate BMI significantly outperformed state-of-the-art methods due to higher control and feedback rates, combined with a different point process mathematical encoding model. Our BMI paradigm can dissect the contribution of different elements in the sensorimotor pathway, providing a unique tool for studying neuroprosthetic control mechanisms.

  12. Chaos control using notch filter feedback.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2006-01-27

    A method for stabilizing periodic orbits and steady states of chaotic systems is presented using specifically filtered feedback signals. The efficiency of this control technique is illustrated with simulations (Rössler system, laser model) and a successful experimental application for stabilizing intensity fluctuations of an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser.

  13. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L

    2015-08-07

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays.

  14. Studies on Feedback Control of Cardiac Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Dubljevic, Stevan; Lin, Shien-Fong; Christofides, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    A beat-to-beat variation in the electric wave propagation morphology in myocardium is referred to as cardiac alternans and it has been linked to the onset of life threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Experimental studies have demonstrated that alternans can be annihilated by the feedback modulation of the basic pacing interval in a small piece of cardiac tissue. In this work, we study the capability of feedback control to suppress alternans both spatially and temporally in an extracted rabbit heart and in a cable of cardiac cells. This work demonstrates real-time control of cardiac alternans in an extracted rabbit heart and provides an analysis of the control methodology applied in the case of a one-dimensional (1D) cable of cardiac cells. The real-time system control is realized through feedback by proportional perturbation of the basic pacing cycle length (PCL). The measurements of the electric wave propagation are obtained by optical mapping of fluorescent dye from the surface of the heart and are fed into a custom-designed software that provides the control action signal that perturbs the basic pacing cycle length. In addition, a novel pacing protocol that avoids conduction block is applied. A numerical analysis, complementary to the experimental study is also carried out, by the ionic model of a 1D cable of cardiac cells under a self-referencing feedback protocol, which is identical to the one applied in the experimental study. Further, the amplitude of alternans linear parabolic PDE that is associated with the 1D ionic cardiac cell cable model under full state feedback control is analyzed. We provide an analysis of the amplitude of alternans parabolic PDE which admits a standard evolutionary form in a well defined functional space. Standard modal decomposition techniques are used in the analysis and the controller synthesis is carried out through pole-placement. State and output feedback controller realizations are developed and the important

  15. Delayed feedback control in quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Emary, Clive

    2013-09-28

    Feedback control in quantum transport has been predicted to give rise to several interesting effects, among them quantum state stabilization and the realization of a mesoscopic Maxwell's daemon. These results were derived under the assumption that control operations on the system are affected instantaneously after the measurement of electronic jumps through it. In this contribution, I describe how to include a delay between detection and control operation in the master equation theory of feedback-controlled quantum transport. I investigate the consequences of delay for the state stabilization and Maxwell's daemon schemes. Furthermore, I describe how delay can be used as a tool to probe coherent oscillations of electrons within a transport system and how this formalism can be used to model finite detector bandwidth.

  16. Feedback control of bimodal wake dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiying; Barros, Diogo; Borée, Jacques; Cadot, Olivier; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Feedback control is applied to symmetrize the bimodal dynamics of a turbulent blunt body wake. The flow is actuated with two lateral slit jets and monitored with pressure sensors at the rear surface. The physics-based controller is inferred from preliminary open-loop tests and is capable of symmetrizing the wake. A slight pressure recovery is achieved due to the net balance between the favourable effect of wake symmetrization and adverse effect of shear-layer mixing and vortex shedding amplification.

  17. Local feedback control of light honeycomb panels.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chinsuk; Elliott, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes theoretical and experimental work on the feedback control of sound radiation from honeycomb panels using piezoceramic actuators. It is motivated by the problem of sound transmission in aircraft, specifically the active control of trim panels. Trim panels are generally honeycomb structures designed to meet the design requirement of low weight and high stiffness. They are resiliently mounted to the fuselage for the passive reduction of noise transmission. Local coupling of the closely spaced sensor and actuator was observed experimentally and modeled using a single degree of freedom system. The effect of the local coupling was to roll off the response between the actuator and sensor at high frequencies, so that a feedback control system can have high gain margins. Unfortunately, only relatively poor global performance is then achieved because of localization of reduction around the actuator. This localization prompts the investigation of a multichannel active control system. Globalized reduction was predicted using a model of 12-channel direct velocity feedback control. The multichannel system, however, does not appear to yield a significant improvement in the performance because of decreased gain margin.

  18. A cascade feedback control approach for hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Hector; Alvarez-Ramírez, José

    2005-10-01

    This article studies the problem of controlling the drug administration during an anesthesia process, where muscle relaxation, analgesia, and hypnosis are regulated by means of monitored administration of specific drugs. On the basis of a seventh-order nonlinear pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic representation of the hypnosis process dynamics, a cascade (master/slave) feedback control structure for controlling the bispectral index (BIS) is proposed. The master controller compares the measured BIS with its reference value to provide the expired isoflurane concentration reference to the slave controller. In turn, the slave controller manipulates the anesthetic isoflurane concentration entering the anesthetic system to achieve the reference from the master controller. The advantage of the proposed cascade control structure with respect to its noncascade counterpart is that the former provides operation protection against BIS measurement failures. In fact, under a BIS measurement fault, the master control feedback is broken and the slave controller operates under a safe reference value. Extensive numerical simulations are used to illustrate the functioning of the proposed cascade control structure.

  19. Feedback control of subcritical oscillatory instabilities.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2006-04-01

    Feedback control of a subcritical oscillatory instability is investigated in the framework of a globally-controlled complex Ginzburg-Landau equation that describes the nonlinear dynamics near the instability threshold. The control is based on a feedback loop between the system linear growth rate and the maximum of the amplitude of the emerging pattern. It is shown that such control can suppress the blow up and result in the formation of spatially localized pulses similar to oscillons. In the one-dimensional case, depending on the values of the linear and nonlinear dispersion coefficients, several types of the pulse dynamics are possible in which the computational domain contains: (i) a single stationary pulse; (ii) several coexisting stationary pulses; (iii) competing pulses that appear one after another at random locations so that at each moment of time there is only one pulse in the domain; (iv) spatiotemporally chaotic system of short pulses; (v) spatially-synchronized pulses. Similar dynamic behavior is found also in the two-dimensional case. The effect of the feedback delay is also studied. It is shown that the increase of the delay leads to an oscillatory instability of the pulses and the formation of pulses with oscillating amplitude.

  20. Closed-loop control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Barral, S.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Kurzyna, J.; Dudeck, M.

    2011-08-15

    Feedback control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated with a proportional-integral-derivative controller acting on the discharge voltage. The stability of the current is found to systematically improve with proportional control, whereas integral and derivative control have in most cases a detrimental or insignificant impact. At low discharge voltages, proportional control eliminates at the same time ionization breathing oscillations as well as a coexisting low frequency mode. A progressive deterioration of the stability is observed at higher voltage, presumably attributable to the limited output voltage range of the controller. The time-averaged characteristics of the discharge such as average current, thrust and efficiency, remain unchanged within measurement uncertainties.

  1. Man-systems evaluation of moving base vehicle simulation motion cues. [human acceleration perception involving visual feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M.; Brye, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A motion cue investigation program is reported that deals with human factor aspects of high fidelity vehicle simulation. General data on non-visual motion thresholds and specific threshold values are established for use as washout parameters in vehicle simulation. A general purpose similator is used to test the contradictory cue hypothesis that acceleration sensitivity is reduced during a vehicle control task involving visual feedback. The simulator provides varying acceleration levels. The method of forced choice is based on the theory of signal detect ability.

  2. Accelerator diagnosis and control by Neural Nets

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neural Nets (NN) have been described as a solution looking for a problem. In the last conference, Artificial Intelligence (AI) was considered in the accelerator context. While good for local surveillance and control, its use for large complex systems (LCS) was much more restricted. By contrast, NN provide a good metaphor for LCS. It can be argued that they are logically equivalent to multi-loop feedback/forward control of faulty systems, and therefore provide an ideal adaptive control system. Thus, where AI may be good for maintaining a 'golden orbit,' NN should be good for obtaining it via a quantitative approach to 'look and adjust' methods like operator tweaking which use pattern recognition to deal with hardware and software limitations, inaccuracies or errors as well as imprecise knowledge or understanding of effects like annealing and hysteresis. Further, insights from NN allow one to define feasibility conditions for LCS in terms of design constraints and tolerances. Hardware and software implications are discussed and several LCS of current interest are compared and contrasted. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Active Nonlinear Feedback Control for Aerospace Systems. Processor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    relating to the role of nonlinearities in feedback control. These area include Lyapunov function theory, chaotic controllers, statistical energy analysis , phase robustness, and optimal nonlinear control theory.

  4. Development of a fast voltage control method for electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.; Linardakis, Peter; Tsifakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The concept of a novel fast voltage control loop for tandem electrostatic accelerators is described. This control loop utilises high-frequency components of the ion beam current intercepted by the image slits to generate a correction voltage that is applied to the first few gaps of the low- and high-energy acceleration tubes adjoining the high voltage terminal. New techniques for the direct measurement of the transfer function of an ultra-high impedance structure, such as an electrostatic accelerator, have been developed. For the first time, the transfer function for the fast feedback loop has been measured directly. Slow voltage variations are stabilised with common corona control loop and the relationship between transfer functions for the slow and new fast control loops required for optimum operation is discussed. The main source of terminal voltage instabilities, which are due to variation of the charging current caused by mechanical oscillations of charging chains, has been analysed.

  5. Output feedback control of a mechanical system using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C; Favela-Contreras, A

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an application of a nonlinear magnetic levitation system to the problem of efficient active control of mass-spring-damper mechanical systems. An output feedback control scheme is proposed for reference position trajectory tracking tasks on the flexible mechanical system. The electromagnetically actuated system is shown to be a differentially flat nonlinear system. An extended state estimation approach is also proposed to obtain estimates of velocity, acceleration and disturbance signals. The differential flatness structural property of the system is then employed for the synthesis of the controller and the signal estimation approach presented in this work. Some experimental and simulation results are included to show the efficient performance of the control approach and the effective estimation of the unknown signals.

  6. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  7. Permafrost carbon-climate feedbacks accelerate global warming.

    PubMed

    Koven, Charles D; Ringeval, Bruno; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; Cadule, Patricia; Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Krinner, Gerhard; Tarnocai, Charles

    2011-09-06

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon, which could act as a positive feedback to global climate change due to enhanced respiration rates with warming. We have used a terrestrial ecosystem model that includes permafrost carbon dynamics, inhibition of respiration in frozen soil layers, vertical mixing of soil carbon from surface to permafrost layers, and CH(4) emissions from flooded areas, and which better matches new circumpolar inventories of soil carbon stocks, to explore the potential for carbon-climate feedbacks at high latitudes. Contrary to model results for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4), when permafrost processes are included, terrestrial ecosystems north of 60°N could shift from being a sink to a source of CO(2) by the end of the 21st century when forced by a Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2 climate change scenario. Between 1860 and 2100, the model response to combined CO(2) fertilization and climate change changes from a sink of 68 Pg to a 27 + -7 Pg sink to 4 + -18 Pg source, depending on the processes and parameter values used. The integrated change in carbon due to climate change shifts from near zero, which is within the range of previous model estimates, to a climate-induced loss of carbon by ecosystems in the range of 25 + -3 to 85 + -16 Pg C, depending on processes included in the model, with a best estimate of a 62 + -7 Pg C loss. Methane emissions from high-latitude regions are calculated to increase from 34 Tg CH(4)/y to 41-70 Tg CH(4)/y, with increases due to CO(2) fertilization, permafrost thaw, and warming-induced increased CH(4) flux densities partially offset by a reduction in wetland extent.

  8. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  9. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  10. Achieving modulated oscillations by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Tian, Xiaoying; Kurths, Jürgen; Feng, Jianfeng; Lin, Wei

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to achieve either frequency or amplitude modulation of an oscillator merely through feedback control. We present and implement a unified theory of our approach for any finite-dimensional continuous dynamical system that exhibits oscillatory behavior. The approach is illustrated not only for the normal forms of dynamical systems but also for representative biological models, such as the isolated and coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of our approach to uncover the mechanisms of frequency and amplitude modulations experimentally observed in a wide range of real systems.

  11. Achieving modulated oscillations by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tian; Tian, Xiaoying; Kurths, Jürgen; Feng, Jianfeng; Lin, Wei

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to achieve either frequency or amplitude modulation of an oscillator merely through feedback control. We present and implement a unified theory of our approach for any finite-dimensional continuous dynamical system that exhibits oscillatory behavior. The approach is illustrated not only for the normal forms of dynamical systems but also for representative biological models, such as the isolated and coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of our approach to uncover the mechanisms of frequency and amplitude modulations experimentally observed in a wide range of real systems.

  12. On the stability of delayed feedback controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgül, Ömer

    2003-08-01

    We consider the stability of delayed feedback control (DFC) scheme for one-dimensional discrete time systems. We first construct a map whose fixed points correspond to the periodic orbits of the uncontrolled system. Then the stability of the DFC is analyzed as the stability of the corresponding equilibrium point of the constructed map. For each periodic orbit, we construct a characteristic polynomial whose Schur stability corresponds to the stability of DFC. By using Schur-Cohn criterion, we can find bounds on the gain of DFC to ensure stability.

  13. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  14. Feedback Controller Design for the Synchronization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan; Liang, Jinling

    2016-09-01

    This brief investigates the partial and complete synchronization of two Boolean control networks (BCNs). Necessary and sufficient conditions for partial and complete synchronization are established by the algebraic representations of logical dynamics. An algorithm is obtained to construct the feedback controller that guarantees the synchronization of master and slave BCNs. Two biological examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  15. Inferring Network Connectivity by Delayed Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongchuan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a control based approach to topology estimation of networks with elements. This method first drives the network to steady states by a delayed feedback control; then performs structural perturbations for shifting the steady states times; and finally infers the connection topology from the steady states' shifts by matrix inverse algorithm () or -norm convex optimization strategy applicable to estimate the topology of sparse networks from perturbations. We discuss as well some aspects important for applications, such as the topology reconstruction quality and error sources, advantages and disadvantages of the suggested method, and the influence of (control) perturbations, inhomegenity, sparsity, coupling functions, and measurement noise. Some examples of networks with Chua's oscillators are presented to illustrate the reliability of the suggested technique. PMID:21969856

  16. Feedback control of polysilicon etching: Controller design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, S.; Kushner, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Feedback control can considerably improve the performance of rf plasma processing reactors. It has been recently demonstrated that plasma simulations can be useful in developing feedback control strategies and controllers. In this paper, the authors extend that work to address issues related to the improvement of controller design, experimental validation, and advanced control strategies for polysilicon etching in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP). The computational tool used in this study, the Virtual Plasma Equipment Model (VPEM), is based on a detailed 2-dimensional hybrid plasma equipment simulation. To validate the control aspects of the VPEM, they simulated a magnetic bucket ICP reactor currently being used for real time feedback control experiments at the University of Wisconsin. Results for the use of capacitively coupled power to control etch rate in real time will be discussed for both PID and PID-feed forward controllers. It has been demonstrated that controllers designed using response surface based techniques can control actuator drifts, compensate for external disturbances and nullify the effect of long term drifts in reactor characteristics. For these controllers to be generally useful, they must be able to handle variances such as sensor noise and process drift. They will discuss and demonstrate design improvements which make the controllers more robust, insensitive to noise and adaptive.

  17. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  18. Observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for nonlinear strict-feedback systems with sampled observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2016-02-01

    The design of observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for continuous-time strict-feedback systems with sampled observation is considered. First two types of observers are designed. One is a discrete-time semiglobal and practical reduced-order observer for the exact model and the other is a continuous-time semiglobal and practical full-order observer for continuous-time strict feedback systems with sampled observation. Then by combining the designed continuous-time observers and continuous-time state feedback laws that are continuous, zero at the origin, and uniformly globally asymptotically stabilise continuous-time systems, output feedback semiglobally practically uniformly asymptotically stabilising controllers are constructed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the proposed design of observers and output feedback controllers.

  19. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  20. A Digital Self Excited Loop for Accelerating Cavity Field Control

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Hovater; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2007-06-22

    We have developed a digital process that emulates an analog oscillator and ultimately a self excited loop (SEL) for field control. The SEL, in its analog form, has been used for many years for accelerating cavity field control. In essence the SEL uses the cavity as a resonant circuit -- much like a resonant (tank) circuit is used to build an oscillator. An oscillating resonant circuit can be forced to oscillate at different, but close, frequencies to resonance by applying a phase shift in the feedback path. This allows the circuit to be phased-locked to a master reference, which is crucial for multiple cavity accelerators. For phase and amplitude control the SEL must be forced to the master reference frequency, and feedback provided for in both dimensions. The novelty of this design is in the way digital signal processing (DSP) is structured to emulate an analog system. While the digital signal processing elements are not new, to our knowledge this is the first time that the digital SEL concept has been designed and demonstrated. This paper reports on the progress of the design and implementation of the digital SEL for field control of superconducting accelerating cavities.

  1. Inline feedback control for deep drawing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Harsch, D.; Heingärtner, J.; Renkci, Y.; Hora, P.

    2016-11-01

    In series production of deep drawing products the quality of the parts is significantly influenced by material scatter. To guarantee a robust manufacturing the processes are designed to have a large process window. As the different material properties can lead to a drift in the process, the press settings have to be adjusted to keep the quality. In the scope of the work a feedback control system is proposed to keep the operation point inside the process window. The blank draw-in measured in predefined points is used as the primary indicator of the expected part quality. A simulation based meta model is then used to design the control algorithm with the blank holder forces as control variable. As the draw-in measurements are carried out punctually, their positioning within the tool becomes of critical importance. A simulation based study is therefore presented for the identification of sensor positions with the highest significance in relation to the process outcome. The baseline calibration of the controller is also based on the meta model. The validation of the proposed control system is illustrated based on experiments in a production line.

  2. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  3. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  4. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies).

  5. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  6. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations.

  7. Autonomous benthic algal cultivator under feedback control of ecosystem metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous and internally-controlled techno-ecological hybrid was developed that controls primary production of algae in a laboratory-scale cultivator. The technoecosystem is based on an algal turf scrubber (ATS) system that combines engineered feedback control programming with internal feedback...

  8. Beam Physics Dissertation Award Talk: Feedback Control of Coupled-Bunch Instabilities: Measurement of System Dynamics and Controller Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2004-05-01

    Modern light sources and circular colliders incorporate high currents with large numbers of populated bunches. At the design currents coupling of bunches via resonant structures causes unstable motion so that operation of these accelerators requires active feedback instability control. Design of stabilizing feedback algorithms is a challenging optimization and control problem involving multiple trade-offs. In this talk the process of feedback controller design will be presented starting from quantifying the behavior of unstable eigenvalues as a function of beam current, beam energy, and other accelerator parameters. I will describe how the the diagnostic capabilities of the longitudinal feedback system are used to measure relevant beam and feedback system parameters. These measurements allow one to create a model of the closed-loop system for off-line testing of the proposed controllers. Comparison of the models with experimental measurements will be presented. Next I will present a method for design of robust stabilizing feedback controllers based on the approximation of a frequency-domain transfer function. The method will be illustrated with design examples and operational results from ALS, DAΦNE, and BESSY-II.

  9. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  10. Delayed-feedback control in a Lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The delayed-feedback control (DFC) method for lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is investigated on a unidirectional road. By using the Hurwitz criteria and the condition for transfer function in term of H∞ -norm, we designed the feedback gain and delay time to stabilize the traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The Bode-plot of transfer function have been plotted and discussed that the stability region enhances with delayed-feedback control. It is shown that the delayed-feedback control method stabilizes the traffic flow and suppresses the traffic jam efficiently. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  11. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment

  12. Feedback linearization for control of air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen; Mattern, Duane

    1991-01-01

    The method of feedback linearization for control of the nonlinear nozzle and compressor components of an air breathing engine is presented. This method overcomes the need for a large number of scheduling variables and operating points to accurately model highly nonlinear plants. Feedback linearization also results in linear closed loop system performance simplifying subsequent control design. Feedback linearization is used for the nonlinear partial engine model and performance is verified through simulation.

  13. Fundamental Principles of Coherent-Feedback Quantum Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-08

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0009 FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF COHERENT- FEEDBACK QUANTUM CONTROL Hideo Mabuchi LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 12/08...foundations and potential applications of coherent- feedback quantum control. We have focused on potential applications in quantum-enhanced metrology and...picture of how coherent feedback can provide a kind of circuit/network theory for quantum engineering, enabling rigorous analysis and numerical simulation

  14. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  15. Self-control of feedback during motor learning: accounting for the absolute amount of feedback using a yoked group with self-control over feedback.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steve; Pfeiffer, Jacob; Patterson, Jae Todd

    2011-01-01

    A traditional control group yoked to a group that self-controls their reception of feedback receives feedback in the same relative and absolute manner. This traditional control group typically does not learn the task as well as the self-control group. Although the groups are matched for the amount of feedback they receive, the information is provided on trials in which the individual may not request feedback if he or she were provided the opportunity. Similarly, individuals may not receive feedback on trials for which it would be a beneficial learning experience. Subsequently, the mismatch between the provision of feedback and the potential learning opportunity leads to a decrement in retention. The present study was designed to examine motor learning for a yoked group with the same absolute amount of feedback, but who could self-control when they received feedback. Increased mental processing of error detection and correction was expected for the participants in the yoked self-control group because of their choice to employ a limited resource in the form of a decreasing amount of feedback opportunities. Participants in the yoked with self-control group committed fewer errors than the self-control group in retention and the traditional yoked group in both the retention and time transfer blocks. The results suggest that the yoked with self-control group was able to produce efficient learning effects and can be a viable control group for further motor learning studies.

  16. Adaptive feedback control of wall modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipeng

    The goal of this study is to stabilize the resistive wall modes (RWM) in tokamaks with adaptive stochastic feedback control. This is the first ever attempt at adaptive stochastic feedback optimal control of RWM in tokamaks. Both adaptive optimal state feedback and adaptive output feedback control have been studied. The adaptive optimal state feedback control design successfully stabilizes a slowly time-evolving RWM in a tokamak in a time scale of 4 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output for the time-invariant model is twice the system noise level. For the time-varying model, it is several times larger than the time-invariant case. The adaptive stochastic output feedback can also stabilize the slowly time-evolving RWM. It can do this in a time about 3 times that of the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output is twice as large as that of the state feedback case. In order to avoid the bottleneck encountered in the various sequential computations with big matrices in the feedback algorithms, neural network control has been proposed. It has been used to implement the adaptive stochastic output feedback control. It can stabilize the RWM instability in a time of 3 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized wall modes have the steady state output similar to the output feedback case. The developed algorithms, state feedback, output feedback, neural network control, can be readily applied to other plasma instabilities.

  17. Feedback control of flow vorticity at low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Maria; Gurevich, Pavel; Stark, Holger

    2015-03-01

    Our aim is to explore strategies of feedback control to design and stabilize novel dynamic flow patterns in model systems of complex fluids. To introduce the control strategies, we investigate the simple Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number in a circular geometry. Then, the fluid vorticity satisfies a diffusion equation. We determine the mean vorticity in the sensing area and use two control strategies to feed it back into the system by controlling the angular velocity of the circular boundary. Hysteretic feedback control generates self-regulated stable oscillations in time, the frequency of which can be adjusted over several orders of magnitude by tuning the relevant feedback parameters. Time-delayed feedback control initiates unstable vorticity modes for sufficiently large feedback strength. For increasing delay time, we first observe oscillations with beats and then regular trains of narrow pulses. Close to the transition line between the resting fluid and the unstable modes, these patterns are relatively stable over long times.

  18. PID feedback control of monochromator thermal stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Derek W.; Makarov, Oleg; Corcoran, Stephen; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-09-01

    The desire for increasingly smaller X-ray beams for macromolecular crystallography experiments also stimulates the need for improvements in beam stability. There are numerous sources of instability, which influence beam quality on the micron-size scale. Typically, the most problematic source is thermal drift within the double crystal monochromators. In addition to using liquid nitrogen to indirectly cool both the first and second crystals, GM/CA-CAT previously used a combination of flowing water at constant temperature and copper braiding to stabilize the mechanics, mounts, and the Compton scatter shielding. However, the copper braids inefficiently stabilized the temperature of components that were distant from the water lines. Additionally, vibrations in the water lines propagated throughout the vibrationally dampened monochromator, thereby introducing both positional and intensity instabilities in the transmitted X-ray beam. To address these problems, heating pads were placed directly onto the temperature-sensitive components, with output controlled by a PID-feedback loop. As a result, there is negligible temperature change in the first crystal radiation shielding over the entire range of operational heat loads. Additionally, the angular drift in the second crystal induced by temperature changes in other components is dramatically decreased.

  19. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  20. The Cortical Computations Underlying Feedback Control in Vocal Production

    PubMed Central

    Houde, John F.; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent neurophysiological studies of speaking are beginning to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback processing during vocalizations. Here we review how research findings impact our state feedback control (SFC) model of speech motor control. We will discuss the evidence for cortical computations that compare incoming feedback with predictions derived from motor efference copy. We will also review observations from auditory feedback perturbation studies that demonstrate clear evidence for a state estimate correction process, which drives compensatory motor behavioral responses. While there is compelling support for cortical computations in the SFC model, there are still several outstanding questions that await resolution by future neural investigations. PMID:25989242

  1. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  2. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  3. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  4. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Dunxiong; Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  5. Control problems in very large accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1985-06-01

    There is no fundamental difference of kind in the control requirements between a small and a large accelerator since they are built of the same types of components, which individually have similar control inputs and outputs. The main difference is one of scale; the large machine has many more components of each type, and the distances involved are much greater. Both of these factors must be taken into account in determining the optimum way of carrying out the control functions. Small machines should use standard equipment and software for control as much as possible, as special developments for small quantities cannot normally be justified if all costs are taken into account. On the other hand, the very great number of devices needed for a large machine means that, if special developments can result in simplification, they may make possible an appreciable reduction in the control equipment costs. It is the purpose of this report to look at the special control problems of large accelerators, which the author shall arbitarily define as those with a length of circumference in excess of 10 km, and point out where special developments, or the adoption of developments from outside the accelerator control field, can be of assistance in minimizing the cost of the control system. Most of the first part of this report was presented as a paper to the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference. It has now been extended to include a discussion on the special case of the controls for the SSC.

  6. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-03-15

    Matlab is a matrix manipulation language originally developed to be a convenient language for using the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. What makes Matlab so appealing for accelerator physics is the combination of a matrix oriented programming language, an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capability, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of software toolboxes for accelerators have been written in Matlab--the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for machine simulations, LOCO for accelerator calibration, Matlab Channel Access Toolbox (MCA) for EPICS connections, and the Middle Layer. This paper will describe the ''middle layer'' software toolbox that resides between the high-level control applications and the low-level accelerator control system. This software was a collaborative effort between ALS (LBNL) and SPEAR3 (SSRL) but easily ports to other machines. Five accelerators presently use this software. The high-level Middle Layer functionality includes energy ramp, configuration control (save/restore), global orbit correction, local photon beam steering, insertion device compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction, response matrix measurement, and script-based programs for machine physics studies.

  7. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  8. Design of output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2014-09-01

    Design of reduced-order observer-based output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form is considered based on nonlinear sampled-data control and consensus control theories. As a practical application of the proposed design method, output feedback consensus control for sampled-data fully actuated ships is also discussed.

  9. Remote Robot Control With High Force-Feedback Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved scheme for force-reflecting hand control of remote robotic manipulator provides unprecedently high force-reflection gain, even when dissimilar master and slave arms used. Three feedback loops contained in remote robot control system exerting position-error-based force feedback and compliance control. Outputs of force and torque sensors on robot not used directly for force reflection, but for compliance control, while errors in position used to generate reflected forces.

  10. Lyapunov optimal feedback control of a nonlinear inverted pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. J.; Anderson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Liapunov optimal feedback control is applied to a nonlinear inverted pendulum in which the control torque was constrained to be less than the nonlinear gravity torque in the model. This necessitates a control algorithm which 'rocks' the pendulum out of its potential wells, in order to stabilize it at a unique vertical position. Simulation results indicate that a preliminary Liapunov feedback controller can successfully overcome the nonlinearity and bring almost all trajectories to the target.

  11. Stability and optimal parameters for continuous feedback chaos control.

    PubMed

    Kouomou, Y Chembo; Woafo, P

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the conditions under which an optimal continuous feedback control can be achieved. Chaotic oscillations in the single-well Duffing model, with either a positive or a negative nonlinear stiffness term, are tuned to their related Ritz approximation. The Floquet theory enables the stability analysis of the control. Critical values of the feedback control coefficient fulfilling the optimization criteria are derived. The influence of the chosen target orbit, of the feedback coefficient, and of the onset time of control on its duration is discussed. The analytic approach is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  12. Thermodynamics of quantum-jump-conditioned feedback control.

    PubMed

    Strasberg, Philipp; Schaller, Gernot; Brandes, Tobias; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2013-12-01

    We consider open quantum systems weakly coupled to thermal reservoirs and subjected to quantum feedback operations triggered with or without delay by monitored quantum jumps. We establish a thermodynamic description of such systems and analyze how the first and second law of thermodynamics are modified by the feedback. We apply our formalism to study the efficiency of a qubit subjected to a quantum feedback control and operating as a heat pump between two reservoirs. We also demonstrate that quantum feedbacks can be used to stabilize coherences in nonequilibrium stationary states which in some cases may even become pure quantum states.

  13. Real-time feedback control of a mesoscopic superposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Kurt; Finn, Justin; Vinjanampathy, Sai

    2011-04-15

    We show that continuous real-time feedback can be used to track, control, and protect a mesoscopic superposition of two spatially separated wave packets. The feedback protocol is enabled by an approximate state estimator and requires two continuous measurements, performed simultaneously. For nanomechanical and superconducting resonators, both measurements can be implemented by coupling the resonators to superconducting qubits.

  14. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Hofmeister, William H.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.; MacCallum, Danny O.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Smugeresky, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  15. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  16. Feedback sensor noise rejection control strategy for quadrotor UAV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer, M. Hassan; Hazry, D.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Joyo, M. Kamran; Warsi, Faizan A.; Kamarudin, H.; Wan, Khairunizam; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman A., B.; Hussain, A. T.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating the true value of all parameters from feedback sensor of quadrotor systems. A simple gyroscope and accelerometer sensors are taken into account for calculating the accurate value of system. Secondly, for filtering and controlling the feedback data of system, a Non-linear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) is proposed. For testing the accuracy of proposed technique a complete model of quadrotor with feedback system is implemented on Matlab and simulation results shows the effectiveness of proposed technique and controller design.

  17. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  18. Pulsed klystrons with feedback controlled mod-anode modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Jerry, Davis L; Rees, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a fast rise and fall, totem-pole mod-anode modulators for klystron application. Details of these systems as recently installed utilizing a beam switch tube ''on-deck'' and a planar triode ''off-deck'' in a grid-catch feedback regulated configuration will be provided. The grid-catch configuration regulates the klystron mod-anode voltage at a specified set-point during switching as well as providing a control mechanism that flat-top regulates the klystron beam current during the pulse. This flat-topped klystron beam current is maintained while the capacitor bank droops. In addition, we will review more modern on-deck designs using a high gain, high voltage planar triode as a regulating and switching element. These designs are being developed, tested, and implemented for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator refurbishment project, ''LANSCE-R''. An advantage of the planar triode is that the tube can be directly operated with solid state linear components and provides for a very compact design. The tubes are inexpensive compared to stacked semiconductor switching assemblies and also provide a linear control capability. Details of these designs are provided as well as operational and developmental results.

  19. Multifunctional design of inertially-actuated velocity feedback controllers.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S J; Rohlfing, J; Gardonio, P

    2012-02-01

    The vibration of a structure can be controlled using either a passive tuned mass damper or using an active vibration control system. In this paper, the design of a multifunctional system is discussed, which uses an inertial actuator as both a tuned mass damper and as an element in a velocity feedback control loop. The natural frequency of the actuator would normally need to be well below that of the structure under control to give a stable velocity feedback controller, whereas it needs to be close to the natural frequency of a dominant structural resonance to act as an effective tuned mass damper. A compensator is used in the feedback controller here to allow stable feedback operation even when the actuator natural frequency is close to that of a structural mode. A practical example of such a compensator is described for a small inertial actuator, which is then used to actively control the vibrations both on a panel and on a beam. The influence of the actuator as a passive tuned mass damper can be clearly seen before the feedback loop is closed, and broadband damping is then additionally achieved by closing the velocity feedback loop.

  20. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  1. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  2. Physiological Feedback Control 2011-2012 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-07

    REPORT Physiological Feedback Control 2011-2012 Annual Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The research completed within this contract...and tested during Phases I and 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 07-01-2013 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views, opinions and/or...Jul-2007 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 30-Dec-2012 Physiological Feedback Control 2011-2012 Annual Report Report

  3. Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2004-06-22

    An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

  4. Coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.-H.; Hou, B.; Gao, G.; Nees, J. A.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Lebailly, V.; Clarke, R.

    2015-05-15

    Plasmas generated by an intense laser pulse can support coherent structures such as large amplitude wakefield that can affect the outcome of an experiment. We investigate the coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation using a deformable mirror. The experimental outcome is directly used as feedback in an evolutionary algorithm for optimization of the phase front of the driving laser pulse. In this paper, we applied this method to two different experiments: (i) acceleration of electrons in laser driven plasma waves and (ii) self-compression of optical pulses induced by ionization nonlinearity. The manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to electron beam properties such as the peak charge, beam divergence, and transverse emittance. The demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications.

  5. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-05-15

    Matlab is an interpretive programming language originally developed for convenient use with the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. Matlab is appealing for accelerator physics because it is matrix-oriented, provides an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capabilities, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of accelerator software toolboxes have been written in Matlab -- the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for model-based machine simulations, LOCO for on-line model calibration, and Matlab Channel Access (MCA) to connect with EPICS. The function of the MATLAB ''MiddleLayer'' is to provide a scripting language for machine simulations and on-line control, including non-EPICS based control systems. The MiddleLayer has simplified and streamlined development of high-level applications including configuration control, energy ramp, orbit correction, photon beam steering, ID compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction and response matrix measurement. The database-driven Middle Layer software is largely machine-independent and easy to port. Six accelerators presently use the software package with more scheduled to come on line soon.

  6. Force control in the absence of visual and tactile feedback.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Abbink, David A; Schouten, Alfred C; van der Helm, Frans C T; Arendzen, J H; Meskers, Carel G M

    2013-02-01

    Motor control tasks like stance or object handling require sensory feedback from proprioception, vision and touch. The distinction between tactile and proprioceptive sensors is not frequently made in dynamic motor control tasks, and if so, mostly based on signal latency. We previously found that force control tasks entail more compliant behavior than a passive, relaxed condition and by neuromuscular modeling we were able to attribute this to adaptations in proprioceptive force feedback from Golgi tendon organs. This required the assumption that both tactile and visual feedback are too slow to explain the measured adaptations in face of unpredictable force perturbations. Although this assumption was shown to hold using model simulations, so far no experimental data is available to validate it. Here we applied a systematic approach using continuous perturbations and engineering analyses to provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that motor control adaptation in force control tasks can be achieved using proprioceptive feedback only. Varying task instruction resulted in substantial adaptations in neuromuscular behavior, which persisted after eliminating visual and/or tactile feedback by a nerve block of the nervus plantaris medialis. It is concluded that proprioception adapts dynamic human ankle motor control even in the absence of visual and tactile feedback.

  7. A variable-gain output feedback control design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Moerder, Daniel D.; Broussard, John R.; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    A digital control system design technique is developed in which the control system gain matrix varies with the plant operating point parameters. The design technique is obtained by formulating the problem as an optimal stochastic output feedback control law with variable gains. This approach provides a control theory framework within which the operating range of a control law can be significantly extended. Furthermore, the approach avoids the major shortcomings of the conventional gain-scheduling techniques. The optimal variable gain output feedback control problem is solved by embedding the Multi-Configuration Control (MCC) problem, previously solved at ICS. An algorithm to compute the optimal variable gain output feedback control gain matrices is developed. The algorithm is a modified version of the MCC algorithm improved so as to handle the large dimensionality which arises particularly in variable-gain control problems. The design methodology developed is applied to a reconfigurable aircraft control problem. A variable-gain output feedback control problem was formulated to design a flight control law for an AFTI F-16 aircraft which can automatically reconfigure its control strategy to accommodate failures in the horizontal tail control surface. Simulations of the closed-loop reconfigurable system show that the approach produces a control design which can accommodate such failures with relative ease. The technique can be applied to many other problems including sensor failure accommodation, mode switching control laws and super agility.

  8. Asymptotically optimal feedback control for a system of linear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovseevich, Alexander; Fedorov, Aleksey

    2013-12-01

    We consider problem of damping of an arbitrary number of linear oscillators under common bounded control. We are looking for a feedback control steering the system to the equilibrium. The obtained control is asymptotically optimal: the ratio of motion time to zero with this control to the minimum one is close to 1, if the initial energy of the system is large.

  9. Orbit stability and feedback control in synchrotron radiation rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is essential for the utilization of a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness radiation source. We discuss the development of the measurement and feedback control of the closed orbit, with emphasis on the activities as the National Synchrotron Light Source of BNL. We discuss the performance of the beam position detectors in use and under development: the PUE rf detector, split ion chamber detector, photo-emission detector, solid state detector, and the graphite detector. Depending on the specific experiments, different beamlines require different tolerances on the orbit motion. Corresponding to these different requirements, we discuss two approaches to closed orbit feedback: the global and local feedback systems. Then we describe a new scheme for the real time global feedback by implementing a feedback system based upon a harmonic analysis of both the orbit movements and the correction magnetic fields. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  11. Global feedback control for pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Stanton, L G; Golovin, A A

    2007-09-01

    Global feedback control of pattern formation in a wide class of systems described by the Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equation is investigated theoretically, by means of stability analysis and numerical simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) feedback control of the competition between hexagon and roll patterns described by a supercritical SH equation, and (ii) the use of feedback control to suppress the blowup in a system described by a subcritical SH equation. In case (i), it is shown that feedback control can change the hexagon and roll stability regions in the parameter space as well as cause a transition from up to down hexagons and stabilize a skewed (mixed-mode) hexagonal pattern. In case (ii), it is demonstrated that feedback control can suppress blowup and lead to the formation of spatially localized patterns in the weakly nonlinear regime. The effects of a delayed feedback are also investigated for both cases, and it is shown that delay can induce temporal oscillations as well as blowup.

  12. A Flight-Path Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper presents an automatic flight-path control of aircraft. In the control, a desired flight trajectory is first determined as a sequence of straight lines, arcs and spirals in the three-dimensional space. Commands and command rates of heading and flight-path (climb) angles are then obtained from the desired trajectory. A required acceleration vector of the aircraft is calculated based on the command rates and angle deviations. Desired roll, pitch and yaw rates are then obtained by acceleration controller and are fed to attitude control. The feedback control of acceleration employs conventional PID control technology, without using inverse dynamics of the aircraft, and the attitude control can employ any existing control technologies suitable for the aircraft to be controlled. These make the proposed control relatively simple and easy to implement. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the control.

  13. Sampled-Data State Feedback Stabilization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we investigate the sampled-data state feedback control (SDSFC) problem of Boolean control networks (BCNs). Some necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stabilization of BCNs by SDSFC. Different from conventional state feedback controls, new phenomena observed the study of SDSFC. Based on the controllability matrix, we derive some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the trajectories of BCNs can be stabilized to a fixed point by piecewise constant control (PCC). It is proved that the global stabilization of BCNs under SDSFC is equivalent to that by PCC. Moreover, algorithms are given to construct the sampled-data state feedback controllers. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  14. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  15. Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia by Nonlinear Spatiotemporal Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujeni, Forough Rezaei; Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    The dynamic feedback control of the cardiac pacing interval has been widely used to suppress alternans. In this paper, temporally and spatially suppressing the alternans for cardiac tissue consisting of a one-dimensional chain of cardiac units is investigated. The model employed is a nonlinear partial difference equation. The model's fixed points and their stability conditions are determined, and bifurcations and chaos phenomenon have been studied by numerical simulations. The main objective of this paper is to stabilize the unstable fixed point of the model. The proposed approach is nonlinear spatiotemporal delayed feedback, and the appropriate interval for controller feedback gain is calculated using the linear stability analysis. It is proven that the proposed approach is robust with respect to all bifurcation parameter variations. Also, set point tracking is achieved by employing delayed feedback with an integrator. Finally, simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  16. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  17. ACCELERATOR TARGET POSITIONER AND CONTROL CIRCUIT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Stone, K.F.; Force, R.J.; Olson, W.W.; Cagle, D.S.

    1959-12-15

    An apparatus is described for inserting and retracting a target material with respect to the internal beam of a charged particle accelerator and to circuitry for controlling the timing and motion of the target placement. Two drive coils are mounted on the shaft of a target holder arm and disposed within the accelerator magnetic field with one coil at right angles to the other. Control circuitry alternately connects each coil to a current source and to a varying shorting resistance whereby the coils interchangeably produce driving and braking forces which swing the target arm within a ninety degree arc. The target is thus moved into the beam and away from it at high speeds and is brought to rest after each movement without whiplash or vibration.

  18. Stabilizing unstable steady states using multiple delay feedback control.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2004-12-31

    Feedback control with different and independent delay times is introduced and shown to be an efficient method for stabilizing fixed points (equilibria) of dynamical systems. In comparison to other delay based chaos control methods multiple delay feedback control is superior for controlling steady states and works also for relatively large delay times (sometimes unavoidable in experiments due to system dead times). To demonstrate this approach for stabilizing unstable fixed points we present numerical simulations of Chua's circuit and a successful experimental application for stabilizing a chaotic frequency doubled Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

  19. Buck-boost converter feedback controller design via evolutionary search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, K.; Devi, V.; Nadeem, S. K.; Sreedevi, V. T.; Palani, S.

    2010-11-01

    Buck-boost converters are switched power converters. The model of the converter system varies from the ON state to the OFF state and hence traditional methods of controller design based on approximate transfer function models do not yield good dynamic response at different operating points of the converter system. This article attempts to design a feedback controller for a buck-boost type dc-dc converter using a genetic algorithm. The feedback controller design is perceived as an optimisation problem and a robust controller is estimated through an evolutionary search. Extensive simulation and experimental results provided in the article show the effectiveness of the new approach.

  20. Software Controls For Automated Feedback Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarski, K.; Alkire, R. W.; Duke, N. E. C.; Rotella, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamlines have been designed to take full advantage of the highly intense radiation available at Argonne's Advance Photon Source for crystallography experiments. In order to facilitate the delivery of an intense, stable x-ray beam to crystallographic samples, new beam position stabilization software has been developed. Using the beam-position monitor developed by Alkire, Rosenbaum and Evans, the position of the beam is corrected in real time by applying changes to the monochromator tune using DC servomotors. Real-time monitoring tools were developed, in addition to the technique of selecting the reference trigger points. A user interface for feedback tuning has been developed in conjunction with real-time monitoring and interacting with data acquisition at the bending-magnet beamline (19BM) of the SBC. Preliminary results showed positional stability of the beam to better than 1 μrad in tune.

  1. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease.

  2. Output feedback fuzzy controller design with local nonlinear feedback laws for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiuxiang; Wang, Youyi; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers the output feedback control problem for nonlinear discrete-time systems, which are represented by a type of fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models. By using the estimations of the states and nonlinear functions in local models, sufficient conditions for designing observer-based controllers are given for discrete-time nonlinear systems. First, a separation property, i.e., the controller and the observer can be independently designed, is proved for the class of fuzzy systems. Second, a two-step procedure with cone complementarity linearization algorithms is also developed for solving the H( ∞) dynamic output feedback (DOF) control problem. Moreover, for the case where the nonlinear functions in local submodels are measurable, a convex condition for designing H(∞) controllers is given by a new DOF control scheme. In contrast to the existing methods, the new methods can design output feedback controllers with fewer fuzzy rules as well as less computational burden, which is helpful for controller designs and implementations. Lastly, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  3. Active vibroacoustic control with multiple local feedback loops.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Stephen J; Gardonio, Paolo; Sors, Thomas C; Brennan, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    When multiple actuators and sensors are used to control the vibration of a panel, or its sound radiation, they are usually positioned so that they couple into specific modes and are all connected together with a centralized control system. This paper investigates the physical effects of having a regular array of actuator and sensor pairs that are connected only by local feedback loops. An array of 4 x 4 force actuators and velocity sensors is first simulated, for which such a decentralized controller can be shown to be unconditionally stable. Significant reductions in both the kinetic energy of the panel and in its radiated sound power can be obtained for an optimal value of feedback gain, although higher values of feedback gain can induce extra resonances in the system and degrade the performance. A more practical transducer pair, consisting of a piezoelectric actuator and velocity sensor, is also investigated and the simulations suggest that a decentralized controller with this arrangement is also stable over a wide range of feedback gains. The resulting reductions in kinetic energy and sound power are not as great as with the force actuators, due to the extra resonances being more prominent and at lower frequencies, but are still worthwhile. This suggests that an array of independent modular systems, each of which included an actuator, a sensor, and a local feedback control loop, could be a simple and robust method of controlling broadband sound transmission when integrated into a panel.

  4. Predictive Feedback and Feedforward Control for Systems with Unknown Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Eure, Kenneth W.

    1998-01-01

    Predictive feedback control has been successfully used in the regulation of plate vibrations when no reference signal is available for feedforward control. However, if a reference signal is available it may be used to enhance regulation by incorporating a feedforward path in the feedback controller. Such a controller is known as a hybrid controller. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the hybrid controller for general linear systems, in particular for structural vibration induced by acoustic noise. The generalized predictive control is extended to include a feedforward path in the multi-input multi-output case and implemented on a single-input single-output test plant to achieve plate vibration regulation. There are cases in acoustic-induce vibration where the disturbance signal is not available to be used by the hybrid controller, but a disturbance model is available. In this case the disturbance model may be used in the feedback controller to enhance performance. In practice, however, neither the disturbance signal nor the disturbance model is available. This paper presents the theory of identifying and incorporating the noise model into the feedback controller. Implementations are performed on a test plant and regulation improvements over the case where no noise model is used are demonstrated.

  5. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    During this year, we concentrated our efforts on the design of controllers for lateral/directional control using mu synthesis. This proved to be a more difficult task than we anticipated and we are still working on the designs. In the lateral-directional control problem, the inputs are pilot lateral stick and pedal commands and the outputs are roll rate about the velocity vector and side slip angle. The control effectors are ailerons, rudder deflection, and directional thrust vectoring vane deflection which produces a yawing moment about the body axis. Our math model does not contain any provision for thrust vectoring of rolling moment. This has resulted in limitations of performance at high angles of attack. During 1994-95, the following tasks for the lateral-directional controllers were accomplished: (1) Designed both inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers. These controllers are implemented using accelerometer outputs rather than an a priori model of the vehicle aerodynamics; (2) Used classical techniques to design controllers for the system linearized by dynamics inversion. These controllers acted to control roll rate and Dutch roll response; (3) Implemented the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers on the six DOF simulation; (4) Developed a lateral-directional control allocation scheme based on minimizing required control effort among the ailerons, rudder, and directional thrust vectoring; and (5) Developed mu outer loop controllers combined with classical inner loop controllers.

  6. Global feedforward and glocal feedback control of large deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    With an increasing demand for high spatial resolution and fast temporal response of AO components for ELTs, the need for actively controlled, electronically damped deformable mirrors is evident. With typically more than 1000 actuators and collocated sensors, the evolving multi-input multi-output control task for shaping the deformable mirror requires sophisticated control concepts. Although global position control of the mirror would be the most promising solution, the computational complexity for high order spatial control of the deformable element typically exceeds available computing power. Due to this reason, existing deformable membrane mirrors for large telescopes incorporate local feedback instead of global feedback control and neglect some of the global dynamics of the deformable mirror. As a side effect, coupling of the separately controlled actuators through the deformable membrane can lead to instability of the individually stable loops and draws the need for carefully designing the control parameters of the local feedback loops. In this presentation, the computational demands for global position control of deformable mirrors are revisited and a less demanding model-based modal control concept for large deformable membrane mirrors with distributed force actuators and collocated position sensors is presented. Both global feedforward and glocal feedback control is employed in a two-degree-of-freedom control structure allowing for separately designing tracking performance and disturbance rejection. In order to implement state feedback control, non-measureable state information is reconstructed by using model-based distributed state observers. By taking into account the circular symmetry of the deformable mirror geometry, the computational complexity of the algorithms is discussed and model reduction techniques with quasi-static state approximation are presented. As an example, the geometric layout of required sensor / actuator wiring and computational

  7. Output feedback boundary control of an axially moving system with input saturation constraint.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhijia; Liu, Yu; Luo, Fei

    2017-02-28

    This paper is concerned with boundary control for an axially moving belt system with high acceleration/deceleration subject to the input saturation constraint. The dynamics of belt system is expressed by a nonhomogeneous hyperbolic partial differential equation coupled with an ordinary differential equation. First, state feedback boundary control is designed for the case that the boundary states of the belt system can be measured. Subsequently, output feedback boundary control is developed when some of the system states can not be accurately obtained. The well-posedness and the uniformly bounded stability of the closed-loop system are achieved through rigorous mathematical analysis. In addition, high-gain observers are utilized to estimate those unmeasurable states, the auxiliary system is introduced to eliminate the constraint effects of the input saturation, and the disturbance observer is adopted to cope with unknown boundary disturbance. Finally, the control performance of the belt system is illustrated by carrying out numerical simulations.

  8. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  9. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy.

  10. Event-triggered output feedback control for distributed networked systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Magdi S; Sabih, Muhammad; Elshafei, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of output-feedback communication and control with event-triggered framework in the context of distributed networked control systems. The design problem of the event-triggered output-feedback control is proposed as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) feasibility problem. The scheme is developed for the distributed system where only partial states are available. In this scheme, a subsystem uses local observers and share its information to its neighbors only when the subsystem's local error exceeds a specified threshold. The developed method is illustrated by using a coupled cart example from the literature.

  11. On spatial spillover in feedforward and feedback noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Antai; Bernstein, Dennis

    2017-03-01

    Active feedback noise control for rejecting broadband disturbances must contend with the Bode integral constraint, which implies that suppression over some frequency range gives rise to amplification over another range at the performance microphone. This is called spectral spillover. The present paper deals with spatial spillover, which refers to the amplification of noise at locations where no microphone is located. A spatial spillover function is defined, which is valid for both feedforward and feedback control with scalar and vector control inputs. This function is numerically analyzed and measured experimentally. Obstructions are introduced in the acoustic space to investigate their effect on spatial spillover.

  12. Hybrid Feedforward-Feedback Noise Control Using Virtual Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Jacob; Fuller, Chris; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches to active noise control using virtual sensors are evaluated for eventual use in an active headrest. Specifically, adaptive feedforward, feedback, and hybrid control structures are compared. Each controller incorporates the traditional filtered-x least mean squares algorithm. The feedback controller is arranged in an internal model configuration to draw comparisons with standard feedforward control theory results. Simulation and experimental results are presented that illustrate each controllers ability to minimize the pressure at both physical and virtual microphone locations. The remote microphone technique is used to obtain pressure estimates at the virtual locations. It is shown that a hybrid controller offers performance benefits over the traditional feedforward and feedback controllers. Stability issues associated with feedback and hybrid controllers are also addressed. Experimental results show that 15-20 dB reduction in broadband disturbances can be achieved by minimizing the measured pressure, whereas 10-15 dB reduction is obtained when minimizing the estimated pressure at a virtual location.

  13. Effect of motor dynamics on nonlinear feedback robot arm control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Li, Zuofeng; Bejczy, Antal K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback robot controller that incorporates the robot manipulator dynamics and the robot joint motor dynamics is proposed. The manipulator dynamics and the motor dynamics are coupled to obtain a third-order-dynamic model, and differential geometric control theory is applied to produce a linearized and decoupled robot controller. The derived robot controller operates in the robot task space, thus eliminating the need for decomposition of motion commands into robot joint space commands. Computer simulations are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed robot controller. The controller is further experimentally evaluated on the PUMA 560 robot arm. The experiments show that the proposed controller produces good trajectory tracking performances and is robust in the presence of model inaccuracies. Compared with a nonlinear feedback robot controller based on the manipulator dynamics only, the proposed robot controller yields conspicuously improved performance.

  14. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  15. Nonlinear feedback control of highly manoeuvrable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Enns, Dale F.; Snell, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of nonlinear quadratic regulator (NLQR) theory to the design of control laws for a typical high-performance aircraft. The NLQR controller design is performed using truncated solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation of optimal control theory. The performance of the NLQR controller is compared with the performance of a conventional P + I gain scheduled controller designed by applying standard frequency response techniques to the equations of motion of the aircraft linearized at various angles of attack. Both techniques result in control laws which are very similar in structure to one another and which yield similar performance. The results of applying both control laws to a high-g vertical turn are illustrated by nonlinear simulation.

  16. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of the year, the investigators concentrated their efforts on completing the design of control laws for the longitudinal axis of the HARV. During the second half of the year they concentrated on the synthesis of control laws for the lateral-directional axes. The longitudinal control law design efforts can be briefly summarized as follows. Longitudinal control laws were developed for the HARV using mu synthesis design techniques coupled with dynamic inversion. An inner loop dynamic inversion controller was used to simplify the system dynamics by eliminating the aerodynamic nonlinearities and inertial cross coupling. Models of the errors resulting from uncertainties in the principal longitudinal aerodynamic terms were developed and included in the model of the HARV with the inner loop dynamic inversion controller. This resulted in an inner loop transfer function model which was an integrator with the modeling errors characterized as uncertainties in gain and phase. Outer loop controllers were then designed using mu synthesis to provide robustness to these modeling errors and give desired response to pilot inputs. Both pitch rate and angle of attack command following systems were designed. The following tasks have been accomplished for the lateral-directional controllers: inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers have been designed; an error model based on a linearized perturbation model of the inner loop system was derived; controllers for the inner loop system have been designed, using classical techniques, that control roll rate and Dutch roll response; the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers have been implemented on the six degree of freedom simulation; and lateral-directional control allocation scheme has been developed based on minimizing required control effort.

  17. Application of stochastic optimal reduced state feedback gain computation procedures to the design of aircraft gust alleviation controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, K.; Kaufman, H.

    1979-01-01

    A stochastic linear model that accounts for process parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, and a restricted number of measurable outputs was used to determine feedback gains useful for reducing the vertical acceleration which results from the presence of a vertical wind gust. Considered in the study were the influence of various feedback configurations, the effects of sensor noise, flight condition changes, and initialization procedures. Results showed that for sixth order linearized longitudinal motion, a controller with feedback on three states could be designed for effective gust alleviation taking into account both sensor noise and flight condition variation.

  18. Cross-Layer Adaptive Feedback Scheduling of Wireless Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Ma, Longhua; Peng, Chen; Sun, Youxian; Dong, Jinxiang

    2008-01-01

    There is a trend towards using wireless technologies in networked control systems. However, the adverse properties of the radio channels make it difficult to design and implement control systems in wireless environments. To attack the uncertainty in available communication resources in wireless control systems closed over WLAN, a cross-layer adaptive feedback scheduling (CLAFS) scheme is developed, which takes advantage of the co-design of control and wireless communications. By exploiting cross-layer design, CLAFS adjusts the sampling periods of control systems at the application layer based on information about deadline miss ratio and transmission rate from the physical layer. Within the framework of feedback scheduling, the control performance is maximized through controlling the deadline miss ratio. Key design parameters of the feedback scheduler are adapted to dynamic changes in the channel condition. An event-driven invocation mechanism for the feedback scheduler is also developed. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is efficient in dealing with channel capacity variations and noise interference, thus providing an enabling technology for control over WLAN. PMID:27879934

  19. Generic stabilizability for time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sieber, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-delayed feedback control is one of the most successful methods to discover dynamically unstable features of a dynamical system in an experiment. This approach feeds back only terms that depend on the difference between the current output and the output from a fixed time T ago. Thus, any periodic orbit of period T in the feedback-controlled system is also a periodic orbit of the uncontrolled system, independent of any modelling assumptions. It has been an open problem whether this approach can be successful in general, that is, under genericity conditions similar to those in linear control theory (controllability), or if there are fundamental restrictions to time-delayed feedback control. We show that, in principle, there are no restrictions. This paper proves the following: for every periodic orbit satisfying a genericity condition slightly stronger than classical linear controllability, one can find control gains that stabilize this orbit with extended time-delayed feedback control. While the paper's techniques are based on linear stability analysis, they exploit the specific properties of linearizations near autonomous periodic orbits in nonlinear systems, and are, thus, mostly relevant for the analysis of nonlinear experiments.

  20. FEEDBACK CONTROL OF THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J. LOHR; J.R. FERRON; Y.A. GORELOV; K. KAJIWARA; D. PONCE; M.R. WADE

    2002-08-01

    The output power of the DIII-D gyrotron complex has been modulated by the plasma control system using feedback on the difference between a desired electron temperature and the ECE measurement. Operation was stable and permitted control of the flux penetration during initiation of the discharge.

  1. Stabilising falling liquid film flows using feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Alice B. Gomes, Susana N.; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    2016-01-15

    Falling liquid films become unstable due to inertial effects when the fluid layer is sufficiently thick or the slope sufficiently steep. This free surface flow of a single fluid layer has industrial applications including coating and heat transfer, which benefit from smooth and wavy interfaces, respectively. Here, we discuss how the dynamics of the system are altered by feedback controls based on observations of the interface height, and supplied to the system via the perpendicular injection and suction of fluid through the wall. In this study, we model the system using both Benney and weighted-residual models that account for the fluid injection through the wall. We find that feedback using injection and suction is a remarkably effective control mechanism: the controls can be used to drive the system towards arbitrary steady states and travelling waves, and the qualitative effects are independent of the details of the flow modelling. Furthermore, we show that the system can still be successfully controlled when the feedback is applied via a set of localised actuators and only a small number of system observations are available, and that this is possible using both static (where the controls are based on only the most recent set of observations) and dynamic (where the controls are based on an approximation of the system which evolves over time) control schemes. This study thus provides a solid theoretical foundation for future experimental realisations of the active feedback control of falling liquid films.

  2. Robustness with observers. [linear optimal feedback control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, J. C.; Stein, G.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes an adjustment procedure for observer-based linear control systems which asymptotically achieves the same loop transfer functions (and hence the same relative stability, robustness, and disturbance rejection properties) as full-state feedback control implementations. Full-state loop-transfer properties can be recovered asymptotically if the plant is minimum phase; this occurs at the expense of noise performance.

  3. High Accuracy Attitude Control of a Spacecraft Using Feedback Linearization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    and Spacecraft Body from Gyro Measurements ......... .................................. 119 D.2 An Approximation to Exact Linearization using IPSRU...31 2-4 Attitude Determination and Control System Architecture ................. 33 3-1 Exact Linearization Using Nonlinear Feedback...though basic techniques were adapted from recent references on the use of exact linearization (such as [8] and [27]), the specific control approach

  4. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  5. ELM frequency feedback control on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P. S.; Carvalho, I. S.; Chapman, I. T.; Felton, R.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Goodyear, A.; Graves, J.; Grist, D.; Jachmich, S.; Lang, P.; Lerche, E.; de la Luna, E.; Mooney, R.; Morris, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F.; Sips, G.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the first development and implementation of a closed loop edge localized mode (ELM) frequency controller using gas injection as the actuator. The controller has been extensively used in recent experiments on JET and it has proved to work well at ELM frequencies in the 15-40 Hz range. The controller responds effectively to a variety of disturbances, generally recovering the requested ELM frequency within approximately 500 ms. Controlling the ELM frequency has become of prime importance in the new JET configuration with all metal walls, where insufficient ELM frequency is associated with excessive tungsten influx. The controller has allowed successful operation near the minimum acceptable ELM frequency where the best plasma confinement can be achieved. Use of the ELM frequency controller in conjunction with pellet injection has enabled investigations of ELM triggering by pellets while maintaining the desired ELM frequency even when pellets fail to trigger ELMs.

  6. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  7. Second Law of Thermodynamics with Discrete Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2008-02-01

    A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller.

  8. Feedback Control Design for Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    thrust vector angle. A model 27N pneumatic R-DDV servovalve from HR Textron is used in the test rig for this purpose. Data acquisition and control are...support this research. We also thank Robert Avant, Fritz Dittus and Mohammed I. Alidu for helping in the experimental setup. References ’Alvi, F. S... Thomson , M., "Minimal Controller Synthesis for Time-delay Systems Using a Smith Predictor," IEE Colloquium on Adaptive Controllers in Practice - Part Two

  9. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  10. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  11. Experimental study on feedback control system of plasma position

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Otsuka, M.; Nishi, M.; Kanamori, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Uchikawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    Performance of the feedback control system for the horizontal plasma position in the small shell-less tokamak, HT-1, has been studied numerically and experimentally. Emphasis was put on verifying the validity of coupling parameter evaluation methods for poloidal field coils and structures such as the vaccum vessel and the transformer iron core. The effect of the iron core on the poloidal field distribution was analyzed numerically. Mutual inductances between poloidal field coils and structures were obtained from the calculated eddy currents. Using these calculated parameters, the indicial response of the feedback control loop was studied analytically. Good agreement between calculations and experiments was obtained.

  12. Control of spatially patterned synchrony with multisite delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Omel‘Chenko, O.; Popovych, O. V.; Maistrenko, Y.; Tass, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present an analytical study describing a method for the control of spatiotemporal patterns of synchrony in networks of coupled oscillators. Delayed feedback applied through a small number of electrodes effectively induces spatiotemporal dynamics at minimal stimulation intensities. Different arrangements of the delays cause different spatial patterns of synchrony, comparable to central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e., interacting clusters of oscillatory neurons producing patterned output, e.g., for motor control. Multisite delayed feedback stimulation might be used to restore CPG activity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury or gait ignition disorders.

  13. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  14. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  15. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  16. Tollmien-Schlichting wave cancellation by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Hari; Morrison, Jonathan; Kerrigan, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves are primary instabilities in the boundary layer and, by actively interfering with their growth, the transition process can be delayed. In this study the experimental results of both open-loop and real-time feedback control will be shown for 3D TS waves excited within a flat-plate boundary layer. They are excited at a 0.75mm pin-hole source driven by a speaker. A 0.75 mm thin, dual slot geometry is used for actuation by another speaker and a wall hot-wire sensor manufactured in-house is used as the sensor for feedback control. The spatial transfer function models between the source and sensor (Gs) and the actuator and sensor (Ga) obtained by classic frequency sweep techniques are used to synthesize various types of robust, stabilizing controllers (K). The transfer function Gs determines the unstable range of frequencies whereas Ga together with K determines the stability of the closed-loop. A second traversing hot-wire is used to record the performance of the controller downstream. It is shown that the experimental transfer functions agree remarkably well with numerical calculations as do the predicted results from feedback control. Preliminary experimental feedback control results for various other actuator configurations will also be presented. This work is supported by EADS (support agreement number IW203591) and LFC-UK.

  17. A stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback control methodology for superagility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Direskeneli, Haldun; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1992-01-01

    A new control design methodology is developed: Stochastic Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Technology (SOFFT). Traditional design techniques optimize a single cost function (which expresses the design objectives) to obtain both the feedforward and feedback control laws. This approach places conflicting demands on the control law such as fast tracking versus noise atttenuation/disturbance rejection. In the SOFFT approach, two cost functions are defined. The feedforward control law is designed to optimize one cost function, the feedback optimizes the other. By separating the design objectives and decoupling the feedforward and feedback design processes, both objectives can be achieved fully. A new measure of command tracking performance, Z-plots, is also developed. By analyzing these plots at off-nominal conditions, the sensitivity or robustness of the system in tracking commands can be predicted. Z-plots provide an important tool for designing robust control systems. The Variable-Gain SOFFT methodology was used to design a flight control system for the F/A-18 aircraft. It is shown that SOFFT can be used to expand the operating regime and provide greater performance (flying/handling qualities) throughout the extended flight regime. This work was performed under the NASA SBIR program. ICS plans to market the software developed as a new module in its commercial CACSD software package: ACET.

  18. Is feedback control effective for ecosystem-based fisheries management?

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Abrams, Peter A

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of species interactions on the robustness of feedback control of the harvesting of prey species. We consider the consequences of feedback control of fishing effort. If a prey species is exploited, increasing fishing effort decreases predator abundance more than it does the prey abundance. Feedback control of fishing effort may cause the extinction of the predator, even if the prey population is well controlled. Even when fishing effort is controlled by predator density, it is difficult for the fishery and the predator to coexist, and, if they do so, the system exhibits complex dynamic behaviors. If the predator and fishery coexist, feedback control of fishing effort converges to a stable equilibrium, a synchronous cycle, or an asynchronous cycle. In the last case, the system undergoes more complex cycling with a longer period than that when the fishing effort is kept constant. These analyses suggest that there is no effective strategy that is robust against measurement errors, process errors and complex interactions in ecosystem dynamics.

  19. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  20. An Improved Force Feedback Control Algorithm for Active Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tieneng; Liu, Zhifeng; Cai, Ligang

    2012-01-01

    An active tendon, consisting of a displacement actuator and a co-located force sensor, has been adopted by many studies to suppress the vibration of large space flexible structures. The damping, provided by the force feedback control algorithm in these studies, is small and can increase, especially for tendons with low axial stiffness. This study introduces an improved force feedback algorithm, which is based on the idea of velocity feedback. The algorithm provides a large damping ratio for space flexible structures and does not require a structure model. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a structure similar to JPL-MPI. The results show that large damping can be achieved for the vibration control of large space structures. PMID:23112660

  1. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  2. Deterministic Production of Photon Number States via Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    It is well-known that measurements reduce the state of a quantum system, at least approximately, to an eigenstate of the operator associated with the physical property being measured. Here, we employ a continuous measurement of cavity photon number to achieve a robust, nondestructively verifiable procedure for preparing number states of an optical cavity mode. Such Fock states are highly sought after for the enabling role they play in quantum computing, networking and precision metrology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the particular Fock state produced in each application of the continuous photon number measurement can be controlled using techniques from real-time quantum feedback control. The result of the feedback- stabilized measurement is a deterministic source of (nearly ideal) cavity Fock states. An analysis of feedback stability and the experimental viability of a quantum optical implementation currently underway at the University of New Mexico will be presented.

  3. Combined scanning tunneling and force microscope with fuzzy controlled feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, F. M.; Bammerlin, M.; Loppacher, Ch.; Guggisberg, M.; Lüthi, R.; Meyer, E.; Eggimann, F.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    Decision-making logic based on fuzzy logic and an adaptive PI-controller was inserted into the feedback loop of a combined atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (AFM/STM), which is able to measure the frequency shift Δf of the cantilever-type spring and the mean tunneling current t simultanously. Depending on the conductivity of the surface the fuzzy logic controller decides whether it has to use the AFM feedback or the STM feedback. On conductive regions of the sample STM mode is used, whereas on poorly conducting regions the non-contact AFM mode is preferred. This allows one to scan over heterogenous surfaces avoiding a tip crash.

  4. On-line system identification for control system applications in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Mahesh

    1997-08-01

    Particle accelerators require a number of feedback systems in order to stabilize a variety of parameters. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility presents a unique set of control and identification problems. This accelerator produces a continuous electron beam with energies between 0.5 and 4.0 GeV to be delivered to the experimental halls. In order to meet stringent beam quality requirements specified by the experimental halls, the position and the energy of the electron beam needs to stabilized at various locations in the accelerator. A number of noise measurement tests were conducted at various locations in the accelerator to obtain accurate information about the amplitude and the frequency of disturbances on the beam orbit and energy. Results of these measurements indicate that the line power harmonics were the primary source of disturbance on the beam orbit and energy. A prototype fast feedback system was implemented in the injector and the East Arc regions of the accelerator to stabilize the beam position and energy at these locations. The scheme of implementation of these systems and measurements of their performance are presented here. These feedback systems have to operate under conditions of varying noise characteristics and changing dynamics of the systems. For the feedback systems to always perform optimally, the knowledge of time varying noise characteristics and changing system dynamics needs to be incorporated into the feedback strategy. The approach presented in this work is to perform on-line system identification using a formulation of Fast Transversal Filter (FTF) in order to extract the time varying information from input/output data of the feedback system. A simulation test stand was developed using an analog computer to represent a continuous time system whose noise characteristics and dynamics could be changed in a controlled manner. An on-line system identification algorithm was implemented

  5. Active flutter suppression using optical output feedback digital controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing digital active flutter suppression controllers using the concept of optimal output feedback is presented. A convergent algorithm is employed to determine constrained control law parameters that minimize an infinite time discrete quadratic performance index. Low order compensator dynamics are included in the control law and the compensator parameters are computed along with the output feedback gain as part of the optimization process. An input noise adjustment procedure is used to improve the stability margins of the digital active flutter controller. Sample rate variation, prefilter pole variation, control structure variation and gain scheduling are discussed. A digital control law which accommodates computation delay can stabilize the wing with reasonable rms performance and adequate stability margins.

  6. Optimization of Feedback Control of Flow over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Euiyoung; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    We perform a feedback gain optimization of the proportional-integral-differential (PID) control for flow over a circular cylinder at Re = 60 and 100. We measure the transverse velocity at a centerline location in the wake as a sensing variable and provide blowing and suction at the upper and lower slots on the cylinder surface as an actuation. The cost function to minimize is defined as the mean square of the sensing variable, and the PID control gains are optimized by iterative feedback tuning method which is a typical model free gain optimization method. In this method, the control gains are iteratively updated by the gradient of cost function until the control system satisfies a certain stopping criteria. The PID control with optimal control gains successfully reduces the velocity fluctuations at the sensing location and attenuates (or annihilates) vortex shedding in the wake, resulting in the reduction in the mean drag and lift fluctuations. Supported by the NRF Program (2011-0028032).

  7. Implementation of integral feedback control in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Somvanshi, Pramod R; Patel, Anilkumar K; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, K V

    2015-01-01

    Integral control design ensures that a key variable in a system is tightly maintained within acceptable levels. This approach has been widely used in engineering systems to ensure offset free operation in the presence of perturbations. Several biological systems employ such an integral control design to regulate cellular processes. An integral control design motif requires a negative feedback and an integrating process in the network loop. This review describes several biological systems, ranging from bacteria to higher organisms in which the presence of integral control principle has been hypothesized. The review highlights that in addition to the negative feedback, occurrence of zero-order kinetics in the process is a key element to realize the integral control strategy. Although the integral control motif is common to these systems, the mechanisms involved in achieving it are highly specific and can be incorporated at the level of signaling, metabolism, or at the phenotypic levels.

  8. Robot arm force control through system linearization by nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1988-01-01

    Based on a differential geometric feedback linearization technique for nonlinear time-varying systems, a dynamic force control method for robot arms is developed. It uses active force-moment measurements at the robot wrist. The controller design fully incorporate the robot-arm dynamics and is so general that it can be reduced to pure position control, hybrid position/force control, pure force control. The controller design is independent of the tasks to be performed. Computer simulations show that the controller improves the position error by a factor of ten in cases in which position errors generate force measurements. A theorem on linearization of time-varying system is also presented.

  9. Output Feedback Slewing Control of Flewible Spacecraft by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daesik; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Bang, Hyochoong

    1997-12-01

    Slewing maneuver and vibration suppression control of flexible spacecraft model by Lyapunov stability theory are considered. The specific model considered in this paper consists of a rigid hub with an elastic appendage attached to the central hub and tip mass. Attitude control to point and stabilize single axis using reaction wheel type device is tested. To control all flexible modes is so critical to designing an active control law. We therefore considered an direct output feeback control design by using Lyapunov stability theory. It is shown that the ouput feedback control law design with proposed configuration gives satisfactory result in slewing performance and vibration suppression control.

  10. Feedback control of optical beam spatial profiles using thermal lensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanwei; Fulda, Paul; Arain, Muzammil A; Williams, Luke; Mueller, Guido; Tanner, D B; Reitze, D H

    2013-09-10

    A method for active control of the spatial profile of a laser beam using adaptive thermal lensing is described. A segmented electrical heater was used to generate thermal gradients across a transmissive optical element, resulting in a controllable thermal lens. The segmented heater also allows the generation of cylindrical lenses, and provides the capability to steer the beam in both horizontal and vertical planes. Using this device as an actuator, a feedback control loop was developed to stabilize the beam size and position.

  11. Discrete-time infinity control problem with measurement feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoorvogel, A. A.; Saberi, A.; Chen, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the discrete-time H(sub infinity) control problem with measurement feedback. The authors extend previous results by having weaker assumptions on the system parameters. The authors also show explicitly the structure of H(sub infinity) controllers. Finally, they show that it is in certain cases possible, without loss of performance, to reduce the dynamical order of the controllers.

  12. The DPC-2000 advanced control system for the Dynamitron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestler, Bernard A.; Lisanti, Thomas F.

    1993-07-01

    The DPC-2000 is an advanced control system utilizing the latest technology in computer control circuitry and components. Its overall design is modular and technologically advanced to keep up with customer and engineering demands. The full control system is presented as four units. They are the Remote I/O (Input / Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The central processing unit, the heart of the system, executes a high level language program that communicates to the different sub-assemblies through advanced serial and parallel communication lines. All operational parameters of the accelerator are monitored, controlled and corrected at close to 20 times per second. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not have to communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the machine. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. This allows the operator to set up the process parameters by selecting the product identification code from a menu presented on the display screen. All process parameters are printed to report at regular intervals during a process run for later analysis and record keeping.

  13. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  14. Kinematics and Dynamics of Motion Control Based on Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Yuzuru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    The first IEEE International Workshop on Advanced Motion Control was held in 1990 pointed out the importance of physical interpretation of motion control. The software servoing technology is now common in machine tools, robotics, and mechatronics. It has been intensively developed for the numerical control (NC) machines. Recently, motion control in unknown environment will be more and more important. Conventional motion control is not always suitable due to the lack of adaptive capability to the environment. A more sophisticated ability in motion control is necessary for compliant contact with environment. Acceleration control is the key technology of motion control in unknown environment. The acceleration control can make a motion system to be a zero control stiffness system without losing the robustness. Furthermore, a realization of multi-degree-of-freedom motion is necessary for future human assistance. A human assistant motion will require various control stiffness corresponding to the task. The review paper focuses on the modal coordinate system to integrate the various control stiffness in the virtual axes. A bilateral teleoperation is a good candidate to consider the future human assistant motion and integration of decentralized systems. Thus the paper reviews and discusses the bilateral teleoperation from the control stiffness and the modal control design points of view.

  15. Stability analysis in a car-following model with reaction-time delay and delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Xu, Meng

    2016-10-01

    The delayed feedback control in terms of both headway and velocity differences has been proposed to guarantee the stability of a car-following model including the reaction-time delay of drivers. Using Laplace transformation and transfer function, the stable condition is derived and appropriate choices of time delay and feedback gains are designed to stabilize traffic flow. Meanwhile, an upper bound on explicit time delay is determined with respect to the response of desired acceleration. To ensure the string stability, the explicit time delay cannot over its upper bound. Numerical simulations indicate that the proposed control method can restraint traffic congestion and improve control performance.

  16. Design of multivariable feedback control systems via spectral assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, R. R.; Tung, L. J.; Marefat, M.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of spectral assignment techniques to the design of multivariable feedback control systems was investigated. A fractional representation design procedure for unstable plants is presented and illustrated with an example. A computer aided design software package implementing eigenvalue/eigenvector design procedures is described. A design example which illustrates the use of the program is explained.

  17. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  18. Kinematic feedback control laws for generating natural arm movements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Jang, Cheongjae; Park, Frank C

    2014-03-01

    We propose a stochastic optimal feedback control law for generating natural robot arm motions. Our approach, inspired by the minimum variance principle of Harris and Wolpert (1998 Nature 394 780-4) and the optimal feedback control principles put forth by Todorov and Jordan (2002 Nature Neurosci. 5 1226-35) for explaining human movements, differs in two crucial respects: (i) the endpoint variance is minimized in joint space rather than Cartesian hand space, and (ii) we ignore the dynamics and instead consider only the second-order differential kinematics. The feedback control law generating the motions can be straightforwardly obtained by backward integration of a set of ordinary differential equations; these equations are obtained exactly, without any linear-quadratic approximations. The only parameters to be determined a priori are the variance scale factors, and for both the two-DOF planar arm and the seven-DOF spatial arm, a table of values is constructed based on the given initial and final arm configurations; these values are determined via an optimal fitting procedure, and consistent with existing findings about neuromuscular motor noise levels of human arm muscles. Experiments conducted with a two-link planar arm and a seven-DOF spatial arm verify that the trajectories generated by our feedback control law closely resemble human arm motions, in the sense of producing nearly straight-line hand trajectories, having bell-shaped velocity profiles, and satisfying Fitts Law.

  19. Nonlinear feedback control for high alpha flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Analytical aerodynamic models are derived from a high alpha 6 DOF wind tunnel model. One detail model requires some interpolation between nonlinear functions of alpha. One analytical model requires no interpolation and as such is a completely continuous model. Flight path optimization is conducted on the basic maneuvers: half-loop, 90 degree pitch-up, and level turn. The optimal control analysis uses the derived analytical model in the equations of motion and is based on both moment and force equations. The maximum principle solution for the half-loop is poststall trajectory performing the half-loop in 13.6 seconds. The agility induced by thrust vectoring capability provided a minimum effect on reducing the maneuver time. By means of thrust vectoring control the 90 degrees pitch-up maneuver can be executed in a small place over a short time interval. The agility capability of thrust vectoring is quite beneficial for pitch-up maneuvers. The level turn results are based currently on only outer layer solutions of singular perturbation. Poststall solutions provide high turn rates but generate higher losses of energy than that of classical sustained solutions.

  20. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2011-08-15

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  1. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  2. L1 adaptive output-feedback control architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharisov, Evgeny

    This research focuses on development of L 1 adaptive output-feedback control. The objective is to extend the L1 adaptive control framework to a wider class of systems, as well as obtain architectures that afford more straightforward tuning. We start by considering an existing L1 adaptive output-feedback controller for non-strictly positive real systems based on piecewise constant adaptation law. It is shown that L 1 adaptive control architectures achieve decoupling of adaptation from control, which leads to bounded away from zero time-delay and gain margins in the presence of arbitrarily fast adaptation. Computed performance bounds provide quantifiable performance guarantees both for system output and control signal in transient and steady state. A noticeable feature of the L1 adaptive controller is that its output behavior can be made close to the behavior of a linear time-invariant system. In particular, proper design of the lowpass filter can achieve output response, which almost scales for different step reference commands. This property is relevant to applications with human operator in the loop (for example: control augmentation systems of piloted aircraft), since predictability of the system response is necessary for adequate performance of the operator. Next we present applications of the L1 adaptive output-feedback controller in two different fields of engineering: feedback control of human anesthesia, and ascent control of a NASA crew launch vehicle (CLV). The purpose of the feedback controller for anesthesia is to ensure that the patient's level of sedation during surgery follows a prespecified profile. The L1 controller is enabled by anesthesiologist after he/she achieves sufficient patient sedation level by introducing sedatives manually. This problem formulation requires safe switching mechanism, which avoids controller initialization transients. For this purpose, we used an L1 adaptive controller with special output predictor initialization routine

  3. Active member bridge feedback control for damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Lurie, Boris J.

    1992-01-01

    An active damping augmentation approach using active members in a structural system is described. The problem of maximizing the vibration damping in a lightly damped structural system is considered using the analogy of impedance matching between the load and source impedances in an electrical network. The proposed active damping augmentation approach therefore consists of finding the desired active member impedances that maximize the vibration damping, and designing a feedback control in order to achieve desired active member impedances. This study uses a bridge feedback concept that feeds back a combination of signals from sensors of the axial force and relative velocity across the active member to realize the desired active member impedance. The proposed active damping augmentation approach and bridge feedback concept were demonstrated on a three-longeron softly suspended truss structure.

  4. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  5. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  6. Output feedback control of a quadrotor UAV using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear controller for a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is proposed using neural networks (NNs) and output feedback. The assumption on the availability of UAV dynamics is not always practical, especially in an outdoor environment. Therefore, in this work, an NN is introduced to learn the complete dynamics of the UAV online, including uncertain nonlinear terms like aerodynamic friction and blade flapping. Although a quadrotor UAV is underactuated, a novel NN virtual control input scheme is proposed which allows all six degrees of freedom (DOF) of the UAV to be controlled using only four control inputs. Furthermore, an NN observer is introduced to estimate the translational and angular velocities of the UAV, and an output feedback control law is developed in which only the position and the attitude of the UAV are considered measurable. It is shown using Lyapunov theory that the position, orientation, and velocity tracking errors, the virtual control and observer estimation errors, and the NN weight estimation errors for each NN are all semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB) in the presence of bounded disturbances and NN functional reconstruction errors while simultaneously relaxing the separation principle. The effectiveness of proposed output feedback control scheme is then demonstrated in the presence of unknown nonlinear dynamics and disturbances, and simulation results are included to demonstrate the theoretical conjecture.

  7. Output-feedback control of reactive batch distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy-Loperena, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2000-02-01

    In this work, an output-feedback, control for the regulation of distillate purity via manipulations of the reflux ratio in reactive batch distillation is designed. The approach is based on an approximate model of the composition dynamics and makes use of a reduced-order observer to estimate the modeling error. An input/output linearizing feedback is proposed where the estimated modeling error is included to achieve robust tracking of a composition reference. It is shown that the resulting controller has the structure of a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller with antireset windup. The controller performance is tested using a simulation example including strong uncertainties in the reaction model. An interesting finding is that the required reflux ratio policy to reach asymptotically a constant reference resembles the reflux ratio policy obtained from posing an optimization technique.

  8. Force Feedback Control of Robotic Forceps for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Chiharu; Kamei, Yusuke

    2008-06-01

    Recently, the robotic surgical support systems are in clinical use for minimally invasive surgery. For improvement in operativity and safety of minimally invasive surgery, the development of haptic forceps manipulator is in demand to help surgeon's immersion and dexterity. We have developed a multi-DOF robotic forceps manipulator using a novel omni-directional bending mechanism, so far. In this paper, in order to control the developed robotic forceps as a slave manipulator, joy-stick type master manipulator with force feedback mechanism for remote control is designed and built, and force feedback bilateral control system was constructed for grasping and bending motions of the robotic forceps. Experimental works were carried out and experimental results showed the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  9. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  10. Stabilizing feedback control for dynamical systems with bounded uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutman, S.; Leitmann, G.

    1976-01-01

    The theories of differential games and generalized dynamic systems are used to deduce stabilizing controllers for quasi-linear systems. Attention is given to a class of dynamic systems subject to parameter and input uncertainty whose values range in a given compact set. Using a worst case design philosophy, a feedback control is derived that assures uniform asymptotic (Liapunov) stability of the origin under all admissible uncertainties.

  11. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  12. VFC - Variational Feedback Controller and its application to semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G.; Carcaterra, A.

    2016-08-01

    Active and semi-active control of oscillating devices and structures is a challenging field and this paper proposes an original investigation based on variational controls that can be successfully applied to mechanical systems. The method produces a general class of new controllers, named VFC - Variational Feedback Controllers, that is the main theoretical contribution of the paper. The value of the theory relies on using a reformulation of the Variational Optimal Control Theory, that has in general the limit of producing control program strategies and not directly feedback control methods. The difficulties are in fact related to the intrinsic nature of the variational optimal control, that must solve initial and final boundary conditions. A special definition of the class of the considered objective functions, permits to skip this difficulty, producing a pure feedback control. The presented theory goes beyond with respect to the most acknowledged LQR variational-based techniques, in that VFC can be applied to more general nonlinear dynamical systems, even with finite time horizon. To test the effectiveness of the novel approach in real engineering problems, a deep investigation on nonlinear suspension systems treated by VFC is proposed in this paper. To this aim, VFC is systematically compared with the most recent methods available in this field and suitable to deal with nonlinear system control of car suspensions. In particular, the comparative analysis is made in terms of both comfort and handling key performance indexes, that permits to easily and significantly compare different control logics, such as the Sky-hook and Ground-hook control families, the Acceleration and Power Driven Dampers. The results of this comparison are collected in a performance plane, having comfort and handling indexes as coordinate axes, showing that VFC controllers completely cover the regions reached by the other mentioned control logics in this plane, but reveal to have access to

  13. Model-based feedback control of a microfluidic electroporation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadami, M.; Mahjoob, M. J.; Shagoshtasbi, H.; Lee, Y.-K.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes new model-based feedback control method used for a single-cell microfluidic electroporation (EP) system. For this purpose, a new four-state nonlinear model has been developed to describe dynamics of a micro-channel electroporation system. EP measured current response is then used to verify the efficiency of the proposed new EP model. Consequently, two feedback control methods, namely, proportional-integral-derivative controller and model predictive controller have been applied to regulate the key states (i.e. transmembrane voltage (Vm) and nano-electropore radius (r)) in the EP model. Numerical simulations of static and dynamic responses of the two critical states, Vm and r, show that feedback control can improve the cell viability and EP efficiency compared to the open-loop system. In the experimental phase, a fabricated micro-EP chip with integrated Coulter counter is used to define the cell-size-dependent parameters of the EP model and electroporation of HeLa cells. In this phase, the EP model is also inserted into LabView software's environment to estimate the value of transmembrane voltage during the experiment. Variation of the external applied voltage derived from experimental result was in good adaptation with its equivalent theoretical values.

  14. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  15. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  16. Control of decoherence in open quantum systems using feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan

    Decoherence, which is caused due to the interaction of a quantum system with its environment plagues all quantum systems and leads to the loss of quantum properties that are vital for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this work we propose a novel strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done so. A novel construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Almost all the earlier work on decoherence control employ density matrix and stochastic master equations to analyze the problem. Our approach to decoherence control involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with non-trivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and Decoherence Free Subspaces (DFS). Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. The two concepts are contrasted and an improved theory of disturbance decoupling for general input affine systems is developed. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system has to be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. Finally the results are also shown to be superior to the ones obtained via master equations. In order to apply feedback a reliable information extraction scheme is presented that employs continuous indirect measurements with the help of a quantum probe. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform

  17. Ultrasensitive Negative Feedback Control: A Natural Approach for the Design of Synthetic Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, Francesco; Akman, Ozgur E.; Soyer, Orkun S.; Bates, Declan G.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the most important potential applications of Synthetic Biology will require the ability to design and implement high performance feedback control systems that can accurately regulate the dynamics of multiple molecular species within the cell. Here, we argue that the use of design strategies based on combining ultrasensitive response dynamics with negative feedback represents a natural approach to this problem that fully exploits the strongly nonlinear nature of cellular information processing. We propose that such feedback mechanisms can explain the adaptive responses observed in one of the most widely studied biomolecular feedback systems—the yeast osmoregulatory response network. Based on our analysis of such system, we identify strong links with a well-known branch of mathematical systems theory from the field of Control Engineering, known as Sliding Mode Control. These insights allow us to develop design guidelines that can inform the construction of feedback controllers for synthetic biological systems. PMID:27537373

  18. An elbow joint movement control model with visual feedback.

    PubMed

    Xiao, S; Li, X

    1997-01-01

    A motor program generator control model is proposed to simulate neuromuscular control. Three muscles (Biceps, Triceps, Brachialis) driving elbow joint flexion in a plane are simulated by integrating their nonlinear dynamic property and spinal neural circuitry. The motor descending commands are described by a visual feedback signal from the joint and an excitation signal for the motor neuron pool. The visual feedback signal mimics the gamma command whereas the excitation signal mimics another descending co-activation command. The gamma command is expressed as the output of a PID controller with the visual feedback error signal as the input. The gamma command and the motoneuron pool background activity are the inputs to the motoneuron pool model coupled with the Renshaw cell recurrent inhibitions. The output of the motoneuron pool model mimics the alpha command feeding directly to the muscle dynamics. A movement is produced by reducing the error signal between goal position and actual position and altering excitation signal properly. The simulation results show that a burst pattern of excitation signal and a PID controller can accurately trace the terminal goal and generate a smooth movement with a bell shaped velocity profile. The muscle activation signals have the characteristic similar to the smoothed EMG. Changing different parameters of the PID can cause the same effects as the stimulus pulse intensity or duration modulation.

  19. An integrated optical sensor for GMAW feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.L.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Smartt, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    The integrated optical sensor (IOS) is a multifunction feedback control sensor for arc welding, that is computer automated and independent of significant operator interaction. It is based on three major off-the-shelf'' components: a charged coupled device (CCD) camera, a diode laser, and a processing computer. The sensor head is compact and lightweight to avoid interference with weld head mobility, hardened to survive the harsh operating environment, and free of specialized cooling and power requirements. The sensor is positioned behind the GMAW torch and measures weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and postweld centerline cooling rate. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint, thus allowing compensation for such phenomena as arc blow. Sensor stand off distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to infer the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby providing a means of controlling post weld mechanical properties.

  20. An integrated optical sensor for GMAW feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.L.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Smartt, H.B.

    1992-08-01

    The integrated optical sensor (IOS) is a multifunction feedback control sensor for arc welding, that is computer automated and independent of significant operator interaction. It is based on three major ``off-the-shelf`` components: a charged coupled device (CCD) camera, a diode laser, and a processing computer. The sensor head is compact and lightweight to avoid interference with weld head mobility, hardened to survive the harsh operating environment, and free of specialized cooling and power requirements. The sensor is positioned behind the GMAW torch and measures weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and postweld centerline cooling rate. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint, thus allowing compensation for such phenomena as arc blow. Sensor stand off distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to infer the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby providing a means of controlling post weld mechanical properties.

  1. Decoherence control in open quantum systems via classical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-03-01

    In this work we propose a strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done. A construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Our approach to decoherence control in contrast to other approaches in the literature involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with nontrivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and decoherence free subspaces. Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system must be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. In the subsequent section we discuss a general information extraction scheme to gain knowledge of the state and the amount of decoherence based on indirect continuous measurement. The analysis of continuous measurement on a decohering quantum system has not been extensively studied before. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free quantum computing. The results obtained are qualitatively different and superior to the ones obtained via master equations.

  2. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  3. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  4. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1990-05-02

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level. 2 figs.

  5. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  6. Feedback control of subcritical Turing instability with zero mode.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Kanevsky, Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2009-04-01

    A global feedback control of a system that exhibits a subcritical monotonic instability at a nonzero wave number (short-wave or Turing instability) in the presence of a zero mode is investigated using a Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to an equation for the zero mode. This system is studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that feedback control, based on measuring the maximum of the pattern amplitude over the domain, can stabilize the system and lead to the formation of localized unipulse stationary states or traveling solitary waves. It is found that the unipulse traveling structures result from an instability of the stationary unipulse structures when one of the parameters characterizing the coupling between the periodic pattern and the zero mode exceeds a critical value that is determined by the zero mode damping coefficient.

  7. Conformal grasping using feedback controlled bubble actuator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Wei; Stein, Richard; Mittal, Manoj; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an implementation of a bubble actuator array (BAA) based active robotic skin, a modular system, onto existing low cost robotic end-effectors or prosthetic hands for conformal grasping of objects. The active skin is comprised of pneumatically controlled polyurethane rubber bubbles with overlaid sensors for feedback control. Sensor feedback allows the BAA based robotic skin to conformally grasp an object with an explicit uniform force distribution. The bubble actuator array reported here is capable of applying up to 4N of force at each point of contact and tested for conformally grasping objects with a radius of curvature up to 57.15mm. Once integrated onto a two-finger gripper with one degree of freedom (DOF), the active skin was shown to reduce point of contact forces of up to 50% for grasped objects.

  8. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  9. A model for reverberating circuits with controlled feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa de Freitas; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Wedemann, Roseli Suzi; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2015-12-01

    We studied the behavior of a mathematic-computational model for a reverberating neuronal circuit with controlled feedback, verifying the output pattern of the circuit, by means simulations using a program in language C++. Using values obtained from surveying the literature from animal experiments, we observed that the model was able to reproduce the polissynaptic activity of a neuron group of a vigil rat, with looping time of three neurons of the order of magnitude of 102 ms.

  10. Feedback-Controlled LED Photobioreactor for Photophysiological Studies of Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Melnicki, Matthew R.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Stolyar, Sergey; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2013-04-09

    A custom photobioreactor (PBR) was designed to enable automatic light adjustments using computerized feedback control. A black anodized aluminum enclosure, constructed to surround the borosilicate reactor vessel, prevents the transmission of ambient light and serves as a mount for arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The high-output LEDs provide narrow-band light of either 630 or 680 nm for preferential excitation of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting pigments, phycobilin or chlorophyll a, respectively. Custom developed software BioLume provides automatic control of optical properties and a computer feedback loop can automatically adjust the incident irradiance as necessary to maintain a fixed transmitted light through the culture, based on user-determined set points. This feedback control serves to compensate for culture dynamics which have optical effects, (e.g., changing cell density, pigment adaptations) and thus can determine the appropriate light conditions for physiological comparisons or to cultivate light-sensitive strains, without prior analyses. The LED PBR may also be controlled as a turbidostat, using a feedback loop to continuously adjust the rate of media-dilution based on the transmitted light measurements, with a fast and precise response. This cultivation system gains further merit as a high-performance analytical device, using non-invasive tools (e.g., dissolved gas sensors, online mass spectrometry) to automate real-time measurements, thus permitting unsupervised experiments to search for optimal growth conditions, to monitor physiological responses to perturbations, as well as to quantitate photophysiological parameters using an in situ light-saturation response routine.

  11. Task driven feedback control of robot arms - A step toward intelligent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Tarn, T. J.; Li, Z. F.

    1986-01-01

    The process of connecting task descriptions originating from machine intelligence planning programs to the mechanization of feedback control of robot arms is analyzed. It is shown in this paper that control theories and practices can be extended to a higher level where feedback control of robot arms directly can respond to work space task commands provided that the work space task as a command is given in the form of a closed function of time. A general mathematical procedure using tools from differential geometry is introduced for synthesizing task space motion planning so that the planned motion can be used as a direct input to the robot arm feedback control system to achieve desired robot hand motion. By definition, 'intelligent control' is being manifested through robot performance in the task space relative to task space commands. Thus, the capability of implementing feedback control of robot arms directly driven by appropriate task descriptions in the workspace as commands is a step toward intelligent control.

  12. Output feedback sliding mode control under networked environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Lam, James; Xia, Yuanqing

    2013-04-01

    This article considers the problem of sliding mode output feedback control for networked control systems (NCSs). The key idea is to make use of not only the current and previous measurements, but also previous inputs for the reconstruction of the state variables. Using this idea, sliding mode controllers are designed for systems with constant or time-varying network delay. The approach is not only more practical but also easy to implement. To illustrate this, the design technique is applied to an inverted pendulum system.

  13. Fiber optic sensor: Feedback control design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, D.; Bertram, L.; Hillaire, R.; Anderson, S.; Leonard, S.; Marburger, S.

    1997-07-01

    Digital feedback control of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) has been demonstrated on a tube sample of stainless steel and titanium alloy. A fiber optic sensor returns a signal proportional to backside radiance from the workpiece; that signal is used by the controller to compute a compensation weld current. The controller executes 10 times a second on an Intel 486 chip. For travel speeds of 3 to 6 inches per minute and thicknesses between 0.025 and 0.10 inches, constant backside bead width was maintained within 0.02 inches, from startup to tie-in.

  14. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  15. Control and regulation of pathways via negative feedback

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The biochemical networks found in living organisms include a huge variety of control mechanisms at multiple levels of organization. While the mechanistic and molecular details of many of these control mechanisms are understood, their exact role in driving cellular behaviour is not. For example, yeast glycolysis has been studied for almost 80 years but it is only recently that we have come to understand the systemic role of the multitude of feedback and feed-forward controls that exist in this pathway. In this article, control theory is discussed as an approach to dissect the control logic of complex pathways. One of the key issues is distinguishing between the terms control and regulation and how these concepts are applied to regulated enzymes such as phosphofructokinase. In doing so, one of the paradoxes in metabolic regulation can be resolved where enzymes such as phosphofructokinase have little control but, nevertheless, possess significant regulatory influence. PMID:28202588

  16. Active Feedback Control of a Web Flutter Using Flow Control Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Hara, Kensuke

    This paper develops a non-contact active feedback control of web flutter in a narrow passage by using movable plates set at inlet and outlet of the passage. The strategy of this active feedback control is based on the flow-control which cancels the exciting fluid force acting on the web, i.e., cancels the self-excited feedback mechanism. In this paper, suppression of the web flutter by the active feedback control is demonstrated experimentally. In the experiments, a web (film), as a controlled object, is subjected to air flow in a narrow passage. The web flutter occurs to the web in the translational motion over the critical flow velocity. And the web flutter is actively controlled and suppressed by the movable plate motion which changes the air flow in the passage. The critical flow velocity under controlled condition is examined with changing the controller gain and phase-shift between the web motion and the movable plate motion. As a result, it is indicated that the active feedback control increases the critical flow velocity, and suppress the web flutter effectively. Moreover, the control performance is examined experimentally, and stabilization mechanism by the active feedback control is discussed.

  17. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  18. Neural substrates of visuomotor learning based on improved feedback control and prediction.

    PubMed

    Grafton, Scott T; Schmitt, Paul; Van Horn, John; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2008-02-01

    Motor skills emerge from learning feedforward commands as well as improvements in feedback control. These two components of learning were investigated in a compensatory visuomotor tracking task on a trial-by-trial basis. Between-trial learning was characterized with a state-space model to provide smoothed estimates of feedforward and feedback learning, separable from random fluctuations in motor performance and error. The resultant parameters were correlated with brain activity using magnetic resonance imaging. Learning related to the generation of a feedforward command correlated with activity in dorsal premotor cortex, inferior parietal lobule, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area, supporting a role of these areas in retrieving and executing a predictive motor command. Modulation of feedback control was associated with activity in bilateral posterior superior parietal lobule as well as right ventral premotor cortex. Performance error correlated with activity in a widespread cortical and subcortical network including bilateral parietal, premotor and rostral anterior cingulate cortex as well as the cerebellar cortex. Finally, trial-by-trial changes of kinematics, as measured by mean absolute hand acceleration, correlated with activity in motor cortex and anterior cerebellum. The results demonstrate that incremental, learning-dependent changes can be modeled on a trial-by-trial basis and neural substrates for feedforward control of novel motor programs are localized to secondary motor areas.

  19. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  20. Disturbance-free phase-shifting laser diode interferometer using adaptive feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takamasa; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Osami

    2009-10-10

    A feedback-control-equipped phase-shifting laser diode interferometer that eliminates external disturbance is proposed. The feedback loop is stabilized by adaptive control of the polarity of the interference signal. Conventional phase-shifting interferometry can be used with the feedback control, resulting in simplified signal processing and accurate measurement. Several experiments confirm the stability of the feedback control with a measurement repeatability of 1.8 nm.

  1. Feedback Control of Vibrations in a Micromachined Cantilever Beam with Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1998-06-01

    The problem of feedback control of vibrations in a micromachined cantilever beam with nonlinear electrostatic actuators is considered. Various forms of nonlinear feedback controls depending on localized spatial averages of the beam velocity and displacement near the beam tip are derived by considering the time rate-of-change of the total energy of the beam. The physical implementation of the derived feedback controls is discussed briefly. The dynamic behaviour of the beam with the derived feedback controls is determined by computer simulation.

  2. Processes controlling Southern Ocean cloud-climate feedbacks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, J. E.; Medeiros, B.; Hwang, Y.; Gettelman, A.

    2013-12-01

    We use a fully coupled climate model (CESM) to identify processes controlling intriguingly diverse Southern Ocean cloud feedbacks in response to increased greenhouse gas forcing. Modeled Southern Ocean cloud-climate feedbacks range from the most positive (enhancing greenhouse warming at ~40 degrees South) to the most negative (damping greenhouse warming at ~60 degrees South) on the planet. As greenhouse gas concentrations increase, Antarctic sea ice loss, warming, and a poleward stormtrack shift/sub-tropical expansion all modify Southern Ocean clouds. Our analysis shows that Southern Ocean clouds are controlled both by thermodynamics (cloud changes for a given subsidence rate) and by dynamics (changes in subsidence rates). Hinting at the importance of thermodynamics, absorbed shortwave radiation over the Southern Ocean is substantially more affected by increased greenhouse gas forcing than by a poleward stormtrack shift in the absence of greenhouse forcing. While we find CESM a useful tool, CESM has substantial Southern Ocean biases (e.g., excessive Antarctic sea ice, excessive absorbed shortwave radiation). Thus, we also assess the impact that these biases have on the realism of CESM Southern Ocean cloud-climate greenhouse feedbacks.

  3. Temporal control and compensation for perturbed voicing feedback

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuya, Takashi; MacDonald, Ewen N.; Munhall, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research employing a real-time auditory perturbation paradigm has shown that talkers monitor their own speech attributes such as fundamental frequency, vowel intensity, vowel formants, and fricative noise as part of speech motor control. In the case of vowel formants or fricative noise, what was manipulated is spectral information about the filter function of the vocal tract. However, segments can be contrasted by parameters other than spectral configuration. It is possible that the feedback system monitors phonation timing in the way it does spectral information. This study examined whether talkers exhibit a compensatory behavior when manipulating information about voicing. When talkers received feedback of the cognate of the intended voicing category (saying “tipper” while hearing “dipper” or vice versa), they changed the voice onset time and in some cases the following vowel. PMID:24815278

  4. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  5. Biomimetic Hybrid Feedback Feedforward Neural-Network Learning Control.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Yu, Haoyong

    2016-03-30

    This brief presents a biomimetic hybrid feedback feedforward neural-network learning control (NNLC) strategy inspired by the human motor learning control mechanism for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The control structure includes a proportional-derivative controller acting as a feedback servo machine and a radial-basis-function (RBF) NN acting as a feedforward predictive machine. Under the sufficient constraints on control parameters, the closed-loop system achieves semiglobal practical exponential stability, such that an accurate NN approximation is guaranteed in a local region along recurrent reference traj- ectories. Compared with the existing NNLC methods, the novelties of the proposed method include: 1) the implementation of an adaptive NN control to guarantee plant states being recurrent is not needed, since recurrent reference signals rather than plant states are utilized as NN inputs, which greatly simplifies the analysis and synthesis of the NNLC and 2) the domain of NN approximation can be determined a priori by the given reference signals, which leads to an easy construction of the RBF-NNs. Simulation results have verified the effectiveness of this approach.

  6. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  7. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  8. Effect of delay mismatch in Pyragas feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purewal, A. S.; Postlethwaite, C. M.; Krauskopf, B.

    2014-11-01

    Pyragas time-delayed feedback is a control scheme designed to stabilize unstable periodic orbits, which occur naturally in many nonlinear dynamical systems. It has been successfully implemented in a number of applications, including lasers and chemical systems. The control scheme targets a specific unstable periodic orbit by adding a feedback term with a delay chosen as the period of the unstable periodic orbit. However, in an experimental or industrial environment, obtaining the exact period or setting the delay equal to the exact period of the target periodic orbit may be difficult. This could be due to a number of factors, such as incomplete information on the system or the delay being set by inaccurate equipment. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of Pyragas control on the prototypical generic subcritical Hopf normal form when the delay is close to but not equal to the period of the target periodic orbit. Specifically, we consider two cases: first, a constant, and second, a linear approximation of the period. We compare these two cases to the case where the delay is set exactly to the target period, which serves as the benchmark case. For this comparison, we construct bifurcation diagrams and determine any regions where a stable periodic orbit close to the target is stabilized by the control scheme. In this way, we find that at least a linear approximation of the period is required for successful stabilization by Pyragas control.

  9. Gantry cranes gain scheduling feedback control with friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Hanafy M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2005-03-01

    We designed a controller based on gain-scheduling feedback to move a load on a gantry crane from point to point within one oscillation cycle and without inducing large swings. The settling time of the system is taken to be equal to the period of oscillation of the load. This criterion enables calculation of the controller feedback gains for varying load weight and cable length. Numerical simulations show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time compared with that of optimal control. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction, and then applied an opposite control action to cancel it. To estimate the friction force, we assumed a mathematical model, and then we estimated the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, such as the method of least squares (LS). First, the process of identification is applied to a theoretical model of a DC motor with known friction coefficients. From this example, some guidelines and rules are deduced for the choice of the LS parameters. Then, the friction coefficients of the gantry crane model are estimated and validated.

  10. State feedback control of switched linear systems: An LMI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, V. F.; Leite, V. J. S.; Oliveira, R. C. L. F.; Peres, P. L. D.

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of state feedback control of continuous-time switched linear systems with arbitrary switching rules. A quadratic Lyapunov function with a common matrix is used to derive a stabilizing switching control strategy that guarantees: (i) the assignment of all the eigenvalues of each linear subsystem inside a chosen circle in the left-hand half of the complex plane; (ii) a minimum disturbance attenuation level for the closed-loop switched system. The proposed design conditions are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities that encompass previous results based on quadratic stability conditions with fixed control gains. Although the quadratic stability based on a fixed Lyapunov matrix has been widely used in robust control design, the use of this condition to provide a convex design method for switching feedback gains has not been fully investigated. Numerical examples show that the switching control strategy can cope with more stringent design specifications than the fixed gain strategy, being useful to improve the performance of this class of systems.

  11. Reinforcement learning output feedback NN control using deterministic learning technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Chenguang; Shi, Zhongke

    2014-03-01

    In this brief, a novel adaptive-critic-based neural network (NN) controller is investigated for nonlinear pure-feedback systems. The controller design is based on the transformed predictor form, and the actor-critic NN control architecture includes two NNs, whereas the critic NN is used to approximate the strategic utility function, and the action NN is employed to minimize both the strategic utility function and the tracking error. A deterministic learning technique has been employed to guarantee that the partial persistent excitation condition of internal states is satisfied during tracking control to a periodic reference orbit. The uniformly ultimate boundedness of closed-loop signals is shown via Lyapunov stability analysis. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control.

  12. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Strehober, David A; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component q(i)(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference q(i)(t)-q(i)(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic.

  13. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  14. Nonlinear feedback control and trajectory tracking of vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassi, Younés; Ait-Amirat, Youcef; Outbib, Rachid

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly studies nonlinear feedback control applied to the nonlinear vehicle dynamics with varying velocity. The main objective of this study is the stabilisation of longitudinal, lateral and yaw angular vehicle velocities. To this end, a nonlinear vehicle model is developed which takes both the lateral and longitudinal vehicle dynamics into account. Based on this model, a method to build a nonlinear state feedback control is first designed by which the complexity of system structure can be simplified. The obtained system is then synthesised by the combined Lyapunov-LaSalle method. The simulation results show that the proposed control can improve stability and comfort of vehicle driving. Moreover, this paper presents a lemma which ensures the trajectory tracking and path-following problem for vehicle. It can also be exploited simultaneously to solve both the tracking and path-following control problems of the vehicle ride and driving stability. We also show how the results of the lemma can be applied to solve the path-following problem, in which the vehicle converges and follows a designed path. The effectiveness of the proposed lemma for trajectory tracking is clearly demonstrated by simulation results.

  15. Decoupling suspension controller based on magnetic flux feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced.

  16. Controller Design for EMA in TVC Incorporating Force Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinstock, Dale E.; Scott, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop control schemes and control design procedures for electromechanical actuators (EMA) in thrust vector control (TVC) applications. For a variety of reasons, there is a tendency within the aerospace community to use electromechanical actuators in applications where hydraulics have traditionally been employed. TVC of rocket engines is one such application. However, there is considerable research, development, and testing to be done before EMA will be accepted by the community at large for these types of applications. Besides the development of design procedures for the basic position controller, two major concerns are dealt with in this research by incorporating force feedback: 1) the effects of resonance on the performance of EMA-TVC-rocket-engine systems, and 2) the effects of engine start transients on EMA. This report only highlights the major contributions of this research.

  17. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  18. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure.

  19. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  20. Effect of vibrotactile feedback on an EMG-based proportional cursor control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunchong; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been introduced into the bio-mechatronics systems, however, most of them are lack of the sensory feedback. In this paper, the effect of vibrotactile feedback for a myoelectric cursor control system is investigated quantitatively. Simultaneous and proportional control signals are extracted from EMG using a muscle synergy model. Different types of feedback including vibrotactile feedback and visual feedback are added, assessed and compared with each other. The results show that vibrotactile feedback is capable of improving the performance of EMG-based human machine interface.

  1. Delayed feedback control experiments on some flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guo-Ping; Chen, Long-Xiang

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, studies on delayed system dynamics have attracted increasing attention and advances have been achieved in stability, nonlinearity, delay identification, delay elimination and application. However, most of the existing work is on the theoretical basis and little is on the experiment. This paper presents our experimental studies on delayed feedback control conducted in recent years with the focus on the discussion of a DSP-based delayed experiment system. Some phenomena in our delay experiments are discussed and a few topics of interest for further research are brought forward.

  2. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  3. A Nonlinear Optimal Control Design using Narrowband Perturbation Feedback for Magnetostrictive Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    A Nonlinear Optimal Control Design using Narrowband Perturbation Feedback for Magnetostrictive Actuators William S. Oates1, Rick Zrostlik2, Scott...Abstract Nonlinear optimal and narrowband feedback control designs are developed and experimentally implemented on a magnetostrictive Terfenol-D...utilizing narrowband feedback. A narrowband filter is implemented by treating the nonlinear and hysteretic magnetostrictive constitutive behavior as

  4. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  5. A lightweight feedback-controlled microdrive for chronic neural recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovalekic, A.; Cavé-Lopez, S.; Canopoli, A.; Ondracek, J. M.; Nager, A.; Vyssotski, A. L.; Hahnloser, R. H. R.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Chronic neural recordings have provided many insights into the relationship between neural activity and behavior. We set out to develop a miniaturized motorized microdrive that allows precise electrode positioning despite possibly unreliable motors. Approach. We designed a feedback-based motor control mechanism. It contains an integrated position readout from an array of magnets and a Hall sensor. Main results. Our extremely lightweight (<1 g) motorized microdrive allows remote positioning of both metal electrodes and glass pipettes along one motorized axis. Target locations can be defined with a range of 6 mm and they can be reached within 1 µm precision. The incorporated headstage electronics are capable of both extracellular and intracellular recordings. We include a simple mechanism for repositioning electrodes in three dimensions and for replacing them during operation. We present neural data from different premotor areas of adult and juvenile zebra finches. Significance. Our findings show that feedback-based microdrive control requires little extra size and weight, suggesting that such control can be incorporated into more complex multi-electrode designs.

  6. Robust ?dynamic output feedback control of networked control systems with congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasool, Faiz; Kiong Ngaung, Sing

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates a robust ?dynamic output feedback controller for networked control systems (NCSs) with a simple congestion control scheme. This scheme enables the NCSs design to enjoy advantages of both time-triggered and event-triggered systems. The proposed scheme compares current measurement with last transmitted measurement. If difference between them is less than a prescribed percentage of the current measurements then no measurement is transmitted to controller and the controller always uses the last transmitted measurements to calculate feedback gains. Moreover, this technique is applied to controller output as well. The stability criteria for closed-loop system is formulated using the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach. The sufficient conditions for the controller are given in terms of solvability of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). These BMIs are converted into quasi-convex linear matrix inequalities that are solved using the cone complementarity linearisation algorithm. A simulation example is used to evaluate how effective the simple congestion control scheme is in reducing network bandwidth.

  7. Exploring teleimpedance and tactile feedback for intuitive control of the Pisa/IIT SoftHand.

    PubMed

    Ajoudani, Arash; Godfrey, Sasha B; Bianchi, Matteo; Catalano, Manuel G; Grioli, Giorgio; Tsagarakis, Nikos; Bicchi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a teleimpedance controller with tactile feedback for more intuitive control of the Pisa/IIT SoftHand. With the aim to realize a robust, efficient and low-cost hand prosthesis design, the SoftHand is developed based on the motor control principle of synergies, through which the immense complexity of the hand is simplified into distinct motor patterns. Due to the built-in flexibility of the hand joints, as the SoftHand grasps, it follows a synergistic path while allowing grasping of objects of various shapes using only a single motor. The DC motor of the hand incorporates a novel teleimpedance control in which the user's postural and stiffness synergy references are tracked in real-time. In addition, for intuitive control of the hand, two tactile interfaces are developed. The first interface (mechanotactile) exploits a disturbance observer which estimates the interaction forces in contact with the grasped object. Estimated interaction forces are then converted and applied to the upper arm of the user via a custom made pressure cuff. The second interface employs vibrotactile feedback based on surface irregularities and acceleration signals and is used to provide the user with information about the surface properties of the object as well as detection of object slippage while grasping. Grasp robustness and intuitiveness of hand control were evaluated in two sets of experiments. Results suggest that incorporating the aforementioned haptic feedback strategies, together with user-driven compliance of the hand, facilitate execution of safe and stable grasps, while suggesting that a low-cost, robust hand employing hardware-based synergies might be a good alternative to traditional myoelectric prostheses.

  8. Time-delayed quantum coherent Pyragas feedback control of photon squeezing in a degenerate parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Manuel; Hein, Sven M.; Lehnert, Judith; Schöll, Eckehard; Hughes, Stephen; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherent feedback control is a measurement-free control method fully preserving quantum coherence. In this paper we show how time-delayed quantum coherent feedback can be used to control the degree of squeezing in the output field of a cavity containing a degenerate parametric oscillator. We focus on the specific situation of Pyragas-type feedback control where time-delayed signals are fed back directly into the quantum system. Our results show how time-delayed feedback can enhance or decrease the degree of squeezing as a function of time delay and feedback strength.

  9. Feedback control of electrode offset voltage during functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun-Uk; Song, Kang-Il; Shon, Ahnsei; Han, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Hwang, Dosik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Choi, Kuiwon; Youn, Inchan

    2013-08-15

    Control of the electrode offset voltage is an important issue related to the processes of functional electrical stimulation because excess charge accumulation over time damages both the tissue and the electrodes. This paper proposes a new feedback control scheme to regulate the electrode offset voltage to a predetermined reference value. The electrode offset voltage was continuously monitored using a sample-and-hold (S/H) circuit during stimulation and non-stimulation periods. The stimulation current was subsequently adjusted using a proportional-integral (PI) controller to minimise the error between the reference value and the electrode offset voltage. During the stimulation period, the electrode offset voltage was maintained through the S/H circuit, and the PI controller did not affect the amplitude of the stimulation current. In contrast, during the non-stimulation period, the electrode offset voltage was sampled through the S/H circuit and rapidly regulated through the PI controller. The experimental results obtained using a nerve cuff electrode showed that the electrode offset voltage was successfully controlled in terms of the performance specifications, such as the steady- and transient-state responses and the constraint of the controller output. Therefore, the proposed control scheme can potentially be used in various nerve stimulation devices and applications requiring control of the electrode offset voltage.

  10. Algorithms for automatic feedback control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Karthik

    This thesis focuses on deriving algorithmic frameworks for the control of Aerodynamic Phenomena. The application of one such control law to the control of Flutter is discussed in detail. Flutter is an aero-structural instability that arises due to the adverse transfer of energy between the airplane structure and the surrounding fluid. CFD is now a mature technology and can be used as a design tool in addition to being used as an analysis tool. This is the motivation for much of the research that takes place at the Aerospace Computing Lab at Stanford. Shape optimization involves finding the shape (2-d or 3-d) that optimizes a certain performance index. Clearly, any optimum shape will be optimum only at the design point. It has been found that the aerodynamic performance at neighboring operating points is a lot less optimal than the original shapes. What we need to do is to design and develop a feasible way of controlling the flow at any operating point such that the resulting performance is optimal. In designing control laws, our philosophy has been to develop an algorithmic framework that enables treating a broad class of control problems rather than design control laws for specific isolated cases. This ensures that once a framework is established, extensions to particular problems can be done with very little effort. The framework we develop is problem independent and controller independent. Moreover, it has been shown that this leads to control laws that are feedback based, hence robust.

  11. On control and synchronization in chaotic and hyperchaotic systems via linear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Marat; Balthazar, José Manoel

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents the control and synchronization of chaos by designing linear feedback controllers. The linear feedback control problem for nonlinear systems has been formulated under optimal control theory viewpoint. Asymptotic stability of the closed-loop nonlinear system is guaranteed by means of a Lyapunov function which can clearly be seen to be the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation thus guaranteeing both stability and optimality. The formulated theorem expresses explicitly the form of minimized functional and gives the sufficient conditions that allow using the linear feedback control for nonlinear system. The numerical simulations were provided in order to show the effectiveness of this method for the control of the chaotic Rössler system and synchronization of the hyperchaotic Rössler system.

  12. Automatic Overset Grid Generation with Heuristic Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Peter I.

    2001-01-01

    An advancing front grid generation system for structured Overset grids is presented which automatically modifies Overset structured surface grids and control lines until user-specified grid qualities are achieved. The system is demonstrated on two examples: the first refines a space shuttle fuselage control line until global truncation error is achieved; the second advances, from control lines, the space shuttle orbiter fuselage top and fuselage side surface grids until proper overlap is achieved. Surface grids are generated in minutes for complex geometries. The system is implemented as a heuristic feedback control (HFC) expert system which iteratively modifies the input specifications for Overset control line and surface grids. It is developed as an extension of modern control theory, production rules systems and subsumption architectures. The methodology provides benefits over the full knowledge lifecycle of an expert system for knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and knowledge execution. The vector/matrix framework of modern control theory systematically acquires and represents expert system knowledge. Missing matrix elements imply missing expert knowledge. The execution of the expert system knowledge is performed through symbolic execution of the matrix algebra equations of modern control theory. The dot product operation of matrix algebra is generalized for heuristic symbolic terms. Constant time execution is guaranteed.

  13. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  14. Robust Nonlinear Feedback Control of Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.; Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on the research performed under NASA Glen grant NASA/NAG-3-1975 concerning feedback control of the Pratt & Whitney (PW) STF 952, a twin spool, mixed flow, after burning turbofan engine. The research focussed on the design of linear and gain-scheduled, multivariable inner-loop controllers for the PW turbofan engine using H-infinity and linear, parameter-varying (LPV) control techniques. The nonlinear turbofan engine simulation was provided by PW within the NASA Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) simulation software environment. ROCETS was used to generate linearized models of the turbofan engine for control design and analysis as well as the simulation environment to evaluate the performance and robustness of the controllers. Comparison between the H-infinity, and LPV controllers are made with the baseline multivariable controller and developed by Pratt & Whitney engineers included in the ROCETS simulation. Simulation results indicate that H-infinity and LPV techniques effectively achieve desired response characteristics with minimal cross coupling between commanded values and are very robust to unmodeled dynamics and sensor noise.

  15. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics.

  16. Observation, control, and modal analysis of longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS via a digital feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Claus, R.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Prabhakar, S.; Ross, W.; Teytelman, D.; Drago, A.; Serio, M.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Stover, G.

    1997-01-01

    The operation of a longitudinal multibunch damping system using digital signal processing (DSP) techniques is shown via measurements from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS). The feedback system (developed for use by PEP-II, ALS, and DA{Phi}NE) uses a parallel array of signal processors to implement a bunch-by-bunch feedback system for sampling rates up to 500 MHz. The programmable DSP system allows feedback control as well as accelerator diagnostics. A diagnostic technique is illustrated which uses the DSP system to excite and then damp the beam. The resulting 12-ms time domain transient is Fourier analyzed to provide the simultaneous measurement of growth rates and damping rates of all unstable coupled-bunch beam modes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Multiobjective controller synthesis via eigenstructure assignment with state feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Lam, James

    2016-10-01

    A general parameter scheme for multiobjective controller synthesis via eigenstructure assignment with state feedback is proposed. The scheme provides total pole configurability, that is, pole assignment constraints, partial pole assignment constraints, generalised regional pole assignment constraints can be dealt with simultaneously without introducing essential conservatism. The scheme is derived from the pole assignment approach using Sylvester equations, and the parameter space is the Cartesian product of some subspaces characterising the free parameters. Under the scheme, the controller design problems are formulated as nonlinear optimisation problems with both objectives and constraints being differentiable and can be solved by derivative-based nonlinear programming technique. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Acceleration Sensing, Feedback Cooling, and Nonlinear Dynamics with Nanoscale Cavity-Optomechanical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Alexander Grey

    Light has long been used for the precise measurement of moving bodies, but the burgeoning field of optomechanics is concerned with the interaction of light and matter in a regime where the typically weak radiation pressure force of light is able to push back on the moving object. This field began with the realization in the late 1960's that the momentum imparted by a recoiling photon on a mirror would place fundamental limits on the smallest measurable displacement of that mirror. This coupling between the frequency of light and the motion of a mechanical object does much more than simply add noise, however. It has been used to cool objects to their quantum ground state, demonstrate electromagnetically-induced-transparency, and modify the damping and spring constant of the resonator. Amazingly, these radiation pressure effects have now been demonstrated in systems ranging 18 orders of magnitude in mass (kg to fg). In this work we will focus on three diverse experiments in three different optomechanical devices which span the fields of inertial sensors, closed-loop feedback, and nonlinear dynamics. The mechanical elements presented cover 6 orders of magnitude in mass (ng to fg), but they all employ nano-scale photonic crystals to trap light and resonantly enhance the light-matter interaction. In the first experiment we take advantage of the sub-femtometer displacement resolution of our photonic crystals to demonstrate a sensitive chip-scale optical accelerometer with a kHz-frequency mechanical resonator. This sensor has a noise density of approximately 10 micro-g/rt-Hz over a useable bandwidth of approximately 20 kHz and we demonstrate at least 50 dB of linear dynamic sensor range. We also discuss methods to further improve performance of this device by a factor of 10. In the second experiment, we used a closed-loop measurement and feedback system to damp and cool a room-temperature MHz-frequency mechanical oscillator from a phonon occupation of 6.5 million down to

  19. Assessing Vibrotactile Feedback Strategies by Controlling a Cursor with Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Kristin M.; Card, Nicholas S.; Whaite, Stephen M.; Mischel, Jessica; Loughlin, Patrick; Batista, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) control predominately uses visual feedback. Real arm movements, however, are controlled under a diversity of feedback mechanisms. The lack of additional BCI feedback modalities forces users to maintain visual contact while performing tasks. Such stringent requirements result in poor BCI control during tasks that inherently lack visual feedback, such as grasping, or when visual attention is diverted. Using a modified version of the Critical Tracking Task [1] which we call the Critical Stability Task (CST), we tested the ability of 9 human subjects to control an unstable system using either free arm movements or pinch force. The subjects were provided either visual feedback, ‘proportional’ vibrotactile feedback, or ‘on-off’ vibrotactile feedback about the state of the unstable system. We increased the difficulty of the control task by making the virtual system more unstable. We judged the effectiveness of a particular form of feedback as the maximal instability the system could reach before the subject lost control of it. We found three main results. First, subjects can use solely vibrotactile feedback to control an unstable system, although control was better using visual feedback. Second, ‘proportional’ vibrotactile feedback provided slightly better control than ‘on-off’ vibrotactile feedback. Third, there was large intra-subject variability in terms of the most effective input and feedback methods. This highlights the need to tailor the input and feedback methods to the subject when a high degree of control is desired. Our new task can provide a complement to traditional center-out paradigms to help boost the real-world relevance of BCI research in the lab. PMID:25570520

  20. Assessing vibrotactile feedback strategies by controlling a cursor with unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Quick, Kristin M; Card, Nicholas S; Whaite, Stephen M; Mischel, Jessica; Loughlin, Patrick; Batista, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) control predominately uses visual feedback. Real arm movements, however, are controlled under a diversity of feedback mechanisms. The lack of additional BCI feedback modalities forces users to maintain visual contact while performing tasks. Such stringent requirements result in poor BCI control during tasks that inherently lack visual feedback, such as grasping, or when visual attention is diverted. Using a modified version of the Critical Tracking Task which we call the Critical Stability Task (CST), we tested the ability of 9 human subjects to control an unstable system using either free arm movements or pinch force. The subjects were provided either visual feedback, 'proportional' vibrotactile feedback, or 'on-off' vibrotactile feedback about the state of the unstable system. We increased the difficulty of the control task by making the virtual system more unstable. We judged the effectiveness of a particular form of feedback as the maximal instability the system could reach before the subject lost control of it. We found three main results. First, subjects can use solely vibrotactile feedback to control an unstable system, although control was better using visual feedback. Second, 'proportional' vibrotactile feedback provided slightly better control than 'on-off' vibrotactile feedback. Third, there was large intra-subject variability in terms of the most effective input and feedback methods. This highlights the need to tailor the input and feedback methods to the subject when a high degree of control is desired. Our new task can provide a complement to traditional center-out paradigms to help boost the real-world relevance of BCI research in the lab.

  1. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  2. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  3. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  4. Feedback control of AHR signalling regulates intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Chris; Wincent, Emma; Metidji, Amina; Iseppon, Andrea; Li, Ying; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Omenetti, Sara; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Nebert, Daniel W; Stockinger, Brigitta

    2017-02-09

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) recognizes xenobiotics as well as natural compounds such as tryptophan metabolites, dietary components and microbiota-derived factors, and it is important for maintenance of homeostasis at mucosal surfaces. AHR activation induces cytochrome P4501 (CYP1) enzymes, which oxygenate AHR ligands, leading to their metabolic clearance and detoxification. Thus, CYP1 enzymes have an important feedback role that curtails the duration of AHR signalling, but it remains unclear whether they also regulate AHR ligand availability in vivo. Here we show that dysregulated expression of Cyp1a1 in mice depletes the reservoir of natural AHR ligands, generating a quasi AHR-deficient state. Constitutive expression of Cyp1a1 throughout the body or restricted specifically to intestinal epithelial cells resulted in loss of AHR-dependent type 3 innate lymphoid cells and T helper 17 cells and increased susceptibility to enteric infection. The deleterious effects of excessive AHR ligand degradation on intestinal immune functions could be counter-balanced by increasing the intake of AHR ligands in the diet. Thus, our data indicate that intestinal epithelial cells serve as gatekeepers for the supply of AHR ligands to the host and emphasize the importance of feedback control in modulating AHR pathway activation.

  5. Restoring standing capabilities with feedback control of functional neuromuscular stimulation following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Triolo, Ronald J

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviews the field of feedback control for neuroprosthesis systems that restore advanced standing function to individuals with spinal cord injury. Investigations into closed-loop control of standing by functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have spanned three decades. The ultimate goal for FNS standing control systems is to facilitate hands free standing and enabling the user to perform manual functions at self-selected leaning positions. However, most clinical systems for home usage currently only provide basic upright standing using preprogrammed stimulation patterns. To date, online modulation of stimulation to produce advanced standing functions such as balance against postural disturbances or the ability to assume leaning postures have been limited to simulation and laboratory investigations. While great technological advances have been made in biomechanical sensing and interfaces for neuromuscular stimulation, further progress is still required for finer motor control by FNS. Another major challenge is the development of sophisticated control schemes that produce the necessary postural adjustments, adapt against accelerating muscle fatigue, and consider volitional actions of the intact upper-body of the user. Model-based development for novel control schemes are proven and sensible approaches to prototype and test the basic operating efficacy of potentially complex and multi-faceted control systems. The major considerations for further innovation of such systems are summarized in this paper prior to describing the evolution of closed-loop FNS control of standing from previous works. Finally, necessary emerging technologies to for implementing FNS feedback control systems for standing are identified. These technological advancements include novel electrodes that more completely and selectively activate paralyzed musculature and implantable sensors and stimulation modules for flexible neuroprosthesis system deployment.

  6. Feedback Control and Learning To Program with the CMU Lisp Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Albert T.; Anderson, John R.

    This study manipulated the timing and control of error feedback in problem solving and examined their effects on skill acquisition by 40 undergraduate students learning to program in the computer language Lisp under four error feedback conditions. These four conditions included two types of symbol-by-symbol feedback that vary in content, a…

  7. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-03-02

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies.

  8. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies. PMID:26931281

  9. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-03-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies.

  10. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  11. Feedback-controlled laser fabrication of micromirror substrates.

    PubMed

    Petrak, Benjamin; Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Perez, Sonia; Muller, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Short (40-200 μs) single focused CO(2) laser pulses of energy ≳100 μJ were used to fabricate high quality concave micromirror templates on silica and fluoride glass. The ablated features have diameters of ≈20-100 μm and average root-mean-square (RMS) surface microroughness near their center of less than 0.2 nm. Temporally monitoring the fabrication process revealed that it proceeds on a time scale shorter than the laser pulse duration. We implement a fast feedback control loop (≈20 kHz bandwidth) based on the light emitted by the sample that ensures an RMS size dispersion of less than 5% in arrays on chips or in individually fabricated features on an optical fiber tip, a significant improvement over previous approaches using longer pulses and open loop operation.

  12. Self-controlled concurrent feedback and the education of attention towards perceptual invariants.

    PubMed

    Huet, Michaël; Camachon, Cyril; Fernandez, Laure; Jacobs, David M; Montagne, Gilles

    2009-08-01

    The present study investigates the effects of different types of concurrent feedback on the acquisition of perceptual-motor skills. Twenty participants walked through virtual corridors in which rhythmically opening and closing sliding doors were placed. The participants aimed to adjust their walking speed so as to cross the doors when the doors were close to their maximal aperture width. The highest level of performance was achieved by learners who practiced the task with unambiguous self-controlled concurrent feedback, which is to say, by learners who could request that feedback at wish. Practice with imposed rather than self-controlled feedback and practice without concurrent feedback were shown to be less effective. Finally, the way in which the self-controlled concurrent feedback was presented was also found to be of paramount importance; if the feedback is ambiguous, it may even prevent participants from learning the task. Clearly, unambiguous self-controlled feedback can give rise to higher levels of performance than other feedback conditions (compared to imposed schedule) but, depending on the way it is presented, the feedback can also prevent the participants from learning the task. In the discussion it is argued that unambiguous self-controlled concurrent feedback allows learners to more rapidly educate their attention towards more useful perceptual invariants and to calibrate the relation between perceptual invariants and action parameters.

  13. Grasp Force Feedback Control of Robot Hand Using Stepping Motors, Gears and Plate Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Han, Ping

    In this paper, a grasp force feedback control method of a robot hand attached to a single-link robot arm is proposed, and the usefulness of the grasp force feedback control method is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. The robot hand consists of two permanent-magnet-type stepping motors, reduction gears and plate springs. In the design of the grasp force feedback control system, the start-stop performance without missing steps concerning stepping motors is effectively utilized. For the shock reduction of the robot hand mechanism using stepping motors, the stepping motors should be stopped at a lower pulse rate. Therefore, the grasp force feedback control system is designed to finish the grasp force feedback control at a lower pulse rate of the stepping motors. For this purpose, the control method of the stepping motors using the angular velocity pattern of trapezoidal shape with a constant-velocity time and an estimated finish-time determined by the grasp force feedback control is devised. Then, numerical simulations using the equations of motion of the robot and the grasp force feedback control law have been carried out, and it is ascertained theoretically that the grasping force can be precisely controlled by the present grasp force feedback control method. Furthermore, experiments have been carried out, and the excellent performance of the grasp force feedback control is confirmed experimentally.

  14. Computational design of nucleic acid feedback control circuits.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Boyan; Kim, Jongmin; Petersen, Rasmus L; Shudy, Angelina; Kulkarni, Vishwesh V; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The design of synthetic circuits for controlling molecular-scale processes is an important goal of synthetic biology, with potential applications in future in vitro and in vivo biotechnology. In this paper, we present a computational approach for designing feedback control circuits constructed from nucleic acids. Our approach relies on an existing methodology for expressing signal processing and control circuits as biomolecular reactions. We first extend the methodology so that circuits can be expressed using just two classes of reactions: catalysis and annihilation. We then propose implementations of these reactions in three distinct classes of nucleic acid circuits, which rely on DNA strand displacement, DNA enzyme and RNA enzyme mechanisms, respectively. We use these implementations to design a Proportional Integral controller, capable of regulating the output of a system according to a given reference signal, and discuss the trade-offs between the different approaches. As a proof of principle, we implement our methodology as an extension to a DNA strand displacement software tool, thus allowing a broad range of nucleic acid circuits to be designed and analyzed within a common modeling framework.

  15. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    DOEpatents

    Heard, H.G.

    1961-10-24

    A particle beam positioning control for a synchrotron or the like is described. The control includes means for selectively impressing a sinusoidal perturbation upon the rising voltage utilized to sweep the frequency of the f-m oscillator which is conventionally coupled to the accelerating electrode of a synchrotron. The perturbation produces a variation in the normal rate of change of frequency of the accelerating voltage applied to the accelerating electrode, resulting in an expansion or contraction of the particle beam orbit diameter during the perturbation. The beam may thus be controlled such that a portion strikes a target positioned close to the expanded or contracted orbit diameter and returns to the original orbit for further acceleration to the final energy. (AEC)

  16. Nonlinear interfaces for acceleration-commanded control of spacecraft and manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, T. A. W., III; Lee, G. K. F.; Chen, N.

    1986-01-01

    Nominal command generation in real time for the control of manipulators or of maneuvering spacecraft is hampered by the nonlinearity of the equations of motion. Likewise the real time tracking of a computed nominal trajectory in the presence of disturbances requires the computation of time-varying Jacobians of the motion. An alternative approach is the formulation of acceleration-commanded control laws in appropriately chosen generalized advantageous to design dedicated circuit interfaces to perform the required transformation. It is also possible to guarantee that actuator and sensor saturation limits are not exceeded, by means of feedback-biased circuits that implement automatic overload limitation of acceleration commands. Recent developments following this 'hardware computation' point of view will be discussed.

  17. Stochastic Prediction and Feedback Control of Router Queue Size in a Virtual Network Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    STOCHASTIC PREDICTION AND FEEDBACK CONTROL OF ROUTER QUEUE SIZE IN A VIRTUAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENT THESIS Muflih Alqahtani, First...AFIT-ENG-T-14-S-10 STOCHASTIC PREDICTION AND FEEDBACK CONTROL OF ROUTER QUEUE SIZE IN A VIRTUAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENT THESIS Presented to the...UNLIMITED AFIT-ENG-T-14-S-10 STOCHASTIC PREDICTION AND FEEDBACK CONTROL OF ROUTER QUEUE SIZE IN A VIRTUAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENT Muflih Alqahtani

  18. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study. Volume 7: Tilt rotor flight control program feedback studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. R.; Eason, W.; Gillmore, K.; Morris, J.; Spittle, R.

    1973-01-01

    An exploratory study has been made of the use of feedback control in tilt rotor aircraft. This has included the use of swashplate cyclic and collective controls and direct lift control. Various sensor and feedback systems are evaluated in relation to blade loads alleviation, improvement in flying qualities, and modal suppression. Recommendations are made regarding additional analytical and wind tunnel investigations and development of feedback systems in the full scale flight vehicle. Estimated costs and schedules are given.

  19. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    This dissertation examines the use of reduced-order models for design of linear feedback controllers for fluid flows. The focus is on transitional channel flow, a canonical shear flow case with a simple geometry yet complex dynamics. Reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe the evolution of perturbations in transitional channel flow, are computed using two methods for snapshot-based balanced truncation, Balanced Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (BPOD) and Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). The performance of these models in feedback control is evaluated in both linearized and nonlinear Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow. The first part of the dissertation describes the application of BPOD to very large systems, and the detailed evaluation of the resulting reduced-order models. Exact balanced truncation, a standard method from control theory, is not computationally tractable for very large systems, such as those typically encountered in fluid flow simulations. The BPOD method, introduced by Rowley (2005), provides a close approximation. We first show that the approximation is indeed close by applying the method to a 1-D linear perturbation to channel flow at a single spatial wavenumber pair, for which exact balanced truncation is tractable. Next, as the first application of BPOD to a very high-dimensional linear system, we show that reduced-order BPOD models of a localized 3-D perturbation capture the dynamics very well. Moreover, the BPOD models significantly outperform standard Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) models, as illustrated by a striking example where models using the POD modes that capture most of the perturbation energy fail to capture the perturbation dynamics. Next, reduced-order models of a complete control system for linearized channel flow are obtained using ERA, a computationally efficient method that results in the same reduced-order models as BPOD. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG

  20. Feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei

    2016-09-01

    In the literatures, to design state feedback controllers to make the response Boolean network synchronise with the drive Boolean network is rarely considered. Motivated by this, feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks is investigated in this paper. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller achieving the complete synchronisation is established first. Then, based on the necessary condition, the feedback control law is proposed. Finally, an example is worked out to illustrate the proposed design procedure.

  1. Nonlinear signal-based control with an error feedback action for nonlinear substructuring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokida, Ryuta; Kajiwara, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    A nonlinear signal-based control (NSBC) method utilises the 'nonlinear signal' that is obtained from the outputs of a controlled system and its linear model under the same input signal. Although this method has been examined in numerical simulations of nonlinear systems, its application in physical experiments has not been studied. In this paper, we study an application of NSBC in physical experiments and incorporate an error feedback action into the method to minimise the error and enhance the feasibility in practice. Focusing on NSBC in substructure testing methods, we propose nonlinear substructuring control (NLSC), that is a more general form of linear substructuring control (LSC) developed for dynamical substructured systems. In this study, we experimentally and numerically verified the proposed NLSC via substructuring tests on a rubber bearing used in base-isolated structures. In the examinations, NLSC succeeded in gaining accurate results despite significant nonlinear hysteresis and unknown parameters in the substructures. The nonlinear signal feedback action in NLSC was found to be notably effective in minimising the error caused by nonlinearity or unknown properties in the controlled system. In addition, the error feedback action in NLSC was found to be essential for maintaining stability. A stability analysis based on the Nyquist criterion, which is used particularly for linear systems, was also found to be efficient for predicting the instability conditions of substructuring tests with NLSC and useful for the error feedback controller design.

  2. Connections among several chaos feedback control approaches and chaotic vibration control of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dixiong; Zhou, Jilei

    2014-11-01

    This study reveals the essential connections among several popular chaos feedback control approaches, such as delayed feedback control (DFC), stability transformation method (STM), adaptive adjustment method (AAM), parameter adjustment method, relaxed Newton method, and speed feedback control method (SFCM), etc. Meanwhile, the generality and practical applicability of these approaches are evaluated and compared. It is shown that for discrete chaotic maps, STM can be regarded as a kind of predictive feedback control, and AAM is actually a special case of STM which is merely effective for a particular dynamical system. The parameter adjustment method is only a different expression of the relaxed Newton method, and both of them represent just one search direction of STM, i.e., the gradient direction. Moreover, the intrinsic relation between the STM and SFCM for controlling the equilibrium of continuous autonomous systems is investigated, indicating that STM can be viewed as a special form of the SFCM. Finally, both the STM and SFCM are extended to control the chaotic vibrations of non-autonomous mechanical systems effectively.

  3. Architectures for parallel DSP-based adaptive optics feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Daniel F.

    1999-11-01

    We have developed a digital image processing system for real-time digital image processing feedback control of adaptive optics systems and simulation of optical image processing algorithms. The system uses multi-computer architecture to capture data from an imaging device such as a charge coupled device camera, process the image data, and control a spatial light-modulator, typically a liquid crystal modulator or a micro-electro mechanical system. The system is a Windows NT Pentium-based system combined with a commercial off-the-shelf peripheral component interconnect bus multi-processor system. The multi-processor is based on the Analog Devices super Harvard architecture computer (SHARC) processor, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The SHARCs provide a scalable reconfigurable C language-based digital signal processing (DSP) development environment. The FPGAs are typically used as reprogrammable interface controllers designed to integrate several off-the- shelf and custom imagers and light modulators into the system. The FPGAs can also be used in concert with the SHARCs for implementation of application-specific high-speed DSP algorithms.

  4. Walking Flexibility after Hemispherectomy: Split-Belt Treadmill Adaptation and Feedback Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Julia T.; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Reisman, Darcy S.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Walking flexibility depends on use of feedback or reactive control to respond to unexpected changes in the environment, and the ability to adapt feedforward or predictive control for sustained alterations. Recent work has demonstrated that cerebellar damage impairs feedforward adaptation, but not feedback control, during human split-belt treadmill…

  5. Stabilization of a flexible body (hoop-column) antenna by feedback control law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, A.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback control laws are presented for stabilization models of a hoop/column antenna. A brief review of linear and nonlinear feedback control laws is included. A method that is computable on a microprocessor and assures closed loop stability is explained and compared to a linear control law model.

  6. Feedforward-feedback control of an activated sludge process: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Vrecko, D; Hvala, N; Carlsson, B

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a simulated plant based on a wastewater treatment benchmark is used to evaluate a number of controllers. Feedforward-feedback controllers for dissolved oxygen set-point and external carbon flow, and feedforward controller for internal recycle flow are evaluated separately and altogether. In the feedforward parts of the controllers, static physical models are incorporated in the control laws. The feedback parts of the controllers are used to compensate for model approximations. A simulation study shows that feedforward-feedback control of the activated sludge plant is more successful than standard PI control in meeting the effluent standards and reducing operational costs.

  7. Time-Delayed Feedback Control for Flutter of Supersonic Aircraft Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Huang, Yu; Xu, Jian

    An active control technique called servo delayed feedback control is proposed to control the flutter of supersonic aircraft wing. It's motivated to increase the critical flow velocity. Firstly, the servo delayed feedback control is designed based on a two-dimensional airfoil so that delayed differential equations are modelled for the controlled system under consideration. Then, the stability of the system without time delay and with time delayed feedback control are considered analytically and flutter boundary of the parameters in the delayed feedback control system is predicted when time delay varies. Finally, numerical simulation for time domain with MATLAB/SIMULINK software is made to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical result. The results show that, critical flow velocity can be increased by regulating the quantity of time delay and the provided strategy of delayed feedback to control the flutter in supersonic aircraft wing system is not only valid but also easily applied to engineering structures.

  8. Accelerator based X-ray facilities applied to freight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, G.

    1996-06-01

    The first accelerator based X-ray facility dedicated to freight control, in this case air-freight pallets, became operational at Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle airport in 1991. Since then, five other facilities have been built, three in Europe and the other two in China, for the control of trucks and sea-containers. In order to be able to see through these very large and dense objects, X-ray energies of several MeV are necessary. Two types of electron accelerators are used for the production of the X-ray beams: linear accelerators and electrostatic accelerators (Van de Graff or Pelletrons), depending on the beam quality requirements which depend on the technology used for the detection of X-rays. A brief description of the functioning of the X-ray inspection facilities is presented in this article as well as an estimation of their global cost and of their profitability.

  9. IPNS Chopper Control and Accelerator Interface Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, G.E.; Donley, L.I.; Rauchas, A.V.; Volk, G.J.; Jung, E.A.; Haumann, J.R.; Pelizzari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Several of the instruments at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne use rotating Fermi choppers. The techniques used to control the speed and phase of these rotating devices are discussed.

  10. Influence of self-controlled feedback on learning a serial motor skill.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soowoen; Ali, Asif; Kim, Wonchan; Kim, Jingu; Choi, Sungmook; Radlo, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    Self-controlled feedback on a variety of tasks are well established as effective means of facilitating motor skill learning. This study assessed the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance of a serial motor skill. The task was to learn the sequence of 18 movements that make up the Taekwondo Poomsae Taegeuk first, which is the first beginner's practice form learned in this martial art. Twenty-four novice female participants (M age=27.2 yr., SD=1.8) were divided into two groups. All participants performed 16 trials in 4 blocks of the acquisition phase and 20 hr. later, 8 trials in 2 blocks of the retention phase. The self-controlled feedback group had significantly higher performance compared to the yoked-feedback group with regard to acquisition and retention. The results of this study may contribute to the literature regarding feedback by extending the usefulness of self-controlled feedback for learning a serial skill.

  11. Temperature feedback control for long-term carrier-envelope phase locking

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Zenghu [Manhattan, KS; Yun, Chenxia [Manhattan, KS; Chen, Shouyuan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, He [Manhattan, KS; Chini, Michael [Manhattan, KS

    2012-07-24

    A feedback control module for stabilizing a carrier-envelope phase of an output of a laser oscillator system comprises a first photodetector, a second photodetector, a phase stabilizer, an optical modulator, and a thermal control element. The first photodetector may generate a first feedback signal corresponding to a first portion of a laser beam from an oscillator. The second photodetector may generate a second feedback signal corresponding to a second portion of the laser beam filtered by a low-pass filter. The phase stabilizer may divide the frequency of the first feedback signal by a factor and generate an error signal corresponding to the difference between the frequency-divided first feedback signal and the second feedback signal. The optical modulator may modulate the laser beam within the oscillator corresponding to the error signal. The thermal control unit may change the temperature of the oscillator corresponding to a signal operable to control the optical modulator.

  12. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

  13. Pellet acceleration using an ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The NCSU ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets to investigate the possibility of using electrothermal launchers as frozen pellet injectors for tokamak fueling. Successful installation of such a device would include a protective shell (sabot) to shield the hydrogenic pellet from ablation and allow it to maintain its integrity throughout the acceleration. The SIRENS device has been modified to include specially designed barrel sections equipped with diagnostic ports.

  14. Proximal Blade Twist Feedback Control for Heliogyro Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sarah Mitchell

    mode is on the order of 0.005%, meaning there is almost no inherent damping in the blade. Next, the proximal blade twist feedback control design was successful in overcoming friction in the root actuator and added damping to the blade. The damping ratio for the lowest frequency torsional mode was increased from 0.001% to 0.09%, which is a significant amount for a heliogyro spacecraft. Finally, the camera sensor used for the proximal differential twist measurement proved to be feasible and quantization from these measurements only decreased the damping ratio to 0.075%. This research provides the first indication that a physically realizable blade root controller can deal with friction in an effective way, thus taking a step towards advancing the technology readiness level of the heliogyro spacecraft.

  15. Automated accelerator controls for a 3 MV tandem Pelletron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathmell, R. D.; Kitchen, R. L.; Luck, T. R.; Sundquist, M. L.

    1991-05-01

    A new accelerator control system has been developed which uses a real-time, multitasking operating system running on a Motorola 68030 based microcomputer. The system includes multiple graphic and text displays and allows the operator to communicate via these displays to the accelerator, which is interfaced to CAMAC. Most accelerator parameters can be controlled using a mouse in conjunction with a single graphic display, eliminating the need to change CRT pages in order to control parameters from the source to the target. A touch screen is also available to permit a number of parameters to be at the operator's finger tips at all times. Operating parameters for a new beam and energy can be automatically set by scaling from a previously stored run. The program and database are structured to facilitate interlocking and closed loop control of parameters. The hardware configuration, structure and features of the software will be reviewed.

  16. Improved methods in neural network-based adaptive output feedback control, with applications to flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nakwan

    Utilizing the universal approximation property of neural networks, we develop several novel approaches to neural network-based adaptive output feedback control of nonlinear systems, and illustrate these approaches for several flight control applications. In particular, we address the problem of non-affine systems and eliminate the fixed point assumption present in earlier work. All of the stability proofs are carried out in a form that eliminates an algebraic loop in the neural network implementation. An approximate input/output feedback linearizing controller is augmented with a neural network using input/output sequences of the uncertain system. These approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. All physical systems also have control position and rate limits, which may either deteriorate performance or cause instability for a sufficiently high control bandwidth. Here we apply a method for protecting an adaptive process from the effects of input saturation and time delays, known as "pseudo control hedging". This method was originally developed for the state feedback case, and we provide a stability analysis that extends its domain of applicability to the case of output feedback. The approach is illustrated by the design of a pitch-attitude flight control system for a linearized model of an R-50 experimental helicopter, and by the design of a pitch-rate control system for a 58-state model of a flexible aircraft consisting of rigid body dynamics coupled with actuator and flexible modes. A new approach to augmentation of an existing linear controller is introduced. It is especially useful when there is limited information concerning the plant model, and the existing controller. The approach is applied to the design of an adaptive autopilot for a guided munition. Design of a neural network adaptive control that ensures asymptotically stable tracking performance is also addressed.

  17. Motivation in vigilance - Effects of self-evaluation and experimenter-controlled feedback.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warm, J. S.; Kanfer, F. H.; Kuwada, S.; Clark, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Vigilance experiments have been performed to study the relative efficiency of feedback operations in enhancing vigilance performance. Two feedback operations were compared - i.e., experimenter-controlled feedback in the form of knowledge of results (KR) regarding response times to signal detections, and subject-controlled feedback in the form of self-evaluation (SE) of response times to signal detections. The subjects responded to the aperiodic offset of a visual signal during a 1-hr vigil. Both feedback operations were found to enhance performance efficiency: subjects in the KR and SE conditions had faster response times than controls receiving no evaluative feedback. Moreover, the data of the KR and SE groups did not differ significantly from each other. The results are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that self-evaluation is a critical factor underlying the incentive value of KR in vigilance tasks.

  18. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  19. Development of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes and the advanced thermal control flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes (FCHP) are discussed. An analytical model was produced to describe the performance of the FCHP under steady state and transient conditions. An advanced thermal control flight experiment was designed to demonstrate the performance of the thermal control component in a space environment. The thermal control equipment was evaluated on the ATS-F satellite to provide performance data for the components and to act as a thermal control system which can be used to provide temperature stability of spacecraft components in future applications.

  20. [Accelerating cancer control innovations in Peru].

    PubMed

    Santos-Ortiz, Carlos; Manrique, Javier; Amorín, Edgar; Sarria, Gustavo; Salazar, Miriam; Limache, Abel; Villena, Marco; Dunstan, Jorge; Abugattas, Julio; Vidaurre, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Against a backdrop of global equity in cancer prevention and control, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN), a national reference center, has designed and developed innovative strategies and programs with the intent to meet institutional goals through health promotion interventions and cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatments that benefit the national population. The INEN Schools and Centers of Excellence have played an important role in the process of determining the results of these actions. The Center of Excellence in Cervical Cancer Training is an interventional pioneer that has applied a methodological design intended to improve health professional skills and has disseminated this model to other Schools of Excellence. Through this intervention, the skills of 12,194 health professionals trained by the INEN have been strengthened with respect to nationwide promotion and primary and secondary prevention during the period of 2012-2015.

  1. A High Reliability Accelerator Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, John; Collins, John; Hunt, William; Qualls, Andrew

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the control system developed at IUCF for the Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS). The Hardware system is VME based and employs fiber optic data transmission for high noise rejection. The hardware includes several modules designed and manufactured at IUCF to meet specifications not attainable with commercial hardware. These modules feature active redundancy with automatic switch over for high reliability; built in test and self diagnosis with centralized failure and system health monitoring for rapid maintenance; and very low drift and self calibration for maximum repeatability. We describe several modules including high precision ramping and non-ramping DAC/ADCs and a deep memory timing sequencer. We give a brief overview of the software system, which is based on Vsystem from Vista, Inc.

  2. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-03

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  3. A positive feedback strategy for enhanced chemotherapy based on ROS-triggered self-accelerating drug release nanosystem.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing-Jing; Lei, Qi; Peng, Meng-Yun; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yi-Xuan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Here, a positive feedback strategy was utilized to amplify the concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a ROS-triggered self-accelerating drug release nanosystem (defined as T/D@RSMSNs) was demonstrated for enhanced tumor chemotherapy. The mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) based nanocarriers were gated by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) through the ROS-cleavable thioketal (TK) linker to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and ROS producing agent α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), whose surface was further anchored with adamantane conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) chain (AD-PEG) via host-guest interaction. It was found that in human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells, T/D@RSMSNs could not only release DOX and α-TOS initiatively, but also lead to increased concentration of intracellular ROS, which could be used as new trigger to cut away TK linkage and then in turn facilitate the further release of DOX for enhanced chemotherapy. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that T/D@RSMSNs exhibited more significant antitumor activity in the human breast cancer than the traditional single-DOX loaded ROS-responsive nanocarrier. This novel ROS-triggered self-accelerating drug release nanosystem with remarkably improved therapeutic effects could provide a general strategy to branch out the applications of existing ROS-responsive drug delivery systems (DDSs).

  4. Deterministic creation and stabilization of entanglement in circuit QED by homodyne-mediated feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhuo; Kuang Luelin; Hu Kai; Xu Luting; Wei Suhua; Guo Lingzhen; Li Xinqi

    2010-09-15

    In a solid-state circuit QED system, we demonstrate that a homodyne-current-based feedback can create and stabilize highly entangled two-qubit states in the presence of a moderate noisy environment. Particularly, we present an extended analysis for the current-based Markovian feedback, which leads to an improved feedback scheme. We show that this is essential to achieve a desirable control effect by the use of dispersive measurement.

  5. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  6. The computer-based control system of the NAC accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdzik, G. F.; Bouckaert, R. F. A.; Cloete, I.; Dutoit, J. S.; Kohler, I. H.; Truter, J. N. J.; Visser, K.; Wikner, V. C. S. J.

    The National Accelerator Center (NAC) of the CSIR is building a two-stage accelerator which will provide charged-particle beams for use in medical and research applications. The control system for this accelerator is based on three mini-computers and a CAMAC interfacing network. Closed-loop control is being relegated to the various subsystems of the accelerators, and the computers and CAMAC network will be used in the first instance for data transfer, monitoring and servicing of the control consoles. The processing power of the computers will be utilized for automating start-up and beam-change procedures, for providing flexible and convenient information at the control consoles, for fault diagnosis and for beam-optimizing procedures. Tasks of a localized or dedicated nature are being off-loaded onto microcomputers, which are being used either in front-end devices or as slaves to the mini-computers. On the control consoles only a few instruments for setting and monitoring variables are being provided, but these instruments are universally-linkable to any appropriate machine variable.

  7. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  8. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  9. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  10. Active vibration control of beams using filtered-velocity feedback controllers with moment pair actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changjoo; Hong, Chinsuk; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, filtered-velocity feedback (FVF) control is proposed to stabilize a control system with a non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration. This method is applied to actively control a clamped beam with a sensor/moment pair actuator. Since the sensor/moment pair actuator is a non-collocated configuration, the control system experiences structural instability at high frequencies. Due to the roll-off property of the FVF controller, the high frequency structural instability problem can be overcome. Due to the second-order filter characteristics of the FVF controller, similar to a low pass filter, multimode disturbances can be controlled at the modes below the cut-off frequency. To verify the performance of the controller, the FVF controller is tuned to around 2 kHz, and the structural responses are successfully reduced by numerical and experimental approaches.

  11. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  12. Temporal variation in plant-soil feedback controls succession.

    PubMed

    Kardol, Paul; Bezemer, T Martijn; van der Putten, Wim H

    2006-09-01

    Soil abiotic and biotic factors play key roles in plant community dynamics. However, little is known about how soil biota influence vegetation changes over time. Here, we show that the effects of soil organisms may depend on both the successional development of ecosystems and on the successional position of the plants involved. In model systems of plants and soils from different successional stages, we observed negative plant-soil feedback for early-successional plant species, neutral feedback for mid-successional species, and positive feedback for late-successional species. The negative feedback of early-successional plants was independent of soil origin, while late-successional plants performed best in late- and worst in early-successional soil. Increased performance of the subordinate, late-successional plants resulted in enhanced plant community diversity. Observed feedback effects were more related to soil biota than to abiotic conditions. Our results show that temporal variations in plant-soil interactions profoundly contribute to plant community assemblage and ecosystem development.

  13. Incorporating feedback from multiple sensory modalities enhances brain-machine interface control

    PubMed Central

    Suminski, Aaron J.; Tkach, Dennis C.; Fagg, Andrew H.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    The brain typically utilizes a rich supply of feedback from multiple sensory modalities to control movement in healthy individuals. In many individuals, these afferent pathways, as well as their efferent counterparts, are compromised by disease or injury resulting in significant impairments and reduced quality of life. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) offer the promise of recovered functionality to these individuals by allowing them to control a device using their thoughts. Most current BMI implantations use visual feedback for closed-loop control; however, it has been suggested that the inclusion of additional feedback modalities may lead to improvements in control. We demonstrate for the first time that kinesthetic feedback can be used together with vision to significantly improve control of a cursor driven by neural activity of the primary motor cortex (MI). Using an exoskeletal robot, the monkey's arm was moved to passively follow a cortically-controlled visual cursor, thereby providing the monkey with kinesthetic information about the cursor's motion. When visual and proprioceptive feedback were congruent, both the time to successfully reach a target decreased and the cursor paths became straighter, as compared with incongruent feedback conditions. This enhanced performance was accompanied by a significant increase in the amount of movement-related information contained in the spiking activity of neurons in MI. These findings suggest that BMI control can be significantly improved in paralyzed patients with residual kinesthetic sense and provide the groundwork for augmenting cortically-controlled BMIs with multiple forms of natural or surrogate sensory feedback. PMID:21159949

  14. Feedback power control strategies in wireless sensor networks with joint channel decoding.

    PubMed

    Abrardo, Andrea; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Martalò, Marco; Perna, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we derive feedback power control strategies for block-faded multiple access schemes with correlated sources and joint channel decoding (JCD). In particular, upon the derivation of the feasible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region for the considered multiple access schemes, i.e., the multidimensional SNR region where error-free communications are, in principle, possible, two feedback power control strategies are proposed: (i) a classical feedback power control strategy, which aims at equalizing all link SNRs at the access point (AP), and (ii) an innovative optimized feedback power control strategy, which tries to make the network operational point fall in the feasible SNR region at the lowest overall transmit energy consumption. These strategies will be referred to as "balanced SNR" and "unbalanced SNR," respectively. While they require, in principle, an unlimited power control range at the sources, we also propose practical versions with a limited power control range. We preliminary consider a scenario with orthogonal links and ideal feedback. Then, we analyze the robustness of the proposed power control strategies to possible non-idealities, in terms of residual multiple access interference and noisy feedback channels. Finally, we successfully apply the proposed feedback power control strategies to a limiting case of the class of considered multiple access schemes, namely a central estimating officer (CEO) scenario, where the sensors observe noisy versions of a common binary information sequence and the AP's goal is to estimate this sequence by properly fusing the soft-output information output by the JCD algorithm.

  15. NOVEL TECHNIQUE OF POWER CONTROL IN MAGNETRON TRANSMITTERS FOR INTENSE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, G.; Johnson, R.; Neubauer, M.; Lebedev, V.; Schappert, W.; Yakovlev, V.

    2016-10-21

    A novel concept of a high-power magnetron transmitter allowing dynamic phase and power control at the frequency of locking signal is proposed. The transmitter compensating parasitic phase and amplitude modulations inherent in Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities within closed feedback loops is intended for powering of the intensity-frontier superconducting accelerators. The con- cept uses magnetrons driven by a sufficient resonant (in- jection-locking) signal and fed by the voltage which can be below the threshold of self-excitation. This provides an extended range of power control in a single magnetron at highest efficiency minimizing the cost of RF power unit and the operation cost. Proof-of-principle of the proposed concept demonstrated in pulsed and CW regimes with 2.45 GHz, 1kW magnetrons is discussed here. A conceptual scheme of the high-power transmitter allowing the dynamic wide-band phase and y power controls is presented and discussed.

  16. Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keehoon; Colgate, J Edward

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that haptic feedback would enhance grip force control of surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthetic hands for targeted reinnervation (TR) amputees. A new miniature haptic device, a tactor, that can deliver touch, pressure, shear, and temperature sensation, allows modality-matching haptic feedback. TR surgery that creates sensory regions on the patient's skin that refer to the surface of the missing limb allows somatotopic-matching haptic feedback. This paper evaluates the hypothesis via an sEMG-controlled virtual prosthetic arm operated by TR amputees under diverse haptic feedback conditions. The results indicate that the grip force control is significantly enhanced via the haptic feedback. However, the simultaneous display of two haptic channels (pressure and shear) does not enhance, but instead degrades, grip force control.

  17. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  18. Cross Feedback Control of a Magnetic Bearing System: Controller Design Considering Gyroscopic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Markus; Kucera, Ladislav

    1996-01-01

    For flywheel rotors or other rotors with significant ratios of moments of inertia, the influence of gyroscopic effects has to be considered. While conservative or damped systems remain stable even under gyroscopic effects, magnetically suspended rotors can be destabilized with increasing rotational speed. The influence of gyroscopic effects on the stability and behavior of a magnetic bearing system is analyzed. The analysis is carried out with a rigid body model for the rotor and a nonlinear model for the magnetic bearing and its amplifier. Cross feedback control can compensate gyroscopic effects. This compensation leads to better system performance and can avoid instability. Furthermore, the implementation of this compensation is simple. The main structure of a decentralized controller can still be used. It has only to be expanded by the cross feedback path.

  19. Feedback channel in linear noiseless dynamic systems controlled over the packet erasure network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Alireza

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with tracking state trajectory at remote controller, stability and performance of linear time-invariant noiseless dynamic systems with multiple observations over the packet erasure network subject to random packet dropout and transmission delay that does not necessarily use feedback channel full time. Three cases are considered in this paper: (1) without feedback channel, (2) with feedback channel intermittently and (3) with full time availability of feedback channel. For all three cases, coding strategies that result in reliable tracking of state trajectory at remote controller with asymptotically zero mean absolute estimation error are presented. Asymptotic mean absolute stability of the controlled system equipped with each of these coding strategies is shown; trade-offs between duty cycle for feedback channel use, transmission delay and performance, which is defined in terms of the settling time, are studied.

  20. Acceleration of quantum optimal control theory algorithms with mixing strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Gross, E K U

    2009-05-01

    We propose the use of mixing strategies to accelerate the convergence of the common iterative algorithms utilized in quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). We show how the nonlinear equations of QOCT can be viewed as a "fixed-point" nonlinear problem. The iterative algorithms for this class of problems may benefit from mixing strategies, as it happens, e.g., in the quest for the ground-state density in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We demonstrate, with some numerical examples, how the same mixing schemes utilized in this latter nonlinear problem may significantly accelerate the QOCT iterative procedures.

  1. Eco-hydrological feedback mechanisms control ecological services in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, J.; Hinz, C.; Vogwill, R.; Tareque, H.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems contain various feedback mechanisms between their abiotc and biotic components. The feedbacks are triggered by climate and propagate into patterns of environment partitioning based on distinct zones of hydrological function that vary in time and space. This partitioning co-evolves with vegetation, defines carbon metabolism and creates niches that govern patterns of flora and fauna abundance and distribution. Using a minimalistic model for wetland eco-hydrology, we explore vegetation adaptation to climate variability and the net metabolism of a wetland ecosystem given a range of climate conditions. We then apply the model to characterize the changes in niche habitat availability for a tortoise population endangered by a drying climate.

  2. Interior Noise Reduction by Adaptive Feedback Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1998-01-01

    . The on-line identification algorithm developed in this research will be useful in constructing a state estimator for feedback vibration control.

  3. A Case Study of Representing Signal Transduction in Liver Cells as a Feedback Control Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Abhay; Jayaraman, Arul; Hahn, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways often contain feedback loops where proteins are produced that regulate signaling. While feedback regulatory mechanisms are commonly found in signaling pathways, there is no example available in the literature that is simple enough to be presented in an undergraduate control class. This paper presents a simulation study of…

  4. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  5. Design of PID controllers in double feedback loops for SISO systems with set-point filters.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V; Panda, Rames C

    2012-07-01

    A PID controller is widely used to control industrial processes that are mostly open loop stable or unstable. Selection of proper feedback structure and controller tuning helps to improve the performance of the loop. In this paper a double-feedback loop/method is used to achieve stability and better performance of the process. The internal feedback is used for stabilizing the process and the outer loop is used for good setpoint tracking. An internal model controller (IMC) based PID method is used for tuning the outer loop controller. Autotuning based on relay feedback or the Ziegler-Nichols method can be used for tuning an inner loop controller. A tuning parameter (λ) that is used to tune IMC-PID is used as a time constant of a setpoint filter that is used for reducing the peak overshoot. The method has been tested successfully on many low order processes.

  6. Robust H ∞ control of a nonlinear uncertain system via a stable nonlinear output feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harno, Hendra G.; Petersen, Ian R.

    2011-04-01

    A new approach to solving a nonlinear robust H ∞ control problem using a stable nonlinear output feedback controller is presented in this article. The class of nonlinear uncertain systems being considered is characterised in terms of integral quadratic constraints and global Lipschitz conditions describing the admissible uncertainties and nonlinearities, respectively. The nonlinear controller is able to exploit the plant nonlinearities through the inclusion of a copy of the known plant nonlinearities in the controller. The H ∞ control objective is to obtain an absolutely stable closed-loop system with a specified disturbance attenuation level. The solution to this control problem involves stabilising solutions to parametrised algebraic Riccati equations. We apply a differential evolution algorithm to solve a non-convex nonlinear optimisation problem arising in the controller synthesis.

  7. Controlled Trial Using Computerized Feedback to Improve Physicians' Diagnostic Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poses, Roy M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study involving 14 experienced physicians investigated the effectiveness of a computer program (providing statistical feedback to teach a clinical diagnostic rule that predicts the probability of streptococcal pharyngitis), in conjunction with traditional lecture and periodic disease-prevalence reports. Results suggest the integrated method is a…

  8. ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.K.C.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure systems are usually subject to field disturbances induced by external sources. Here, a method for designing a feedback control system for canceling the effect of external ELF magnetic field disturbances on the magnetic field over the exposure area is presented. This method was used in the design of a feedback-controlled exposure system for an inverted microscope stage. The effectiveness of the proposed feedback control system for disturbance rejection was verified experimentally and by means of computer simulation.

  9. Model-based feedback control of subsonic cavity flows: Control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin

    In this dissertation, we present and discuss development, implementation, and experimental results of reduced-order model based feedback control of subsonic cavity flows. Model based feedback control of subsonic flows have been studied and implemented by the flow control group at the Collaborative Center of Control Science (CCCS) at the Ohio State University (OSU). The team, composed of researchers from the departments of Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at the Ohio State, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA Glenn Research Center, possesses synergistic capabilities in all of the required multidisciplinary areas of experimental data acquisition, computational flow simulation, low dimensional modeling, controller design, and experimental validation. The goal of the CCCS effort is to develop tools and methodologies for the use of closed-loop aerodynamic flow control to manipulate the flow over maneuvering air vehicles. The problem chosen for the initial study by the CCCS flow team is control of the resonant noise generated by subsonic flow past an open cavity. This phenomenon is characterized by a strong coupling between the flow dynamics and the flow-induced acoustic field that can lead to self-sustained resonance. Two approaches towards model development have been studied in this dissertation. One aims at representing the physical properties of the system by dynamical models in transfer function forms, referred to as the physics-based linear model in this dissertation. The other approach we have followed is based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Galerkin projection methods involving the flow governing equations, which is referred to as the nonlinear model or Galerkin model in the dissertation. Each model mentioned above can be further divided into two types: model derived from numerical simulation data and model derived from real time experimental data. Different types of feedback controllers have been designed for corresponding

  10. Social context rapidly modulates the influence of auditory feedback on avian vocal motor control.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Jon T; Brainard, Michael S

    2009-10-01

    Sensory feedback is important for the learning and control of a variety of behaviors. Vocal motor production in songbirds is a powerful model system to study sensory influences on behavior because the learning, maintenance, and control of song are critically dependent on auditory feedback. Based on previous behavioral and neural experiments, it has been hypothesized that songs produced in isolation [undirected (UD) song] represent a form of vocal practice, whereas songs produced to females during courtship interactions [female-directed (FD) song] represent a form of vocal performance. According to this "practice versus performance" framework, auditory feedback should be more influential when birds engage in vocal practice than when they engage in vocal performance. To directly test this hypothesis, we used a computerized system to perturb auditory feedback at precise locations during the songs of Bengalese finches and compared the degree to which feedback perturbations caused song interruptions as well as changes to the sequencing and timing of syllables between interleaved renditions of UD and FD song. We found that feedback perturbation caused fewer song interruptions and smaller changes to syllable timing during FD song than during UD song. These data show that changes in the social context in which song is produced rapidly modulate the influence of auditory feedback on song control in a manner consistent with the practice versus performance framework. More generally, they indicate that, for song, as for other motor skills including human speech, the influence of sensory feedback on activity within vocal premotor circuitry can be dynamically modulated.

  11. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  12. Slewing maneuvers and vibration control of space structures by feedforward/feedback moment-gyro controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Li-Farn; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Park, K. C.; Su, Renjeng

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a moment-gyro control approach to the maneuver and vibration suppression of a flexible truss arm undergoing a constant slewing motion. The overall slewing motion is triggered by a feedforward input, and a companion feedback controller is employed to augment the feedforward input and subsequently to control vibrations. The feedforward input for the given motion requirement is determined from the combined CMG (Control Momentum Gyro) devices and the desired rigid-body motion. The rigid-body dynamic model has enabled us to identify the attendant CMG momentum saturation constraints. The task for vibration control is carried out in two stages; first in the search of a suitable CMG placement along the beam span for various slewing maneuvers, and subsequently in the development of Liapunov-based control algorithms for CMG spin-stabilization. Both analytical and numerical results are presented to show the effectiveness of the present approach.

  13. Active control of an innovative seat suspension system with acceleration measurement based friction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Donghong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Hongyi; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an innovative active seat suspension system for vehicles is presented. This seat suspension prototype is built with two low cost actuators each of which has one rotary motor and one gear reducer. A H∞ controller with friction compensation is designed for the seat suspension control system where the friction is estimated and compensated based on the measurement of seat acceleration. This principal aim of this research was to control the low frequency vibration transferred or amplified by the vehicle (chassis) suspension, and to maintain the passivity of the seat suspension at high frequency (isolation vibration) while taking into consideration the trade-off between the active seat suspension cost and its high frequency performance. Sinusoidal excitations of 1-4.5 Hz were applied to test the active seat suspension both when controlled and when uncontrolled and this is compared with a well-tuned passive heavy duty vehicle seat suspension. The results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm within the tested frequencies. Further tests were conducted using the excitations generated from a quarter-car model under bump and random road profiles. The bump road tests indicate the controlled active seat suspension has good transient response performance. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) method and ISO 2631-1 standards were applied to analyse the seat suspension's acceleration under random road conditions. Although some low magnitude and high frequency noise will inevitably be introduced by the active system, the weighted-frequency Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration shows that this may not have a large effect on ride comfort. In fact, the ride comfort is improved from being an 'a little uncomfortable' to a 'not uncomfortable' level when compared with the well-tuned passive seat suspension. This low cost active seat suspension design and the proposed controller with the easily measured feedback signals are very practical for real

  14. Digital controller design: Analysis of the annular suspension pointing system. [analog controllers with feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.

    1978-01-01

    The analog controllers of the annular suspension pointing system are designed for control of the chi, phi sub 1, and phi sub 2 bandwidth dynamics through decoupling and pole placement. Since it is virtually impossible to find an equivalent bandwidth of the overall system and establish a general eigenvalue requirement for the system, the subsystem dynamics are decoupled through state feedback and the poles are placed simultaneously to realize the desired bandwidths for the three system components. Decoupling and pole placement are also used to design the closed-loop digital system through approximation.

  15. Quaternion-based adaptive output feedback attitude control of spacecraft using Chebyshev neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zou, An-Min; Dev Kumar, Krishna; Hou, Zeng-Guang

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of output feedback attitude control of an uncertain spacecraft. Two robust adaptive output feedback controllers based on Chebyshev neural networks (CNN) termed adaptive neural networks (NN) controller-I and adaptive NN controller-II are proposed for the attitude tracking control of spacecraft. The four-parameter representations (quaternion) are employed to describe the spacecraft attitude for global representation without singularities. The nonlinear reduced-order observer is used to estimate the derivative of the spacecraft output, and the CNN is introduced to further improve the control performance through approximating the spacecraft attitude motion. The implementation of the basis functions of the CNN used in the proposed controllers depends only on the desired signals, and the smooth robust compensator using the hyperbolic tangent function is employed to counteract the CNN approximation errors and external disturbances. The adaptive NN controller-II can efficiently avoid the over-estimation problem (i.e., the bound of the CNNs output is much larger than that of the approximated unknown function, and hence, the control input may be very large) existing in the adaptive NN controller-I. Both adaptive output feedback controllers using CNN can guarantee that all signals in the resulting closed-loop system are uniformly ultimately bounded. For performance comparisons, the standard adaptive controller using the linear parameterization of spacecraft attitude motion is also developed. Simulation studies are presented to show the advantages of the proposed CNN-based output feedback approach over the standard adaptive output feedback approach.

  16. On stability theory. [of nonlinear feedback control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    It is found that under mild assumptions, feedback system stability can be concluded if one can 'topologically separate' the infinite-dimensional function space containing the system's dynamical input-output relations into two regions, one region containing the dynamical input-output relation of the 'feedforward' element of the system and the other region containing the dynamical output-input relation of the 'feedback' element. Nonlinear system stability criteria of both the input-output type and the state-space (Liapunov) type are interpreted in this context. The abstract generality and conceptual simplicity afforded by the topological separation perspective clarifies some of the basic issues underlying stability theory and serves to suggest improvements in existing stability criteria. A generalization of Zames' (1966) conic-relation stability criterion is proved, laying the foundation for improved multivariable generalizations of the frequency-domain circle stability criterion for nonlinear systems.

  17. Linear feedback control and estimation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, Markus; Bewley, Thomas R.; Henningson, Dan S.

    2003-04-01

    Modern linear control theory has recently been established as a viable tool for developing effective, spatially localized convolution kernels for the feedback control and estimation of linearized Navier Stokes systems. In the present paper, the effectiveness of these kernels for significantly expanding the basin of attraction of the laminar state in a subcritical nonlinear channel flow system is quantified using direct numerical simulations for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re_{CL}=2000, 3000 and 5000) and for a variety of initial conditions of physical interest. This is done by quantifying the change in the transition thresholds (see Reddy et al. 1998) when feedback control is applied. Such transition thresholds provide a relevant measure of performance for transition control strategies even in the nonlinear regime. Initial flow perturbations with streamwise vortices, oblique waves, and random excitations over an array of several Fourier modes are considered. It is shown that the minimum amplitude of these initial flow perturbations that is sufficient to excite nonlinear instability, and thereby promote transition to turbulence, is significantly increased by application of the control feedback. The kernels used to apply the feedback are found to decay exponentially with distance far from the origin, as predicted by the analysis of Bamieh, Paganini & Dahleh (2002). In the present paper, it is demonstrated via numerical simulation that truncation of these spatially localized convolution kernels to spatially compact kernels with finite non-zero support does not significantly degrade the effectiveness of the control feedback. In addition to the new state-feedback control results, exponential convergence of a localized physical-space state estimator with wall measurements is also demonstrated. The estimator and the full-state feedback controller are then combined to obtain a wall-information-based linear compensator. The compensator performance is also quantified, and

  18. Haptic control of the hand force feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisco, Giuseppe M.; Ortiz, Massimiliano; Barbagli, Frederico; Avizzano, Carlo A.; Bergamasco, Massimo

    1999-11-01

    The Hand Force Feedback System is an anthropomorphic haptic interface for the replication of the forces arising during grasping and fine manipulation operations. It is composed of four independent finger dorsal exoskeletons which wrap up four fingers of the human hand (the little finger is excluded). Each finger possesses three electrically actuated DOF placed in correspondence with the human finger flexion axes and a passive DOF allowing finger abduction movements.

  19. Comprehensive Joint Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint-feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, three-dimensional computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint-feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage. PMID:20923741

  20. Asymmetric interjoint feedback contributes to postural control of redundant multi-link systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunderson, Nathan E.; Ting, Lena H.; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Maintaining the postural configuration of a limb such as an arm or leg is a fundamental neural control task that involves the coordination of multiple linked body segments. Biological systems are known to use a complex network of inter- and intra-joint feedback mechanisms arising from muscles, spinal reflexes and higher neuronal structures to stabilize the limbs. While previous work has shown that a small amount of asymmetric heterogenic feedback contributes to the behavior of these systems, a satisfactory functional explanation for this non-conservative feedback structure has not been put forth. We hypothesized that an asymmetric multi-joint control strategy would confer both an energetic and stability advantage in maintaining endpoint position of a kinematically redundant system. We tested this hypothesis by using optimal control models incorporating symmetric versus asymmetric feedback with the goal of maintaining the endpoint location of a kinematically redundant, planar limb. Asymmetric feedback improved endpoint control performance of the limb by 16%, reduced energetic cost by 21% and increased interjoint coordination by 40% compared to the symmetric feedback system. The overall effect of the asymmetry was that proximal joint motion resulted in greater torque generation at distal joints than vice versa. The asymmetric organization is consistent with heterogenic stretch reflex gains measured experimentally. We conclude that asymmetric feedback has a functionally relevant role in coordinating redundant degrees of freedom to maintain the position of the hand or foot.

  1. Feedback control in a general almost periodic discrete system of plankton allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenshuang

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of almost periodic solutions for a general discrete system of plankton allelopathy with feedback controls and establish a theorem on the uniformly asymptotic stability of almost periodic solutions.

  2. Two-dimensional optical feedback control of Euglena confined in closed-type microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2011-06-07

    We examined two-dimensional (2D) optical feedback control of phototaxis flagellate Euglena cells confined in closed-type microfluidic channels (microaquariums), and demonstrated that the 2D optical feedback enables the control of the density and position of Euglena cells in microaquariums externally, flexibly, and dynamically. Using three types of feedback algorithms, the density of Euglena cells in a specified area can be controlled arbitrarily and dynamically, and more than 70% of the cells can be concentrated into a specified area. Separation of photo-sensitive/insensitive Euglena cells was also demonstrated. Moreover, Euglena-based neuro-computing has been achieved, where 16 imaginary neurons were defined as Euglena-activity levels in 16 individual areas in microaquariums. The study proves that 2D optical feedback control of photoreactive flagellate microbes is promising for microbial biology studies as well as applications such as microbe-based particle transportation in microfluidic channels or separation of photo-sensitive/insensitive microbes.

  3. A force feedback joystick and control algorithm for wheelchair obstacle avoidance.

    PubMed

    Brienza, D M; Angelo, J

    1996-03-01

    Many powered wheelchair users have difficulty manoeuvring in confined spaces. Common tasks such as traversing through doorways, turning around in halls or travelling on a straight path are complicated by an inability to accurately and reliably control the wheelchair with a joystick or other common input device, or by a sensory impairment that prevents the user from receiving feedback from the environment. An active joystick with force feedback to indicate obstacles in the environment has been developed. Two force feedback schemes designed to assist a powered wheelchair user have been developed and implemented using the active joystick. The development of the joystick and associated control algorithms are described.

  4. Method for neural network control of motion using real-time environmental feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of motion control for robotics and other automatically controlled machinery using a neural network controller with real-time environmental feedback. The method is illustrated with a two-finger robotic hand having proximity sensors and force sensors that provide environmental feedback signals. The neural network controller is taught to control the robotic hand through training sets using back- propagation methods. The training sets are created by recording the control signals and the feedback signal as the robotic hand or a simulation of the robotic hand is moved through a representative grasping motion. The data recorded is divided into discrete increments of time and the feedback data is shifted out of phase with the control signal data so that the feedback signal data lag one time increment behind the control signal data. The modified data is presented to the neural network controller as a training set. The time lag introduced into the data allows the neural network controller to account for the temporal component of the robotic motion. Thus trained, the neural network controlled robotic hand is able to grasp a wide variety of different objects by generalizing from the training sets.

  5. Controlling chaos in some laser systems via variable coupling and feedback time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahverdiev, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    We study numerically a system of two lasers cross-coupled optoelectronically with a time delay where the output intensity of each laser modulates the pump current of the other laser. We demonstrate control of chaos via variable coupling time delay by converting the laser intensity chaos to the steady-state. We also show that wavelength chaos in an electrically tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode with a feedback loop that can be controlled via variable feedback time delay.

  6. RKH space approximations for the feedback operator in a linear hereditary control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reneke, J. A.; Fennell, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Computational implementation of feedback control laws for linear hereditary systems requires the approximation of infinite dimensional feedback operators with finite dimensional operators. The dense subspaces of K-polygonal functions in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, RKH spaces, suggest finite dimensional approximations of the matrix representations of the control operators. A convergence theorem is developed for the approximations and the numerical implementation of the approximations is discussed.

  7. Nonlinear feedforward-feedback control of clutch-to-clutch shift technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bingzhao; Chen, Hong; Hu, Yunfeng; Sanada, Kazushi

    2011-12-01

    To improve the shift quality of the vehicle with clutch-to-clutch gear shifts, a nonlinear feedforward-feedback control scheme is proposed for clutch slip control during the shift inertia phase. The feedforward control is designed based on flatness in consideration of the system nonlinearities, and the linear feedback control is given to accommodate the model errors and the disturbances. Lookup tables, which are widely used to represent complex nonlinear characteristics of powertrain systems, appear in their original form in the designed feedforward controller, while the linear feedback controller is calculated through linear matrix inequalities such that the control system is robust against the parameter uncertainties. Finally, the designed controller is tested on an AMESim powertrain simulation model, which contains a time-variant model of clutch actuators.

  8. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  9. Neutron Production from Feedback Controlled Thermal Cycling of a Pyroelectric Crystal Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Meyer, G; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Kerr, P; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Naranjo, B; Putterman, S

    2007-08-09

    The LLNL Crystal Driven Neutron Source is operational and has produced record ion currents of {approx}10 nA and neutron output of 1.9 ({+-}0.3) x 10{sup 5} per thermal cycle using a crystal heating rate of 0.2 C/s from 10 C to 110 C. A 3 cm diameter by 1 cm thick LiTaO{sub 3} crystal with a socket secured field emitter tip is thermally cycled with feedback control for ionization and acceleration of deuterons onto a deuterated target to produce D-D fusion neutrons. The entire crystal and temperature system is mounted on a bellows which allows movement of the crystal along the beam axis and is completely contained on a single small vacuum flange. The modular crystal assembly permitted experimental flexibility. Operationally, flashover breakdowns along the side of the crystal and poor emitter tip characteristics can limit the neutron source. The experimental neutron results extend earlier published work by increasing the ion current and pulse length significantly to achieve a factor-of-two higher neutron output per thermal cycle. These findings are reviewed along with details of the instrument.

  10. Feedback control of plasma instabilities with charged particle beams and study of plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tham, Philip Kin-Wah

    1994-01-01

    A new non-perturbing technique for feedback control of plasma instabilities has been developed in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM). The feedback control scheme involves the injection of a feedback modulated ion beam as a remote suppressor. The ion beam was obtained from a compact ion beam source which was developed for this purpose. A Langmuir probe was used as the feedback sensor. The feedback controller consisted of a phase-shifter and amplifiers. This technique was demonstrated by stabilizing various plasma instabilities to the background noise level, like the trapped particle instability, the ExB instability and the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven instability. An important feature of this scheme is that the injected ion beam is non-perturbing to the plasma equilibrium parameters. The robustness of this feedback stabilization scheme was also investigated. The principal result is that the scheme is fairly robust, tolerating about 100% variation about the nominal parameter values. Next, this scheme is extended to the unsolved general problem of controlling multimode plasma instabilities simultaneously with a single sensor-suppressor pair. A single sensor-suppressor pair of feedback probes is desirable to reduce the perturbation caused by the probes. Two plasma instabilities the ExB and the ITG modes, were simultaneously stabilized. A simple 'state' feedback type method was used where more state information was generated from the single sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing, in this case, by differentiation. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated for the first time that by designing a more sophisticated electronic feedback controller, many plasma instabilities may be simultaneously controlled. Simple theoretical models showed generally good agreement with the feedback experimental results. On a parallel research front, a better understanding of the saturated state of a plasma instability was sought partly with the help of feedback

  11. An Integrated Enterprise Accelerator Database for the SLC Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, Terri E

    2002-08-07

    Since its inception in the early 1980's, the SLC Control System has been driven by a highly structured memory-resident real-time database. While efficient, its rigid structure and file-based sources makes it difficult to maintain and extract relevant information. The goal of transforming the sources for this database into a relational form is to enable it to be part of a Control System Enterprise Database that is an integrated central repository for SLC accelerator device and Control System data with links to other associated databases. We have taken the concepts developed for the NLC Enterprise Database and used them to create and load a relational model of the online SLC Control System database. This database contains data and structure to allow querying and reporting on beamline devices, their associations and parameters. In the future this will be extended to allow generation of EPICS and SLC database files, setup of applications and links to other databases such as accelerator maintenance, archive data, financial and personnel records, cabling information, documentation etc. The database is implemented using Oracle 8i. In the short term it will be updated daily in batch from the online SLC database. In the longer term, it will serve as the primary source for Control System static data, an R&D platform for the NLC, and contribute to SLC Control System operations.

  12. Lessons learned on the Ground Test Accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When we initiated the control system design for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), we envisioned a system that would be flexible enough to handle the changing requirements of an experimental project. This control system would use a developers` toolkit to reduce the cost and time to develop applications for GTA, and through the use of open standards, the system would accommodate unforeseen requirements as they arose. Furthermore, we would attempt to demonstrate on GTA a level of automation far beyond that achieved by existing accelerator control systems. How well did we achieve these goals? What were the stumbling blocks to deploying the control system, and what assumptions did we make about requirements that turned out to be incorrect? In this paper we look at the process of developing a control system that evolved into what is now the ``Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System`` (EPICS). Also, we assess the impact of this system on the GTA project, as well as the impact of GTA on EPICS. The lessons learned on GTA will be valuable for future projects.

  13. Load speed regulation in compliant mechanical transmission systems using feedback and feedforward control actions.

    PubMed

    Raul, P R; Dwivedula, R V; Pagilla, P R

    2016-07-01

    The problem of controlling the load speed of a mechanical transmission system consisting of a belt-pulley and gear-pair is considered. The system is modeled as two inertia (motor and load) connected by a compliant transmission. If the transmission is assumed to be rigid, then using either the motor or load speed feedback provides the same result. However, with transmission compliance, due to belts or long shafts, the stability characteristics and performance of the closed-loop system are quite different when either motor or load speed feedback is employed. We investigate motor and load speed feedback schemes by utilizing the singular perturbation method. We propose and discuss a control scheme that utilizes both motor and load speed feedback, and design an adaptive feedforward action to reject load torque disturbances. The control algorithms are implemented on an experimental platform that is typically used in roll-to-roll manufacturing and results are shown and discussed.

  14. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  15. Asynchronous switching output feedback control of discrete-time switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Wu, Fen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of dynamic output-feedback control synthesis is addressed for discrete-time switched linear systems under asynchronous switching. The proposed hybrid controller consists of a standard dynamic output-feedback switching control law and an impulsive reset law induced by controller state jumps. Using the average dwell time technique incorporating with multiple quadratic Lyapunov functions, the switching control synthesis conditions for asymptotic stability with guaranteed weighted ℓ2-gain performance are derived as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The proposed hybrid synthesis scheme advances existing design methods for output-feedback asynchronous switching control of switched linear systems in two important aspects: LMI formulation of the synthesis problem; and arbitrary order of the controller state. A numerical example is used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed design technique.

  16. A combined stochastic feedforward and feedback control design methodology with application to autoland design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1987-01-01

    A combined stochastic feedforward and feedback control design methodology was developed. The objective of the feedforward control law is to track the commanded trajectory, whereas the feedback control law tries to maintain the plant state near the desired trajectory in the presence of disturbances and uncertainties about the plant. The feedforward control law design is formulated as a stochastic optimization problem and is embedded into the stochastic output feedback problem where the plant contains unstable and uncontrollable modes. An algorithm to compute the optimal feedforward is developed. In this approach, the use of error integral feedback, dynamic compensation, control rate command structures are an integral part of the methodology. An incremental implementation is recommended. Results on the eigenvalues of the implemented versus designed control laws are presented. The stochastic feedforward/feedback control methodology is used to design a digital automatic landing system for the ATOPS Research Vehicle, a Boeing 737-100 aircraft. The system control modes include localizer and glideslope capture and track, and flare to touchdown. Results of a detailed nonlinear simulation of the digital control laws, actuator systems, and aircraft aerodynamics are presented.

  17. Corticothalamic Feedback Controls Sleep Spindle Duration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonjean, Maxime; Baker, Tanya; Lemieux, Maxime; Timofeev, Igor; Sejnowski, Terrence; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    Spindle oscillations are commonly observed during stage two of non-REM sleep. During sleep spindles, the cerebral cortex and thalamus interact through feedback connections. Both initiation and termination of spindle oscillations are thought to originate in the thalamus, based on thalamic recordings and computational models, although some in vivo results suggest otherwise. Here, we have used computer modeling and in vivo multisite recordings from the cortex and the thalamus in cats to examine the involvement of the cortex in spindle oscillations. We found that although the propagation of spindles depended on synaptic interaction within the thalamus, the initiation and termination of spindle sequences critically involved corticothalamic influences. PMID:21697364

  18. The new control system of the Saclay Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gournay, J.F.; Garreau, F.; Giraud, A.; Gourcy, G.; Rouault, J.

    1985-10-01

    A new control system for the Saclay Linear Accelerator is now being designed. The computer control architecture is based on 3 dedicated VME crates with MC68000 micro-processors : one crate with a disk-based operating system will run the high level application programs and the data base management facilities, another one will manage the man-machine communications and the third one will interface the system to the linac equipments. Communications between the VME microcomputers will be done through 16 bit parallel links. The software is modular and organized in specific layers, the data base is fully distributed. About 90% of the code is written in Fortran.

  19. Self-controlled feedback facilitates motor learning in both high and low activity individuals.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Laughlin, David D; Nguyen, Timothy V

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if high and low activity individuals differed in terms of the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance and learning of a movement skill. The task consisted of a blindfolded beanbag toss using the non-preferred arm. Participants were pre-screened according to their physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. An equal number of high activity (HA) and low activity (LA) participants were assigned to self-control (SC) and yoked (YK) feedback conditions, creating four groups: Self-Control-High Activity; Self-Control-Low Activity; Yoked-High Activity; and Yoked-Low Activity. SC condition participants were provided feedback whenever they requested it, while YK condition participants received feedback according to a schedule created by their SC counterpart. Results indicated that the SC condition was more accurate than the YK condition during acquisition and transfer phases, and the HA condition was more accurate than the LA condition during all phases of the experiment. A post-training questionnaire indicated that participants in the SC condition asked for feedback mostly after what they perceived to be "good" trials; those in the YK condition indicated that they would have preferred to receive feedback after "good" trials. This study provided further support for the advantages of self-controlled feedback when learning motor skills, additionally showing benefits for both active and less active individuals. The results suggested that the provision of self-controlled feedback to less active learners may be a potential avenue to teaching motor skills necessary to engage in greater amounts of physical activity.

  20. Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand

    PubMed Central

    Segil, Jacob L.; Clemente, Francesco; Weir, Richard F. ff; Edin, Benoni

    2015-01-01

    Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions. PMID:24992899

  1. Controlled electron injection using nanoparticles in laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung Hoon; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Nam, Chang Hee; CenterRelativistic Laser Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration is one of compact electron acceleration schemes due to its high accelerating gradient. Despite of the great progress of several GeV electron beams with high power lasers, the electron injection to the wakefield is still a critical issue for a very low density plasma 1017 electrons/cc. In this talk a novel method to control the injection using nanoparticles is proposed. We investigate the electron injection by analyzing the interaction of electrons with the two potentials - one created by a nanoparticle and the other by the wakefield. The nanoparticle creates a localized electric potential and this nanoparticle potential just slips the present wake potential. To confirm the Hamiltonian description of the interaction, a test particle calculation is performed by controlling the bubble and the nanoparticle potentials. A multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are also presented as a proof-of-principle. Comparing theoretical estimates and PIC simulation, we suggest nanoparticle parameters of size and electron density depending on the background plasma density. Our scheme can be applicable for low plasma density to break though the limitation of self-injection toward extremely high energy electron energy.

  2. High performance/low cost accelerator control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyary, S.; Glatz, J.; Lancaster, H.; Selph, F.; Fahmie, M.; Ritchie, A.; Timossi, C.; Hinkson, C.; Benjegerdes, R.

    1980-10-01

    Implementation of a high performance computer control system tailored to the requirements of the Super HILAC accelerator is described. This system uses a distributed structure with fiber optic data links; multiple CPUs operate in parallel at each node. A large number of the latest 16 bit microcomputer boards are used to get a significant processor bandwidth. Dynamically assigned and labeled knobs together with touch screens allow a flexible and efficient operator interface. An X-Y vector graphics system allows display and labeling of real time signals as well as general plotting functions. Both the accelerator parameters and the graphics system can be driven from BASIC interactive programs in addition to the precanned user routines.

  3. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach.

  4. Output-feedback MRAC of networked control systems with packet dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahoun, A. H.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, a technique of output-feedback model reference adaptive control for networked control systems is developed. The key issues of networked control systems such as channel bandwidth and data-packets dropout induced by the insertion of data networks in the feedback adaptive control loops are considered. The advantage of this article over earlier ones is that the combination of different aspects in networked control systems, output-feedback model reference control of systems with unknown parameters, and unknown data-packets dropout. Error models, adaptive laws, and stability analysis are derived in the case of uncertainty due to data-packets dropout. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated in a practical numerical example of a ship-steering adaptive system.

  5. Measuring neuromuscular control dynamics during car following with continuous haptic feedback.

    PubMed

    Abbink, David A; Mulder, Mark; van der Helm, Frans C T; Mulder, Max; Boer, Erwin R

    2011-10-01

    In previous research, a driver support system that uses continuous haptic feedback on the gas pedal to inform drivers of the separation to the lead vehicle was developed. Although haptic feedback has been previously shown to be beneficial, the influence of the underlying biomechanical properties of the driver on the effectiveness of haptic feedback is largely unknown. The goal of this paper is to experimentally determine the biomechanical properties of the ankle-foot complex (i.e., the admittance) while performing a car-following task, thereby separating driver responses to visual feedback from those to designed haptic feedback. An experiment was conducted in a simplified fixed-base driving simulator, where ten participants were instructed to follow a lead vehicle, with and without the support of haptic feedback. During the experiment, the lead vehicle velocity was perturbed, and small stochastic torque perturbations were applied to the pedal. Both perturbations were separated in the frequency domain to allow the simultaneous estimation of frequency response functions of both the car-following control behavior and the biomechanical admittance. For comparison to previous experiments, the admittance was also estimated during three classical motion control tasks (resist forces, relax, and give way to forces). The main experimental hypotheses were that, first, the haptic feedback would encourage drivers to adopt a "give way to force task," resulting in larger admittance compared with other tasks and, second, drivers needed less control effort to realize the same car-following performance. Time- and frequency-domain analyses provided evidence for both hypotheses. The developed methodology allows quantification of the range of admittances that a limb can adopt during vehicle control or while performing a variety of motion control tasks. It thereby allows detailed computational driver modeling and provides valuable information on how to design and evaluate continuous

  6. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  7. Optimal output feedback control of linear systems in presence of forcing and measurement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of obtaining an optimal control law, which is constrained to be a linear feedback of the available measurements, for both continuous and discrete time linear systems subjected to additive white process noise and measurement noise was Necessary conditions are obtained for minimizing a quadratic performance function for both finite and infinite terminal time cases. The feedback gains are constrained to be time invariant for the infinite terminal time cases. For all the cases considered, algorithms are derived for generating sequences of feedback gain matrices which successively improve the performance function. A continuous time numerical example is included for the purpose of demonstration.

  8. Composite multi-modal vibration control for a stiffened plate using non-collocated acceleration sensor and piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengquan; Li, Juan; Mo, Yueping; Zhao, Rong

    2014-01-01

    A novel active method for multi-mode vibration control of an all-clamped stiffened plate (ACSP) is proposed in this paper, using the extended-state-observer (ESO) approach based on non-collocated acceleration sensors and piezoelectric actuators. Considering the estimated capacity of ESO for system state variables, output superposition and control coupling of other modes, external excitation, and model uncertainties simultaneously, a composite control method, i.e., the ESO based vibration control scheme, is employed to ensure the lumped disturbances and uncertainty rejection of the closed-loop system. The phenomenon of phase hysteresis and time delay, caused by non-collocated sensor/actuator pairs, degrades the performance of the control system, even inducing instability. To solve this problem, a simple proportional differential (PD) controller and acceleration feed-forward with an output predictor design produce the control law for each vibration mode. The modal frequencies, phase hysteresis loops and phase lag values due to non-collocated placement of the acceleration sensor and piezoelectric patch actuator are experimentally obtained, and the phase lag is compensated by using the Smith Predictor technology. In order to improve the vibration control performance, the chaos optimization method based on logistic mapping is employed to auto-tune the parameters of the feedback channel. The experimental control system for the ACSP is tested using the dSPACE real-time simulation platform. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed composite active control algorithm is an effective approach for suppressing multi-modal vibrations.

  9. Important messages in the 'post': recent discoveries in 5-HT neurone feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Trevor; Boothman, Laura; Raley, Josie; Quérée, Philip

    2007-12-01

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) mediates important brain functions and contributes to the pathophysiology and successful drug treatment of many common psychiatric disorders, especially depression. It is established that a key mechanism involved in the control of 5-HT neurones is feedback inhibition by presynaptic 5-HT autoreceptors, which are located on 5-HT cell bodies and nerve terminals. However, recent experiments have discovered an unexpected complexity of 5-HT neurone control, specifically in the form of postsynaptic 5-HT feedback mechanisms. These mechanisms have the physiological effects of 5-HT autoreceptors but use additional 5-HT receptor subtypes and operate through neural inputs to 5-HT neurones. A postsynaptic feedback system that excites 5-HT neurones has also been reported. This article discusses current knowledge of the pharmacology and physiology of these new found 5-HT feedback mechanisms and considers their possible contribution to depression pathophysiology and utility as a resource of novel antidepressant drug strategies.

  10. Rotor-state feedback in the design of flight control laws for a hovering helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1994-01-01

    The use of rigid-body and rotor-state feedback gains in the design of helicopter flight control laws was investigated analytically on a blade element, articulated rotor, helicopter model. The study was conducted while designing a control law to meet an existing military rotorcraft handling qualities design specification (ADS-33C) in low-speed flight. A systematic approach to meet this specification was developed along with an assessment of the function of these gains in the feedback loops. Using the results of this assessment, the pitch and roll crossover behavior was easily modified by adjusting the body attitude and rotor-flap feedback gains. Critical to understanding the feedback gains is that the roll and pitch rate dynamics each have second-order behavior, not the classic first-order behavior, which arises from a quasi-static rotor, six degree-of-freedom model.

  11. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  12. Switching delayed feedback control for an electrodynamic tether system in an inclined elliptic orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Sugimoto, Tetsuro

    2010-04-01

    The chaotic librational motion of a tether system in elliptic orbit has been studied and controlled by delayed feedback control up to date. Contrary to the past literatures that addressed the periodic stability of tether systems, this paper studies the local stability of in-plane/out-of-plane motion of electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems in elliptic orbits with respect to the true anomaly. From the viewpoint of the local stability of tether systems, in this paper, provided that the electric current is used only for controlling the librational motion, a new simple delayed feedback control, named "switching delayed-feedback control (SDFC)" is proposed, which combines a delayed-feedback control (DFC) and variable structure system (VSS) concept. The effectiveness of the proposed method to stabilize the librational in-plane/out-of-plane periodic motion of an electrodynamic tether system in an inclined elliptic orbit with high eccentricity was demonstrated, and compared with that of the traditional delayed-feedback controllers by numerical simulations.

  13. Accelerated monotonic convergence of optimal control over quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-08-01

    The control of quantum dynamics is often concerned with finding time-dependent optimal control fields that can take a system from an initial state to a final state to attain the desired value of an observable. This paper presents a general method for formulating monotonically convergent algorithms to iteratively improve control fields. The formulation is based on a two-point boundary-value quantum control paradigm (TBQCP) expressed as a nonlinear integral equation of the first kind arising from dynamical invariant tracking control. TBQCP is shown to be related to various existing techniques, including local control theory, the Krotov method, and optimal control theory. Several accelerated monotonic convergence schemes for iteratively computing control fields are derived based on TBQCP. Numerical simulations are compared with the Krotov method showing that the new TBQCP schemes are efficient and remain monotonically convergent over a wide range of the iteration step parameters and the control pulse lengths, which is attributable to the trap-free character of the transition probability quantum dynamics control landscape.

  14. Delayed feedback control of time-delayed chaotic systems: Analytical approach at Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    2008-07-01

    This Letter is concerned with bifurcation and chaos control in scalar delayed differential equations with delay parameter τ. By linear stability analysis, the conditions under which a sequence of Hopf bifurcation occurs at the equilibrium points are obtained. The delayed feedback controller is used to stabilize unstable periodic orbits. To find the controller delay, it is chosen such that the Hopf bifurcation remains unchanged. Also, the controller feedback gain is determined such that the corresponding unstable periodic orbit becomes stable. Numerical simulations are used to verify the analytical results.

  15. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  16. The Construction of Plasma Density Feedback Control System on J-TEXT Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xin; Chen, Zhipeng; Ba, Weigang; Shu, Shuangbao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-02-01

    The plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) has been established on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) for meeting the need for an accurate plasma density in physical experiments. It consists of a density measurement subsystem, a feedback control subsystem and a gas puffing subsystem. According to the characteristic of the gas puffing system, a voltage amplitude control mode has been applied in the feedback control strategy, which is accomplished by the proportion, integral and differential (PID) controller. In this system, the quantity calibration of gas injection, adjusted responding to the change of the density signal, has been carried out. Some experimental results are shown and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program (Nos. 2014GB103001 and 2013GB106001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11305070 and 11105028)

  17. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  18. Feedback-Driven Mode Rotation Control by Electro-Magnetic Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; La Haye, R. J.; in, Y.; Hanson, J. M.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The recent experimental discovery of feedback-driven mode rotation control, supported by modeling, opens new approaches for avoidance of locked tearing modes that otherwise lead to disruptions. This approach is an application of electro-magnetic (EM) torque using 3D fields, routinely maximized through a simple feedback system. In DIII-D, it is observed that a feedback-applied radial field can be synchronized in phase with the poloidal field component of a large amplitude tearing mode, producing the maximum EM torque input. The mode frequency can be maintained in the 10 Hz to 100 Hz range in a well controlled manner, sustaining the discharges. Presently, in the ITER internal coils designed for edge localized mode (ELM) control can only be varied at few Hz, yet, well below the inverse wall time constant. Hence, ELM control system could in principle be used for this feedback-driven mode control in various ways. For instance, the locking of MHD modes can be avoided during the controlled shut down of multi hundreds Mega Joule EM stored energy in case of emergency. Feedback could also be useful to minimize mechanical resonances at the disruption events by forcing the MHD frequency away from dangerous ranges. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC-02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-08ER85195, and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  19. Feedback control of combustion oscillations in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Jing; Li, Dong-hai; Zhu, Min; Xue, Ya-li

    2010-11-01

    Model-based algorithms are generally employed in active control of combustion oscillations. Since practical combustion processes consist of complex thermal and acoustic couplings, their accurate models and parameters may not be obtained in advance economically, a model free controller is necessary for the control of thermoacoustic instabilities. Active compensation based control algorithm is applied in the suppression of combustion instabilities. Tuning the controller parameters on line, the amplitudes of the acoustic waves can be modulated to desired values. Simulations performed on a control oriented, typical longitudinal oscillations combustor model illustrate the controllers' capability to attenuate combustion oscillations.

  20. When Optimal Feedback Control Is Not Enough: Feedforward Strategies Are Required for Optimal Control with Active Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Sang-Hoon; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Movement planning is thought to be primarily determined by motor costs such as inaccuracy and effort. Solving for the optimal plan that minimizes these costs typically leads to specifying a time-varying feedback controller which both generates the movement and can optimally correct for errors that arise within a movement. However, the quality of the sensory feedback during a movement can depend substantially on the generated movement. We show that by incorporating such state-dependent sensory feedback, the optimal solution incorporates active sensing and is no longer a pure feedback process but includes a significant feedforward component. To examine whether people take into account such state-dependency in sensory feedback we asked people to make movements in which we controlled the reliability of sensory feedback. We made the visibility of the hand state-dependent, such that the visibility was proportional to the component of hand velocity in a particular direction. Subjects gradually adapted to such a sensory perturbation by making curved hand movements. In particular, they appeared to control the late visibility of the movement matching predictions of the optimal controller with state-dependent sensory noise. Our results show that trajectory planning is not only sensitive to motor costs but takes sensory costs into account and argues for optimal control of movement in which feedforward commands can play a significant role. PMID:27973566

  1. Combustion Control System Design of Diesel Engine via ASPR based Output Feedback Control Strategy with a PFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Tsunematsu, Junpei; Fujii, Seiya

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a design method of an output feedback control system with a simple feedforward input for a combustion model of diesel engine will be proposed based on the almost strictly positive real-ness (ASPR-ness) of the controlled system for a combustion control of diesel engines. A parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) design scheme which renders the resulting augmented controlled system ASPR will also be proposed in order to design a stable output feedback control system for the considered combustion model. The effectiveness of our proposed method will be confirmed through numerical simulations.

  2. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Decentralized Feedback Controllers for Exponential Stabilization of Hybrid Periodic Orbits: Application to Robotic Walking*

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Kaveh Akbari; Gregg, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic algorithm to design time-invariant decentralized feedback controllers to exponentially stabilize periodic orbits for a class of hybrid dynamical systems arising from bipedal walking. The algorithm assumes a class of parameterized and nonlinear decentralized feedback controllers which coordinate lower-dimensional hybrid subsystems based on a common phasing variable. The exponential stabilization problem is translated into an iterative sequence of optimization problems involving bilinear and linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved with available software packages. A set of sufficient conditions for the convergence of the iterative algorithm to a stabilizing decentralized feedback control solution is presented. The power of the algorithm is demonstrated by designing a set of local nonlinear controllers that cooperatively produce stable walking for a 3D autonomous biped with 9 degrees of freedom, 3 degrees of underactuation, and a decentralization scheme motivated by amputee locomotion with a transpelvic prosthetic leg. PMID:27990059

  4. Output-feedback stabilisation for a class of switched nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2013-03-01

    This article investigates the problem of global stabilisation for a class of switched nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients by output feedback. Full state measurements are unavailable. We first show that via a coordinate transformation, the unknown control coefficients are lumped together and the original switched nonlinear system is transformed into a new switched nonlinear system for which control design becomes feasible. Second, for the new switched nonlinear system, based on backstepping, we design output-feedback controllers for subsystems and construct a common Lyapunov function, which rely on the designed state observer, to guarantee asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system under arbitrary switchings. Finally, as an application of the proposed design method, global stabilisation of a mass-spring-damper system is achieved by output feedback.

  5. Enhancement of mobility in an interacting colloidal system under feedback control.

    PubMed

    Gernert, Robert; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-08-01

    Feedback control schemes are a promising way to manipulate transport properties of driven colloidal suspensions. In the present article, we suggest a feedback scheme to enhance the collective transport of colloidal particles with repulsive interactions through a one-dimensional tilted washboard potential. The control is modeled by a harmonic confining potential, mimicking an optical "trap," with the center of this trap moving with the (instantaneous) mean particle position. Our theoretical analysis is based on the Smoluchowski equation combined with dynamical density functional theory for systems with hard-core or ultrasoft (Gaussian) interactions. For either type of interaction, we find that the feedback control can lead to an enhancement of the mobility by several orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The largest effects occur for intermediate stiffness of the trap and large particle numbers. Moreover, in some regions of the parameter space the feedback control induces oscillations of the mean velocity. Finally, we show that the enhancement of mobility is robust against a small time delay in implementing the feedback control.

  6. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  7. A Kalman filter for feedback control of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; De Bono, Bryan; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Mauel, Michael E.; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Shiraki, Daisuke; James, Royce W.

    2009-05-15

    The simulation and experimental optimization of a Kalman filter feedback control algorithm for n=1 tokamak external kink modes are reported. In order to achieve the highest plasma pressure limits in ITER, resistive wall mode stabilization is required [T. C. Hender et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S128 (2007)] and feedback algorithms will need to distinguish the mode from noise due to other magnetohydrodynamic activity. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. This model is actively compared with real-time measurements to produce an optimal estimate for the mode's amplitude and phase. On the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse experiment [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)], the Kalman filter algorithm is implemented using a set of digital, field-programmable gate array controllers with 10 {mu}s latencies. Signals from an array of 20 poloidal sensor coils are used to measure the n=1 mode, and the feedback control is applied using 40 poloidally and toroidally localized control coils. The feedback system with the Kalman filter is able to suppress the external kink mode over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field. Scans of filter parameters show good agreement between simulation and experiment, and feedback suppression and excitation of the kink mode are enhanced in experiments when a filter made using optimal parameters from the scans is used.

  8. Performance Optimization of Force Feedback Control System in Virtual Vascular Intervention Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  9. Feedback control of biomimetic exotendon device for hand rehabilitation in stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Many hand exoskeleton devices have recently been developed for hand rehabilitation of stroke survivors, but most hand exoskeletons focused on implementing joint movement driven by individual actuator located at the finger joints rather than considering function of hand muscle-tendons and their coordination. In order to achieve hand rehabilitation targeted on restoration of specific muscle-tendon functions, a biomimetic hand exotendon device (BiomHED) was introduced recently. This paper introduces a ring-type design of exotendon device for easier donning and the design of a feedback control system for controlling posture of the finger. Technical details of the feedback sensor and controller with preliminary experimental results are presented.

  10. Finite-Time Control by Observer-Based Output Feedback for Linear Discrete-Time Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Hitoshi

    In this paper we consider finite-time stabilization and finite-time boundedness control problems for time-varying discrete-time systems. We give a set of sufficient conditions, in terms of difference LMIs, for the existence of observer-based output feedback controllers that make the system finite-time stable and finite-time bounded. We then reduce the obtained results to the ones for time-invariant discrete-time systems and derive numerically tractable sufficient conditions given by LMIs. We also show numerical examples to illustrate the design methods of observer-based output feedback controllers.

  11. Output-Feedback Model Predictive Control of a Pasteurization Pilot Plant based on an LPV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Pour, Fatemeh; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Puig, Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control (MPC) of a pasteurization pilot plant based on an LPV model. Since not all the states are measured, an observer is also designed, which allows implementing an output-feedback MPC scheme. However, the model of the plant is not completely observable when augmented with the disturbance models. In order to solve this problem, the following strategies are used: (i) the whole system is decoupled into two subsystems, (ii) an inner state-feedback controller is implemented into the MPC control scheme. A real-time example based on the pasteurization pilot plant is simulated as a case study for testing the behavior of the approaches.

  12. Nonlinear Time Delayed Feedback Control of Aeroelastic Systems: A Functional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to its intrinsic practical importance, nonlinear time delayed feedback control applied to lifting surfaces can result in interesting aeroelastic behaviors. In this paper, nonlinear aeroelastic response to external time-dependent loads and stability boundary for actively controlled lifting surfaces, in an incompressible flow field, are considered. The structural model and the unsteady aerodynamics are considered linear. The implications of the presence of time delays in the linear/nonlinear feedback control and of geometrical parameters on the aeroelasticity of lifting surfaces are analyzed and conclusions on their implications are highlighted.

  13. Smart feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gribov, I. V.; Gudkov, K. A.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    1994-12-01

    It is necessary to find the golden mean in allocating the processing resources of a computer control system. Traditionally, feedback loops operate at the lower levels to ensure safe and stable operation of the accelerator. At present we use analogue and digital feedback loops. Some systems, such as the RF, require more complex algorithms. A possible way of providing these, using digital signal processors is described. The results of tests with the Race-Track Microtron Linac are given and the sources of the main internal and external disturbances have been analysed.

  14. Dynamic control of robot arms in tasks space using nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Tarn, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Differential geometric system and control theory is used to develop a new dynamic system feedback technique for robot task space commands. The nonlinear robot arm system is feedback-linearized and simultaneously is output-decoupled by an appropriate nonlinear feedback and nonlinear coordinate transformation. On the joint space level, the scheme only commands drive forces or torques or their equivalent quantities addressed to the joint drives. An important property of the technique is that the planned and commanded task space trajectory together with its time derivatives directly drive the robot arm through a linear system model. A method for task space motion planning matching the requirements of the new scheme is briefly presented. The implications of the new technique for second and third order model robot arms with and without force feedback measuremnts and for two or more dynamically cooperating robot arms are discussed.

  15. Receding horizon output feedback control for constrained uncertain systems using periodic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae Sik; Son, Sung Yong; Lee, Young Il

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we consider a receding horizon output feedback control (RHOC) method for linear discrete-time systems with polytopic model uncertainties and input constraints. First, we derive a set of estimator gains and then we obtain, on the basis of the periodic invariance, a series of state feedback gains stabilising the augmented output feedback system with these estimator gains. These procedures are formulated as linear matrix inequalities. An RHOC strategy is proposed based on these state feedback and state estimator gains in conjunction with their corresponding periodically invariant sets. The proposed RHOC strategy enhances the performance in comparison with the case in which static periodic gains are used, and increases the size of the stabilisable region by introducing a degree of freedom to steer the augmented state into periodically invariant sets.

  16. An Active Noise Control (ACN) system for a commercially available HVAC using feedback architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbekar, Prashanth

    This thesis report discusses design of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system for a commercially available HVAC using Feedback architecture. Reducing noise in living environments is an important problem to create quieter residential and work places. The main contributions of this thesis include development of a real time, stable and fast single channel Feedback ANC prototype ANC using a FPGA to cancel the compressor noise. Based on observations from the real time implementation a multichannel Feedback ANC with novel delayless subband architecture has been developed to reduce computational complexity and to improve performance. This work represents an important step in developing an ANC system for the HVAC due to application of novel delayless subband multichannel Feedback ANC algorithm on real data collected from the HVAC system. It also discusses the practical issues involved in developing an ANC system prototype using a FPGA.

  17. A wearable skin stretch haptic feedback device: Towards improving balance control in lower limb amputees.

    PubMed

    Husman, M A B; Maqbool, H F; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2016-08-01

    Haptic feedback to lower limb amputees is essential to maximize the functionality of a prosthetic device by providing information to the user about the interaction with the environment and the position of the prostheses in space. Severed sensory pathway and the absence of connection between the prosthesis and the Central Nervous System (CNS) after lower limb amputation reduces balance control, increases visual dependency and increases risk of falls among amputees. This work describes the design of a wearable haptic feedback device for lower limb amputees using lateral skin-stretch modality intended to serve as a feedback cue during ambulation. A feedback scheme was proposed based on gait event detection for possible real-time postural adjustment. Preliminary perceptual test with healthy subjects in static condition was carried out and the results indicated over 98% accuracy in determining stimuli location around the upper leg region, suggesting good perceptibility of the delivered stimuli.

  18. Circadian Neuron Feedback Controls the Drosophila Sleep-Activity Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Junwei; Jung, Hyung Jae; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Luo, Weifei; Griffith, Leslie C.; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the ability of Drosophila circadian neurons to promote sleep. We show here with optogenetic manipulations and video recording that a subset of dorsal clock neurons (DN1s) are potent sleep-promoting cells, releasing glutamate to directly inhibit key pacemaker neurons. These pacemakers promote morning arousal by activating these same DN1s, implying that there is a late-day feedback circuit to drive siesta and nighttime sleep. To address more plastic aspects of the sleep program, we used a novel calcium assay to monitor and compared the real-time DN1 activity of freely behaving males and females. It revealed a dramatic sexual dimorphism, which parallels the well-known difference in daytime sleep. DN1 activity is also enhanced by elevated temperature, consistent with its known effect on sleep. These new approaches indicate that the DN1s have a major impact on the fly sleep-wake profile and integrate environmental information with the circadian molecular program. PMID:27479324

  19. Feedback stabilization and control of linear neutral systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Spong, M. W.; Ito, K.

    1982-01-01

    The first problem treated here is the realization and stabilization of linear neutral systems with discrete delays. It is shown that any autonomous linear neutral system with discrete delays is zero-state equivalent to an abstract linear system over a local ring of operators. Using the abstract model, the basic existence question for neutral realization is then settled. For general infinite dimensional linear systems, there is no precise analog of the finite dimensional state space isomorphism theorem. Because of this, the notion of spectral minimality must be introduced. For the case of single input-single output systems, realizations are obtained that are both minimal and spectrally minimal. Using the Cruz-Hale theory of stable D-operators, conditions are given that ensure that any poles introduced into the realization are strictly contained in the left half plane and indeed are characterized as characteristic values of the D-operator. The problem of the feedback stabilization of neutral systems is then considered using the abstract model. It is shown that, for neutral systems with commensurable delays and a stable D-operator in the sense of Cruz and Hale, Morses theorem (1976) on pole assignment over a PID implies stabilizability in the reachable case.

  20. Combining a feedback linearization controller with a disturbance observer to control a chaotic system under external excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Chyun-Chau; Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Yao, Wei-Hann

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust controller which combines a feedback linearization controller with a disturbance observer. This controller can suppress the chaotic motion of an unknown nonlinear system even though it receives an unknown external force. Two numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  1. Computer Simulated Visual and Tactile Feedback as an Aid to Manipulator and Vehicle Control,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-08

    STATEMENT ........................ 8 Artificial Intellegence Versus Supervisory Control ....... 8 Computer Generation of Operator Feedback...operator. Artificial Intelligence Versus Supervisory Control The use of computers to aid human operators can be divided into two catagories: artificial ...operator. Artificial intelligence ( A. I. ) attempts to give the computer maximum intelligence and to replace all operator functions by the computer

  2. Robust synchronization of chaotic Lur'e systems via delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cailian; Feng, Gang; Guan, Xinping

    2004-02-01

    This Letter presents a robust synchronization method for a class of chaotic Lur'e systems based on its T-S fuzzy model and the delayed feedback control (DFC) scheme. The controlled slave system can adaptively track the master system under the circumstances of system uncertainties and external disturbances.

  3. Optimal Control Allocation with Load Sensor Feedback for Active Load Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    These slide sets describe the OCLA formulation and associated algorithms as a set of new technologies in the first practical application of load limiting flight control utilizing load feedback as a primary control measurement. Slide set one describes Experiment Development and slide set two describes Flight-Test Performance.

  4. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.; King, Robert D.; Sanza, Peter C.; Haefner, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation.

  5. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.; King, R.D.; Sanza, P.C.; Haefner, K.B.

    1992-11-24

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation. 1 figure.

  6. The inhibitory microcircuit of the substantia nigra provides feedback gain control of the basal ganglia output

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jennifer; Pan, Wei-Xing; Dudman, Joshua Tate

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the basal ganglia produces severe deficits in the timing, initiation, and vigor of movement. These diverse impairments suggest a control system gone awry. In engineered systems, feedback is critical for control. By contrast, models of the basal ganglia highlight feedforward circuitry and ignore intrinsic feedback circuits. In this study, we show that feedback via axon collaterals of substantia nigra projection neurons control the gain of the basal ganglia output. Through a combination of physiology, optogenetics, anatomy, and circuit mapping, we elaborate a general circuit mechanism for gain control in a microcircuit lacking interneurons. Our data suggest that diverse tonic firing rates, weak unitary connections and a spatially diffuse collateral circuit with distinct topography and kinetics from feedforward input is sufficient to implement divisive feedback inhibition. The importance of feedback for engineered systems implies that the intranigral microcircuit, despite its absence from canonical models, could be essential to basal ganglia function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02397.001 PMID:24849626

  7. Observer-Based State Feedback for Enhanced Insulin Control of Type ‘I’ Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type ‘I’ diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink. PMID:22276077

  8. Observer-based state feedback for enhanced insulin control of type 'i' diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type 'I' diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink.

  9. Accelerated radiation damping for increased spin equilibrium (ARISE): a new method for controlling the recovery of longitudinal magnetization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Susie Y; Witzel, Thomas; Wald, Lawrence L

    2008-11-01

    Control of the longitudinal magnetization in fast gradient-echo (GRE) sequences is an important factor in enabling the high efficiency of balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequences. We introduce a new method for accelerating the return of the longitudinal magnetization to the +z-axis that is independent of externally applied RF pulses and shows improved off-resonance performance. The accelerated radiation damping for increased spin equilibrium (ARISE) method uses an external feedback circuit to strengthen the radiation damping (RD) field. The enhanced RD field rotates the magnetization back to the +z-axis at a rate faster than T(1) relaxation. The method is characterized in GRE phantom imaging at 3T as a function of feedback gain, phase, and duration, and compared with results from numerical simulations of the Bloch equations incorporating RD. A short period of feedback (10 ms) during a refocused interval of a crushed GRE sequence allowed greater than 99% recovery of the longitudinal magnetization when very little T(2) relaxation had time to occur. An appropriate application might be to improve navigated sequences. Unlike conventional flip-back schemes, the ARISE "flip-back" is generated by the spins themselves, thereby offering a potentially useful building block for enhancing GRE sequences.

  10. Structural tailoring and feedback control synthesis - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    Structural tailoring provides an attractive method to optimize the performance of actively controlled space structures. However, the simultaneous optimization of control gains and structural properties often becomes prohibitively expensive for large systems and physical insight is often lost in the resulting control law. This paper presents a method for optimization of the closed loop structural system using only structural tailoring. Optimal Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control theory is used with weighting matrices chosen based on physical considerations. The LQR control law depends only on two scalar gains and the structural properties. Hence, the closed loop-performance can be expressed in terms of the structural parameters. Results are given for a beam and a truss-beam to show the simplicity of the method and the importance of structural tailoring to increase dynamic performance and to reduce the control effort.

  11. Computer control of large accelerators design concepts and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.; Gormley, M.

    1984-05-01

    Unlike most of the specialities treated in this volume, control system design is still an art, not a science. These lectures are an attempt to produce a primer for prospective practitioners of this art. A large modern accelerator requires a comprehensive control system for commissioning, machine studies and day-to-day operation. Faced with the requirement to design a control system for such a machine, the control system architect has a bewildering array of technical devices and techniques at his disposal, and it is our aim in the following chapters to lead him through the characteristics of the problems he will have to face and the practical alternatives available for solving them. We emphasize good system architecture using commercially available hardware and software components, but in addition we discuss the actual control strategies which are to be implemented since it is at the point of deciding what facilities shall be available that the complexity of the control system and its cost are implicitly decided. 19 references.

  12. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of aerodynamic pressure differentials to position a control surface is evaluated. The system is a differential pressure command loop, analogous to a position command loop, where the surface is commanded to move until a desired differential pressure across the surface is achieved. This type of control is more direct and accurate because it is the differential pressure which causes the control forces and moments. A frequency response test was performed in a low speed wind tunnel to measure the performance of the system. Both pressure and position feedback were tested. The pressure feedback performed as well as position feedback implying that the actuator, with a break frequency on the order of 10 Rad/sec, was the limiting component. Theoretical considerations indicate that aerodynamic lags will not appear below frequencies of 50 Rad/sec, or higher.

  13. The Total Synthesis Problem of linear multivariable control. II - Unity feedback and the design morphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Antsaklis, P. J.; Gejji, R. R.; Wyman, B. F.; Peczkowski, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Zames (1981) has observed that there is, in general, no 'separation principle' to guarantee optimality of a division between control law design and filtering of plant uncertainty. Peczkowski and Sain (1978) have solved a model matching problem using transfer functions. Taking into consideration this investigation, Peczkowski et al. (1979) proposed the Total Synthesis Problem (TSP), wherein both the command/output-response and command/control-response are to be synthesized, subject to the plant constraint. The TSP concept can be subdivided into a Nominal Design Problem (NDP), which is not dependent upon specific controller structures, and a Feedback Synthesis Problem (FSP), which is. Gejji (1980) found that NDP was characterized in terms of the plant structural matrices and a single, 'good' transfer function matrix. Sain et al. (1981) have extended this NDP work. The present investigation is concerned with a study of FSP for the unity feedback case. NDP, together with feedback synthesis, is understood as a Total Synthesis Problem.

  14. Adaptive fuzzy decentralised control for stochastic nonlinear large-scale systems in pure-feedback form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shaocheng; Xu, Yinyin; Li, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control for a class of uncertain stochastic nonlinear pure-feedback large-scale systems with completely unknown functions, the mismatched interconnections and without requiring the states being available for controller design. With the help of fuzzy logic systems approximating the unknown nonlinear functions, a fuzzy state observer is designed estimating the unmeasured states. Therefore, the nonlinear filtered signals are incorporated into the backstepping recursive design, and an adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control scheme is developed. It is proved that the filter system converges to a small neighbourhood of the origin based on appropriate choice of the design parameters. Simulation studies are included illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. W.; Cameron, B. J.

    1991-12-01

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1 percent at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of approximately 2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs3Sb and the K2CsSb. The most stable material found is the K2CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250 C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used on cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25 percent loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  16. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, R.W.; Cameron, B.J.

    1991-12-20

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1% at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of {approximately}2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs{sub 3}Sb and the K{sub 2}CsSb. The most stable material found is the K{sub 2}CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250{degrees}C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25% loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  17. A feedback linearization approach to spacecraft control using momentum exchange devices. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzielski, John Edward

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of nonlinear control theory have shown how coordiante changes in the state and input spaces can be used with nonlinear feedback to transform certain nonlinear ordinary differential equations into equivalent linear equations. These feedback linearization techniques are applied to resolve two problems arising in the control of spacecraft equipped with control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). The first application involves the computation of rate commands for the gimbals that rotate the individual gyroscopes to produce commanded torques on the spacecraft. The second application is to the long-term management of stored momentum in the system of control moment gyroscopes using environmental torques acting on the vehicle. An approach to distributing control effort among a group of redundant actuators is described that uses feedback linearization techniques to parameterize sets of controls which influence a specified subsystem in a desired way. The approach is adapted for use in spacecraft control with double-gimballed gyroscopes to produce an algorithm that avoids problematic gimbal configurations by approximating sets of gimbal rates that drive CMG rotors into desirable configurations. The momentum management problem is stated as a trajectory optimization problem with a nonlinear dynamical constraint. Feedback linearization and collocation are used to transform this problem into an unconstrainted nonlinear program. The approach to trajectory optimization is fast and robust. A number of examples are presented showing applications to the proposed NASA space station.

  18. Optimal velocity model with consideration of the lateral effect and its feedback control research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. Z.; Ge, H. X.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a car-following model with the consideration of lateral effect is constructed. An improved control signal with considering more comprehensive information is introduced according to the feedback control theory. The stability conditions with control signal or not are derived. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the advantage of the modified model with and without the control signal, and the results are consistent with the analytical ones.

  19. Use of feedback control to address flight safety issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Subhabrata

    This thesis addresses three control problems related to flight safety. The first problem relates to the scope of improvement in performance of conventional flight control laws. In particular, aircraft longitudinal axis control based on the Total Energy Control System (TECS) is studied. The research draws attention to a potentially sluggish and undesirable aircraft response when the engine dynamics is slow (typically the case). The proposed design method uses a theoretically well-developed modern design method based on Hinfinity optimization to improve the aircraft dynamic behavior in spite of slow engine characteristics. At the same time, the proposed design method achieves other desirable performance goals such as insensitivity to sensor noise and wind gust rejection: all addressed in one unified framework. The second problem is based on a system level analysis of control structure hierarchy for aircraft flight control. The objective of the analysis problem is to translate outer-loop stability and performance specifications into a comprehensive inner-loop metric. The prime motivation is to make the flight control design process more systematic and the system-integration reliable and independent of design methodology. The analysis problem is posed within the robust control analysis framework. Structured singular value techniques and free controller parameterization ideas are used to impose a hierarchical structure for flight control architecture. The third problem involves development and demonstration of a new reconfiguration strategy in the flight control architecture that has the potential of improving flight safety while keeping cost and complexity low. This research proposes a fault tolerant feature based on active robust reconfiguration. The fault tolerant control problem is formulated in the Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) design framework. A prime advantage of this approach is that the synthesis results in a single nonlinear controller (as opposed to a bank

  20. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  1. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulou, Georgia; Maaswinkel, Erwin; Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a stable or unstable surface, with or without each of four sensory manipulations: visual (eyes open/closed), vestibular (left and right galvanic vestibular stimulation alternating at 0.25 Hz), proprioceptive (left and right paraspinal muscle vibration alternating at 0.25 Hz), and tactile (minimal finger contact with object moving in the frontal plane at 0.25 Hz). The root mean square (RMS) and the power at 0.25 Hz (P25) of the ML trunk acceleration were the dependent variables. The latter was analyzed only for the rhythmic sensory manipulations and the reference condition. RMS was always significantly larger on the unstable than the stable surface. Closing the eyes caused a significant increase in RMS, more so on the unstable surface. Vestibular stimulation significantly increased RMS and P25 and more so on the unstable surface. Main effects of the proprioceptive manipulation were significant, but the interactions with surface condition were not. Finally, also tactile manipulation increased RMS and P25, but did not interact with surface condition. Sensory information in feedback control of trunk posture appears to be reweighted depending on stability of the environment. The absolute effects of visual and vestibular manipulations increase on an unstable surface, suggesting a relative decrease in the weights of proprioceptive and tactile information.

  2. Haptic feedback enhances rhythmic motor control by reducing variability, not improving convergence rate.

    PubMed

    Ankarali, M Mert; Tutkun Sen, H; De, Avik; Okamura, Allison M; Cowan, Noah J

    2014-03-01

    Stability and performance during rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion are critical for survival across taxa: falling down would bode well for neither cheetah nor gazelle. Little is known about how haptic feedback, particularly during discrete events such as the heel-strike event during walking, enhances rhythmic behavior. To determine the effect of haptic cues on rhythmic motor performance, we investigated a virtual paddle juggling behavior, analogous to bouncing a table tennis ball on a paddle. Here, we show that a force impulse to the hand at the moment of ball-paddle collision categorically improves performance over visual feedback alone, not by regulating the rate of convergence to steady state (e.g., via higher gain feedback or modifying the steady-state hand motion), but rather by reducing cycle-to-cycle variability. This suggests that the timing and state cues afforded by haptic feedback decrease the nervous system's uncertainty of the state of the ball to enable more accurate control but that the feedback gain itself is unaltered. This decrease in variability leads to a substantial increase in the mean first passage time, a measure of the long-term metastability of a stochastic dynamical system. Rhythmic tasks such as locomotion and juggling involve intermittent contact with the environment (i.e., hybrid transitions), and the timing of such transitions is generally easy to sense via haptic feedback. This timing information may improve metastability, equating to less frequent falls or other failures depending on the task.

  3. Design of proportional-derivative-type state feedback controllers for congestion control of transmission control protocol networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, Masoumeh; Beheshti, Mohammad T. H.; Tavassoli, Babak

    2015-07-01

    A new proportional-derivative-type state feedback controller is proposed for congestion control of transmission control protocol (TCP) networks. An analytical TCP model is adopted. In the proposed control scheme, it is possible to efficiently control the TCP traffic using only the queue length at the router without the need to know the TCP window size which is not available locally. The results are presented in terms of delay-dependent linear matrix inequality. The proposed method is verified by simulation examples using NS software, and the effectiveness and superiority of our method over other control schemes, such as the proportional-integral, random early detection and generalised minimum variancemethods, are also shown.

  4. Frequency modulated cutaneous orientation feedback from artificial arms. [dynamic control model of human arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomonow, M.; Freedy, A.; Lyman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the human arm, emphasizing the neuromuscular mechanisms of feedback control, has been constructed. The various parameters and functions of physiological receptors in the feedback section have been classified into an automated category that can be incorporated in the prosthesis servo loop, and into a sensory category that should be communicated to the operator if control and dynamic performance are to be optimized. A scheme for simultaneous display of two such sensory parameters, i.e., fingertip pressure and elbow position, has been developed, implemented and evaluated. The neurophysiological mechanism of such displays, and the feasibility of sensory transformation, is discussed in this paper.

  5. Feedback control of two-mode output entanglement and steering in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Muhammad; Tombesi, Paolo; Vitali, David

    2016-11-01

    We show that the closed-loop control obtained by feeding back the derivative of the signal from the homodyne measurement of one mode of the light exiting a two-mode optical cavity interacting with a mechanical resonator permits us to control and increase optical output entanglement. In particular, the proposed feedback-enhanced setup allows us to achieve a fidelity of coherent-state teleportation greater than the threshold value of 2/3 for secure teleportation and two-way steering between the two cavities' output modes down the line in the presence of loss, which otherwise would not be possible without feedback.

  6. An overview of neural function and feedback control in human communication.

    PubMed

    Hood, L J

    1998-01-01

    The speech and hearing mechanisms depend on accurate sensory information and intact feedback mechanisms to facilitate communication. This article provides a brief overview of some components of the nervous system important for human communication and some electrophysiological methods used to measure cortical function in humans. An overview of automatic control and feedback mechanisms in general and as they pertain to the speech motor system and control of the hearing periphery is also presented, along with a discussion of how the speech and auditory systems interact.

  7. Active feedback control for stabilization of vibration in rotating machinery (24. 034). Period covered: April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Some of the considerations involved in the use of feedback control as a means of reducing the unbalanced response of a rotor or of eliminating or alleviating rotor dynamic instability are discussed. A simple model of a mass on a flexible shaft is used to illustrate the application of feedback control concepts. A description is given of a system assembled at the University of Virginia which uses feedback control individually adjustable in the vertical and horizontal directions to support the shaft bearings.

  8. LQG and direct rate feedback control with model reduction on a flexible laboratory grid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schamel, G. C., II; Haftka, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and theoretical comparisons of three control laws applied to a complex laboratory structure. A reduced finite element model was generated for designing the control systems and then corrected based on measured mode shapes and frequencies. A standard time-invariant linear quadratic regulator with state estimation was investigated first. Two simple direct rate feedback control laws both guaranteeing stability were also designed using the reduced model. One minimizes the maximum control force and the other minimizes the same quadratic performance index as the linear quadratic regulator. The three control laws have comparable performance indices with the direct rate feedback designs having better spillover properties. Experimental results for all designs were obtained with digital implementation. It was shown that the performance of the control system designed on the basis of the corrected finite element model agreed better with experimental results than the performance of the control system designed on the basis of the uncorrected model.

  9. Neural network-based optimal adaptive output feedback control of a helicopter UAV.

    PubMed

    Nodland, David; Zargarzadeh, Hassan; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2013-07-01

    Helicopter unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are widely used for both military and civilian operations. Because the helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems, high-performance controller design for them presents a challenge. This paper introduces an optimal controller design via an output feedback for trajectory tracking of a helicopter UAV, using a neural network (NN). The output-feedback control system utilizes the backstepping methodology, employing kinematic and dynamic controllers and an NN observer. The online approximator-based dynamic controller learns the infinite-horizon Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation in continuous time and calculates the corresponding optimal control input by minimizing a cost function, forward-in-time, without using the value and policy iterations. Optimal tracking is accomplished by using a single NN utilized for the cost function approximation. The overall closed-loop system stability is demonstrated using Lyapunov analysis. Finally, simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design for trajectory tracking.

  10. Adaptive Predictor-Based Output Feedback Control for a Class of Unknown MIMO Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong Hoang; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the problem of characterizing adaptive output feedback control laws for a general class of unknown MIMO linear systems is considered. Specifically, the presented control approach relies on three components, i.e., a predictor, a reference model and a controller. The predictor is designed to predict the system's output with arbitrary accuracy, for any admissible control input. Subsequently, a full state feedback control law is designed to control the predictor output to approach the reference system, while the reference system tracks the desired trajectory. Ultimately, the control objective of driving the actual system output to track the desired trajectories is achieved by showing that the system output, the predictor output and the reference system trajectories all converge to each other.

  11. Biomolecular implementation of a quasi sliding mode feedback controller based on DNA strand displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Sawlekar, Rucha; Montefusco, Francesco; Kulkarni, Vishwesh; Bates, Declan G

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental aim of synthetic biology is to achieve the capability to design and implement robust embedded biomolecular feedback control circuits. An approach to realize this objective is to use abstract chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a programming language for the design of complex circuits and networks. Here, we employ this approach to facilitate the implementation of a class of nonlinear feedback controllers based on sliding mode control theory. We show how a set of two-step irreversible reactions with ultrasensitive response dynamics can provide a biomolecular implementation of a nonlinear quasi sliding mode (QSM) controller. We implement our controller in closed-loop with a prototype of a biological pathway and demonstrate that the nonlinear QSM controller outperforms a traditional linear controller by facilitating faster tracking response dynamics without introducing overshoots in the transient response.

  12. Adaptive Fuzzy Bounded Control for Consensus of Multiple Strict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tong, Shaocheng

    2017-01-10

    This paper studies the adaptive fuzzy bounded control problem for leader-follower multiagent systems, where each follower is modeled by the uncertain nonlinear strict-feedback system. Combining the fuzzy approximation with the dynamic surface control, an adaptive fuzzy control scheme is developed to guarantee the output consensus of all agents under directed communication topologies. Different from the existing results, the bounds of the control inputs are known as a priori, and they can be determined by the feedback control gains. To realize smooth and fast learning, a predictor is introduced to estimate each error surface, and the corresponding predictor error is employed to learn the optimal fuzzy parameter vector. It is proved that the developed adaptive fuzzy control scheme guarantees the uniformly ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop systems, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. The simulation results and comparisons are provided to show the validity of the control strategy presented in this paper.

  13. Robust multi-objective optimization of state feedback controllers for heat exchanger system with probabilistic uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Babak; Wang, Qiuwang

    2013-07-01

    The performance of thermal control systems has, in recent years, improved in numerous ways due to developments in control theory and information technology. The shell-and-tube heat exchanger (STHX) is a medium where heat transfer process occurred. The accuracy of the heat exchanger depends on the performance of both elements. Therefore, both components need to be controlled in order to achieve a substantial result in the process. For this purpose, the actual dynamics of both shell and tube of the heat exchanger is crucial. In this paper, optimal reliability-based multi-objective Pareto design of robust state feedback controllers for a STHX having parameters with probabilistic uncertainties. Accordingly, the probabilities of failure of those objective functions are also considered in the reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) approach. A new multi-objective uniform-diversity genetic algorithm (MUGA) is presented and used for Pareto optimum design of linear state feedback controllers for STHX problem. In this way, Pareto front of optimum controllers is first obtained for the nominal deterministic STHX using the conflicting objective functions in time domain. Such Pareto front is then obtained for STHX having probabilistic uncertainties in its parameters using the statistical moments of those objective functions through a Hammersley Sequence Sampling (HSS) approach. It is shown that multi-objective reliability-based Pareto optimization of the robust state feedback controllers using MUGA includes those that may be obtained by various crisp threshold values of probability of failures and, thus, remove the difficulty of selecting suitable crisp values. Besides, the multi-objective Pareto optimization of such robust feedback controllers using MUGA unveils some very important and informative trade-offs among those objective functions. Consequently, some optimum robust state feedback controllers can be compromisingly chosen from the Pareto frontiers.

  14. Modelling Robust Feedback Control Mechanisms That Ensure Reliable Coordination of Histone Gene Expression with DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Corrigall, Holly; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are key elements in the packing of eukaryotic DNA into chromosomes. A little understood control system ensures that histone gene expression is balanced with DNA replication so that histone proteins are produced in appropriate amounts. Disturbing or disrupting this system affects genome stability and gene expression, and has detrimental consequences for human development and health. It has been proposed that feedback control involving histone proteins contributes to this regulation and there is evidence implicating cell cycle checkpoint molecules activated when DNA synthesis is impaired in this control. We have developed mathematical models that incorporate these control modes in the form of inhibitory feedback of histone gene expression from free histone proteins, and alternatively a direct link that couples histone RNA synthesis to DNA synthesis. Using our experimental evidence and related published data we provide a simplified description of histone protein synthesis during S phase. Both models reproduce the coordination of histone gene expression with DNA replication during S phase and the down-regulation of histone RNA when DNA synthesis is interrupted, but only the model incorporating histone protein feedback control was able to effectively simulate the coordinate expression of a simplified histone gene family. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach supports the hypothesis that the regulation of histone gene expression involves feedback control. PMID:27798685

  15. Application of nonlinear feedback control theory to supermaneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Enns, Dale F.

    1991-01-01

    Controlled flight at extremely high angles of attack, far exceeding the stall angle, and/or at high angular rates is sometimes referred to as supermaneuvering flight. The objective was to examine methods for design of control laws for aircraft performing supermaneuvers. Since the equations which govern the motion of aircraft during supermaneuvers are nonlinear, this study concentrated on nonlinear control law design procedures. The two nonlinear techniques considered were Nonlinear Quadratic Regulator (NLQR) theory and nonlinear dynamic inversion. A conventional gain scheduled proportional plus integral (P + I) controller was also developed to serve as a baseline design typical of current control laws used in aircraft. A mathematical model of a generic supermaneuverable aircraft was developed from data obtained from the literature. A detailed computer simulation of the aircraft was also developed. This simulation allowed the flying of proposed supermaneuvers and was used to evaluate the performance of the control law designs and to generate linearized models of the aircraft at different flight conditions.

  16. Feedback in the brainstem: An excitatory disynaptic pathway for control of whisking

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, David W.; Deschênes, Martin; Furuta, Takahiro; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Fan; Karten, Harvey J.; Kleinfeld, David

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor processing relies on hierarchical neuronal circuits to mediate sensory-driven behaviors. In the mouse vibrissa system, trigeminal brainstem circuits are thought to mediate the first stage of vibrissa scanning control via sensory feedback that provides reflexive protraction in response to stimulation. However, these circuits are not well defined. Here, we describe a complete disynaptic sensory receptor-to-muscle circuit for positive feedback in vibrissa movement. We identified a novel region of trigeminal brainstem, spinal trigeminal nucleus pars muralis, that contains a class of vGluT2+ excitatory projection neurons involved in vibrissa motor control. Complementary single- and duallabeling with traditional and virus tracers demonstrate that these neurons both receive primary inputs from vibrissa sensory afferent fibers and send monosynaptic connections to facial nucleus motoneurons that directly innervate vibrissa musculature. These anatomical results suggest a general role of disynaptic architecture in fast positive feedback for motor output driving active sensation. PMID:25503925

  17. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015)] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation.

  18. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.012920] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation.

  19. Feedback linearisation control of an induction machine augmented by single-hidden layer neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Abbas, Hamou; Belkheiri, Mohammed; Zegnini, Boubakeur

    2016-01-01

    We consider adaptive output feedback control methodology of highly uncertain nonlinear systems with both parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics. The approach is also applicable to systems of unknown, but bounded dimension. However, the relative degree of the regulated output is assumed to be known. This new control strategy is proposed to address the tracking problem of an induction motor based on a modified field-oriented control method. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modelling errors. The network weight adaptation rule is derived from the Lyapunov stability analysis, that guarantees boundedness of all the error signals of the closed-loop system. Computer simulations of an output feedback controlled induction machine, augmented via single-hidden-layer neural networks, demonstrate the practical potential of the proposed control algorithm.

  20. Hybrid Invariance and Stability of a Feedback Linearizing Controller for Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anne E.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of powered lower-limb prostheses has the potential to significantly improve amputees’ quality of life. By applying advanced control schemes, such as hybrid zero dynamics (HZD), to prostheses, more intelligent prostheses could be designed. Originally developed to control bipedal robots, HZD-based control specifies the motion of the actuated degrees of freedom using output functions to be zeroed, and the required torques are calculated using feedback linearization. Previous work showed that an HZD-like prosthesis controller can successfully control the stance period of gait. This paper shows that an HZD-based prosthesis controller can be used for the entire gait cycle and that feedback linearization can be performed using only information measured with on-board sensors. An analytic metric for orbital stability of a two-step periodic gait is developed. The results are illustrated in simulation. PMID:26604427

  1. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching L.; Adams, Neil; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design that uses linearization by state feedback to allow faster maneuvering of payloads by the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS). A nonlinear feedback law is defined to cancel the nonlinear plant dynamics so that a linear controller can be designed for the SRMS. First a nonlinear design model was generated via SIMULINK. This design model included nonlinear arm dynamics derived from the Lagrangian approach, linearized servo model, and linearized gearbox model. The current SRMS position hold controller was implemented on this system. Next, a trajectory was defined using a rigid body kinematics SRMS tool, KRMS. The maneuver was simulated. Finally, higher bandwidth controllers were developed. Results of the new controllers were compared with the existing SRMS automatic control modes for the Space Station Freedom Mission Build 4 Payload extended on the SRMS.

  2. Observer-Based Output-Feedback Asynchronous Control for Switched Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiechao; Tong, Shaocheng

    2016-05-10

    This paper investigates an output-feedback control design problem for a class of switched continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy systems. The considered fuzzy systems consist of several switching modes and each switching mode is described by T-S fuzzy models. In addition, there exists the asynchronous switching between the system switching modes and the controller switching modes. By using parallel distributed compensation design method, the output-feedback control schemes are developed based on state observers for the measurable and immeasurable premise variables cases. The sufficient conditions of ensuring the switched control system stabilization are proposed based on the theory of Lyapunov stability and average-dwell time methods. The controller and observer gains are obtained via two-step method. An illustrated numerical example is provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches.

  3. Robust torque control of an elastic robotic arm based on invertibility and feedback stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to the control of elastic robotic systems for space applications using inversion, servocompensation, and feedback stabilization is presented. For simplicity, a robot arm (PUMA-type) with three rotational joints is considered. The third link is assumed to be elastic. Using an inversion algorithm, a nonlinear decoupling control law, u sub d, is derived such that in the closed loop system, independent control of joint angles by the three joint torquers is accomplished. For the stabilization of elastic oscillations, a linear feedback torquer control law, u sub s, is obtained applying linear quadratic optimization to the linearized arm model augmented with a servocompensator about the terminal state. Simulation results show that, in spite of uncertainties in the payload and vehicle angular velocity, good joint angle control and damping of elastic oscillations are obtained with the torquer control law u = u sub d + u sub s.

  4. State feedback integral control for a rotary direct drive servo valve using a Lyapunov function approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue; Zhuang, Jian; Yu, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns a state feedback integral control using a Lyapunov function approach for a rotary direct drive servo valve (RDDV) while considering parameter uncertainties. Modeling of this RDDV servovalve reveals that its mechanical performance is deeply influenced by friction torques and flow torques; however, these torques are uncertain and mutable due to the nature of fluid flow. To eliminate load resistance and to achieve satisfactory position responses, this paper develops a state feedback control that integrates an integral action and a Lyapunov function. The integral action is introduced to address the nonzero steady-state error; in particular, the Lyapunov function is employed to improve control robustness by adjusting the varying parameters within their value ranges. This new controller also has the advantages of simple structure and ease of implementation. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed controller can achieve higher control accuracy and stronger robustness.

  5. Dynamic feedback linearization control of spacecraft with flexible appendages based on extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinli; Li, Donghai; Sun, Xianfang

    2006-11-01

    A dynamic feedback linearization control approach is designed in this paper for the pitch angle trajectory control and vibration suppression of a flexible spacecraft. Using the extended state observer, the pitch rate and entire unknown dynamics can be estimated, so only pitch angle is needed to measure in the feedback linearization control. The expression of the control law is simple, and few observer parameters need to be tuned. These all reduce the engineering difficulty greatly. The design of this control law does not depend on elastic modes included in the spacecraft model. Simulation results are presented to show that, the control law designed can ensure that pitch angle maneuver to its target precisely and smoothly, and elastic vibration is suppressed effectively.

  6. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary-thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-02

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies.

  7. Auditory reafferences: the influence of real-time feedback on movement control

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Christian; Streese, Lukas; Pizzera, Alexandra; Justen, Christoph; Hohmann, Tanja; Raab, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Auditory reafferences are real-time auditory products created by a person’s own movements. Whereas the interdependency of action and perception is generally well studied, the auditory feedback channel and the influence of perceptual processes during movement execution remain largely unconsidered. We argue that movements have a rhythmic character that is closely connected to sound, making it possible to manipulate auditory reafferences online to understand their role in motor control. We examined if step sounds, occurring as a by-product of running, have an influence on the performance of a complex movement task. Twenty participants completed a hurdling task in three auditory feedback conditions: a control condition with normal auditory feedback, a white noise condition in which sound was masked, and a delayed auditory feedback condition. Overall time and kinematic data were collected. Results show that delayed auditory feedback led to a significantly slower overall time and changed kinematic parameters. Our findings complement previous investigations in a natural movement situation with non-artificial auditory cues. Our results support the existing theoretical understanding of action–perception coupling and hold potential for applied work, where naturally occurring movement sounds can be implemented in the motor learning processes. PMID:25688230

  8. Acceleration control system for semi-active in-car crib with joint application of regular and inverted pendulum mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, T.

    2016-09-01

    To reduce the risk of injury to an infant in an in-car crib (or in a child safety bed) collision shock during a car crash, it is necessary to maintain a constant force acting on the crib below a certain allowable value. To realize this objective, we propose a semi-active in-car crib system with the joint application of regular and inverted pendulum mechanisms. The arms of the proposed crib system support the crib like a pendulum while the pendulum system itself is supported like an inverted pendulum by the arms. In addition, the friction torque of each arm is controlled using a brake mechanism that enables the proposed in-car crib to decrease the acceleration of the crib gradually and maintain it around the target value. This system not only reduces the impulsive force but also transfers the force to the infant's back using a spin control system, i.e., the impulse force acts is made to act perpendicularly on the crib. The spin control system was developed in our previous work. This work focuses on the acceleration control system. A semi-active control law with acceleration feedback is introduced, and the effectiveness of the system is demonstrated using numerical simulation and model experiment.

  9. Implementation of Real-Time Feedback Flow Control Algorithms on a Canonical Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Ye; Song, Qi; Cattafesta, Louis

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities on "Implementation of Real-Time Feedback Flow Control Algorithms on a Canonical Testbed." The work summarized consists primarily of two parts. The first part summarizes our previous work and the extensions to adaptive ID and control algorithms. The second part concentrates on the validation of adaptive algorithms by applying them to a vibration beam test bed. Extensions to flow control problems are discussed.

  10. Combustion Control of Diesel Engine using Feedback Error Learning with Kernel Online Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayaka, Elfady Satya; Ohmori, Hiromitsu

    2016-09-01

    This paper shows how to design Multivariable Model Reference Adaptive Control System (MRACS) for “Tokyo University discrete-time engine model” proposed by Yasuda et al (2014). This controller configuration has the structure of “Feedback error learning (FEL)” and adaptive law is based on kernel method. Simulation results indicate that “kernelized” adaptive controllers can improve the tracking performance, the speed of convergence and the robustness to disturbances.

  11. Nonlinear Feedback Control for Rapid, On-Line Trajectory Optimization of Reentry Vehicles (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    feedback without using an inner-loop tracking controller. The original concept dates back to the early 1990’s, when Pesch discussed off- line and on- line...approach is not mature enough for general optimal control problems. Although this paper 3 does not provide the “mathematical justification” that Pesch ...Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference, AIAA Paper No. 2001-4429, Aug 2001. 14. Pesch , H.J., “Off-Line and On-Line Computation of Optimal

  12. Multichannel Feedback Control for the Isolation of Base-Excited Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SERRAND, M.; ELLIOTT, S. J.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an independent two-channel controller based on absolute velocity feedback and its performance in improving the isolation from base vibration of a mounted rigid equipment structure characterized by two-degrees of freedom. A single-channel controller is also investigated. If the base structure were rigid, a collocated control strategy based on feedback of the equipment absolute velocity reduces the vibration transmission by skyhook damping. In this study, the vibrating base is flexible so that no rigid ground is available to react the secondary forces off. The direct velocity feedback (DVFB) control implemented here is shown to be very stable, however, so that high control gains could be applied. Effective damping ratios of up to 600% in the modes of the suspended system could be introduced by the two control channels. The passive isolation performance is thus dramatically improved by the two-channel controller: the heave mode is reduced by up to 40 dB, whereas the amplitude of the pitching mode is attenuated up to 26 dB. The experimental results also show a global improvement in the vibration caused by the resonances of the base plate over the frequency range of control [0-200 Hz]. The control effect decreases with frequency as a consequence of the increasing efficiency of the passive isolation. It is also shown that if the feedback gains are equal for the two control channels, the control effect is the same as adding equal damping terms to the two modal responses of the mounted equipment. Finally, the control is shown to be robust to changes in the plate support dynamics, since adding masses at various positions on the base plate did not destabilize the system.

  13. State feedback control of surge oscillations of two-point mooring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, R. K.; Banik, A. K.; Chatterjee, S.

    2017-01-01

    Stability analysis of surge oscillations of two-point mooring system under state feedback control with time-delay is investigated. The two-point mooring system is harmonically excited and essentially represents a strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillator. In this paper, a frequency domain based method viz. incremental harmonic balance method along with arc-length continuation technique (IHBC) is first employed to identify the primary and higher order subharmonic responses which may be present in such system. The IHBC is then reformulated in a manner to treat two-point mooring system under state feedback control with time-delay and is applied to obtain control of responses in an efficient and systematic way. The stability of uncontrolled responses for primary and higher order subharmonic oscillations is obtained by Floquet's theory using Hsu' scheme; whereas the stability of controlled responses is obtained by applying semi-discretization method for delay differential equation. The study focussed on the controlling primary, higher order subharmonics and chaotic responses by considering appropriate feedback gains and delay by way of (i) appreciable reduction of primary, subharmonic responses, (ii) exclusion of all higher order subharmonics 2T, 3T, 5T and 9T (1/n subharmonics or period-n solutions), and (iii) reduction of the extent of domain of all instability phenomena represented by various type of bifurcation of solutions, jump phenomena, chaotic responses etc. In the study, negative velocity feedback is observed to be much effective than state feedback for better controlling of surge oscillation of two-point mooring system. Also, the effect of larger gain values is investigated by an extensive parametric study for vibration control with different delay values.

  14. Combining Vibrotactile Feedback with Volitional Myoelectric Control for Robotic Transtibial Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baojun; Feng, Yanggang; Wang, Qining

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the development of myoelectric control for robotic lower-limb prostheses makes it possible for amputee users to volitionally control prosthetic joints. However, the human-centered control loop is not closed due to the lack of sufficient feedback of prosthetic joint movement, and it may result in poor control performance. In this research, we propose a vibrotactile stimulation system to provide the feedback of ankle joint position, and validate the necessity of combining it with volitional myoelectric control to achieve improved control performance. The stimulation system is wearable and consists of six vibrators. Three of the vibrators are placed on the anterior side of the thigh and the other three on the posterior side of the thigh. To explore the potential of applying the proposed vibrotactile feedback system for prosthetic ankle control, eight able-bodied subjects and two transtibial amputee subjects (TT1 and TT2) were recruited in this research, and several experiments were designed to investigate subjects’ sensitivities to discrete and continuous vibration stimulations applied on the thigh. Then, we proposed a stimulation controller to produce different stimulation patterns according to current ankle angle. Amputee subjects were asked to control a virtual ankle displayed on the computer screen to reach different target ankle angles with a myoelectric controller, and control performances under different feedback conditions were compared. Experimental results indicated that subjects were more sensitive to stimulation position changes (identification accuracies were 96.39 ± 0.86, 91.11, and 93.89% for able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2, respectively) than stimulation amplitude changes (identification accuracies were 89.89 ± 2.40, 87.04, and 85.19% for able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2, respectively). Response times of able-bodied subjects, TT1, and TT2 to stimulation pattern changes were 0.47 ± 0.02 s, 0.53 s, and 0.48

  15. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching LO

    1993-01-01

    This thesis develops and demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design using linearization by state feedback. The design provides improved transient response behavior allowing faster maneuvering of payloads by the SRMS. Modeling uncertainty is accounted for by using a second feedback loop designed around the feedback linearized dynamics. A classical feedback loop is developed to provide the easy implementation required for the relatively small on board computers. Feedback linearization also allows the use of higher bandwidth model based compensation in the outer loop, since it helps maintain stability in the presence of the nonlinearities typically neglected in model based designs.

  16. On the interaction structure of linear multi-input feedback control systems. M.S. Thesis; [problem solving, lattices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The closely-related problems of designing reliable feedback stabilization strategy and coordinating decentralized feedbacks are considered. Two approaches are taken. A geometric characterization of the structure of control interaction (and its dual) was first attempted and a concept of structural homomorphism developed based on the idea of 'similarity' of interaction pattern. The idea of finding classes of individual feedback maps that do not 'interfere' with the stabilizing action of each other was developed by identifying the structural properties of nondestabilizing and LQ-optimal feedback maps. Some known stability properties of LQ-feedback were generalized and some partial solutions were provided to the reliable stabilization and decentralized feedback coordination problems. A concept of coordination parametrization was introduced, and a scheme for classifying different modes of decentralization (information, control law computation, on-line control implementation) in control systems was developed.

  17. Applying an output feedback control to a simulated nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tong; Zhao, Guancheng; Guo, Jinjin; Yang, Yuanhong

    2008-10-01

    The mean-wavelength stability of broadband fiber source is analyzed: The model between the mean-wavelength and the pump optical power is revealed based on the theoretical and experimental study on the change of mean-wavelength under different pump optical power. To promote the temperature stability, a mean-wavelength control scheme is proposed based on the relation of mean-wavelength, pumping current and environment temperature. The output power was stabilized with a close-loop control technology by taking a adjustable attenuator. Prototype fiber source was made and tested. The Mean-wavelength stability 0.5×10-6/°C and output power stability 3% within -45°C ~+70°C was achieved.

  18. Computational Methods for Feedback Controllers for Aerodynamics Flow Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-15

    include the massively separated flow around an F-1i5E at 650 angle of attack reported by Forsythe et a/. (2004) (the first eddy-resolving simulation...to one step prediction, of MIMO (multi-input, multi- output) systems. A schematic representation of the feed-forward ANN-ARX network topology is...present, and can also accommodate multiple actuator interaction allowing for MIMO control. We did not intend it to be used for random turbulent flows, but

  19. Optimized feedback control system modeling of resistive wall modes for burning plasmas experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana Nikolaevna

    A numerical study of active feedback control system performance and optimization for tokamak Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is the subject of this thesis. The ability to accurately model and predict the performance of an active MHD control systems is critical to present and future advanced confinement scenarios and fusion reactor design studies. The computer code VALEN has been designed to calculate the performance of a MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. The simulation of realistic effects in feedback systems, such as noise, time delays and filters is of particular importance. In this work realistic measurement noise analysis was added to VALEN and used to design the RWM feedback control amplifier power level for the DIII-D experiment. Modern control theory based on a state-space formulation obtained from VALEN was applied to design an Optimal Controller and Observer based on a reduced VALEN model. A quantitative low order model of the VALEN state space was derived from the high dimensional intrinsic state space structure of the VALEN using methods of a balanced realization and matched DC gain truncation. These techniques for the design of an optimal controller and optimal observer were applied to models of the DIII-D and ITER experiments and showed an order of magnitude reduction of the required control coil current and voltage in the presence of white noise as compared to a traditional, classical PID controller. This optimal controller for the ITER burning plasma experiment was robust from the no-wall pressure limit to a pressure value well above those achieved with a classical PID controller and could approach the ideal wall limit.

  20. Optimal feedback gains of a delayed proportional-derivative (PD) control for balancing an inverted pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zaihua

    2017-03-01

    In the dynamics analysis and synthesis of a controlled system, it is important to know for what feedback gains can the controlled system decay to the demanded steady state as fast as possible. This article presents a systematic method for finding the optimal feedback gains by taking the stability of an inverted pendulum system with a delayed proportional-derivative controller as an example. First, the condition for the existence and uniqueness of the stable region in the gain plane is obtained by using the D-subdivision method and the method of stability switch. Then the same procedure is used repeatedly to shrink the stable region by decreasing the real part of the rightmost characteristic root. Finally, the optimal feedback gains within the stable region that minimizes the real part of the rightmost root are expressed by an explicit formula. With the optimal feedback gains, the controlled inverted pendulum decays to its trivial equilibrium at the fastest speed when the initial values around the origin are fixed. The main results are checked by numerical simulation.

  1. Stabilisation and control design by partial output feedback and by partial interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumthaler, Ingrid

    2012-11-01

    We study stabilisation and control design by partial output feedback on the one hand and by partial interconnection according to Willems on the other hand. This article is based on the paper Design, parametrization, and pole placement of stabilizing output feedback compensators via injective cogenerator quotient signal modules by I. Blumthaler and U. Oberst, and the same technique is used. Both discrete and continuous behaviours and various notions of stability are treated simultaneously. In the case of partial output feedback, we require that both the compensator and the feedback behaviour have proper transfer matrices without presuming properness of the plant. We obtain conditions ensuring the existence of such stabilising compensators which perform additional control tasks like, for instance, tracking, and an algorithm for constructing a large class of such compensators. In the case of stabilisation by interconnection no input-output structures of plant or compensator are assumed, but the controlled behaviour is endowed with a canonical input-output structure. Again we demand this input-output behaviour to have proper transfer matrix. For this situation we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of compensators solving the given control task, and a constructive parametrisation of all of them.

  2. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrown, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using ultrashort pulse laser (USPL). Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  3. Support surface related changes in feedforward and feedback control of standing posture

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Sambit; Kukkar, Komal K.; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different support surfaces on feedforward and feedback components of postural control. Nine healthy subjects were exposed to external perturbations applied to their shoulders while standing on a rigid platform, foam, and wobble board with eyes open or closed. Electrical activity of nine trunk and leg muscles and displacements of the center of pressure were recorded and analyzed during the time frames typical of feedforward and feedback postural adjustments. Feedforward control of posture was characterized by earlier activation of anterior muscles when the subjects stood on foam compared to a wobble board or a firm surface. In addition, the magnitude of feedforward muscle activity was the largest when the foam was used. During the feedback control, anterior muscles were activated prior to posterior muscles irrespective of the nature of surface. Moreover, the largest muscle activity was seen when the supporting surface was foam. Maximum CoP displacement occurred when subjects were standing on a rigid surface. Altering support surface affects both feedforward and feedback components of postural control. This information should be taken into consideration in planning rehabilitation interventions geared towards improvement of balance. PMID:24268589

  4. Efficacy of Web-Based Personalized Normative Feedback: A Two-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Clayton; Lewis, Melissa A.; Atkins, David C.; Jensen, Megan M.; Walter, Theresa; Fossos, Nicole; Lee, Christine M.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Web-based brief alcohol interventions have the potential to reach a large number of individuals at low cost; however, few controlled evaluations have been conducted to date. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of gender-specific versus gender-nonspecific personalized normative feedback (PNF) with single versus…

  5. Flexible, task-dependent use of sensory feedback to control hand movements.

    PubMed

    Knill, David C; Bondada, Amulya; Chhabra, Manu

    2011-01-26

    We tested whether changing accuracy demands for simple pointing movements leads humans to adjust the feedback control laws that map sensory signals from the moving hand to motor commands. Subjects made repeated pointing movements in a virtual environment to touch a button whose shape varied randomly from trial to trial-between squares, rectangles oriented perpendicular to the movement path, and rectangles oriented parallel to the movement path. Subjects performed the task on a horizontal table but saw the target configuration and a virtual rendering of their pointing finger through a mirror mounted between a monitor and the table. On one-third of trials, the position of the virtual finger was perturbed by ±1 cm either in the movement direction or perpendicular to the movement direction when the finger passed behind an occluder. Subjects corrected quickly for the perturbations despite not consciously noticing them; however, they corrected almost twice as much for perturbations aligned with the narrow dimension of a target than for perturbations aligned with the long dimension. These changes in apparent feedback gain appeared in the kinematic trajectories soon after the time of the perturbations, indicating that they reflect differences in the feedback control law used throughout the duration of movements. The results indicate that the brain adjusts its feedback control law for individual movements "on demand" to fit task demands. Simulations of optimal control laws for a two-joint arm show that accuracy demands alone, coupled with signal-dependent noise, lead to qualitatively the same behavior.

  6. How Predictive Is Grip Force Control in the Complete Absence of Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Dennis A.; Glasauer, Stefan; Hermsdorfer, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Grip force control relies on accurate internal models of the dynamics of our motor system and the external objects we manipulate. Internal models are not fixed entities, but rather are trained and updated by sensory experience. Sensory feedback signals relevant object properties and mechanical events, e.g. at the skin-object interface, to modify…

  7. Suppression and Feedback Control of Anomalous Induced Backscattering by Pump-Frequency Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V.; Truhachev, F. M.; Gusakov, E. Z.

    2008-10-24

    The possibility of induced backscattering parametric decay instability resonant suppression by harmonic pump-frequency modulation is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that the pump anomalous reflection is strongly reduced at the modulation frequency equal to the difference of the decay instability eigenfrequencies. The parametric instability feedback control method is proposed based on this effect.

  8. Adaptive Output-Feedback Neural Control of Switched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Average Dwell Time.

    PubMed

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive neural tracking control via output-feedback for a class of switched uncertain nonlinear systems without the measurements of the system states. The unknown control signals are approximated directly by neural networks. A novel adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is set up by exploiting the average dwell time method and backstepping. A switched filter and different update laws are designed to reduce the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer and a common update law for all subsystems. The proposed controllers of subsystems guarantee that all closed-loop signals remain bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, while the output tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. As an application of the proposed design method, adaptive output feedback neural tracking controllers for a mass-spring-damper system are constructed.

  9. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  10. Controlling Chaos for Fractional Order Loss Type of Coupled Dynamos Systems via Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianhong; Xiong, Xueyan; Bin, Hong; Sun, Nayan

    This paper studies the problem of chaos control for the fractional order modified coupled dynamos system that involves mechanical damping loss. Based on the Routh-Hurwitz criterion generalized to the fractional order stability theory, the stability conditions of the controlled system are discussed. We adopt a simple single-variable linear feedback method to suppress chaos to the unstable equilibrium point and limit cycle. Then, a modified feedback control method is developed in light of the sliding mode variable structure, namely exerting the controller only when the system trajectory is close to the target orbit. This method not only maintains the dynamics of the system, but provides the optimal control time and adjustable limit cycles radius. Numerical simulation proves the validity of this method.

  11. Feedback control of a Darrieus wind turbine and optimization of the produced energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, T.; Henry, B.; Devos, F.; de Saint Louvent, B.; Gosselin, J.

    1984-03-01

    A microprocessor-driven control system, applied to the feedback control of a Darrieus wind turbine is presented. The use of a dc machine as a generator to recover the energy and as a motor to start the engine, allows simplified power electronics. The architecture of the control unit is built to ensure four different functions: starting, optimization of the recoverable energy, regulation of the speed, and braking. An experimental study of the system in a wind tunnel allowed optimization of the coefficients of the proportional and integral (pi) control algorithm. The electrical energy recovery was found to be much more efficient using the feedback system than without the control unit. This system allows a better characterization of the wind turbine and a regulation adapted to the wind statistics observed in one given geographical location.

  12. Learning from adaptive neural network output feedback control of a unicycle-type mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Qinghui; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies learning from adaptive neural network (NN) output feedback control of nonholonomic unicycle-type mobile robots. The major difficulties are caused by the unknown robot system dynamics and the unmeasurable states. To overcome these difficulties, a new adaptive control scheme is proposed including designing a new adaptive NN output feedback controller and two high-gain observers. It is shown that the stability of the closed-loop robot system and the convergence of tracking errors are guaranteed. The unknown robot system dynamics can be approximated by radial basis function NNs. When repeating same or similar control tasks, the learned knowledge can be recalled and reused to achieve guaranteed stability and better control performance, thereby avoiding the tremendous repeated training process of NNs.

  13. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Zhou, Ben-Mou; Liu, Hui-Xing; Ji, Yan-Liang; Huang, Ya-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%.

  14. Combined input shaping and feedback control for double-pendulum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Robert; Goyal, Anurag; Nguyen, Vinh; Yang, Tianle; Singhose, William

    2017-02-01

    A control system combining input shaping and feedback is developed for double-pendulum systems subjected to external disturbances. The proposed control method achieves fast point-to-point response similar to open-loop input-shaping control. It also minimizes transient deflections during the motion of the system, and disturbance-induced residual swing using the feedback control. Effects of parameter variations such as the mass ratio of the double pendulum, the suspension length ratio, and the move distance were studied via numerical simulation. The most important results were also verified with experiments on a small-scale crane. The controller effectively suppresses the disturbances and is robust to modelling uncertainties and task variations.

  15. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  16. Operating wind turbines in strong wind conditions by using feedforward-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ju; Sheng, Wen Zhong

    2014-12-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind energy into power systems, it becomes critical to reduce the impact of wind energy on the stability and reliability of the overall power system. In precedent works, Shen and his co-workers developed a re-designed operation schema to run wind turbines in strong wind conditions based on optimization method and standard PI feedback control, which can prevent the typical shutdowns of wind turbines when reaching the cut-out wind speed. In this paper, a new control strategy combing the standard PI feedback control with feedforward controls using the optimization results is investigated for the operation of variable-speed pitch-regulated wind turbines in strong wind conditions. It is shown that the developed control strategy is capable of smoothening the power output of wind turbine and avoiding its sudden showdown at high wind speeds without worsening the loads on rotor and blades.

  17. An SDRE Based Estimator Approach for HIV Feedback Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-24

    suboptimal HIV treatment starting from the unhealthy steady state when ²max1 = 0.7. -2 -1 0 1 2 3 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 T1 T1s -4...13] R. Culshaw, S. Ruan, and R. J. Spiteri, Optimal HIV treatment by maximising immune response, J. Math. Biol., 48 (2004), pp. 545–562. [14] K. R...Zurakowski, M. J. Messina, S. E. Tuna, and A. R. Teel, HIV treatment scheduling via robust nonlinear model predictive control, in Proceedings of the 5th Asian

  18. Feedback/feedforward control of hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuators for high-speed scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfang; Shan, Jinjun; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the control system design for a piezoelectric actuator (PEA) for a high-speed trajectory scanning application. First nonlinear hysteresis is compensated for by using the Maxwell resistive capacitor model. Then the linear dynamics of the hysteresis-compensated piezoelectric actuator are identified. A proportional plus integral (PI) controller is designed based on the linear system, enhanced by feedforward hysteresis compensation. It is found that the feedback controller does not always improve tracking accuracy. When the input frequency exceeds a certain value, feedforward control only may result in better control performance. Experiments are conducted, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  19. A coherence preservation control strategy in cavity QED based on classical quantum feedback.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Wei; Gao, Junli

    2013-01-01

    For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation.

  20. A Coherence Preservation Control Strategy in Cavity QED Based on Classical Quantum Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Gao, Junli

    2013-01-01

    For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation. PMID:23781154