Science.gov

Sample records for acceleration feedback control

  1. Acceleration and torque feedback for robotic control - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclnroy, John E.; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    Gross motion control of robotic manipulators typically requires significant on-line computations to compensate for nonlinear dynamics due to gravity, Coriolis, centripetal, and friction nonlinearities. One controller proposed by Luo and Saridis avoids these computations by feeding back joint acceleration and torque. This study implements the controller on a Puma 600 robotic manipulator. Joint acceleration measurement is obtained by measuring linear accelerations of each joint, and deriving a computationally efficient transformation from the linear measurements to the angular accelerations. Torque feedback is obtained by using the previous torque sent to the joints. The implementation has stability problems on the Puma 600 due to the extremely high gains inherent in the feedback structure. Since these high gains excite frequency modes in the Puma 600, the algorithm is modified to decrease the gain inherent in the feedback structure. The resulting compensator is stable and insensitive to high frequency unmodeled dynamics. Moreover, a second compensator is proposed which uses acceleration and torque feedback, but still allows nonlinear terms to be fed forward. Thus, by feeding the increment in the easily calculated gravity terms forward, improved responses are obtained. Both proposed compensators are implemented, and the real time results are compared to those obtained with the computed torque algorithm.

  2. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2014-01-15

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup −7} rad /√( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  3. Tangential acceleration feedback control of friction induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jyayasi; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    Tangential control action is studied on a phenomenological mass-on-belt model exhibiting friction-induced self-excited vibration attributed to the low-velocity drooping characteristics of friction which is also known as Stribeck effect. The friction phenomenon is modelled by the exponential model. Linear stability analysis is carried out near the equilibrium point and local stability boundary is delineated in the plane of control parameters. The system is observed to undergo a Hopf bifurcation as the eigenvalues determined from the linear stability analysis are found to cross the imaginary axis transversally from RHS s-plane to LHS s-plane or vice-versa as one varies the control parameters, namely non-dimensional belt velocity and the control gain. A nonlinear stability analysis by the method of Averaging reveals the subcritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation. Thus, a global stability boundary is constructed so that any choice of control parameters from the globally stable region leads to a stable equilibrium. Numerical simulations in a MATLAB SIMULINK model and bifurcation diagrams obtained in AUTO validate these analytically obtained results. Pole crossover design is implemented to optimize the filter parameters with an independent choice of belt velocity and control gain. The efficacy of this optimization (based on numerical results) in the delicate low velocity region is also enclosed.

  4. Feedback: Theory and Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himel, T.

    The use of feedback to stabilize the beam and improve the performance of accelerators is becoming more common. The methods used to design the feedback algorithms are introduced and some practical implementation details are described. The design of a PID loop using classical control techniques is covered as is the design of an optimal controller using modern control theory. Some adaptive control techniques are also briefly described. Examples are given of multiple-input-multiple-output loops and of how to handle systems of many interacting feedback loops.

  5. Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency by PID Feedback Control on the Acceleration Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of frequency stabilization by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control of acceleration voltage in the 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) are presented. The experiment was organized on the basis of the frequency modulation by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The frequency stabilization during 10 h experiment was better than 10-6, which is compared with the results of the frequency deviation in free-running gyrotron operation.

  6. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control of Standing Balance by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation against External Postural Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the use of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback for improving performance of a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) control system to restore standing function to a subject with complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury (SCI). The approach for linearly relating changes in muscle stimulation to changes in COM acceleration was verified experimentally and subsequently produced data to create an input-output map driven by sensor feedback. The feedback gains were systematically tuned to reduce upper extremity (UE) loads applied to an instrumented support device while resisting external postural disturbances. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (> 89% variance explained) using three-dimensional (3-D) outputs of two accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, feedback control of stimulation reduced UE loading by 33%. COM acceleration feedback is advantageous in constructing a standing neuroprosthesis since it provides the basis for a comprehensive control synergy about a global, dynamic variable and requires minimal instrumentation. Future work should include tuning and testing the feedback control system during functional reaching activity that is more indicative of activities of daily living. PMID:22987499

  7. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control of Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation for Standing in the Presence of Internal Postural Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Audu, Musa L.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the feasibility and performance of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback control of a neuroprosthesis utilizing functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore standing balance to a single subject paralyzed by a motor and sensory complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury (SCI). An artificial neural network (ANN) was created to map gain-modulated changes in total body COM acceleration estimated from body-mounted sensors to optimal changes in stimulation required to maintain standing. Feedback gains were systematically tuned to minimize the upper extremity (UE) loads applied by the subject to an instrumented support device during internally generated postural perturbations produced by volitional reaching and object manipulation. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (> 90% variance explained) from two three-dimensional (3-D) accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, COM acceleration feedback control of stimulation improved standing performance by reducing the UE loading required to resist internal postural disturbances by 27%. This case study suggests that COM acceleration feedback could potentially be advantageous in a standing neuroprosthesis since it can be implemented with only a few feedback parameters and requires minimal instrumentation for comprehensive, 3-D control of dynamic standing function. PMID:23299260

  8. Reward feedback accelerates motor learning.

    PubMed

    Nikooyan, Ali A; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2015-01-15

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reward feedback alone can drive motor learning. However, it is not yet clear whether reward feedback alone can lead to learning when a perturbation is introduced abruptly, or how a reward gradient can modulate learning. In this study, we provide reward feedback that decays continuously with increasing error. We asked whether it is possible to learn an abrupt visuomotor rotation by reward alone, and if the learning process could be modulated by combining reward and sensory feedback and/or by using different reward landscapes. We designed a novel visuomotor learning protocol during which subjects experienced an abruptly introduced rotational perturbation. Subjects received either visual feedback or reward feedback, or a combination of the two. Two different reward landscapes, where the reward decayed either linearly or cubically with distance from the target, were tested. Results demonstrate that it is possible to learn from reward feedback alone and that the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning. An analysis of the underlying mechanisms reveals that although reward feedback alone does not allow for sensorimotor remapping, it can nonetheless lead to broad generalization, highlighting a dissociation between remapping and generalization. Also, the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning without compromising sensorimotor remapping. These findings suggest that the use of reward feedback is a promising approach to either supplement or substitute sensory feedback in the development of improved neurorehabilitation techniques. More generally, they point to an important role played by reward in the motor learning process. PMID:25355957

  9. Using Patterns for Multivariate Monitoring and Feedback Control of Linear Accelerator Performance: Proof-of-Concept Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Gail Adele; Van Ausdeln, Leo Anthony; Velasquez, Maria Elena

    2002-04-01

    The report discusses preliminary proof-of-concept research for using the Advanced Data Validation and Verification System (ADVVS), a new INEEL software package, to add validation and verification and multivariate feedback control to the operation of non-destructive analysis (NDA) equipment. The software is based on human cognition, the recognition of patterns and changes in patterns in time-related data. The first project applied ADVVS to monitor operations of a selectable energy linear electron accelerator, and showed how the software recognizes in real time any deviations from the optimal tune of the machine. The second project extended the software method to provide model-based multivariate feedback control for the same linear electron accelerator. The projects successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept for the applications and focused attention on the common application of intelligent information processing techniques.

  10. Acceleration feedback control (AFC) enhanced by disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) for high precision tracking in telescope systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Cai, Hua-Xiang; Huang, Yong-Mei; Ge, Liang; Tang, Tao; Su, Yan-Rui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Jin-Ying; He, Dong; Du, Sheng-Ping; Ling, Yu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a cascade acceleration feedback control (AFC) enhanced by a disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) method is proposed to improve the tracking precision of telescope systems. Telescope systems usually suffer some uncertain disturbances, such as wind load, nonlinear friction and other unknown disturbances. To ensure tracking precision, an acceleration feedback loop which can increase the stiffness of such a system is introduced. Moreover, to further improve the tracking precision, we introduce the DOC method which can accurately estimate the disturbance and compensate it. Furthermore, the analysis of tracking accuracy used by this method is proposed. Finally, a few comparative experimental results show that the proposed control method has excellent performance for reducing the tracking error of a telescope system.

  11. Acceleration feedback improves balancing against reflex delay

    PubMed Central

    Insperger, Tamás; Milton, John; Stépán, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    A model for human postural balance is considered in which the time-delayed feedback depends on position, velocity and acceleration (proportional–derivative–acceleration (PDA) feedback). It is shown that a PDA controller is equivalent to a predictive controller, in which the prediction is based on the most recent information of the state, but the control input is not involved into the prediction. A PDA controller is superior to the corresponding proportional–derivative controller in the sense that the PDA controller can stabilize systems with approximately 40 per cent larger feedback delays. The addition of a sensory dead zone to account for the finite thresholds for detection by sensory receptors results in highly intermittent, complex oscillations that are a typical feature of human postural sway. PMID:23173196

  12. Feedback implementation options and issues for B factory accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Briggs, D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Hosseini, W.; Oxoby, G. ); Linscott, I. ); Coiro, O.; Ghigo, A.; Serio, M. . Lab. Nazionale di Frascati); Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F. . Lawrence Berkeley Lab

    1992-09-01

    The proposed B factory accelerator facilities will require active feedback systems to control multibunch instabilities. These feedback systems must operate in machines with thousands of circulating bunches and with short (2--4 ns) interbunch intervals. The functional requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback systems are presented. Several possible implementation options are discussed and system requirements developed. Conceptual designs are presented for the PEP II transverse and longitudinal feedback systems.

  13. Tail buffet alleviation of high performance twin tail aircraft using offset piezoceramic stack actuators and acceleration feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon de Noyer, Maxime P.

    In High Performance Twin-Tail Aircraft (HPTTA), tail buffet occurs during high angles of attack maneuvers. At high angles of attack, flow separates and vortices are convected by the geometry of the wing-fuselage interface toward the vertical tails. This phenomenon, along with the aeroelastic coupling of the tail structural assembly, results in vibrations that can shorten the fatigue life of the empennage assembly and limit the flight envelope due to the large amplitude of the fin vibrations. The main goal of this research was to develop an active buffet alleviation system for HPTTA using Offset Piezoceramic Stack Actuators (OPSA) in combination with Acceleration Feedback Control (AFC) theory. In order to complete this task, the research work was divided into three main areas. First, two new methods for the design of non-collocated AFC controller parameters were developed for pure active damping applications and for quadratic performance criterion minimization. Second, a new type of moment inducing actuator based on piezoceramic stacks, the OPSA, was developed to provide high control authority while satisfying high reliability and maintainability requirements. A modal model of the OPSA acting on a benchmark structure was developed to create a low frequency approximation of the actuator and to optimize its offset distance and its placement. Third, because of the non-availability of reliable models for the controlled structure and the buffet-induced loads, a control system design method, based solely on the use of experimental data, was developed. Finally, two sets of experiments were conducted to show the feasibility of controlling buffet-induced vibrations during high angle of attack operations of a HPTTA. The first experiment validated both the effectiveness and the robustness of the active buffet alleviation system on an aeroelastically scaled model in wind tunnel tests. The second experiment showed that the combination of OPSA and AFC could suppress vibrations in

  14. Stability and chaotic dynamics of a rate gyro with feedback control under uncertain vehicle spin and acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng-Hui

    2004-06-01

    An analysis of stability and chaotic dynamics is presented by a single-axis rate gyro subjected to linear feedback control loops. This rate gyro is supposed to be mounted on a space vehicle which undergoes an uncertain angular velocity ωZ( t) around its spin axis. And simultaneously acceleration ω˙X(t) occurs with respect to the output axis. The necessary and sufficient conditions of stability for the autonomous case, whose vehicle undergoes a steady rotation, were provided by Routh-Hurwitz theory. Also, the degeneracy conditions of the non-hyperbolic point were derived and the dynamics of the resulting system on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using center manifold and normal form methods were examined. The stability of the non-linear non-autonomous system was investigated by Liapunov stability and instability theorems. As the electrical time constant is much smaller than the mechanical time constant, the singularly perturbed system can be obtained by the singular perturbation theory. The Liapunov stability of this system by studying the reduced and boundary-layer systems was also analyzed. Numerical simulations were performed to verify the analytical results. The stable regions of the autonomous system were obtained in parametric diagrams. For the non-autonomous case in which ωZ( t) oscillates near boundary of stability, periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic motions were demonstrated by using time history, phase plane and Poincaré maps.

  15. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  16. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  17. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  18. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  19. Feedback control of canards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Joseph; Moehlis, Jeff

    2008-03-01

    We present a control mechanism for tuning a fast-slow dynamical system undergoing a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to be in the canard regime, the tiny parameter window between small and large periodic behavior. Our control strategy uses continuous feedback control via a slow control variable to cause the system to drift on average toward canard orbits. We apply this to tune the FitzHugh-Nagumo model to produce maximal canard orbits. When the controller is improperly configured, periodic or chaotic mixed-mode oscillations are found. We also investigate the effects of noise on this control mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that a sensor tuned in this way to operate near the canard regime can detect tiny changes in system parameters.

  20. Feedback between Accelerator Physicists and magnet builders

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1995-12-31

    Our task is not to record history but to change it. (K. Marx (paraphrased)) How should Accelerator Physicists set magnet error specifications? In a crude social model, they place tolerance limits on undesirable nonlinearities and errors (higher order harmonics, component alignments, etc.). The Magnet Division then goes away for a suitably lengthy period of time, and comes back with a working magnet prototype that is reproduced in industry. A better solution is to set no specifications. Accelerator Physicists begin by evaluating expected values of harmonics, generated by the Magnet Division, before and during prototype construction. Damaging harmonics are traded off against innocuous harmonics as the prototype design evolves, lagging one generation behind the evolution of expected harmonics. Finally, the real harmonics are quickly evaluated during early industrial production, allowing a final round of performance trade-offs, using contingency scenarios prepared earlier. This solution assumes a close relationship and rapid feedback between the Accelerator Physicists and the magnet builders. What follows is one perspective of the way that rapid feedback was used to `change history` (improve linear and dynamic aperture) at RHIC, to great benefit.

  1. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  2. Feedback control of waiting times.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions. PMID:27176250

  3. Feedbacks and Acceleration of Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, William

    2014-05-01

    The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the Industrial revolution has increased the level of atmospheric CO2 by about 45 % over that of earlier times. The increasing greenhouse effect is augmented by a series of feedbacks; most have been positive, but a few are negative. The most important are 1) Slowing of the thermohaline circulation system; 2) Decreasing Atlantic to Pacific vapor transport; 3) Increasing Arctic river runoff; 4) Melting of Arctic sea ice; 5) Periodic replacement of the Arctic atmospheric high by a cyclonic low pressure system; 6) Increased exchange of waters between the Arctic and North Atlantic; 7) Lessening of the Northern Hemisphere ice-albedo feedback effect; 8) Addition of methane from melting permafrost; 9) Overall changes in the rate of ocean mixing; 10) Overall changes in vegetation cover of land; 11) Increase in the area covered by C4 vegetation; 12) Addition of nitrous oxide from agricultural practices; 13) Changes in insect populations and their effect on vegetation; 14) Wildfires; 15) Soot accumulation on snow and ice; 16) Accelerated melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet; 17) Changes in the East Antarctic Ice Sheet; 18) Closing of the ozone hole over Antarctica; 19) Decay of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet; 20) Expansion of Southern Ocean sea ice; 21) Slowing of the rate of organic matter sinking into the deep ocean; 22) Decrease in insolation reaching the surface of the Earth as a result of introduction of aerosols into the atmosphere; 23) Depletion of stratospheric ozone by nitrous oxide. The global and regional effects and relative importance of many of these feedbacks are uncertain, and they may change both in magnitude and sign with time. New and unexpected mechanisms are constantly being discovered. The uncertainties and complexity associated with climate system feedbacks are responsible for the acceleration of climate change beyond the rates predicted by numerical modeling. To add to the difficulties inherent in

  4. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  5. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  6. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  7. ASDTIC: A feedback control innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  8. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  9. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  10. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  11. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Robust control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.D. ); Abdallah, C.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The problem of controlling the variations in the rf power system can be effectively cast as an application of modern control theory. Two components of this theory are obtaining a model and a feedback structure. The model inaccuracies influence the choice of a particular controller structure. Because of the modeling uncertainty, one has to design either a variable, adaptive controller or a fixed, robust controller to achieve the desired objective. The adaptive control scheme usually results in very complex hardware; and, therefore, shall not be pursued in this research. In contrast, the robust control methods leads to simpler hardware. However, robust control requires a more accurate mathematical model of the physical process than is required by adaptive control. Our research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has led to the development and implementation of a new robust rf power feedback system. In this paper, we report on our research progress. In section one, the robust control problem for the rf power system and the philosophy adopted for the beginning phase of our research is presented. In section two, the results of our proof-of-principle experiments are presented. In section three, we describe the actual controller configuration that is used in LANL FEL physics experiments. The novelty of our approach is that the control hardware is implemented directly in rf without demodulating, compensating, and then remodulating.

  13. Robust control of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joel, W.; Johnson, D.; Chaouki, Abdallah T.

    1991-07-01

    The problem of controlling the variations in the rf power system can be effectively cast as an application of modern control theory. Two components of this theory are obtaining a model and a feedback structure. The model inaccuracies influence the choice of a particular controller structure. Because of the modelling uncertainty, one has to design either a variable, adaptive controller or a fixed, robust controller to achieve the desired objective. The adaptive control scheme usually results in very complex hardware; and, therefore, shall not be pursued in this research. In contrast, the robust control method leads to simpler hardware. However, robust control requires a more accurate mathematical model of the physical process than is required by adaptive control. Our research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has led to the development and implementation of a new robust rf power feedback system. In this article, we report on our research progress. In section 1, the robust control problem for the rf power system and the philosophy adopted for the beginning phase of our research is presented. In section 2, the results of our proof-of-principle experiments are presented. In section 3, we describe the actual controller configuration that is used in LANL FEL physics experiments. The novelty of our approach is that the control hardware is implemented directly in rf. without demodulating, compensating, and then remodulating.

  14. KEKB accelerator control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Nobumasa; Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Araki, Sakae; Furukawa, Kazuro; Katoh, Tadahiko; Kawamoto, Takashi; Komada, Ichitaka; Kudo, Kikuo; Naito, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Suetake, Masaaki; Takeda, Shigeru; Takeuchi, Yasunori; Yamamoto, Noboru; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kikutani, Eji

    2003-02-01

    The KEKB accelerator control system including a control computer system, a timing distribution system, and a safety control system are described. KEKB accelerators were installed in the same tunnel where the TRISTAN accelerator was. There were some constraints due to the reused equipment. The control system is based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). In order to reduce the cost and labor for constructing the KEKB control system, as many CAMAC modules as possible are used again. The guiding principles of the KEKB control computer system are as follows: use EPICS as the controls environment, provide a two-language system for developing application programs, use VMEbus as frontend computers as a consequence of EPICS, use standard buses, such as CAMAC, GPIB, VXIbus, ARCNET, RS-232 as field buses and use ergonomic equipment for operators and scientists. On the software side, interpretive Python and SAD languages are used for coding application programs. The purpose of the radiation safety system is to protect personnel from radiation hazards. It consists of an access control system and a beam interlock system. The access control system protects people from strong radiation inside the accelerator tunnel due to an intense beam, by controlling access to the beamline area. On the other hand, the beam interlock system prevents people from radiation exposure by interlocking the beam operation. For the convenience of accelerator operation and access control, the region covered by the safety system is divided into three major access control areas: the KEKB area, the PF-AR area, and the beam-transport (BT) area. The KEKB control system required a new timing system to match a low longitudinal acceptance due to a low-alpha machine. This timing system is based on a frequency divider/multiply technique and a digital delay technique. The RF frequency of the KEKB rings and that of the injector Linac are locked with a common divisor frequency. The common

  15. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  16. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  17. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  18. Feedback control of pulsed laser deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, S. J. P.; Stark, E. F.

    1993-10-01

    Implementation of closed loop feedback on PLD (pulsed laser deposition) requires actuators and sensors. Improvements in quality and reproducibility of material depositions are achieved by actuating the process towards desired operating regions. Empirical relationships are experimentally determined for describing the complex dynamical interactions of laser parameters. Feedback control based on this description can then be implemented to reduce process disorder.

  19. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for E×B rotationally driven flute modes.

  1. Design and evaluation of a state-feedback vibration controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Val, R. W.; Gregory, C. Z., Jr.; Gupta, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness and practicality of the state-feedback vibration controller is demonstrated by computer simulations. It is shown that: (1) the required measurements can be reduced to fuselage accelerations; (2) the system is stable over a wide range of flight conditions; (3) a discrete design for the controller provides effective digital implementation at 80-Hz sampling; (4) attenuation produced by the actuators does not create a problem, and a simple lead compensator provides vibration reduction; and (5) a design based on a hover model worked well at five knots. At 40 and 120 knots, vibrations in all but the vertical acceleration were effectively suppressed. The state-feedback vibration controller has a rapid convergence time and implementation is easier than with multicyclic control since no on-line harmonic analysis or identification algorithms are required.

  2. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  3. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  4. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  5. Optimal open-loop and feedback control using single gimbal control moment gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.; Vadali, Srinvas R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for control of spacecraft maneuvers through the use of single gimbal control moment gyroscopes are developed. The development employs an integrated model of the spacecraft dynamics with the control moment gyroscope dynamics. Smooth and continuous open-loop control profiles are obtained which minimize a weighted function of maneuver time, magnitude of control effort, and proximity to singular gimbal configurations. Closed-loop state feedback control laws are derived by invoking Lyapunov stability theory. The schemes are presented for implementing the commanded state feedback: gimbal rate control and gimbal acceleration control. The appropriate handling of singular gimbal configurations is also discussed.

  6. Feedback controlled electrostatic and electromagnetic sample positioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Elleman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Four different sample positioners are discussed. The four systems share a common operating principle in that the sample positioning is achieved by feedback controlled forces which can be electrostatic, dielectrophoretic, or electromagnetic. The first system is the electrostatic liquid drop positioner which operates at the near ambient position. The second system is the tetrahedral electrostatic positioner which is being developed for the high temperature materials processing in vacuum. The third system is essentially the the same tetrahedral system above except that the position control is achieved by dielectrophoretic forces in the pressurized gas environment. Finally, the feasibility of a feedback controlled electromagnetic positioner is discussed.

  7. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical.

  8. Nonsmooth feedback controls of nonlocal dispersal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaguti, Luisa; Rubbioni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with a nonlocal diffusion equation which is a model for biological invasion and disease spread. A nonsmooth feedback control term is included and the existence of controlled dynamics is proved, satisfying different kinds of nonlocal condition. Jump discontinuities appear in the process. The existence of optimal control strategies is also shown, under suitably regular control functionals. The investigation makes use of techniques of multivalued analysis and is based on the degree theory for condensing operators in Hilbert spaces.

  9. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a study of the application of H infinity and mu synthesis techniques to the design of feedback control laws for the longitudinal dynamics of the High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are presented. The objective of this study is to develop methods for the design of feedback control laws which cause the closed loop longitudinal dynamics of the HARV to meet handling quality specifications over the entire flight envelope. Control law designs are based on models of the HARV linearized at various flight conditions. The control laws are evaluated by both linear and nonlinear simulations of typical maneuvers. The fixed gain control laws resulting from both the H infinity and mu synthesis techniques result in excellent performance even when the aircraft performs maneuvers in which the system states vary significantly from their equilibrium design values. Both the H infinity and mu synthesis control laws result in performance which compares favorably with an existing baseline longitudinal control law.

  10. Balanced-Bridge Feedback Control Of Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity to variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics reduced. Proposed control system for motor-driven rotary actuator includes three nested feedback loops which, when properly designed, decoupled from each other. Intended to increase accuracy of control by mitigating such degrading effects as vibrations and variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics of structure rotated. Lends itself to optimization of performance via independent optimization of each of three loops. Includes outer, actuator, and driver feedback loops, configured so that actuator is subsystem, and driver is subsystem of actuator.

  11. Control of robot dynamics using acceleration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Prateru, S.; Li, W.; Hinman, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    Acceleration control of robotic devices can provide improvements to many space-based operations using flexible manipulators and to ground-based operations requiring better precision and efficiency than current industrial robots can provide. This paper reports on a preliminary study of acceleration measurement on robotic motion during parabolic flights on the NASA KC-135 and a parallel study of accelerations with and without gravity arising from computer simulated motions using TREETOPS software.

  12. Control systems for Coline accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Artur; Latała, Agata; Ceglińska, Kaja; Andrasiak, Michał

    2008-01-01

    Medical linear accelerators are the largest group of devices for therapy of cancer diseases because of their compact design, relatively low operating costs, advanced features and broad range of treatment procedures. Their reliability and ease of operation are very important but the most crucial is to ensure personnel and patient safety. For this reason the development of control and safety systems is the current "leading edge" in medical linear accelerators technology. Provided internal monitoring, machine control and steering, interlock system as well as the automatic recording of the device and patient parameters are nowadays fully controlled by the computer. This paper describes in details projects connected to advanced development of Coline accelerators. As it is crucial to assure reliable steering and monitoring of all the machine settings and actual dose delivered to the patient, advanced control systems composed of steering, control and interlock systems, communication protocol as well as data management system have been developed.

  13. Applying vision feedback to crane controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Pan, Shing-Tai; Wijaya Lie, Handra; Chiang, Tung-Chien; Chang, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Encoders are generally used to track the motion of industrial mechanisms. However, the information obtained by encoders may have errors due to encoder aging or mechanism-design problem. Therefore, information by visual feedback is a better way to track the movement of industrial mechanisms. However, image information costs lots of computing effort so it is not easy to be used in real-time control applications. This manuscript derives a simple but effective visual feedback method to follow the target and the image information is obtained only by a general handy camcorder. Besides, the proposed method can track multi-locations in a meantime. Fast image pattern recognition and localisation of the colour histogram by using a moving tracking block is applied to increase the calculation speed. Finally, the obtained locations information by the proposed visual feedback method is applied in an industrial crane control system to verify the effectiveness.

  14. Structural learning in feedforward and feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    For smooth and efficient motor control, the brain needs to make fast corrections during the movement to resist possible perturbations. It also needs to adapt subsequent movements to improve future performance. It is important that both feedback corrections and feedforward adaptation need to be made based on noisy and often ambiguous sensory data. Therefore, the initial response of the motor system, both for online corrections and adaptive responses, is guided by prior assumptions about the likely structure of perturbations. In the context of correcting and adapting movements perturbed by a force field, we asked whether these priors are hard wired or whether they can be modified through repeated exposure to differently shaped force fields. We found that both feedback corrections to unexpected perturbations and feedforward adaptation to a new force field changed, such that they were appropriate to counteract the type of force field that participants had experienced previously. We then investigated whether these changes were driven by a common mechanism or by two separate mechanisms. Participants experienced force fields that were either temporally consistent, causing sustained adaptation, or temporally inconsistent, causing little overall adaptation. We found that the consistent force fields modified both feedback and feedforward responses. In contrast, the inconsistent force field modified the temporal shape of feedback corrections but not of the feedforward adaptive response. These results indicate that responses to force perturbations can be modified in a structural manner and that these modifications are at least partly dissociable for feedback and feedforward control. PMID:22896725

  15. Sensory Feedback Control of Mammalian Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Smotherman, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Somatosensory and auditory feedback mechanisms are dynamic components of the vocal motor pattern generator in mammals. This review explores how sensory cues arising from central auditory and somatosensory pathways actively guide the production of both simple sounds and complex phrases in mammals. While human speech is a uniquely sophisticated example of mammalian vocal behavior, other mammals can serve as examples of how sensory feedback guides complex vocal patterns. Echolocating bats in particular are unique in their absolute dependence on voice control for survival: these animals must constantly adjust the acoustic and temporal patterns of their orientation sounds to efficiently navigate and forage for insects at high speeds under the cover of darkness. Many species of bats also utter a broad repertoire of communication sounds. The functional neuroanatomy of the bat vocal motor pathway is basically identical to other mammals, but the acute significance of sensory feedback in echolocation has made this a profitable model system for studying general principles of sensorimotor integration with regard to vocalizing. Bats and humans are similar in that they both maintain precise control of many different voice parameters, both exhibit a similar suite of responses to altered auditory feedback, and for both the efficacy of sensory feedback depends upon behavioral context. By comparing similarities and differences in the ways sensory feedback influences voice in humans and bats, we may shed light on the basic architecture of the mammalian vocal motor system and perhaps be able to better distinguish those features of human vocal control that evolved uniquely in support of speech and language. PMID:17449116

  16. Sensory feedback control of mammalian vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Smotherman, Michael S

    2007-09-01

    Somatosensory and auditory feedback mechanisms are dynamic components of the vocal motor pattern generator in mammals. This review explores how sensory cues arising from central auditory and somatosensory pathways actively guide the production of both simple sounds and complex phrases in mammals. While human speech is a uniquely sophisticated example of mammalian vocal behavior, other mammals can serve as examples of how sensory feedback guides complex vocal patterns. Echolocating bats in particular are unique in their absolute dependence on voice control for survival: these animals must constantly adjust the acoustic and temporal patterns of their orientation sounds to efficiently navigate and forage for insects at high speeds under the cover of darkness. Many species of bats also utter a broad repertoire of communication sounds. The functional neuroanatomy of the bat vocal motor pathway is basically identical to other mammals, but the acute significance of sensory feedback in echolocation has made this a profitable model system for studying general principles of sensorimotor integration with regard to vocalizing. Bats and humans are similar in that they both maintain precise control of many different voice parameters, both exhibit a similar suite of responses to altered auditory feedback, and for both the efficacy of sensory feedback depends upon behavioral context. By comparing similarities and differences in the ways sensory feedback influences voice in humans and bats, we may shed light on the basic architecture of the mammalian vocal motor system and perhaps be able to better distinguish those features of human vocal control that evolved uniquely in support of speech and language. PMID:17449116

  17. Bihemispheric network dynamics coordinating vocal feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kort, Naomi S; Cuesta, Pablo; Houde, John F; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of vocal pitch is a key speech feature that conveys important linguistic and affective information. Auditory feedback is used to monitor and maintain pitch. We examined induced neural high gamma power (HGP) (65-150 Hz) using magnetoencephalography during pitch feedback control. Participants phonated into a microphone while hearing their auditory feedback through headphones. During each phonation, a single real-time 400 ms pitch shift was applied to the auditory feedback. Participants compensated by rapidly changing their pitch to oppose the pitch shifts. This behavioral change required coordination of the neural speech motor control network, including integration of auditory and somatosensory feedback to initiate change in motor plans. We found increases in HGP across both hemispheres within 200 ms of pitch shifts, covering left sensory and right premotor, parietal, temporal, and frontal regions, involved in sensory detection and processing of the pitch shift. Later responses to pitch shifts (200-300 ms) were right dominant, in parietal, frontal, and temporal regions. Timing of activity in these regions indicates their role in coordinating motor change and detecting and processing of the sensory consequences of this change. Subtracting out cortical responses during passive listening to recordings of the phonations isolated HGP increases specific to speech production, highlighting right parietal and premotor cortex, and left posterior temporal cortex involvement in the motor response. Correlation of HGP with behavioral compensation demonstrated right frontal region involvement in modulating participant's compensatory response. This study highlights the bihemispheric sensorimotor cortical network involvement in auditory feedback-based control of vocal pitch. PMID:26917046

  18. Modal self-excitation by nonlinear acceleration feedback in a class of mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, Anindya; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-08-01

    The article proposes an acceleration feedback based technique for exciting modal self-oscillation in a class of multi degrees-of-freedom mechanical systems. The controller comprises a bank of second-order filters and the control law is formulated as the nonlinear function of the filter output. A design methodology is developed to excite self-oscillation in any desired mode or combination of modes (mixed-mode oscillation). The choice of control parameters takes into account the control cost and robustness of the controller. The effects of structural damping on the system performance are also studied. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. An adaptive control is proposed to maintain the oscillation amplitude at the desired level.

  19. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne L.

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays.

  20. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays. PMID:26296104

  1. Impedance feedback control for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alpuche-Aviles, M A; Wipf, D O

    2001-10-15

    A new constant-distance imaging method based on the relationship between tip impedance and tip-substrate separation has been developed for the scanning electrochemical microscope. The tip impedance is monitored by application of a high-frequency ac voltage bias between the tip and auxiliary electrode. The high-frequency ac current is easily separated from the dc-level faradaic electrochemistry with a simple RC filter, which allows impedance measurements during feedback or generation/collection experiments. By employing a piezo-based feedback controller, we are able to maintain the impedance at a constant value and, thus, maintain a constant tip-substrate separation. Application of the method to feedback and generation/collection experiments with tip electrodes as small as 2 microm is presented. PMID:11681463

  2. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.A. III

    1997-06-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development.

  3. Nonholonomic feedback control among moving obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Stephen Gregory

    A feedback controller is developed for navigating a nonholonomic vehicle in an area with multiple stationary and possibly moving obstacles. Among other applications the developed algorithms can be used for automatic parking of a passenger car in a parking lot with complex configuration or a ground robot in cluttered environment. Several approaches are explored which combine nonholonomic systems control based on sliding modes and potential field methods.

  4. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  5. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  6. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin–actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  7. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  8. Local feedback control of light honeycomb panels.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chinsuk; Elliott, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes theoretical and experimental work on the feedback control of sound radiation from honeycomb panels using piezoceramic actuators. It is motivated by the problem of sound transmission in aircraft, specifically the active control of trim panels. Trim panels are generally honeycomb structures designed to meet the design requirement of low weight and high stiffness. They are resiliently mounted to the fuselage for the passive reduction of noise transmission. Local coupling of the closely spaced sensor and actuator was observed experimentally and modeled using a single degree of freedom system. The effect of the local coupling was to roll off the response between the actuator and sensor at high frequencies, so that a feedback control system can have high gain margins. Unfortunately, only relatively poor global performance is then achieved because of localization of reduction around the actuator. This localization prompts the investigation of a multichannel active control system. Globalized reduction was predicted using a model of 12-channel direct velocity feedback control. The multichannel system, however, does not appear to yield a significant improvement in the performance because of decreased gain margin. PMID:17297778

  9. Personal computers in accelerator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderssen, P. S.

    1988-07-01

    The advent of the personal computer has created a popular movement which has also made a strong impact on science and engineering. Flexible software environments combined with good computational performance and large storage capacities are becoming available at steadily decreasing costs. Of equal importance, however, is the quality of the user interface offered on many of these products. Graphics and screen interaction is available in ways that were only possible on specialized systems before. Accelerator engineers were quick to pick up the new technology. The first applications were probably for controllers and data gatherers for beam measurement equipment. Others followed, and today it is conceivable to make personal computer a standard component of an accelerator control system. This paper reviews the experience gained at CERN so far and describes the approach taken in the design of the common control center for the SPS and the future LEP accelerators. The design goal has been to be able to integrate personal computers into the accelerator control system and to build the operator's workplace around it.

  10. Thermodynamics of Nonequilibrium Systems with Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    In modern nonequilibrium physics, ``Maxwell's demon'' has attracted renewed attentions in both terms of theory and experiment. The demon plays a key role to unify thermodynamics and information theory, which can extract the useful work from a heat bath by using the obtained information via feedback control. In this talk, I will talk about the recent development of thermodynamics of information. In particular, I will focus on the generalizations of the second law of thermodynamics and the Jarzynski equality in the presence of feedback control, where information contents and thermodynamic quantities are treated on an equal footing. I will also discuss recent experimental results that realized Maxwell's demon by colloidal particles and single electrons.

  11. Feedback control during voluntary motor actions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stephen H; Cluff, Tyler; Lowrey, Catherine R; Takei, Tomohiko

    2015-08-01

    Humans possess an impressive ability to generate goal-oriented motor actions to move and interact with the environment. The planning and initiation of these body movements is supported by highly distributed cortical and subcortical circuits. Recent studies, inspired by advanced control theory, highlight similar sophistication when we make online corrections to counter small disturbances of the limb or altered visual feedback. Such goal-directed feedback is likely generated by the same neural circuits associated with motor planning and initiation. These common neural substrates afford a highly responsive system to maintain goal-directed control and rapidly select new motor actions as required to deftly move and interact in a complex world. PMID:25827274

  12. Modern control techniques for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.W.; Shea, M.F.

    1984-05-01

    Beginning in the mid to late sixties, most new accelerators were designed to include computer based control systems. Although each installation differed in detail, the technology of the sixties and early to mid seventies dictated an architecture that was essentially the same for the control systems of that era. A mini-computer was connected to the hardware and to a console. Two developments have changed the architecture of modern systems: (a) the microprocessor and (b) local area networks. This paper discusses these two developments and demonstrates their impact on control system design and implementation by way of describing a possible architecture for any size of accelerator. Both hardware and software aspects are included.

  13. Adaptive output feedback control of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun

    Neural network-based adaptive output feedback approaches that augment a linear control design are described in this thesis, and emphasis is placed on their real-time implementation with flexible systems. Two different control architectures that are robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics are presented. The unmodelled effects can consist of minimum phase internal dynamics of the system together with external disturbance process. Within this context, adaptive compensation for external disturbances is addressed. In the first approach, internal model-following control, adaptive elements are designed using feedback inversion. The effect of an actuator limit is treated using control hedging, and the effect of other actuation nonlinearities, such as dead zone and backlash, is mitigated by a disturbance observer-based control design. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through simulation and experimental testing with a three-disk torsional system, which is subjected to control voltage limit and stiction. While the internal model-following control is limited to minimum phase systems, the second approach, external model-following control, does not involve feedback linearization and can be applied to non-minimum phase systems. The unstable zero dynamics are assumed to have been modelled in the design of the existing linear controller. The laboratory tests for this method include a three-disk torsional pendulum, an inverted pendulum, and a flexible-base robot manipulator. The external model-following control architecture is further extended in three ways. The first extension is an approach for control of multivariable nonlinear systems. The second extension is a decentralized adaptive control approach for large-scale interconnected systems. The third extension is to make use of an adaptive observer to augment a linear observer-based controller. In this extension, augmenting terms for the adaptive observer can be used to achieve adaptation in

  14. Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanua, Prabjot

    1994-01-01

    Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

  15. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  16. Wide power range microwave feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, L. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A substantially constant power level is derived over a predetermined frequency band, in each of a plurality of relatively widely spaced power ranges, from a microwave load having a predetermined amplitude versus frequency response, such as an antenna. A microwave source of substantially constant amplitude drives a forward path connected between the source and the load. A feedback path responsive to the microwave power level in the forward path derives a control voltage for the PIN attenuator. The equalizer attenuator drives a linear, crystal amplitude detector. Attenuating means included in the forward and feedback paths are selectively connected in circuit to maintain the power level of the microwave input to the amplitude detector substantially constant, even though different power ranges are supplied to the load by the forward path.

  17. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  18. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  19. Output feedback control of a mechanical system using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C; Favela-Contreras, A

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an application of a nonlinear magnetic levitation system to the problem of efficient active control of mass-spring-damper mechanical systems. An output feedback control scheme is proposed for reference position trajectory tracking tasks on the flexible mechanical system. The electromagnetically actuated system is shown to be a differentially flat nonlinear system. An extended state estimation approach is also proposed to obtain estimates of velocity, acceleration and disturbance signals. The differential flatness structural property of the system is then employed for the synthesis of the controller and the signal estimation approach presented in this work. Some experimental and simulation results are included to show the efficient performance of the control approach and the effective estimation of the unknown signals. PMID:25707718

  20. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  1. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  2. Speech Production as State Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker's brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has been the use of state feedback control (SFC) theory to explain the role of the CNS in motor control. SFC postulates that the CNS controls motor output by (1) estimating the current dynamic state of the thing (e.g., arm) being controlled, and (2) generating controls based on this estimated state. SFC has successfully predicted a great range of non-speech motor phenomena, but as yet has not received attention in the speech motor control community. Here, we review some of the key characteristics of speech motor control and what they say about the role of the CNS in the process. We then discuss prior efforts to model the role of CNS in speech motor control, and argue that these models have inherent limitations – limitations that are overcome by an SFC model of speech motor control which we describe. We conclude by discussing a plausible neural substrate of our model. PMID:22046152

  3. Feedback Error Learning in neuromotor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Abraham K.

    This thesis is concerned with adaptive human motor control. Adaptation is a highly desirable characteristic of any biological system. Failure is an undesirable, yet very real, characteristic of the human motor control systems. Variability is a ubiquitous observation in human movements that has no direct analogue in the design and analysis of robotic control algorithms. This thesis attempts to link these three aspects of motor control under the constraints of a biologically inspired control framework termed Feedback Error Learning (FEL). Utilizing nonlinear and adaptive control methods we prove conditions for which the FEL framework is stable and successful learning can occur. Utilizing singular perturbation methods, we derive conditions for which the system is guaranteed to fail. Variability is analyzed using Ito Calculus and stochastic Lyapunov functionals where signal dependent noise, a commonly observed phenomenon, enters in the learning algorithm. We also show how signal dependent noise might benefit biological control systems despite the inherent variability introduced into the motor control loops. Lastly, we investigate a force tracking control task, where subjects are asked to track a time-varying plant. Using basic control and system identification techniques, we probe the human motor learning system and extract learning rates with respect to the FEL model.

  4. Learner Control of Feedback in a Computer Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pridemore, Doris R.; Klein, James D.

    This study assessed whether learner control of feedback has a beneficial effect in student performance and attitude, focusing on whether the degree of elaboration feedback needed for high performance could be determined. Program and learner control were used at three levels of feedback, verification, correct answer, and elaboration. Subjects were…

  5. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  6. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running

    PubMed Central

    Busa, Michael A.; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E. A.; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01) during early stance and at the head (p<0.01) during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01) and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01) in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01). When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability. PMID:27271850

  7. Trends in accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1984-04-01

    Over the years, we have seen a revolution in control systems that has followed the ever decreasing cost of computer power and memory. It started with the data gathering, when people distrusted the computer to perform control actions correctly, through the stage of using a computer to perform control actions correctly, through the stage of using a computer system to provide a convenient remote look and adjust facility, to the present day, when more and more emphasis is being placed on using a computer system to simulate or model all or parts of the accelerator, feed in the required performance and calling for the computers to set the various parameters and then measure the actual performance, with iteration if necessary. The progress that has been made in the fields of architecture, communications, computers, interface, software design and operator interface is reviewed.

  8. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  9. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. The OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated, and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  10. Man-systems evaluation of moving base vehicle simulation motion cues. [human acceleration perception involving visual feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M.; Brye, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A motion cue investigation program is reported that deals with human factor aspects of high fidelity vehicle simulation. General data on non-visual motion thresholds and specific threshold values are established for use as washout parameters in vehicle simulation. A general purpose similator is used to test the contradictory cue hypothesis that acceleration sensitivity is reduced during a vehicle control task involving visual feedback. The simulator provides varying acceleration levels. The method of forced choice is based on the theory of signal detect ability.

  11. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  12. DTRC electromagnetic launcher with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad, F. P.; Borraccini, J. P.; Waltman, D. J.; Fikse, T. H.; Ruby, W. R.; Superczynski, M. J.; Whitestone, R. C.; Thomas, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    Emad et al. (1989) described the development of an analytical model used to simulate, and aid in the design and construction, of a coaxial launcher. Attention is here given to a more powerful launcher, improved design methods, and the use of feedback to control the forces as the launch is taking place. The model is based on a variable set of differential equations that represent the electromagnetics of the system coupled with the mechanical equations of motion. This approach in modeling results in excellent accuracy, numerical stability, and efficiency. The simulation can be performed on a desktop computer. The resulting design was used to build a full scale model, which was then instrumented and tested. Both simulation and actual test results of the new launcher are presented.

  13. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  14. Feedback control of an ensemble of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Chen, Qun; Wang, Rang; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-06-01

    Rectified transport of self-propelled particles in an asymmetric period potential is numerically investigated by employing a feedback control protocol. The feedback control is switched on and off depending on the direction of the self-propelled speed. It is found that the direction of the transport is determined by the asymmetry of the potential and the feedback control strength. In the presence of feedback control, the directed transport can be improved significantly by increasing the feedback control strength under appropriate conditions. For large ensembles of particles, however, the feedback control will not obviously affect the transport of self-propelled particles. The present studies may be relevant to some applications in biology and nanotechnology, and provide the predicting results in experiments of active particles.

  15. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies). PMID:27387146

  16. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  17. BISMAC control using SMA resistance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2010-04-01

    Recently, bio-inspired shape memory alloy composite (BISMAC) actuators have been shown to be promising for the design of medusae rowing propulsion. BISMAC actuators were able to recreate bell deformation of Aurelia aurita by controlling shape memory alloy (SMA) deformation that allowed matching the contraction-relaxation deformation profile. In this study, we improve upon the control system and demonstrate feedback control using SMA wire resistance to decrease contraction time and power consumption. The controller requires the knowledge of threshold resistance and safe current inputs which were determined experimentally. The overheating effect of SMA wires was analyzed for BioMetal Fiber (BMF) and Flexinol 100 μm diameter wires revealing an increase in resistance as the wires overheated. The controller was first characterized on a SMA wire with bias spring system for a BMF 100 using Ihi = 0.5 A and Ilow = 0.2 A, where hi corresponds to peak current for fast actuation and low corresponds to the safe current which prevents overheating and maintains desired deformation. A contraction of 4.59% was achieved in 0.06 s using the controller and the deformation was maintained for 2 s at low current. The BISMAC actuator was operated using the controller with Ihi = 1.1 A and Ilow = 0.65 A achieving a 67% decrease in contraction time compared to using a constant driving current of Ilow = 0.2 A and a 60% decrease in energy consumption compared to using constant Ihi = 0.5 A while still exceeding the contraction requirements of the Aurelia aurita.

  18. Accelerator diagnosis and control by Neural Nets

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neural Nets (NN) have been described as a solution looking for a problem. In the last conference, Artificial Intelligence (AI) was considered in the accelerator context. While good for local surveillance and control, its use for large complex systems (LCS) was much more restricted. By contrast, NN provide a good metaphor for LCS. It can be argued that they are logically equivalent to multi-loop feedback/forward control of faulty systems, and therefore provide an ideal adaptive control system. Thus, where AI may be good for maintaining a 'golden orbit,' NN should be good for obtaining it via a quantitative approach to 'look and adjust' methods like operator tweaking which use pattern recognition to deal with hardware and software limitations, inaccuracies or errors as well as imprecise knowledge or understanding of effects like annealing and hysteresis. Further, insights from NN allow one to define feasibility conditions for LCS in terms of design constraints and tolerances. Hardware and software implications are discussed and several LCS of current interest are compared and contrasted. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Narrowband feedback for narrowband control of resonant and non-resonant vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Myeong; Brennan, Michael J.; Abreu, Gustavo L. C. M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a simple feedback methodology that uses second order filters to control narrowband resonant and non-resonant vibration of a structural system. In particular, a single degree-of-freedom system is studied throughout the paper. The idea of the methodology is based on the fact that direct feedback is effective for in-phase vibration control. Thus, the position, velocity and acceleration are respectively fed back to control the low, resonant and high frequency vibration of the system. Each of these is passed through a band pass filter of second order that is inserted to extract and feed back the in-phase signal component only. This is called narrowband feedback. It is demonstrated with experiments that narrowband feedback is useful for narrowband control of resonant and non-resonant vibration.

  20. Autonomous benthic algal cultivator under feedback control of ecosystem metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous and internally-controlled techno-ecological hybrid was developed that controls primary production of algae in a laboratory-scale cultivator. The technoecosystem is based on an algal turf scrubber (ATS) system that combines engineered feedback control programming with internal feedback...

  1. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. This LQR design was obtained as part of the F100 Multivariable Control Synthesis (MVCS) program. In the MVCS program the LQR feedback control was designed in a reduced dimension state space and then applied to the original system. However, the OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the MVCS program LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  2. Permafrost carbon-climate feedbacks accelerate global warming

    PubMed Central

    Koven, Charles D.; Ringeval, Bruno; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; Cadule, Patricia; Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Krinner, Gerhard; Tarnocai, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon, which could act as a positive feedback to global climate change due to enhanced respiration rates with warming. We have used a terrestrial ecosystem model that includes permafrost carbon dynamics, inhibition of respiration in frozen soil layers, vertical mixing of soil carbon from surface to permafrost layers, and CH4 emissions from flooded areas, and which better matches new circumpolar inventories of soil carbon stocks, to explore the potential for carbon-climate feedbacks at high latitudes. Contrary to model results for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4), when permafrost processes are included, terrestrial ecosystems north of 60°N could shift from being a sink to a source of CO2 by the end of the 21st century when forced by a Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2 climate change scenario. Between 1860 and 2100, the model response to combined CO2 fertilization and climate change changes from a sink of 68 Pg to a 27 + -7 Pg sink to 4 + -18 Pg source, depending on the processes and parameter values used. The integrated change in carbon due to climate change shifts from near zero, which is within the range of previous model estimates, to a climate-induced loss of carbon by ecosystems in the range of 25 + -3 to 85 + -16 Pg C, depending on processes included in the model, with a best estimate of a 62 + -7 Pg C loss. Methane emissions from high-latitude regions are calculated to increase from 34 Tg CH4/y to 41–70 Tg CH4/y, with increases due to CO2 fertilization, permafrost thaw, and warming-induced increased CH4 flux densities partially offset by a reduction in wetland extent. PMID:21852573

  3. Disrupting vagal feedback affects birdsong motor control

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Jorge M.; Dall'Asén, Analía G.; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Coordination of different motor systems for sound production involves the use of feedback mechanisms. Song production in oscines is a well-established animal model for studying learned vocal behavior. Whereas the online use of auditory feedback has been studied in the songbird model, very little is known about the role of other feedback mechanisms. Auditory feedback is required for the maintenance of stereotyped adult song. In addition, the use of somatosensory feedback to maintain pressure during song has been demonstrated with experimentally induced fluctuations in air sac pressure. Feedback information mediating this response is thought to be routed to the central nervous system via afferent fibers of the vagus nerve. Here, we tested the effects of unilateral vagotomy on the peripheral motor patterns of song production and the acoustic features. Unilateral vagotomy caused a variety of disruptions and alterations to the respiratory pattern of song, some of which affected the acoustic structure of vocalizations. These changes were most pronounced a few days after nerve resection and varied between individuals. In the most extreme cases, the motor gestures of respiration were so severely disrupted that individual song syllables or the song motif were atypically terminated. Acoustic changes also suggest altered use of the two sound generators and upper vocal tract filtering, indicating that the disruption of vagal feedback caused changes to the motor program of all motor systems involved in song production and modification. This evidence for the use of vagal feedback by the song system with disruption of song during the first days after nerve cut provides a contrast to the longer-term effects of auditory feedback disruption. It suggests a significant role for somatosensory feedback that differs from that of auditory feedback. PMID:21113000

  4. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  5. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  6. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment

  7. Feedback linearization for control of air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen; Mattern, Duane

    1991-01-01

    The method of feedback linearization for control of the nonlinear nozzle and compressor components of an air breathing engine is presented. This method overcomes the need for a large number of scheduling variables and operating points to accurately model highly nonlinear plants. Feedback linearization also results in linear closed loop system performance simplifying subsequent control design. Feedback linearization is used for the nonlinear partial engine model and performance is verified through simulation.

  8. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, J.; Hövel, P.; Flunkert, V.; Guzenko, P. Yu.; Fradkov, A. L.; Schöll, E.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  9. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions. PMID:22225348

  10. Sparse feedback structures for wireless control of civil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoljak, Reuben D.; Linderman, Lauren E.

    2015-03-01

    Although originally popularized for structural health monitoring, wireless smart sensors are an attractive alternative to traditional tethered systems for structural control. Their onboard sensing, processing, and wireless communication offer all the components of a feedback control system. However, wireless smart sensors pose unique challenges for the application of centralized control, which is common in most modern control systems. Decentralized control offers several advantages to wireless structural control, including limiting the wireless communication required and the associated slow sampling rate and time delays in the control system. Previous decentralized structural control algorithms, both Ad-Hoc and Heuristic, enforce a spatial sparsity pattern during the design, which is assumed a priori. Therefore, the optimal feedback structure is not considered in the design. This work explores a decentralized optimal LQR design algorithm where the sparsity of the feedback gain is incorporated into the objective function. The control approach is compared to previous decentralized control techniques on the 20-Story control benchmark structure. Sparsity and control requirements are compared to centralized designs. The optimal sparse feedback design offers the best balance of performance, measurement feedback, and control effort. Additionally, the feedback structure identified is not easily identifiable a priori; thus, highlighting the significance of particular measurements in this feedback framework.

  11. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force. PMID:27575077

  12. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  13. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  14. Lyapunov optimal feedback control of a nonlinear inverted pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. J.; Anderson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Liapunov optimal feedback control is applied to a nonlinear inverted pendulum in which the control torque was constrained to be less than the nonlinear gravity torque in the model. This necessitates a control algorithm which 'rocks' the pendulum out of its potential wells, in order to stabilize it at a unique vertical position. Simulation results indicate that a preliminary Liapunov feedback controller can successfully overcome the nonlinearity and bring almost all trajectories to the target.

  15. An improved output feedback control of flexible large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A special output feedback control design technique for flexible large space structures is proposed. It is shown that the technique will increase both the damping and frequency of selected modes for more effective control. It is also able to effect integrated control of elastic and rigid-body modes and, in particular, closed-loop system stability and robustness to modal truncation and parameter variation. The technique is seen as marking an improvement over previous work concerning large space structures output feedback control.

  16. Estimating feedforward vs. feedback control of speech production through kinematic analyses of unperturbed articulatory movements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang S.; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the contributions of feedforward vs. feedback control systems in speech articulation, we analyzed the correspondence between initial and final kinematics in unperturbed tongue and jaw movements for consonant-vowel (CV) and vowel-consonant (VC) syllables. If movement extents and endpoints are highly predictable from early kinematic information, then the movements were most likely completed without substantial online corrections (feedforward control); if the correspondence between early kinematics and final amplitude or position is low, online adjustments may have altered the planned trajectory (feedback control) (Messier and Kalaska, 1999). Five adult speakers produced CV and VC syllables with high, mid, or low vowels while movements of the tongue and jaw were tracked electromagnetically. The correspondence between the kinematic parameters peak acceleration or peak velocity and movement extent as well as between the articulators' spatial coordinates at those kinematic landmarks and movement endpoint was examined both for movements across different target distances (i.e., across vowel height) and within target distances (i.e., within vowel height). Taken together, results suggest that jaw and tongue movements for these CV and VC syllables are mostly under feedforward control but with feedback-based contributions. One type of feedback-driven compensatory adjustment appears to regulate movement duration based on variation in peak acceleration. Results from a statistical model based on multiple regression are presented to illustrate how the relative strength of these feedback contributions can be estimated. PMID:25426056

  17. A Digital Self Excited Loop for Accelerating Cavity Field Control

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Hovater; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2007-06-22

    We have developed a digital process that emulates an analog oscillator and ultimately a self excited loop (SEL) for field control. The SEL, in its analog form, has been used for many years for accelerating cavity field control. In essence the SEL uses the cavity as a resonant circuit -- much like a resonant (tank) circuit is used to build an oscillator. An oscillating resonant circuit can be forced to oscillate at different, but close, frequencies to resonance by applying a phase shift in the feedback path. This allows the circuit to be phased-locked to a master reference, which is crucial for multiple cavity accelerators. For phase and amplitude control the SEL must be forced to the master reference frequency, and feedback provided for in both dimensions. The novelty of this design is in the way digital signal processing (DSP) is structured to emulate an analog system. While the digital signal processing elements are not new, to our knowledge this is the first time that the digital SEL concept has been designed and demonstrated. This paper reports on the progress of the design and implementation of the digital SEL for field control of superconducting accelerating cavities.

  18. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  19. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  20. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Hofmeister, William H.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.; MacCallum, Danny O.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Smugeresky, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  1. Coherent controllers for optical-feedback cooling of quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We study the cooling performance of optical-feedback controllers for open optical and mechanical resonators in the linear quadratic Gaussian setting of stochastic control theory. We utilize analysis and numerical optimization of closed-loop models based on quantum stochastic differential equations to show that coherent control schemes, where we embed the resonator in an interferometer to achieve all-optical feedback, can outperform optimal measurement-based feedback control schemes in the quantum regime of low steady-state excitation number. These performance gains are attributed to the coherent controller's ability to simultaneously process both quadratures of an optical probe field without measurement or loss of fidelity, and may guide the design of coherent feedback schemes for more general problems of robust nonlinear and robust control.

  2. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla

  3. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  4. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations.

  5. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  6. Pulsed klystrons with feedback controlled mod-anode modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Jerry, Davis L; Rees, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a fast rise and fall, totem-pole mod-anode modulators for klystron application. Details of these systems as recently installed utilizing a beam switch tube ''on-deck'' and a planar triode ''off-deck'' in a grid-catch feedback regulated configuration will be provided. The grid-catch configuration regulates the klystron mod-anode voltage at a specified set-point during switching as well as providing a control mechanism that flat-top regulates the klystron beam current during the pulse. This flat-topped klystron beam current is maintained while the capacitor bank droops. In addition, we will review more modern on-deck designs using a high gain, high voltage planar triode as a regulating and switching element. These designs are being developed, tested, and implemented for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator refurbishment project, ''LANSCE-R''. An advantage of the planar triode is that the tube can be directly operated with solid state linear components and provides for a very compact design. The tubes are inexpensive compared to stacked semiconductor switching assemblies and also provide a linear control capability. Details of these designs are provided as well as operational and developmental results.

  7. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  8. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this, quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis, we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback. PMID:24827219

  9. Identification and feedback control in structures with piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.; Wang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture we give fundamental well-posedness results for a variational formulation of a class of damped second order partial differential equations with unbounded input or control coefficients. Included as special cases in this class are structures with piezoceramic actuators. We consider approximation techniques leading to computational methods in the context of both parameter estimation and feedback control problems for these systems. Rigorous convergence results for parameter estimates and feedback gains are discussed.

  10. Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2004-06-22

    An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

  11. A variable-gain output feedback control design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Moerder, Daniel D.; Broussard, John R.; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    A digital control system design technique is developed in which the control system gain matrix varies with the plant operating point parameters. The design technique is obtained by formulating the problem as an optimal stochastic output feedback control law with variable gains. This approach provides a control theory framework within which the operating range of a control law can be significantly extended. Furthermore, the approach avoids the major shortcomings of the conventional gain-scheduling techniques. The optimal variable gain output feedback control problem is solved by embedding the Multi-Configuration Control (MCC) problem, previously solved at ICS. An algorithm to compute the optimal variable gain output feedback control gain matrices is developed. The algorithm is a modified version of the MCC algorithm improved so as to handle the large dimensionality which arises particularly in variable-gain control problems. The design methodology developed is applied to a reconfigurable aircraft control problem. A variable-gain output feedback control problem was formulated to design a flight control law for an AFTI F-16 aircraft which can automatically reconfigure its control strategy to accommodate failures in the horizontal tail control surface. Simulations of the closed-loop reconfigurable system show that the approach produces a control design which can accommodate such failures with relative ease. The technique can be applied to many other problems including sensor failure accommodation, mode switching control laws and super agility.

  12. Orbit stability and feedback control in synchrotron radiation rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is essential for the utilization of a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness radiation source. We discuss the development of the measurement and feedback control of the closed orbit, with emphasis on the activities as the National Synchrotron Light Source of BNL. We discuss the performance of the beam position detectors in use and under development: the PUE rf detector, split ion chamber detector, photo-emission detector, solid state detector, and the graphite detector. Depending on the specific experiments, different beamlines require different tolerances on the orbit motion. Corresponding to these different requirements, we discuss two approaches to closed orbit feedback: the global and local feedback systems. Then we describe a new scheme for the real time global feedback by implementing a feedback system based upon a harmonic analysis of both the orbit movements and the correction magnetic fields. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Reduction of the apparent impedance of wide band accelerating cavities by RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Boussard, D.; Lambert, G.

    1983-08-01

    In the CERN SPS proton synchrotron the four accelerating cavities are of the travelling wave structure type. At the 10 GeV/c injection energy the cavities present to the beam an impedance very similar to that of a detuned RLC cavity with the result that strong dipole and quadrupole instabilities occur. The SPS accelerated beam current was limited by the combined action of these two effects to 2.5 X 10/sup 13/ protons which resulted in capture losses increasing with the injected beam intensity. Among the solutions possible for this problem, the RF feedback, which would alleviate both transient beam loading and instability effects, looked to the authors to be the most promising. In such a system the total voltage seen by the beam is reinjected into the feedback cavity via its power amplifier. Without any delay in the system the cavity impedance seen by the beam could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately the long delay in the system severely limits the bandwidth and the RF feedback could hardly correct more than the n = O beam loading component. The authors circumvented this problem by observing that they needed a large gain only in the vicinities of the RF frequencies. Outside these bands the phase rotation due to the long delay is unimportant if the gain is made low enough. If, in addition, the total delay of the system is made exactly equal to one machine turn, the open loop phase of the feedback system is always zero for each RF frequency. The two ingredients needed to make the RF feedback work for n not too small are therefore a transfer function with comb filter shape and a total delay of one machine turn. In this paper these ingredients are derived.

  14. Control, Transport Reduction and Diagnostic use of Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    1999-11-01

    In the past we have reported on feedback suppression of a variety of micro-instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine via an electron/ion beam suppressor. These include a curvature driven trapped particle mode, an E×B flute mode and an ITG mode; sometimes two of them simultaneously. We now report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. The anomalous particle transport due to an E×B centrifugally driven mode has been measured via cross-correlation of density and potential fluctuations. The transport is found to be reduced by up to a factor of three under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, we find the scaling of diffusion coefficient to be linear with RMS fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. Recently, we have performed a numerical experiment on feedback control of dissipative drift wave instability in collaboration with ETP, University of Marseille. The preliminary result is that even a highly chaotic state of the instability can be suppressed, if the feedback delay is less than the correlation time of fluctuations. We will explore the implication of these results for the remote prospect of reduction of micro-turbulence and associated transport. We are also persuing a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, we use time series analysis method for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a model of three coupled modes may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Secondly, we have

  15. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, A.E.; Horowitz, I. ||; Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J.

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  16. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible, highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible Space Station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control (IPFC), feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system's characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model; hence, closed-loop system's poles will not move - they will be invariant (provided bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system's characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and, solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model's characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  17. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible space station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control, feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model. Hence closed-loop system poles will not move; they will be invariant (provided that bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  18. Virtual Grasping: Closed-Loop Force Control Using Electrotactile Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Jorgovanovic, Nikola; Dosen, Strahinja; Djozic, Damir J.; Krajoski, Goran; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Closing the control loop by providing somatosensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is a well-known, long standing challenge in the field of prosthetics. Various approaches have been investigated for feedback restoration, ranging from direct neural stimulation to noninvasive sensory substitution methods. Although there are many studies presenting closed-loop systems, only a few of them objectively evaluated the closed-loop performance, mostly using vibrotactile stimulation. Importantly, the conclusions about the utility of the feedback were partly contradictory. The goal of the current study was to systematically investigate the capability of human subjects to control grasping force in closed loop using electrotactile feedback. We have developed a realistic experimental setup for virtual grasping, which operated in real time, included a set of real life objects, as well as a graphical and dynamical model of the prosthesis. We have used the setup to test 10 healthy, able bodied subjects to investigate the role of training, feedback and feedforward control, robustness of the closed loop, and the ability of the human subjects to generalize the control to previously “unseen” objects. Overall, the outcomes of this study are very optimistic with regard to the benefits of feedback and reveal various, practically relevant, aspects of closed-loop control. PMID:24516504

  19. Transverse wakefield control and feedback in the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider) linear

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.; Petersen, A.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.; Soderstrom, E.

    1987-01-01

    Transverse wakefields in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been observed to enlarge the effective emittance of beams which are not properly centered in the accelerating structure. A fast feedback system has been constructed to minimize the enlargement under changing conditions by controlling the beam launching parameters. Theoretical aspects of this transverse feedback system are reviewed as well as the design of the beam sensors, launch controllers, communication equipment and data processing micro-computer. A variety of beam observations have been made. They show that dispersion as well as wakefield effects are important. In the near future the fast transverse feedback system will be beam tested, and algorithms tailored to the noise environment of the SLC will be tried.

  20. Coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.-H.; Hou, B.; Gao, G.; Nees, J. A.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Lebailly, V.; Clarke, R.

    2015-05-15

    Plasmas generated by an intense laser pulse can support coherent structures such as large amplitude wakefield that can affect the outcome of an experiment. We investigate the coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation using a deformable mirror. The experimental outcome is directly used as feedback in an evolutionary algorithm for optimization of the phase front of the driving laser pulse. In this paper, we applied this method to two different experiments: (i) acceleration of electrons in laser driven plasma waves and (ii) self-compression of optical pulses induced by ionization nonlinearity. The manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to electron beam properties such as the peak charge, beam divergence, and transverse emittance. The demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications.

  1. Coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Hou, B.; Gao, G.; Lebailly, V.; Nees, J. A.; Clarke, R.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmas generated by an intense laser pulse can support coherent structures such as large amplitude wakefield that can affect the outcome of an experiment. We investigate the coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation using a deformable mirror. The experimental outcome is directly used as feedback in an evolutionary algorithm for optimization of the phase front of the driving laser pulse. In this paper, we applied this method to two different experiments: (i) acceleration of electrons in laser driven plasma waves and (ii) self-compression of optical pulses induced by ionization nonlinearity. The manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to electron beam properties such as the peak charge, beam divergence, and transverse emittance. The demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications.

  2. A force-feedback control system for micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Chen, Peter C. Y.; Ganapathy, Anand; Zhao, Guoyong; Nam, Joohoo; Yang, Guilin; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Cheeleong; Meng, Qingnian; Lin, Wei

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an explicit force-feedback control system for micro-assembly, focusing on the key issues of force transmission and control. The force-feedback system is incorporated with a compound flexure stage, which is driven by a voice-coil actuator and designed to provide frictionless translation motion along one axis. A force sensor measures the interaction force between the micromanipulator and its environment, while an explicit force controller controls the interaction force to follow a desired force trajectory. The effectiveness of this prototype force-control system has been demonstrated in an experimental application, where parts (with dimensions in microns) were picked up and assembled under explicit force-feedback control.

  3. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  4. Sampled-Data State Feedback Stabilization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we investigate the sampled-data state feedback control (SDSFC) problem of Boolean control networks (BCNs). Some necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stabilization of BCNs by SDSFC. Different from conventional state feedback controls, new phenomena observed the study of SDSFC. Based on the controllability matrix, we derive some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the trajectories of BCNs can be stabilized to a fixed point by piecewise constant control (PCC). It is proved that the global stabilization of BCNs under SDSFC is equivalent to that by PCC. Moreover, algorithms are given to construct the sampled-data state feedback controllers. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results. PMID:26890349

  5. Delayed feedback control of self-mobile cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, A.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Gurevich, S. V.; Panajotov, K.; Huyet, G.; Tlidi, M.

    2013-11-01

    Control of the motion of cavity solitons is one the central problems in nonlinear optical pattern formation. We report on the impact of the phase of the time-delayed optical feedback and carrier lifetime on the self-mobility of localized structures of light in broad-area semiconductor cavities. We show both analytically and numerically that the feedback phase strongly affects the drift instability threshold as well as the velocity of cavity soliton motion above this threshold. In addition we demonstrate that the noninstantaneous carrier response of the semiconductor medium is responsible for the increase of the critical feedback rate corresponding to the drift instability.

  6. A speed feedback control strategy for car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Xing; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    A speed feedback control mechanism was introduced into the system to improve the dynamical performance of the traffic flow. The modern control theory was used to analyze the stability of the system. It is found that the stability region varies with the feedback coefficient proportionally. In addition, the unit step responses in time domain and phase-frequency curves in frequency domain were given with different feedback coefficients in step response diagram and Bode diagram respectively. The overshoot and phase margins are inversely proportional to the speed feedback coefficients in an underdamped condition. The simulations were conducted to verify the validity of the improvement. The conclusion can be drawn that the analytical result and the simulation result are in good agreement with each other.

  7. Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia by Nonlinear Spatiotemporal Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujeni, Forough Rezaei; Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    The dynamic feedback control of the cardiac pacing interval has been widely used to suppress alternans. In this paper, temporally and spatially suppressing the alternans for cardiac tissue consisting of a one-dimensional chain of cardiac units is investigated. The model employed is a nonlinear partial difference equation. The model's fixed points and their stability conditions are determined, and bifurcations and chaos phenomenon have been studied by numerical simulations. The main objective of this paper is to stabilize the unstable fixed point of the model. The proposed approach is nonlinear spatiotemporal delayed feedback, and the appropriate interval for controller feedback gain is calculated using the linear stability analysis. It is proven that the proposed approach is robust with respect to all bifurcation parameter variations. Also, set point tracking is achieved by employing delayed feedback with an integrator. Finally, simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  8. Dissipative preparation of multibody entanglement via quantum feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Xia, Yan; Sun, Xiu-Dong; Song, He-Shan

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the generation of a multibody Dicke state in a coupled cavity system subject to environmental noise. Based on quantum feedback control, cavity decay may play a constructive role in obtaining the intended state. The required interaction time need not be accurately controlled. In addition, the feedback operations are only applied to a single atom in one cavity during the whole evolution process, and it is not necessary to change the control strategy as the number of atoms increases. Thus, our proposal can exploit the core advantage of coupled cavities to implement a scalable control scheme for preparing multibody entanglement.

  9. A Proposed Fast Luminosity Feedback for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Field, R.Clive; Fisher, Alan; Sullivan, Michael; Drago, Alessandro; /Frascati

    2009-05-15

    We present a possible design for a fast luminosity feedback for the SuperB Interaction Point (IP). The design is an extension of the fast luminosity feedback installed on the PEP-II accelerator. During the last two runs of PEP-II and BaBar (2007-2008), we had an improved luminosity feedback system that was able to maintain peak luminosity with faster correction speed than the previous system. The new system utilized fast dither coils on the High-Energy Beam (HEB) to independently dither the x position, the y position and the y angle at the IP, at roughly 100 Hz. The luminosity signal was then read out with three independent lock-in amplifiers. An overall correction was computed based on the lock-in signal strengths and beam corrections for position in x and y and in the y angle at the IP were simultaneously applied to the HEB. With the 100 times increase in luminosity for the SuperB design, we propose using a similar fast luminosity feedback that can operate at frequencies between DC and 1 kHz, high enough to follow any beam motion from the final focusing magnets.

  10. Control problems in very large accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1985-04-01

    There is no fundamental difference of kind in the control requirements between a small and a large accelerator since they are built of the same types of components, which individually have the same types of control inputs and outputs. The main difference is one of scale; the large machine has many more components of each type, and the distances involved are much greater. It is the purpose of this paper to look at the special control problems of large accelerators, which the author shall arbitrarily define as those with a length or circumference in excess of 10 km, and point out where special developments, or the adoption of developments from outside the accelerator control field, can be of assistance in minimizing the cost of the control system.

  11. Preliminary determination of Newtonian gravitational constant with angular acceleration feedback method

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chao; Quan, Li-Di; Yang, Shan-Qing; Wang, Bing-Peng; Wu, Jun-Fei; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Milyukov, Vadim; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant G with the angular acceleration feedback method at HUST. The apparatus has been built, and preliminary measurement performed, to test all aspects of the experimental design, particularly the feedback function, which was recently discussed in detail by Quan et al. The experimental results show that the residual twist angle of the torsion pendulum at the signal frequency introduces 0.4 ppm to the value of G. The relative uncertainty of the angular acceleration of the turntable is approximately 100 ppm, which is mainly limited by the stability of the apparatus. Therefore, the experiment has been modified with three features: (i) the height of the apparatus is reduced almost by half, (ii) the aluminium shelves were replaced with shelves made from ultra-low expansion material and (iii) a perfect compensation of the laboratory-fixed gravitational background will be carried out. With these improvements, the angular acceleration is expected to be determined with an uncertainty of better than 10 ppm, and a reliable value of G with 20 ppm or below will be obtained in the near future. PMID:25201996

  12. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    During this year, we concentrated our efforts on the design of controllers for lateral/directional control using mu synthesis. This proved to be a more difficult task than we anticipated and we are still working on the designs. In the lateral-directional control problem, the inputs are pilot lateral stick and pedal commands and the outputs are roll rate about the velocity vector and side slip angle. The control effectors are ailerons, rudder deflection, and directional thrust vectoring vane deflection which produces a yawing moment about the body axis. Our math model does not contain any provision for thrust vectoring of rolling moment. This has resulted in limitations of performance at high angles of attack. During 1994-95, the following tasks for the lateral-directional controllers were accomplished: (1) Designed both inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers. These controllers are implemented using accelerometer outputs rather than an a priori model of the vehicle aerodynamics; (2) Used classical techniques to design controllers for the system linearized by dynamics inversion. These controllers acted to control roll rate and Dutch roll response; (3) Implemented the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers on the six DOF simulation; (4) Developed a lateral-directional control allocation scheme based on minimizing required control effort among the ailerons, rudder, and directional thrust vectoring; and (5) Developed mu outer loop controllers combined with classical inner loop controllers.

  13. Predictive Feedback and Feedforward Control for Systems with Unknown Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Eure, Kenneth W.

    1998-01-01

    Predictive feedback control has been successfully used in the regulation of plate vibrations when no reference signal is available for feedforward control. However, if a reference signal is available it may be used to enhance regulation by incorporating a feedforward path in the feedback controller. Such a controller is known as a hybrid controller. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the hybrid controller for general linear systems, in particular for structural vibration induced by acoustic noise. The generalized predictive control is extended to include a feedforward path in the multi-input multi-output case and implemented on a single-input single-output test plant to achieve plate vibration regulation. There are cases in acoustic-induce vibration where the disturbance signal is not available to be used by the hybrid controller, but a disturbance model is available. In this case the disturbance model may be used in the feedback controller to enhance performance. In practice, however, neither the disturbance signal nor the disturbance model is available. This paper presents the theory of identifying and incorporating the noise model into the feedback controller. Implementations are performed on a test plant and regulation improvements over the case where no noise model is used are demonstrated.

  14. [Anomalous ion transport and feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The slab branch of the ITG mode was produced by a d.c. ion acceleration heating scheme and definitively identified in CLM under the previous DOE grant. A transit-time rf heating scheme was used to produce a more Maxwellian ion population to produce and identify a more predictable slab ITG mode. These experiments are partly based on some theoretical work on the substantial effects of anisotropy in [eta][sub i] on the slab mode. The progress under the present DOE grant are described below.

  15. [Anomalous ion transport and feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The slab branch of the ITG mode was produced by a d.c. ion acceleration heating scheme and definitively identified in CLM under the previous DOE grant. A transit-time rf heating scheme was used to produce a more Maxwellian ion population to produce and identify a more predictable slab ITG mode. These experiments are partly based on some theoretical work on the substantial effects of anisotropy in {eta}{sub i} on the slab mode. The progress under the present DOE grant are described below.

  16. Control problems in very large accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1985-06-01

    There is no fundamental difference of kind in the control requirements between a small and a large accelerator since they are built of the same types of components, which individually have similar control inputs and outputs. The main difference is one of scale; the large machine has many more components of each type, and the distances involved are much greater. Both of these factors must be taken into account in determining the optimum way of carrying out the control functions. Small machines should use standard equipment and software for control as much as possible, as special developments for small quantities cannot normally be justified if all costs are taken into account. On the other hand, the very great number of devices needed for a large machine means that, if special developments can result in simplification, they may make possible an appreciable reduction in the control equipment costs. It is the purpose of this report to look at the special control problems of large accelerators, which the author shall arbitarily define as those with a length of circumference in excess of 10 km, and point out where special developments, or the adoption of developments from outside the accelerator control field, can be of assistance in minimizing the cost of the control system. Most of the first part of this report was presented as a paper to the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference. It has now been extended to include a discussion on the special case of the controls for the SSC.

  17. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  18. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Dunxiong; Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  19. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  20. Human hip-ankle coordination emerging from multisensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Georg; Assländer, Lorenz; Gollhofer, Albert; Mergner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Human sensorimotor control involves inter-segmental coordination to cope with the complexity of a multi-segment system. The combined activation of hip and ankle muscles during upright stance represents the hip-ankle coordination. This study postulates that the coordination emerges from interactions on the sensory levels in the feedback control. The hypothesis was tested in a model-based approach that compared human experimental data with model simulations. Seven subjects were standing with eyes closed on an anterior-posterior tilting motion platform. Postural responses in terms of angular excursions of trunk and legs with respect to vertical were measured and characterized using spectral analysis. The presented control model consists of separate feedback modules for the hip and ankle joints, which exchange sensory information with each other. The feedback modules utilize sensor-derived disturbance estimates rather than 'raw' sensory signals. The comparison of the human data with the simulation data revealed close correspondence, suggesting that the model captures important aspects of the human sensory feedback control. For verification, the model was re-embodied in a humanoid robot that was tested in the human laboratory. The findings show that the hip-ankle coordination can be explained by interactions between the feedback control modules of the hip and ankle joints. PMID:25150802

  1. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-03-15

    Matlab is a matrix manipulation language originally developed to be a convenient language for using the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. What makes Matlab so appealing for accelerator physics is the combination of a matrix oriented programming language, an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capability, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of software toolboxes for accelerators have been written in Matlab--the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for machine simulations, LOCO for accelerator calibration, Matlab Channel Access Toolbox (MCA) for EPICS connections, and the Middle Layer. This paper will describe the ''middle layer'' software toolbox that resides between the high-level control applications and the low-level accelerator control system. This software was a collaborative effort between ALS (LBNL) and SPEAR3 (SSRL) but easily ports to other machines. Five accelerators presently use this software. The high-level Middle Layer functionality includes energy ramp, configuration control (save/restore), global orbit correction, local photon beam steering, insertion device compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction, response matrix measurement, and script-based programs for machine physics studies.

  2. Dynamic output feedback H ∞ control for affine fuzzy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the problem of designing H ∞ dynamic output feedback controllers for nonlinear systems, which are described by affine fuzzy models. The system outputs have been chosen as premise variables, which can guarantee that the plant and the controller always switch to the same region. By using a piecewise Lyapunov function and adding slack matrix variables, a piecewise-affine dynamic output feedback controller design method is obtained in the formulation of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be efficiently solved numerically. In contrast to the existing work, the proposed approach needs less LMI constraints and leads to less conservatism. Finally, numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the new result.

  3. Dynamical singularities in adaptive delayed-feedback control.

    PubMed

    Saito, Asaki; Konishi, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the dynamical characteristics of adaptive delayed-feedback control systems, exploiting a discrete-time adaptive control method derived for carrying out detailed analysis. In particular, the systems exhibit singularities such as power-law decay of the distribution of transient times and almost zero finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We can explain these results by characterizing such systems as having (1) a Jacobian matrix with unity eigenvalue in the whole phase space, and (2) parameters approaching a stability boundary proven to be identical with that of (nonadaptive) delayed-feedback control. PMID:22060398

  4. Event-triggered output feedback control for distributed networked systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Magdi S; Sabih, Muhammad; Elshafei, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of output-feedback communication and control with event-triggered framework in the context of distributed networked control systems. The design problem of the event-triggered output-feedback control is proposed as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) feasibility problem. The scheme is developed for the distributed system where only partial states are available. In this scheme, a subsystem uses local observers and share its information to its neighbors only when the subsystem's local error exceeds a specified threshold. The developed method is illustrated by using a coupled cart example from the literature. PMID:26708304

  5. Hybrid Feedforward-Feedback Noise Control Using Virtual Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Jacob; Fuller, Chris; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches to active noise control using virtual sensors are evaluated for eventual use in an active headrest. Specifically, adaptive feedforward, feedback, and hybrid control structures are compared. Each controller incorporates the traditional filtered-x least mean squares algorithm. The feedback controller is arranged in an internal model configuration to draw comparisons with standard feedforward control theory results. Simulation and experimental results are presented that illustrate each controllers ability to minimize the pressure at both physical and virtual microphone locations. The remote microphone technique is used to obtain pressure estimates at the virtual locations. It is shown that a hybrid controller offers performance benefits over the traditional feedforward and feedback controllers. Stability issues associated with feedback and hybrid controllers are also addressed. Experimental results show that 15-20 dB reduction in broadband disturbances can be achieved by minimizing the measured pressure, whereas 10-15 dB reduction is obtained when minimizing the estimated pressure at a virtual location.

  6. Effect of motor dynamics on nonlinear feedback robot arm control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Li, Zuofeng; Bejczy, Antal K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback robot controller that incorporates the robot manipulator dynamics and the robot joint motor dynamics is proposed. The manipulator dynamics and the motor dynamics are coupled to obtain a third-order-dynamic model, and differential geometric control theory is applied to produce a linearized and decoupled robot controller. The derived robot controller operates in the robot task space, thus eliminating the need for decomposition of motion commands into robot joint space commands. Computer simulations are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed robot controller. The controller is further experimentally evaluated on the PUMA 560 robot arm. The experiments show that the proposed controller produces good trajectory tracking performances and is robust in the presence of model inaccuracies. Compared with a nonlinear feedback robot controller based on the manipulator dynamics only, the proposed robot controller yields conspicuously improved performance.

  7. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  8. Nonlinear feedback control of highly manoeuvrable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Enns, Dale F.; Snell, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of nonlinear quadratic regulator (NLQR) theory to the design of control laws for a typical high-performance aircraft. The NLQR controller design is performed using truncated solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation of optimal control theory. The performance of the NLQR controller is compared with the performance of a conventional P + I gain scheduled controller designed by applying standard frequency response techniques to the equations of motion of the aircraft linearized at various angles of attack. Both techniques result in control laws which are very similar in structure to one another and which yield similar performance. The results of applying both control laws to a high-g vertical turn are illustrated by nonlinear simulation.

  9. Feedback control laws for highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of the year, the investigators concentrated their efforts on completing the design of control laws for the longitudinal axis of the HARV. During the second half of the year they concentrated on the synthesis of control laws for the lateral-directional axes. The longitudinal control law design efforts can be briefly summarized as follows. Longitudinal control laws were developed for the HARV using mu synthesis design techniques coupled with dynamic inversion. An inner loop dynamic inversion controller was used to simplify the system dynamics by eliminating the aerodynamic nonlinearities and inertial cross coupling. Models of the errors resulting from uncertainties in the principal longitudinal aerodynamic terms were developed and included in the model of the HARV with the inner loop dynamic inversion controller. This resulted in an inner loop transfer function model which was an integrator with the modeling errors characterized as uncertainties in gain and phase. Outer loop controllers were then designed using mu synthesis to provide robustness to these modeling errors and give desired response to pilot inputs. Both pitch rate and angle of attack command following systems were designed. The following tasks have been accomplished for the lateral-directional controllers: inner and outer loop dynamic inversion controllers have been designed; an error model based on a linearized perturbation model of the inner loop system was derived; controllers for the inner loop system have been designed, using classical techniques, that control roll rate and Dutch roll response; the inner loop dynamic inversion and classical controllers have been implemented on the six degree of freedom simulation; and lateral-directional control allocation scheme has been developed based on minimizing required control effort.

  10. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  11. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  12. Stabilising falling liquid film flows using feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alice B.; Gomes, Susana N.; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    2016-01-01

    Falling liquid films become unstable due to inertial effects when the fluid layer is sufficiently thick or the slope sufficiently steep. This free surface flow of a single fluid layer has industrial applications including coating and heat transfer, which benefit from smooth and wavy interfaces, respectively. Here, we discuss how the dynamics of the system are altered by feedback controls based on observations of the interface height, and supplied to the system via the perpendicular injection and suction of fluid through the wall. In this study, we model the system using both Benney and weighted-residual models that account for the fluid injection through the wall. We find that feedback using injection and suction is a remarkably effective control mechanism: the controls can be used to drive the system towards arbitrary steady states and travelling waves, and the qualitative effects are independent of the details of the flow modelling. Furthermore, we show that the system can still be successfully controlled when the feedback is applied via a set of localised actuators and only a small number of system observations are available, and that this is possible using both static (where the controls are based on only the most recent set of observations) and dynamic (where the controls are based on an approximation of the system which evolves over time) control schemes. This study thus provides a solid theoretical foundation for future experimental realisations of the active feedback control of falling liquid films.

  13. A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1989-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback is described and test results for a laboratory model magnetic bearing actuator are presented. Test results were obtained using a magnetic bearing test fixture, which is also described. The magnetic bearing actuator consists of elements similar to those used in a laboratory test model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD).

  14. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  15. Second law of thermodynamics with discrete quantum feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2008-02-29

    A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller. PMID:18352605

  16. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  17. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  18. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  19. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  20. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  1. Stabilization and feedback control of weak measurement monitored quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Du Toit, Pieter; Burd, Shaun; Konrad, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study feedback control of quantum oscillators, monitored through periodic weak measurement. By implementing reversals of measurement perturbations based on a Bayesian estimate of the state dynamics, we demonstrate suppressed measurement noise leading to greater oscillator stability and improved quantum feedback control. The work in this paper was supported in part by the National Research Foundation of South Africa through Grant No. 93602 as well as an award by the United States Airforce Office of Scientific Research, Award No. FA9550-14-1-0151.

  2. Output feedback regulator design for jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on the output feedback regulator formulation is described and applied to turbofan engine model. Full order model dynamics, were incorporated in the example design. The effect of actuator dynamics on closed loop performance was investigaged. Also, the importance of turbine inlet temperature as an element of the dynamic feedback was studied. Step responses were given to indicate the improvement in system performance with this control. Calculation times for all experiments are given in CPU seconds for comparison purposes.

  3. Output feedback regulator design for jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on the output feedback regulator formulation is described and applied to an F100 turbofan engine model. Full order model dynamics, are incorporated in the example design. The effect of actuator dynamics on closed loop performance is investigated. Also, the importance of turbine inlet temperature as an element of the dynamic feedback is studied. Step responses are given to indicate the improvement in system performance with this control. Calculation times for all experiments are given in CPU seconds for comparison purposes.

  4. Mode control of semiconductor laser with diffraction and dispersion feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsuji, R.; Fujii, K.; Nakayama, S.; Amano, M.; Kiyono, H.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tokita, Y.; Hanasawa, Y.; Mirov, S.B.; McCutcheon, M.J.; Whinnery, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    We have constructed two kinds of external cavity semiconductor laser. The first one is a diffraction feedback system consisting of a collimating lens, a diffraction grating and a mirror controlled by a PZT element. The second one is a dispersion feedback system in which the diffraction grating is replaced with a prism. Changing the angle of the external mirror by controlling the voltage to be supplied to the PZT, we have succeeded to tune the longitudinal mode of semiconductor laser continuously in the range of about 1 GHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  6. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  7. Feedback controllers for broadband active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Benoit; Legrain, Isabelle

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate the efficiency of an LQG-based controller for the active control of the acoustic field radiated by a rectangular panel. This topic has been of interest for numerous researchers in the past 10 or 15 years, but very little attention has been paid to broadband disturbances occurring in a relatively high frequency range. These are unfortunately common features of noise perturbations in realistic structures such as airplanes or helicopters. The few articles that deal with this problem provide very scarce experimental results and are related to frequency bands where the structure dynamics is rather poor. From the outset, the problem at hand involves numerous difficulties, such as the modeling of the active structure itself and the possible large size of the controller. In the following, the experimental setup is described, then the controller design procedure is developed and finally some experimental results are shown that prove the efficiency of the method.

  8. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  9. Towards MRI-guided linear accelerator control: gating on an MRI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crijns, S. P. M.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2011-08-01

    To boost the possibilities of image guidance in radiotherapy by providing images with superior soft-tissue contrast during treatment, we pursue diagnostic quality MRI functionality integrated with a linear accelerator. Large respiration-induced semi-periodic target excursions hamper treatment of cancer of the abdominal organs. Methods to compensate in real time for such motion are gating and tracking. These strategies are most effective in cases where anatomic motion can be visualized directly, which supports the use of an integrated MRI accelerator. We establish here an infrastructure needed to realize gated radiation delivery based on MR feedback and demonstrate its potential as a first step towards more advanced image guidance techniques. The position of a phantom subjected to one-dimensional periodic translation is tracked with the MR scanner. Real-time communication with the MR scanner and control of the radiation beam are established. Based on the time-resolved position of the phantom, gated radiation delivery to the phantom is realized. Dose distributions for dynamic delivery conditions with varying gating windows are recorded on gafchromic film. The similarity between dynamically and statically obtained dose profiles gradually increases as the gating window is decreased. With gating windows of 5 mm, we obtain sharp dose profiles. We validate our gating implementation by comparing measured dose profiles to theoretical profiles calculated using the knowledge of the imposed motion pattern. Excellent correspondence is observed. At the same time, we show that real-time on-line reconstruction of the accumulated dose can be performed using time-resolved target position information. This facilitates plan adaptation not only on a fraction-to-fraction scale but also during one fraction, which is especially valuable in highly accelerated treatment strategies. With the currently established framework and upcoming improvements to our prototype-integrated MRI accelerator

  10. Is feedback control effective for ecosystem-based fisheries management?

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Abrams, Peter A

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of species interactions on the robustness of feedback control of the harvesting of prey species. We consider the consequences of feedback control of fishing effort. If a prey species is exploited, increasing fishing effort decreases predator abundance more than it does the prey abundance. Feedback control of fishing effort may cause the extinction of the predator, even if the prey population is well controlled. Even when fishing effort is controlled by predator density, it is difficult for the fishery and the predator to coexist, and, if they do so, the system exhibits complex dynamic behaviors. If the predator and fishery coexist, feedback control of fishing effort converges to a stable equilibrium, a synchronous cycle, or an asynchronous cycle. In the last case, the system undergoes more complex cycling with a longer period than that when the fishing effort is kept constant. These analyses suggest that there is no effective strategy that is robust against measurement errors, process errors and complex interactions in ecosystem dynamics. PMID:23792332

  11. Feedback control as a framework for understanding tradeoffs in biology.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Noah J; Ankarali, Mert M; Dyhr, Jonathan P; Madhav, Manu S; Roth, Eatai; Sefati, Shahin; Sponberg, Simon; Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Daniel, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Control theory arose from a need to control synthetic systems. From regulating steam engines to tuning radios to devices capable of autonomous movement, it provided a formal mathematical basis for understanding the role of feedback in the stability (or change) of dynamical systems. It provides a framework for understanding any system with regulation via feedback, including biological ones such as regulatory gene networks, cellular metabolic systems, sensorimotor dynamics of moving animals, and even ecological or evolutionary dynamics of organisms and populations. Here, we focus on four case studies of the sensorimotor dynamics of animals, each of which involves the application of principles from control theory to probe stability and feedback in an organism's response to perturbations. We use examples from aquatic (two behaviors performed by electric fish), terrestrial (following of walls by cockroaches), and aerial environments (flight control by moths) to highlight how one can use control theory to understand the way feedback mechanisms interact with the physical dynamics of animals to determine their stability and response to sensory inputs and perturbations. Each case study is cast as a control problem with sensory input, neural processing, and motor dynamics, the output of which feeds back to the sensory inputs. Collectively, the interaction of these systems in a closed loop determines the behavior of the entire system. PMID:24893678

  12. A stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback control methodology for superagility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Direskeneli, Haldun; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1992-01-01

    A new control design methodology is developed: Stochastic Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Technology (SOFFT). Traditional design techniques optimize a single cost function (which expresses the design objectives) to obtain both the feedforward and feedback control laws. This approach places conflicting demands on the control law such as fast tracking versus noise atttenuation/disturbance rejection. In the SOFFT approach, two cost functions are defined. The feedforward control law is designed to optimize one cost function, the feedback optimizes the other. By separating the design objectives and decoupling the feedforward and feedback design processes, both objectives can be achieved fully. A new measure of command tracking performance, Z-plots, is also developed. By analyzing these plots at off-nominal conditions, the sensitivity or robustness of the system in tracking commands can be predicted. Z-plots provide an important tool for designing robust control systems. The Variable-Gain SOFFT methodology was used to design a flight control system for the F/A-18 aircraft. It is shown that SOFFT can be used to expand the operating regime and provide greater performance (flying/handling qualities) throughout the extended flight regime. This work was performed under the NASA SBIR program. ICS plans to market the software developed as a new module in its commercial CACSD software package: ACET.

  13. Tollmien-Schlichting wave cancellation by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Hari; Morrison, Jonathan; Kerrigan, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves are primary instabilities in the boundary layer and, by actively interfering with their growth, the transition process can be delayed. In this study the experimental results of both open-loop and real-time feedback control will be shown for 3D TS waves excited within a flat-plate boundary layer. They are excited at a 0.75mm pin-hole source driven by a speaker. A 0.75 mm thin, dual slot geometry is used for actuation by another speaker and a wall hot-wire sensor manufactured in-house is used as the sensor for feedback control. The spatial transfer function models between the source and sensor (Gs) and the actuator and sensor (Ga) obtained by classic frequency sweep techniques are used to synthesize various types of robust, stabilizing controllers (K). The transfer function Gs determines the unstable range of frequencies whereas Ga together with K determines the stability of the closed-loop. A second traversing hot-wire is used to record the performance of the controller downstream. It is shown that the experimental transfer functions agree remarkably well with numerical calculations as do the predicted results from feedback control. Preliminary experimental feedback control results for various other actuator configurations will also be presented. This work is supported by EADS (support agreement number IW203591) and LFC-UK.

  14. Application of stochastic optimal reduced state feedback gain computation procedures to the design of aircraft gust alleviation controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, K.; Kaufman, H.

    1979-01-01

    A stochastic linear model that accounts for process parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, and a restricted number of measurable outputs was used to determine feedback gains useful for reducing the vertical acceleration which results from the presence of a vertical wind gust. Considered in the study were the influence of various feedback configurations, the effects of sensor noise, flight condition changes, and initialization procedures. Results showed that for sixth order linearized longitudinal motion, a controller with feedback on three states could be designed for effective gust alleviation taking into account both sensor noise and flight condition variation.

  15. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  16. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  17. Multiple feedback control apparatus for power conditioning equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biess, John (Inventor); Yu, Yuan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved feedback control system to govern the cyclic operation of the power switch of a non-dissipative power conditioning equipment. The apparatus includes two or three control loops working in unison. The first causes the output DC level to be compared with a reference, and the error amplified for control purposes. The second utilizes the AC component of the voltage across the output filter inductor or the current through the output filter capacitor, and the third loop senses the output transients.

  18. Discrete-time infinity control problem with measurement feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoorvogel, A. A.; Saberi, A.; Chen, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the discrete-time H(sub infinity) control problem with measurement feedback. The authors extend previous results by having weaker assumptions on the system parameters. The authors also show explicitly the structure of H(sub infinity) controllers. Finally, they show that it is in certain cases possible, without loss of performance, to reduce the dynamical order of the controllers.

  19. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  20. Time optimal feedback control of discrete systems with bounded inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xin; Longman, Richard W.; Klein, George

    1990-01-01

    Deadbeat control theory gives a feedback solution to the time optimal control of discrete time systems. Experience has shown the results to be impractical because they ignore bounds on the actuator strength. This paper develops two algorithms for generating time optimal control in feedback form for discrete systems with bounded controls. The results are also applicable for generating recovery regions and the set of reachable states. For multiple control problems a method of generating sublayers is developed which decreases off-line and on-line computational effort. Two algorithms are presented with somewhat different computational and storage requirements. The algorithms are practical within certain dimension constraints, and are natural for implementation with parallel processing.

  1. Microgravity vibration isolation: Optimal preview and feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Allaire, P. E.; Lewis, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to achieve adequate low-frequency vibration isolation for certain space experiments an active control is needed, due to inherent passive-isolator limitations. Proposed here are five possible state-space models for a one-dimensional vibration isolation system with a quadratic performance index. The five models are subsets of a general set of nonhomogeneous state space equations which includes disturbance terms. An optimal control is determined, using a differential equations approach, for this class of problems. This control is expressed in terms of constant, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) feedback gains and constant feedforward (preview) gains. The gains can be easily determined numerically. They result in a robust controller and offers substantial improvements over a control that uses standard LQR feedback alone.

  2. Note: Pneumatically modulated liquid delivery with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, C. R.; Terray, A. V.; Lubrano, A. L.; Rogers, D. A.; Hart, S. J.; Rose-Pehrsson, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the design and characterization of a pneumatically driven liquid delivery system using an embedded microcontroller with feedback control capable of maintaining a stable, constant flow rate over several hours of operation. Flow rates with relative standard deviations less than 1% were achieved and compared to a typical laboratory syringe pump.

  3. Kinematic feedback control laws for generating natural arm movements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Jang, Cheongjae; Park, Frank C

    2014-03-01

    We propose a stochastic optimal feedback control law for generating natural robot arm motions. Our approach, inspired by the minimum variance principle of Harris and Wolpert (1998 Nature 394 780-4) and the optimal feedback control principles put forth by Todorov and Jordan (2002 Nature Neurosci. 5 1226-35) for explaining human movements, differs in two crucial respects: (i) the endpoint variance is minimized in joint space rather than Cartesian hand space, and (ii) we ignore the dynamics and instead consider only the second-order differential kinematics. The feedback control law generating the motions can be straightforwardly obtained by backward integration of a set of ordinary differential equations; these equations are obtained exactly, without any linear-quadratic approximations. The only parameters to be determined a priori are the variance scale factors, and for both the two-DOF planar arm and the seven-DOF spatial arm, a table of values is constructed based on the given initial and final arm configurations; these values are determined via an optimal fitting procedure, and consistent with existing findings about neuromuscular motor noise levels of human arm muscles. Experiments conducted with a two-link planar arm and a seven-DOF spatial arm verify that the trajectories generated by our feedback control law closely resemble human arm motions, in the sense of producing nearly straight-line hand trajectories, having bell-shaped velocity profiles, and satisfying Fitts Law. PMID:24343165

  4. Design of multivariable feedback control systems via spectral assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, R. R.; Tung, L. J.; Marefat, M.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of spectral assignment techniques to the design of multivariable feedback control systems was investigated. A fractional representation design procedure for unstable plants is presented and illustrated with an example. A computer aided design software package implementing eigenvalue/eigenvector design procedures is described. A design example which illustrates the use of the program is explained.

  5. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  6. Feedback and Modularity in Cell Cycle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Underlying the wonderful diversity of natural forms is the ability of an organism to grow into its appropriate shape. Regulation ensures that cells grow, divide and differentiate so that the organism and its constitutive parts are properly proportioned and of suitable size. Although the size-control mechanism active in an individual cell is of fundamental importance to this process, it is difficult to isolate and study in complex multi-cellular systems and remains poorly understood. This motivates our use of the budding yeast model organism, whose Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal (e.g. cell size) and external signals into an irreversible decision to enter the cell cycle. We have endeavored to address the following two questions: What makes the Start transition irreversible? How does a cell compute its own size? I will report on the progress we have made. Our work is part of an emerging framework for understanding biological control circuits, which will allow us to discern the function of natural systems and aid us in engineering synthetic systems.

  7. Nonlinear feedback control for high alpha flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Analytical aerodynamic models are derived from a high alpha 6 DOF wind tunnel model. One detail model requires some interpolation between nonlinear functions of alpha. One analytical model requires no interpolation and as such is a completely continuous model. Flight path optimization is conducted on the basic maneuvers: half-loop, 90 degree pitch-up, and level turn. The optimal control analysis uses the derived analytical model in the equations of motion and is based on both moment and force equations. The maximum principle solution for the half-loop is poststall trajectory performing the half-loop in 13.6 seconds. The agility induced by thrust vectoring capability provided a minimum effect on reducing the maneuver time. By means of thrust vectoring control the 90 degrees pitch-up maneuver can be executed in a small place over a short time interval. The agility capability of thrust vectoring is quite beneficial for pitch-up maneuvers. The level turn results are based currently on only outer layer solutions of singular perturbation. Poststall solutions provide high turn rates but generate higher losses of energy than that of classical sustained solutions.

  8. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  9. L1 adaptive output-feedback control architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharisov, Evgeny

    This research focuses on development of L 1 adaptive output-feedback control. The objective is to extend the L1 adaptive control framework to a wider class of systems, as well as obtain architectures that afford more straightforward tuning. We start by considering an existing L1 adaptive output-feedback controller for non-strictly positive real systems based on piecewise constant adaptation law. It is shown that L 1 adaptive control architectures achieve decoupling of adaptation from control, which leads to bounded away from zero time-delay and gain margins in the presence of arbitrarily fast adaptation. Computed performance bounds provide quantifiable performance guarantees both for system output and control signal in transient and steady state. A noticeable feature of the L1 adaptive controller is that its output behavior can be made close to the behavior of a linear time-invariant system. In particular, proper design of the lowpass filter can achieve output response, which almost scales for different step reference commands. This property is relevant to applications with human operator in the loop (for example: control augmentation systems of piloted aircraft), since predictability of the system response is necessary for adequate performance of the operator. Next we present applications of the L1 adaptive output-feedback controller in two different fields of engineering: feedback control of human anesthesia, and ascent control of a NASA crew launch vehicle (CLV). The purpose of the feedback controller for anesthesia is to ensure that the patient's level of sedation during surgery follows a prespecified profile. The L1 controller is enabled by anesthesiologist after he/she achieves sufficient patient sedation level by introducing sedatives manually. This problem formulation requires safe switching mechanism, which avoids controller initialization transients. For this purpose, we used an L1 adaptive controller with special output predictor initialization routine

  10. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2011-08-15

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  11. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-05-15

    Matlab is an interpretive programming language originally developed for convenient use with the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. Matlab is appealing for accelerator physics because it is matrix-oriented, provides an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capabilities, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of accelerator software toolboxes have been written in Matlab -- the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for model-based machine simulations, LOCO for on-line model calibration, and Matlab Channel Access (MCA) to connect with EPICS. The function of the MATLAB ''MiddleLayer'' is to provide a scripting language for machine simulations and on-line control, including non-EPICS based control systems. The MiddleLayer has simplified and streamlined development of high-level applications including configuration control, energy ramp, orbit correction, photon beam steering, ID compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction and response matrix measurement. The database-driven Middle Layer software is largely machine-independent and easy to port. Six accelerators presently use the software package with more scheduled to come on line soon.

  12. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  13. Feedback Control of Two-Component Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-01

    Two-component systems are a dominant form of bacterial signal transduction. The prototypical two-component system consists of a sensor that responds to a specific input(s) by modifying the output of a cognate regulator. Because the output of a two-component system is the amount of phosphorylated regulator, feedback mechanisms may alter the amount of regulator, and/or modify the ability of a sensor or other proteins to alter the phosphorylation state of the regulator. Two-component systems may display intrinsic feedback whereby the amount of phosphorylated regulator changes under constant inducing conditions and without the participation of additional proteins. Feedback control allows a two-component system to achieve particular steady-state levels, to reach a given steady state with distinct dynamics, to express coregulated genes in a given order, and to activate a regulator to different extents, depending on the signal acting on the sensor. PMID:27607549

  14. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease. PMID:27129778

  15. Output feedback control of a quadrotor UAV using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear controller for a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is proposed using neural networks (NNs) and output feedback. The assumption on the availability of UAV dynamics is not always practical, especially in an outdoor environment. Therefore, in this work, an NN is introduced to learn the complete dynamics of the UAV online, including uncertain nonlinear terms like aerodynamic friction and blade flapping. Although a quadrotor UAV is underactuated, a novel NN virtual control input scheme is proposed which allows all six degrees of freedom (DOF) of the UAV to be controlled using only four control inputs. Furthermore, an NN observer is introduced to estimate the translational and angular velocities of the UAV, and an output feedback control law is developed in which only the position and the attitude of the UAV are considered measurable. It is shown using Lyapunov theory that the position, orientation, and velocity tracking errors, the virtual control and observer estimation errors, and the NN weight estimation errors for each NN are all semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB) in the presence of bounded disturbances and NN functional reconstruction errors while simultaneously relaxing the separation principle. The effectiveness of proposed output feedback control scheme is then demonstrated in the presence of unknown nonlinear dynamics and disturbances, and simulation results are included to demonstrate the theoretical conjecture. PMID:19963698

  16. Feedback control of solid oxide fuel cell spatial temperature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardadi, Mahshid; Mueller, Fabian; Jabbari, Faryar

    A high performance feedback controller has been developed to minimize SOFC spatial temperature variation following significant load perturbations. For thermal management, spatial temperature variation along SOFC cannot be avoided. However, results indicate that feedback control can be used to manipulate the fuel cell air flow and inlet fuel cell air temperature to maintain a nearly constant SOFC electrode electrolyte assembly temperature profile. For example temperature variations of less than 5 K are obtained for load perturbations of ±25% from nominal. These results are obtained using a centralized control strategy to regulate a distributed temperature profile and manage actuator interactions. The controller is based on H-infinity synthesis using a physical based dynamic model of a single co-flow SOFC repeat cell. The model of the fuel cell spatial temperature response needed for control synthesis was linearized and reduced from nonlinear model of the fuel cell assembly. A single 11 state feedback linear system tested in the full nonlinear model was found to be effective and stable over a wide fuel cell operating envelope (0.82-0.6 V). Overall, simulation of the advanced controller resulted in small and smooth monotonic temperature response to rapid and large load perturbations. This indicates that future SOFC systems can be designed and controlled to have superb load following characteristic with less than previously expected thermal stresses.

  17. Delayed feedback control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    We study control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks by using a phase-reduction approach. Starting from a general class of limit-cycle oscillators we derive a phase model, which shows that delayed feedback control changes effective coupling strengths and effective frequencies. We derive the analytical condition for critical control gain, where the phase dynamics of the oscillator becomes extremely sensitive to any perturbations. As a result the network can attain phase synchronization even if the natural interoscillatory couplings are small. In addition, we demonstrate that delayed feedback control can disrupt the coherent phase dynamic in synchronized networks. The validity of our results is illustrated on networks of diffusively coupled Stuart-Landau and FitzHugh-Nagumo models.

  18. Nonlinear feedback method of robot control - A preliminary experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Ganguly, S.; Li, Z.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear feedback method of robot control has been experimentally implemented on two PUMA 560 robot arms. The feasibility of the proposed controller, which was shown viable through simulation results earlier, is stressed. The servomechanism operates in task space, and the nonlinear feedback takes care of the necessary transformations to compute the necessary joint currents. A discussion is presented of the implementation with details of the experiments performed. The performance of the controller is encouraging but was limited to 100-Hz sampling frequency and to derived velocity information at the time of the experimentation. The setup of the lab, the software aspects, results, and the control hardware architecture that has recently been implemented are discussed.

  19. Low Order Empirical Galerkin Models for Feedback Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadmor, Gilead; Noack, Bernd

    2005-11-01

    Model-based feedback control restrictions on model order and complexity stem from several generic considerations: real time computation, the ability to either measure or reliably estimate the state in real time and avoiding sensitivity to noise, uncertainty and numerical ill-conditioning are high on that list. Empirical POD Galerkin models are attractive in the sense that they are simple and (optimally) efficient, but are notoriously fragile, and commonly fail to capture transients and control effects. In this talk we review recent efforts to enhance empirical Galerkin models and make them suitable for feedback design. Enablers include `subgrid' estimation of turbulence and pressure representations, tunable models using modes from multiple operating points, and actuation models. An invariant manifold defines the model's dynamic envelope. It must be respected and can be exploited in observer and control design. These ideas are benchmarked in the cylinder wake system and validated by a systematic DNS investigation of a 3-dimensional Galerkin model of the controlled wake.

  20. Feedback Control for Noise Reduction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's continuing noise reduction program, an active noise control system (ANC) is being developed to suppress noise inside an aircraft cabin. This interior noise reduction system consists of the following major components: 1. Several accelerometers. 2. An input amplifier. 3. A digital signal processor (DSP) system that includes an analog to digital converter (ADC) and a digital to analog converter (DAC). 4. A high voltage power amplifier. 5. PZT actuators. 6. Power supply and distribution. The accelerometers detect interior panel vibrations. The accelerometer signals are fed to the input amplifier where they are conditioned prior to being sent to the ADC. The DSP receives the digitized signals form the ADC, processes these signals, and sends the result to the DAC. The DAC's analog output is used as input to the high voltage power amplifier. The power amplifier drives the PZT actuators to cancel noise form 50 to 1,300 Hz. The specific area of concern for this work was development of a DSP system that could be used for an actual flight demonstration. It was decided to base the system on a commercially available DSP board, the Spectrum Digital eZdsp. This was complicated by the fact that the ADC and DAC capabilities available on the eZdsp board were not sufficient to meet the system specification. Designing and fabricating a special ADC and DAC daughter card for the eZdsp circumvented this problem. The DSP system hardware has been successfully tested and is currently being integrated into the complete noise reduction system. This work has been completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr.William Edmonson from Hampton University and was conducted under the direction of the principle investigator, Dr. Qamar A. Shams of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch, as part of a continuing noise reduction program.

  1. Longitudinal stability and control in wind shear with energy height rate feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1980-01-01

    The longitudinal linearized equations of motion in wind shear were derived for the NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle, a modified Boeing 737 airplane. In addition to the apparent acceleration terms resulting from wind shear, the equations included altitude dependent stability derivatives. A linear analysis of these equations indicates a first order divergence type of instability due to wind shear in which head wind decreased with altitude. Furthermore, this instability cannot be stabilized by attitude control alone. However, attitude control used in combination with an addition feedback loop which consisted of the energy height rate feedback to the throttle proved to be effective in suppressing instability due to wind shear. A brief piloted, real time, nonlinear simulation indicated the desirability of using a display based on the rate of change of energy height rate and of commanded thrust.

  2. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  3. Computationally efficient design of optimal output feedback strategies for controllable passive damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalzare, Mahmoud; Johnson, Erik A.; Wojtkiewicz, Steven F.

    2014-05-01

    Designing control strategies for smart structures, such as those with semiactive devices, is complicated by the nonlinear nature of the feedback control, secondary clipping control and other additional requirements such as device saturation. The usual design approach resorts to large-scale simulation parameter studies that are computationally expensive. The authors have previously developed an approach for state-feedback semiactive clipped-optimal control design, based on a nonlinear Volterra integral equation that provides for the computationally efficient simulation of such systems. This paper expands the applicability of the approach by demonstrating that it can also be adapted to accommodate more realistic cases when, instead of full state feedback, only a limited set of noisy response measurements is available to the controller. This extension requires incorporating a Kalman filter (KF) estimator, which is linear, into the nominal model of the uncontrolled system. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical study of a 100-degree-of-freedom frame model, excited by a filtered Gaussian random excitation, with noisy acceleration sensor measurements to determine the semiactive control commands. The results show that the proposed method can improve computational efficiency by more than two orders of magnitude relative to a conventional solver, while retaining a comparable level of accuracy. Further, the proposed approach is shown to be similarly efficient for an extensive Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effects of sensor noise levels and KF tuning on the accuracy of the response.

  4. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  5. Control system for the NBS microtron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. Ray; Trout, Robert E.; Wilson, Bonnie L.; Ayres, Robert L.; Yoder, Neil R.

    1986-06-01

    As various subsystems of the National Bureau of Standards/Los Alamos racetrack microtron accelerator are being brought on-line, experience has been gained with some of the innovations implemented in the control system. Foremost among these are the joystick-based operator controls, the hierarchical distribution of control system intelligence, and the independent secondary stations, permitting sectional stand-alone operation. The result of the distributed database philosophy and parallel data links has been very fast data updates, permitting joystick interaction with system elements. The software development was greatly simplified by using the hardware arbitration of several parallel processors in the Multibus system to split the software tasks into independent modules.

  6. Interfacial force sensor with force-feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.A.; Houston, J.E.; Smith, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    A new interfacial force microscope capable of measuring the forces between two surfaces over the entire range of surface separations, up to contact, has been developed. The design is centered around a differential capacitance displacement sensor where the common capacitor plate is supported by torsion bars. A force-feedback control system balances the interfacial forces at the sensor, maintaining the common capacitor plate at its rest position. This control eliminates the instability which occurs with the conventional cantilever-based force sensors when the attractive force gradient exceeds the mechanical stiffness of the cantilever. The ability to measure interfacial forces at surface separations smaller than this instability point using the feedback control is demonstrated. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  7. ACCELERATOR TARGET POSITIONER AND CONTROL CIRCUIT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Stone, K.F.; Force, R.J.; Olson, W.W.; Cagle, D.S.

    1959-12-15

    An apparatus is described for inserting and retracting a target material with respect to the internal beam of a charged particle accelerator and to circuitry for controlling the timing and motion of the target placement. Two drive coils are mounted on the shaft of a target holder arm and disposed within the accelerator magnetic field with one coil at right angles to the other. Control circuitry alternately connects each coil to a current source and to a varying shorting resistance whereby the coils interchangeably produce driving and braking forces which swing the target arm within a ninety degree arc. The target is thus moved into the beam and away from it at high speeds and is brought to rest after each movement without whiplash or vibration.

  8. Object oriented programming interfaces for accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, L.T.

    1997-07-01

    Several years ago, the AGS controls group was given the task of developing software for the RHIC accelerator. Like the AGS, the RHIC control system needs to control and monitor equipment distributed around a relatively large geographic area. A local area network connects this equipment to a collection of UNIX workstations in a central control room. Similar software had been developed for the AGS about a decade earlier, but isn`t well suited for RHIC use for a number of reasons. Rather than adapt the AGS software for RHIC use, the controls group opted to start with a clean slate. To develop software that would address the shortcomings of the AGS software, while preserving the useful features that evolved through years of use. A current trend in control system design is to provide an object oriented programming interface for application developers. This talk will discuss important aspects and features of object oriented application programming interfaces (APIs) for accelerator control systems, and explore why such interfaces are becoming the norm.

  9. [Weekly control measurement at the linear accelerator].

    PubMed

    Christ, G

    1983-05-01

    Weekly control measurements taken at the linear accelerator of the Medizinisches Strahleninstitut der Universität Tübingen are described which largely exceed those prescribed by the "Richtlinien Strahlenschutz in der Medizin" (instructions about radioprotection in medicine). Since the determination of the field homogeneity and the energy of electron and X-ray radiation is very time-consuming, a largely automatized procedure has been elaborated which is presented in this study. PMID:6857748

  10. Neural networks and orbit control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1994-07-01

    An overview of the architecture, workings and training of Neural Networks is given. We stress the aspects which are important for the use of Neural Networks for orbit control in accelerators and storage rings, especially its ability to cope with the nonlinear behavior of the orbit response to `kicks` and the slow drift in the orbit response during long-term operation. Results obtained for the two NSLS storage rings with several network architectures and various training methods for each architecture are given.

  11. VFC - Variational Feedback Controller and its application to semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G.; Carcaterra, A.

    2016-08-01

    Active and semi-active control of oscillating devices and structures is a challenging field and this paper proposes an original investigation based on variational controls that can be successfully applied to mechanical systems. The method produces a general class of new controllers, named VFC - Variational Feedback Controllers, that is the main theoretical contribution of the paper. The value of the theory relies on using a reformulation of the Variational Optimal Control Theory, that has in general the limit of producing control program strategies and not directly feedback control methods. The difficulties are in fact related to the intrinsic nature of the variational optimal control, that must solve initial and final boundary conditions. A special definition of the class of the considered objective functions, permits to skip this difficulty, producing a pure feedback control. The presented theory goes beyond with respect to the most acknowledged LQR variational-based techniques, in that VFC can be applied to more general nonlinear dynamical systems, even with finite time horizon. To test the effectiveness of the novel approach in real engineering problems, a deep investigation on nonlinear suspension systems treated by VFC is proposed in this paper. To this aim, VFC is systematically compared with the most recent methods available in this field and suitable to deal with nonlinear system control of car suspensions. In particular, the comparative analysis is made in terms of both comfort and handling key performance indexes, that permits to easily and significantly compare different control logics, such as the Sky-hook and Ground-hook control families, the Acceleration and Power Driven Dampers. The results of this comparison are collected in a performance plane, having comfort and handling indexes as coordinate axes, showing that VFC controllers completely cover the regions reached by the other mentioned control logics in this plane, but reveal to have access to

  12. Accelerator controls at CERN: Some converging trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, B.

    1990-08-01

    CERN's growing services to the high-energy physics community using frozen resources has led to the implementation of "Technical Boards", mandated to assist the management by making recommendations for rationalizations in various technological domains. The Board on Process Control and Electronics for Accelerators, TEBOCO, has emphasized four main lines which might yield economy in resources. First, a common architecture for accelerator controls has been agreed between the three accelerator divisions. Second, a common hardware/software kit has been defined, from which the large majority of future process interfacing may be composed. A support service for this kit is an essential part of the plan. Third, high-level protocols have been developed for standardizing access to process devices. They derive from agreed standard models of the devices and involve a standard control message. This should ease application development and mobility of equipment. Fourth, a common software engineering methodology and a commercial package of application development tools have been adopted. Some rationalization in the field of the man-machine interface and in matters of synchronization is also under way.

  13. Ultrasensitive Negative Feedback Control: A Natural Approach for the Design of Synthetic Controllers.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, Francesco; Akman, Ozgur E; Soyer, Orkun S; Bates, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    Many of the most important potential applications of Synthetic Biology will require the ability to design and implement high performance feedback control systems that can accurately regulate the dynamics of multiple molecular species within the cell. Here, we argue that the use of design strategies based on combining ultrasensitive response dynamics with negative feedback represents a natural approach to this problem that fully exploits the strongly nonlinear nature of cellular information processing. We propose that such feedback mechanisms can explain the adaptive responses observed in one of the most widely studied biomolecular feedback systems-the yeast osmoregulatory response network. Based on our analysis of such system, we identify strong links with a well-known branch of mathematical systems theory from the field of Control Engineering, known as Sliding Mode Control. These insights allow us to develop design guidelines that can inform the construction of feedback controllers for synthetic biological systems. PMID:27537373

  14. Controlling low-dimensional dynamics using restricted feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Daniel J.; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    1998-03-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that it is possible to control the dynamics of biological systems, such as the heart and brain, by making small adjustments to an accesible system parameter or variable. The strength and timing of the adjustments are determined using nonlinear dynamcis theory. It is often the case that the dynamics can be modified only in a restricted manner. For example, it is easy to shorten the interbeat interval in cardiac dynamics but nearly impossible to lengthen the interval. We describe our investigation of a simple theoretical model of stabilization of an unstable fixed point using such restricted feedback. We find that the restrictions give rise to surprising changes in the domain of control. For restricted proportional feedback, the domain shrinks considerably and feedback parameters that were `optimal' in the absence of restrictions are no longer desirable. For restricted time-delay autosynchronization, the domain of control is extended to highly unstable fixed points whereas such states are not controllable in the absence of restrictions.

  15. Scanning ablation of root caries with acoustic feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that short λ=355-nm laser pulses can be used for the selective removal of caries lesions and composite restorative materials from occlusal surfaces with minimal damage to the peripheral sound tooth structure. One advantage of laser-systems is they can be integrated with acoustic and optical feedback systems for the automated discrimination of dental caries and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that root caries could be selectively removed from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled laserscanning system coupled with an acoustic feedback system. Dental root caries surfaces on extracted teeth were scanned with λ=355-nm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 J/cm2. Acoustic feedback signals were acquired and used to control the laser output and scanning stages were used to position the laser over carious dentin until all the caries were removed to a fixed depth. Polarization optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) was used to acquire images of the root caries lesions before and after removal by the laser in order to assess if ablation was selective. The amplitude of the acoustic waves generated during the ablation of carious dentin was higher than for sound dentin allowing the acoustic feedback system to discriminate between sound and carious dentin. PS-OCT showed that caries were removed to a depth of up to 1.5-mm with minimal peripheral damage to peripheral sound dentin. The acoustic feedback was successfully used to distinguish between root caries and sound dentin, enabling the selective removal of caries from dentin surfaces using a λ=355-nm, Nd:YAG Q-switched laser system.

  16. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  17. Temperature sensitive stability of feedback controllers for MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterbee, D. C.; Sims, N. D.

    2008-03-01

    Smart fluid dampers can undergo large temperature changes due to the heating associated with energy dissipation. Such heating will alter the fluid's properties and could degrade control system performance. For example, previous work by the authors has shown that the stability of an MR damper under feedback control is dependent on the fluid's compressibility and viscosity. In the present study, a temperature dependent model of a magnetorheological damper is developed from experimental data, and it is shown that the fluid's yield stress, viscosity and compressibility parameters vary significantly. An experimental and numerical control study is then performed to investigate the resulting effects of temperature on the stability of two feedback controllers - a PID controller, and a proportional controller. Experimental results indicate that both controllers can exhibit a reduction in stability with increasing temperature, particularly if the controller gains are not suitably chosen. The temperature dependent MR damper model predicts this behaviour well, and it is shown that the change in viscosity has the most significant effect on stability. Future work could focus on the resulting effect on a complete vibration system, devices with different modes of operation, and alternative controllers.

  18. Delay-feedback control strategy for reducing CO2 emission of traffic flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Dong; Zhu, Wen-Xing

    2015-06-01

    To study the signal control strategy for reducing traffic emission theoretically, we first presented a kind of discrete traffic flow model with relative speed term based on traditional coupled map car-following model. In the model, the relative speed difference between two successive running cars is incorporated into following vehicle's acceleration running equation. Then we analyzed its stability condition with discrete control system stability theory. Third, we designed a delay-feedback controller to suppress traffic jam and decrease traffic emission based on modern controller theory. Last, numerical simulations are made to support our theoretical results, including the comparison of models' stability analysis, the influence of model type and signal control on CO2 emissions. The results show that the temporal behavior of our model is superior to other models, and the traffic signal controller has good effect on traffic jam suppression and traffic CO2 emission, which fully supports the theoretical conclusions.

  19. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  20. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  1. Conformal grasping using feedback controlled bubble actuator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Wei; Stein, Richard; Mittal, Manoj; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an implementation of a bubble actuator array (BAA) based active robotic skin, a modular system, onto existing low cost robotic end-effectors or prosthetic hands for conformal grasping of objects. The active skin is comprised of pneumatically controlled polyurethane rubber bubbles with overlaid sensors for feedback control. Sensor feedback allows the BAA based robotic skin to conformally grasp an object with an explicit uniform force distribution. The bubble actuator array reported here is capable of applying up to 4N of force at each point of contact and tested for conformally grasping objects with a radius of curvature up to 57.15mm. Once integrated onto a two-finger gripper with one degree of freedom (DOF), the active skin was shown to reduce point of contact forces of up to 50% for grasped objects.

  2. On reliable control system designs with and without feedback reconfigurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birdwell, J. D.; Castanon, D. A.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper contains an overview of a theoretical framework for the design of reliable multivariable control systems, with special emphasis on actuator failures and necessary actuator redundancy levels. Using a linear model of the system, with Markovian failure probabilities and quadratic performance index, an optimal stochastic control problem is posed and solved. The solution requires the iteration of a set of highly coupled Riccati-like matrix difference equations; if these converge one has a reliable design; if they diverge, the design is unreliable, and the system design cannot be stabilized. In addition, it is shown that the existence of a stabilizing constant feedback gain and the reliability of its implementation is equivalent to the convergence properties of a set of coupled Riccati-like matrix difference equations. In summary, these results can be used for offline studies relating the open loop dynamics, required performance, actuator mean time to failure, and functional or identical actuator redundancy, with and without feedback gain reconfiguration strategies.

  3. Fiber optic sensor: Feedback control design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, D.; Bertram, L.; Hillaire, R.; Anderson, S.; Leonard, S.; Marburger, S.

    1997-07-01

    Digital feedback control of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) has been demonstrated on a tube sample of stainless steel and titanium alloy. A fiber optic sensor returns a signal proportional to backside radiance from the workpiece; that signal is used by the controller to compute a compensation weld current. The controller executes 10 times a second on an Intel 486 chip. For travel speeds of 3 to 6 inches per minute and thicknesses between 0.025 and 0.10 inches, constant backside bead width was maintained within 0.02 inches, from startup to tie-in.

  4. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  5. A model for reverberating circuits with controlled feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa de Freitas; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Wedemann, Roseli Suzi; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2015-12-01

    We studied the behavior of a mathematic-computational model for a reverberating neuronal circuit with controlled feedback, verifying the output pattern of the circuit, by means simulations using a program in language C++. Using values obtained from surveying the literature from animal experiments, we observed that the model was able to reproduce the polissynaptic activity of a neuron group of a vigil rat, with looping time of three neurons of the order of magnitude of 102 ms.

  6. Optimal feedback control infinite dimensional parabolic evolution systems: Approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A general approximation framework is discussed for computation of optimal feedback controls in linear quadratic regular problems for nonautonomous parabolic distributed parameter systems. This is done in the context of a theoretical framework using general evolution systems in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Conditions are discussed for preservation under approximation of stabilizability and detectability hypotheses on the infinite dimensional system. The special case of periodic systems is also treated.

  7. Feedback-Controlled LED Photobioreactor for Photophysiological Studies of Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Melnicki, Matthew R.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Stolyar, Sergey; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2013-04-09

    A custom photobioreactor (PBR) was designed to enable automatic light adjustments using computerized feedback control. A black anodized aluminum enclosure, constructed to surround the borosilicate reactor vessel, prevents the transmission of ambient light and serves as a mount for arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The high-output LEDs provide narrow-band light of either 630 or 680 nm for preferential excitation of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting pigments, phycobilin or chlorophyll a, respectively. Custom developed software BioLume provides automatic control of optical properties and a computer feedback loop can automatically adjust the incident irradiance as necessary to maintain a fixed transmitted light through the culture, based on user-determined set points. This feedback control serves to compensate for culture dynamics which have optical effects, (e.g., changing cell density, pigment adaptations) and thus can determine the appropriate light conditions for physiological comparisons or to cultivate light-sensitive strains, without prior analyses. The LED PBR may also be controlled as a turbidostat, using a feedback loop to continuously adjust the rate of media-dilution based on the transmitted light measurements, with a fast and precise response. This cultivation system gains further merit as a high-performance analytical device, using non-invasive tools (e.g., dissolved gas sensors, online mass spectrometry) to automate real-time measurements, thus permitting unsupervised experiments to search for optimal growth conditions, to monitor physiological responses to perturbations, as well as to quantitate photophysiological parameters using an in situ light-saturation response routine.

  8. Galerkin method for feedback controlled Rayleigh Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, A.; Wagner, B.

    2008-11-01

    The problem of feedback controlled Rayleigh-Bénard convection is considered. For this problem with the simple flow structure in the vertical direction, a Galerkin method that uses only a few basis functions in this direction is presented. This approximation yields considerable simplification of the problem, explicitly incorporates the non-classical boundary conditions at the horizontal boundaries of the fluid layer resulting from feedback control and reduces the dimension of the original problem by one. This method is in spirit very similar to lubrication theory, where the simple laminar flow in the vertical direction is integrated out across the height of the fluid layer. Using a minimal set of appropriate basis functions to capture the nonlinear behaviour of the flow, we investigate the effects of feedback control on amplitude, wavelength and selection of patterns via weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations of the resulting dimension-reduced problems in two and three dimensions. In the second part of this study we discuss the derivation of the appropriate basis functions and prove convergence of the Galerkin scheme. This paper is published as part of a collection in honour of Todd Dupont's 65th birthday.

  9. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  10. Feedback control and steering laws for spacecraft using Canfield joint attitude manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Eamonn James

    A novel attitude control system using a reaction wheel mounted on a Canfield joint is introduced. The rotational equations of motion for a rigid body spacecraft equipped with a pair of Canfield joint attitude manipulators are derived. Stable feedback laws are developed for attitude control and momentum management of the spacecraft using Lyapunov theory. Steering laws to find the gimbal rates and accelerations to generate the torque required for a maneuver are derived in both a linear and a nonlinear form. Numerical simulations of representative spacecraft reorientation maneuvers demonstrate the utility of the control and steering laws developed in this research. The singularity problem associated with traditional configurations of single-gimbal control moment gyroscopes is discussed in relation to the attitude control system being presented.

  11. Independent modal space control with positive position feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.; Fedor, J.

    1989-01-01

    An independent modal space control (IMSC) algorithm is presented, whose modal control forces are generated from a positive position feedback (PPF) strategy. The proposed algorithm combines the attributes of both the IMSC and the PPF, and maintains the simplicity of the IMSC as it designs the controller of a complex structure at the uncoupled modal level. The effectiveness of the algorithm in damping out the vibration of flexible structures is validated experimentally. A simple cantilevered beam is employed as an example of a flexible structure whose multimodes of vibration are controlled by a single actuator. Performance of the active control system is determined in the frequency and the time domains. The experimental results indicate the potential of the proposed methodology as a viable method for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures.

  12. Temporal control and compensation for perturbed voicing feedback

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuya, Takashi; MacDonald, Ewen N.; Munhall, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research employing a real-time auditory perturbation paradigm has shown that talkers monitor their own speech attributes such as fundamental frequency, vowel intensity, vowel formants, and fricative noise as part of speech motor control. In the case of vowel formants or fricative noise, what was manipulated is spectral information about the filter function of the vocal tract. However, segments can be contrasted by parameters other than spectral configuration. It is possible that the feedback system monitors phonation timing in the way it does spectral information. This study examined whether talkers exhibit a compensatory behavior when manipulating information about voicing. When talkers received feedback of the cognate of the intended voicing category (saying “tipper” while hearing “dipper” or vice versa), they changed the voice onset time and in some cases the following vowel. PMID:24815278

  13. Temporal control and compensation for perturbed voicing feedback.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Takashi; MacDonald, Ewen N; Munhall, Kevin G

    2014-05-01

    Previous research employing a real-time auditory perturbation paradigm has shown that talkers monitor their own speech attributes such as fundamental frequency, vowel intensity, vowel formants, and fricative noise as part of speech motor control. In the case of vowel formants or fricative noise, what was manipulated is spectral information about the filter function of the vocal tract. However, segments can be contrasted by parameters other than spectral configuration. It is possible that the feedback system monitors phonation timing in the way it does spectral information. This study examined whether talkers exhibit a compensatory behavior when manipulating information about voicing. When talkers received feedback of the cognate of the intended voicing category (saying "tipper" while hearing "dipper" or vice versa), they changed the voice onset time and in some cases the following vowel. PMID:24815278

  14. Dissipative control for linear systems by static output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhiguang; Lam, James; Shu, Zhan

    2013-08-01

    In this article, the problem of static output-feedback dissipative control is investigated for linear continuous-time system based on an augmented system approach. A necessary and sufficient condition for stability and strict (Q,S,R)-dissipativity of the closed-loop system is established in terms of a matrix inequality with free parametrisation matrix. An equivalent characterisation with some slack matrices for numerical solvability is then proposed. Based on this, a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a desired controller is given, and a corresponding iterative algorithm is developed to solve the condition. The effectiveness of results developed in this article is demonstrated by some numerical examples.

  15. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  16. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  17. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  19. Reinforcement learning output feedback NN control using deterministic learning technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Chenguang; Shi, Zhongke

    2014-03-01

    In this brief, a novel adaptive-critic-based neural network (NN) controller is investigated for nonlinear pure-feedback systems. The controller design is based on the transformed predictor form, and the actor-critic NN control architecture includes two NNs, whereas the critic NN is used to approximate the strategic utility function, and the action NN is employed to minimize both the strategic utility function and the tracking error. A deterministic learning technique has been employed to guarantee that the partial persistent excitation condition of internal states is satisfied during tracking control to a periodic reference orbit. The uniformly ultimate boundedness of closed-loop signals is shown via Lyapunov stability analysis. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control. PMID:24807456

  20. Delayed feedback control method for dynamical systems with chaotic saddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Miki U.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-08-01

    We consider systems whose orbits diverge after chaotic transient for a finite time, and propose a controlmethod for preventing the divergence. These systems generally possess not chaotic attractors but some chaotic saddles. Our aim of control, i.e., the prevention of divergence, is achieved through the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the chaotic saddle by making use of the delayed feedback controlmethod. The key concept of our control strategy is the application of the Proper Interior Maximum (PIM) triple method and the method to detect unstable periodic orbits from time series, originally developed by Lathrop and Kostelich, as initial steps before adding the delayed feedback control input. We show that our control method can be applied to the Hénon map and an intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy model, which is a model for therapy of advanced prostate cancer. The fact that our method can be applied to the IAS therapy model indicates that our control strategy may be useful in the therapy of advanced prostate cancer.

  1. Closed loop kinesthetic feedback for postural control rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vérité, Fabien; Bachta, Wael; Morel, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Postural control rehabilitation may benefit from the use of smart devices providing biofeedback. This approach consists of increasing the patients perception of their postural state. Namely, postural state is monitored and fed back in real time to the patients through one or more sensory channels. This allows implementing rehabilitation exercises where the patients control their posture with the help of additional sensory inputs. In this paper, a closed loop control of the Center-Of-Pressure (CoP) based on kinesthetic feedback is proposed as a new form of biofeedback. The motion of a one Degree of Freedom (DoF) translational device, lightly touched by the patient's forefinger, is servoed to the patient's CoP position extracted from the measurements of a force plate on which he/she stands. As a result, the patient's CoP can be controllably displaced. A first set of experiments is used to prove the feasibility of this closed-loop control under ideal conditions favoring the perception of the kinesthetic feedback, while the subject is totally unaware of the context. A second set of experiments is then proposed to evaluate the robustness of this approach under experimental conditions that are more realistic with regards to the clinical context of a rehabilitation program involving biofeedback-based exercises. PMID:24968379

  2. A feedback control for the advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans; Cliff, Eugene M.

    1991-01-01

    A robust feedback algorithm is presented for a near-minimum-fuel ascent of a two-stage launch vehicle operating in the equatorial plane. The development of the algorithm is based on the ideas of neighboring optimal control and can be derived into three phases. In phase 1, the formalism of optimal control is employed to calculate fuel-optimal ascent trajectories for a simple point-mass model. In phase 2, these trajectories are used to numerically calculate gain functions of time for the control(s), the total flight time, and possibly, for other variables of interest. In phase 3, these gains are used to determine feedback expressions for the controls associated with a more realistic model of a launch vehicle. With the Advanced Launch System in mind, all calculations are performed on a two-stage vehicle with fixed thrust history, but this restriction is by no means important for the approach taken. Performance and robustness of the algorithm is found to be excellent.

  3. Gantry cranes gain scheduling feedback control with friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Hanafy M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2005-03-01

    We designed a controller based on gain-scheduling feedback to move a load on a gantry crane from point to point within one oscillation cycle and without inducing large swings. The settling time of the system is taken to be equal to the period of oscillation of the load. This criterion enables calculation of the controller feedback gains for varying load weight and cable length. Numerical simulations show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time compared with that of optimal control. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction, and then applied an opposite control action to cancel it. To estimate the friction force, we assumed a mathematical model, and then we estimated the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, such as the method of least squares (LS). First, the process of identification is applied to a theoretical model of a DC motor with known friction coefficients. From this example, some guidelines and rules are deduced for the choice of the LS parameters. Then, the friction coefficients of the gantry crane model are estimated and validated.

  4. Feedback control by online learning an inverse model.

    PubMed

    Waegeman, Tim; Wyffels, Francis; Schrauwen, Francis

    2012-10-01

    A model, predictor, or error estimator is often used by a feedback controller to control a plant. Creating such a model is difficult when the plant exhibits nonlinear behavior. In this paper, a novel online learning control framework is proposed that does not require explicit knowledge about the plant. This framework uses two learning modules, one for creating an inverse model, and the other for actually controlling the plant. Except for their inputs, they are identical. The inverse model learns by the exploration performed by the not yet fully trained controller, while the actual controller is based on the currently learned model. The proposed framework allows fast online learning of an accurate controller. The controller can be applied on a broad range of tasks with different dynamic characteristics. We validate this claim by applying our control framework on several control tasks: 1) the heating tank problem (slow nonlinear dynamics); 2) flight pitch control (slow linear dynamics); and 3) the balancing problem of a double inverted pendulum (fast linear and nonlinear dynamics). The results of these experiments show that fast learning and accurate control can be achieved. Furthermore, a comparison is made with some classical control approaches, and observations concerning convergence and stability are made. PMID:24808008

  5. Learning arm's posture control using reinforcement learning and feedback-error-learning.

    PubMed

    Kambara, H; Kim, J; Sato, M; Koike, Y

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a learning model using the Actor-Critic method and the feedback-error-learning scheme. The Actor-Critic method, which is one of the major frameworks in reinforcement learning, has attracted attention as a computational learning model in the basal ganglia. Meanwhile, the feedback-error-learning is learning architecture proposed as a computationally coherent model of cerebellar motor learning. This learning architecture's purpose is to acquire a feed-forward controller by using a feedback controller's output as an error signal. In past researches, a predetermined constant gain feedback controller was used for the feedback-error-learning. We use the Actor-Critic method for obtaining a feedback controller in the feedback-error-earning. By applying the proposed learning model to an arm's posture control, we show that high-performance feedback and feed-forward controller can be acquired from only by using a scalar value of reward. PMID:17271719

  6. Feedback inhibition controls spike transfer in hybrid thalamic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Renaud-Le Masson, Sylvie; Debay, Damien; Bal, Thierry

    2002-06-01

    Sensory information reaches the cerebral cortex through the thalamus, which differentially relays this input depending on the state of arousal. Such `gating' involves inhibition of the thalamocortical relay neurons by the reticular nucleus of the thalamus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We reconstructed the thalamocortical circuit as an artificial and biological hybrid network in vitro. With visual input simulated as retinal cell activity, we show here that when the gain in the thalamic inhibitory feedback loop is greater than a critical value, the circuit tends towards oscillations-and thus imposes a temporal decorrelation of retinal cell input and thalamic relay output. This results in the functional disconnection of the cortex from the sensory drive, a feature typical of sleep states. Conversely, low gain in the feedback inhibition and the action of noradrenaline, a known modulator of arousal, converge to increase input-output correlation in relay neurons. Combining gain control of feedback inhibition and modulation of membrane excitability thus enables thalamic circuits to finely tune the gating of spike transmission from sensory organs to the cortex.

  7. Modeling and sensory feedback control for space manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masutani, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Fumio; Arimoto, Suguru

    1989-01-01

    The positioning control problem of the endtip of space manipulators whose base are uncontrolled is examined. In such a case, the conventional control method for industrial robots based on a local feedback at each joint is not applicable, because a solution of the joint displacements that satisfies a given position and orientation of the endtip is not decided uniquely. A sensory feedback control scheme for space manipulators based on an artificial potential defined in a task-oriented coordinates is proposed. Using this scheme, the controller can easily determine the input torque of each joint from the data of an external sensor such as a visual device. Since the external sensor is mounted on the unfixed base, the manipulator must track the moving image of the target in sensor coordinates. Moreover the dynamics of the base and the manipulator are interactive. However, the endtip is proven to asymptotically approach the stationary target in an inertial coordinate frame by the Liapunov's method. Finally results of computer simulation for a 6-link space manipulator model show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Strehober, David A; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component q(i)(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference q(i)(t)-q(i)(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic. PMID:24483470

  9. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehober, David A.; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component qi(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference qi(t)-qi(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic.

  10. Nonlinear feedback control and trajectory tracking of vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassi, Younés; Ait-Amirat, Youcef; Outbib, Rachid

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly studies nonlinear feedback control applied to the nonlinear vehicle dynamics with varying velocity. The main objective of this study is the stabilisation of longitudinal, lateral and yaw angular vehicle velocities. To this end, a nonlinear vehicle model is developed which takes both the lateral and longitudinal vehicle dynamics into account. Based on this model, a method to build a nonlinear state feedback control is first designed by which the complexity of system structure can be simplified. The obtained system is then synthesised by the combined Lyapunov-LaSalle method. The simulation results show that the proposed control can improve stability and comfort of vehicle driving. Moreover, this paper presents a lemma which ensures the trajectory tracking and path-following problem for vehicle. It can also be exploited simultaneously to solve both the tracking and path-following control problems of the vehicle ride and driving stability. We also show how the results of the lemma can be applied to solve the path-following problem, in which the vehicle converges and follows a designed path. The effectiveness of the proposed lemma for trajectory tracking is clearly demonstrated by simulation results.

  11. Diamagnetically Levitating Three Phase Motor with Optical Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Shrey; Nhut Ho, Joe; Irwen, Jonathan; Chih Wang, Wei

    2010-11-01

    This article describes a feasibility study of creating a low friction, low maintenance power delivering motor using a diamagnetically stabilized levitating rotor. The planar rotor described in this article uses a triangular configuration of magnets that rotates due to nine electric coils evenly spaced around the rotor. The principle behind levitation of the rotor and the dynamic forces on it are described in detail. An optical encoder feedback system is designed and fabricated that controls the frequency of the levitating rotor. The current input to the coils is given through a driving circuit that amplifies a DC pulse signal generated by a control algorithm designed in LabVIEW. The driving circuit allows current to flow through one phase at a time, which produces a magnetic field strong enough to spin the rotor. Experiments suggest that the optical encoder feedback control system can do reference tracking on the levitating rotor. The designed control algorithm can drive the rotor to specified reference frequencies up to 1.3 Hz using the optical encoder measurements.

  12. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  13. Quantised output feedback control via limited capacity communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Jin, Fang

    2012-12-01

    This article addresses the output feedback stability problem for single-input single-output (SISO) linear systems with quantised measurements of the plant output, where sensors and controllers are connected via errorless digital channels carrying a finite number of bits per unit time. The main idea here is to present a lower bound of data rates, above which there exists a quantisation, coding and control scheme to guarantee both stability and a prescribed control performance of the unstable plant. A quantisation and coding scheme, which is based on the distribution of measurements and the dynamics of the plant, is proposed. The proof techniques rely on both information-theoretic and control-theoretic tools. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Myoelectric hand prosthesis force control through servo motor current feedback.

    PubMed

    Sono, Tálita Saemi Payossim; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the prehension force closed-loop control design of a mechanical finger commanded by electromyographic signal (EMG) from a patient's arm. The control scheme was implemented and tested in a mechanical finger prototype with three degrees of freedom and one actuator, driven by arm muscles EMG of normal volunteers. Real-time indirect estimation of prehension force was assessed by measuring the DC servo motor actuator current. A model of the plant comprising finger, motor, and grasped object was proposed. Model parameters were identified experimentally and a classical feedback phase-lead compensator was designed. The controlled mechanical finger was able to provide a more accurate prehension force modulation of a compliant object when compared to open-loop control. PMID:19681841

  15. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  16. Controller Design for EMA in TVC Incorporating Force Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinstock, Dale E.; Scott, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop control schemes and control design procedures for electromechanical actuators (EMA) in thrust vector control (TVC) applications. For a variety of reasons, there is a tendency within the aerospace community to use electromechanical actuators in applications where hydraulics have traditionally been employed. TVC of rocket engines is one such application. However, there is considerable research, development, and testing to be done before EMA will be accepted by the community at large for these types of applications. Besides the development of design procedures for the basic position controller, two major concerns are dealt with in this research by incorporating force feedback: 1) the effects of resonance on the performance of EMA-TVC-rocket-engine systems, and 2) the effects of engine start transients on EMA. This report only highlights the major contributions of this research.

  17. Decoupling suspension controller based on magnetic flux feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  18. Decoupling Suspension Controller Based on Magnetic Flux Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  19. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  20. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure. PMID:9921654

  1. Quantum-trajectory thermodynamics with discrete feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zongping; Ashida, Yuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We employ the quantum-jump-trajectory approach to construct a systematic framework to study the thermodynamics at the trajectory level in a nonequilibrium open quantum system under discrete feedback control. Within this framework, we derive quantum versions of the generalized Jarzynski equalities, which are demonstrated in an isolated pseudospin system and a coherently driven two-level open quantum system. Due to quantum coherence and measurement backaction, a fundamental distinction from the classical generalized Jarzynski equalities emerges in the quantum versions, which is characterized by a large negative information gain reflecting genuinely quantum rare events. A possible experimental scheme to test our findings in superconducting qubits is discussed.

  2. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  3. Hybrid FES orthosis incorporating closed loop control and sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Andrews, B J; Baxendale, R H; Barnett, R; Phillips, G F; Yamazaki, T; Paul, J P; Freeman, P A

    1988-04-01

    A hybrid functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthosis is described, comprising a rigid ankle-foot brace, a multi-channel FES stimulator with surface electrodes, body mounted sensors, a 'rule-based' controller and an electro-cutaneous display for supplementary sensory feedback. The mechanical brace provides stability, without FES activation of muscles, for standing postures normally adopted by patients. This avoids inducing muscle fatigue during prolonged upright activity. However, stability is conditional upon the position of the ground reaction vector (GRV) relative to the knee joint. The finite state FES controller reacts automatically to destabilizing shifts of the GRV by stimulating appropriate anti-gravity musculature to brace the leg. The FES system also features a control mode to initiate and terminate flexion of the leg during forward progression. A simple mode of supplementary sensory feedback was used during the laboratory standing tests to assist the patient in maintaining a set posture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests for two spinal cord injured subjects are presented. PMID:3361878

  4. Exact methods for modal transient response analysis including feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modal method for the analysis of controlled structural systems that retains the uncoupled nature of the classical transient response analysis of a structure subjected to a prescribed time-varying load. The control force is expanded as a Taylor series that remains on the right side of the equations, and it does not lead to a computational approach that requires coupling between modes on the left side. Retaining a sufficient number of terms in the series produces a solution to the modal equations that is accurate to machine precision. The approach is particularly attractive for large problems in which standard matrix exponential methods become computationally prohibitive. Numerical results are presented to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach for dynamic feedback compensation of a truss structure with local member modes in the controller bandwidth.

  5. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  6. Reliable timing systems for computer controlled accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Jürgen; Nettleton, Robert

    1986-06-01

    Over the past decade the use of computers has set new standards for control systems of accelerators with ever increasing complexity coupled with stringent reliability criteria. In fact, with very slow cycling machines or storage rings any erratic operation or timing pulse will cause the loss of precious particles and waste hours of time and effort of preparation. Thus, for the CERN linac and LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) timing system reliability becomes a crucial factor in the sense that all components must operate practically without fault for very long periods compared to the effective machine cycle. This has been achieved by careful selection of components and design well below thermal and electrical limits, using error detection and correction where possible, as well as developing "safe" decoding techniques for serial data trains. Further, consistent structuring had to be applied in order to obtain simple and flexible modular configurations with very few components on critical paths and to minimize the exchange of information to synchronize accelerators. In addition, this structuring allows the development of efficient strategies for on-line and off-line fault diagnostics. As a result, the timing system for Linac 2 has, so far, been operating without fault for three years, the one for LEAR more than one year since its final debugging.

  7. Time-delayed quantum coherent Pyragas feedback control of photon squeezing in a degenerate parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Manuel; Hein, Sven M.; Lehnert, Judith; Schöll, Eckehard; Hughes, Stephen; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherent feedback control is a measurement-free control method fully preserving quantum coherence. In this paper we show how time-delayed quantum coherent feedback can be used to control the degree of squeezing in the output field of a cavity containing a degenerate parametric oscillator. We focus on the specific situation of Pyragas-type feedback control where time-delayed signals are fed back directly into the quantum system. Our results show how time-delayed feedback can enhance or decrease the degree of squeezing as a function of time delay and feedback strength.

  8. Exploring teleimpedance and tactile feedback for intuitive control of the Pisa/IIT SoftHand.

    PubMed

    Ajoudani, Arash; Godfrey, Sasha B; Bianchi, Matteo; Catalano, Manuel G; Grioli, Giorgio; Tsagarakis, Nikos; Bicchi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a teleimpedance controller with tactile feedback for more intuitive control of the Pisa/IIT SoftHand. With the aim to realize a robust, efficient and low-cost hand prosthesis design, the SoftHand is developed based on the motor control principle of synergies, through which the immense complexity of the hand is simplified into distinct motor patterns. Due to the built-in flexibility of the hand joints, as the SoftHand grasps, it follows a synergistic path while allowing grasping of objects of various shapes using only a single motor. The DC motor of the hand incorporates a novel teleimpedance control in which the user's postural and stiffness synergy references are tracked in real-time. In addition, for intuitive control of the hand, two tactile interfaces are developed. The first interface (mechanotactile) exploits a disturbance observer which estimates the interaction forces in contact with the grasped object. Estimated interaction forces are then converted and applied to the upper arm of the user via a custom made pressure cuff. The second interface employs vibrotactile feedback based on surface irregularities and acceleration signals and is used to provide the user with information about the surface properties of the object as well as detection of object slippage while grasping. Grasp robustness and intuitiveness of hand control were evaluated in two sets of experiments. Results suggest that incorporating the aforementioned haptic feedback strategies, together with user-driven compliance of the hand, facilitate execution of safe and stable grasps, while suggesting that a low-cost, robust hand employing hardware-based synergies might be a good alternative to traditional myoelectric prostheses. PMID:24968383

  9. Automatic Overset Grid Generation with Heuristic Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Peter I.

    2001-01-01

    An advancing front grid generation system for structured Overset grids is presented which automatically modifies Overset structured surface grids and control lines until user-specified grid qualities are achieved. The system is demonstrated on two examples: the first refines a space shuttle fuselage control line until global truncation error is achieved; the second advances, from control lines, the space shuttle orbiter fuselage top and fuselage side surface grids until proper overlap is achieved. Surface grids are generated in minutes for complex geometries. The system is implemented as a heuristic feedback control (HFC) expert system which iteratively modifies the input specifications for Overset control line and surface grids. It is developed as an extension of modern control theory, production rules systems and subsumption architectures. The methodology provides benefits over the full knowledge lifecycle of an expert system for knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and knowledge execution. The vector/matrix framework of modern control theory systematically acquires and represents expert system knowledge. Missing matrix elements imply missing expert knowledge. The execution of the expert system knowledge is performed through symbolic execution of the matrix algebra equations of modern control theory. The dot product operation of matrix algebra is generalized for heuristic symbolic terms. Constant time execution is guaranteed.

  10. Development of force-feedback-controlled Nafion micromanipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenli; Li, Wen J.; Xi, Ning; Ma, Shugen

    2001-07-01

    The ability to manipulation of biological cells while having reflective-force information from the cells is a key technology necessary for many new applications in Bio-MEMS, but is currently lacking in all cellular manipulators. We will report on our preliminary experimental work in using an Ionic Conducting Polymer Film (ICPF) to develop a biological cell robotic gripper with force sensing capability. ICPF actuators are able to give large deflection with small input voltage (~5V), and also able to give relatively large output voltage due to deflection by a mechanical forces, thus are investigated as a possible material to make force-feedback controlled cellular manipulators in our work. A laser micromachining process is introduced to fabricate arrays of ICPF griping devices, which can be potentially integrated onto a substrate to develop a micro manipulation system. Individual multi-finger grippers with dimensions of 200micrometers x 200micrometers x 3000micrometers for each finger were realized. We will report on the design, fabrication procedures, and operating performance of these micro-grippers. Further development in the reduction of size of these actuators will enable effective force-feedback control of underwater micro objects and lead to new frontiers in cellular manipulation.

  11. Feedback control of wave propagation in a rectangular panel, part 2: Experimental realization using clustered velocity and displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Nobuo; Hill, Simon G.

    2012-10-01

    This study presents the feedback control of flexural waves propagating in a rectangular panel. The objective of this paper (part 2) is to experimentally implement the feedback wave control method which was proposed in part 1 of the two series papers. Firstly, based on the collocation of sensors and actuators, clustered velocity and displacement feedback (C-VDFB) is newly proposed. Next, linking C-VDFB with the active wave control proposed in part 1, it is clarified that the active wave control system can be realized to a limited extent. Then, from a viewpoint of numerical simulations, the characteristics of the feedback gains of C-VDFB and its control performance are clarified. It is shown that C-VDFB enables the inactivation of vibration modes at the target frequencies. Furthermore, it is clarified that even at the non-target frequencies, the proposed method sufficiently reduces the structural vibration. Finally, experiments on the reflected wave absorbing control using clustered direct velocity and displacement feedback are carried out. The experimental results show good agreement with those obtained in the simulation.

  12. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  13. Robust Nonlinear Feedback Control of Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Balas, Gary J.; Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on the research performed under NASA Glen grant NASA/NAG-3-1975 concerning feedback control of the Pratt & Whitney (PW) STF 952, a twin spool, mixed flow, after burning turbofan engine. The research focussed on the design of linear and gain-scheduled, multivariable inner-loop controllers for the PW turbofan engine using H-infinity and linear, parameter-varying (LPV) control techniques. The nonlinear turbofan engine simulation was provided by PW within the NASA Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) simulation software environment. ROCETS was used to generate linearized models of the turbofan engine for control design and analysis as well as the simulation environment to evaluate the performance and robustness of the controllers. Comparison between the H-infinity, and LPV controllers are made with the baseline multivariable controller and developed by Pratt & Whitney engineers included in the ROCETS simulation. Simulation results indicate that H-infinity and LPV techniques effectively achieve desired response characteristics with minimal cross coupling between commanded values and are very robust to unmodeled dynamics and sensor noise.

  14. A synthetic gene circuit for measuring autoregulatory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Schikora-Tamarit, Miquel Àngel; Toscano-Ochoa, Carlos; Domingo Espinós, Júlia; Espinar, Lorena; Carey, Lucas B

    2016-04-18

    Autoregulatory feedback loops occur in the regulation of molecules ranging from ATP to MAP kinases to zinc. Negative feedback loops can increase a system's robustness, while positive feedback loops can mediate transitions between cell states. Recent genome-wide experimental and computational studies predict hundreds of novel feedback loops. However, not all physical interactions are regulatory, and many experimental methods cannot detect self-interactions. Our understanding of regulatory feedback loops is therefore hampered by the lack of high-throughput methods to experimentally quantify the presence, strength and temporal dynamics of autoregulatory feedback loops. Here we present a mathematical and experimental framework for high-throughput quantification of feedback regulation and apply it to RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in yeast. Our method is able to determine the existence of both direct and indirect positive and negative feedback loops, and to quantify the strength of these loops. We experimentally validate our model using two RBPs which lack native feedback loops and by the introduction of synthetic feedback loops. We find that RBP Puf3 does not natively participate in any direct or indirect feedback regulation, but that replacing the native 3'UTR with that of COX17 generates an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop which reduces gene expression noise. Likewise, RBP Pub1 does not natively participate in any feedback loops, but a synthetic positive feedback loop involving Pub1 results in increased expression noise. Our results demonstrate a synthetic experimental system for quantifying the existence and strength of feedback loops using a combination of high-throughput experiments and mathematical modeling. This system will be of great use in measuring auto-regulatory feedback by RNA binding proteins, a regulatory motif that is difficult to quantify using existing high-throughput methods. PMID:26728081

  15. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  16. The use of force feedback control for robotic mating of umbilical fuel lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullmer, R.; Dilpare, A.; Davis, L.

    1988-01-01

    Control problems in developing force feedback control to use in remotely connecting, disconnecting, and reconnecting the umbilical fuel lines of the Space Shuttle Vehicle are discussed. A docking protocol is proposed, indicating the required role of force feedback. The use of active force feedback control is examined and performance requirements and experimental results are given. A single degree-of-freedom force feedback model is presented and the application of classical control compensation techniques to the force control loop to increase flexibility is considered. In addition, possible modifications to the controller and plans for future research are discussed.

  17. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies. PMID:26931281

  18. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-03-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies.

  19. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies. PMID:26931281

  20. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  1. Simulation and design of feedback control on resistive wall modes in Keda Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chenguang; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong

    2014-12-15

    The feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) (Liu et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 56, 094009 (2014)) is investigated by simulation. A linear model is built to describe the growth of the unstable modes in the absence of feedback and the resulting mode suppression due to feedback, given the typical reversed field pinch plasma equilibrium. The layout of KTX with two shell structures (the vacuum vessel and the stabilizing shell) is taken into account. The feedback performance is explored both in the scheme of “clean mode control” (Zanca et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1425 (2007)) and “raw mode control.” The discrete time control model with specific characteristic times will mimic the real feedback control action and lead to the favored control cycle. Moreover, the conceptual design of feedback control system is also presented, targeting on both RWMs and tearing modes.

  2. Observation, control and modal analysis of longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS via a digital feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Claus, R.; Hindi, H.

    1996-09-01

    The operation of a longitudinal multi-bunch damping system using digital signal processing techniques is shown via measurements from the LBL Advanced Light Source. The feedback system (developed for use by PEP-II, ALS and DA{Phi}NE) uses a parallel array of signal processors to implement a bunch by bunch feedback system for sampling rates up to 500 MHz. The programmable DSP system allows feedback control as well as accelerator diagnostics. A diagnostic technique is illustrated which uses the DSP system to excite and then damp the beam. The resulting 12 ms time domain transient is Fourier analyzed to provide the simultaneous measurement of growth rates and damping rates of all unstable coupled-bunch beam modes.

  3. Observation, control, and modal analysis of longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS via a digital feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Claus, R.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Prabhakar, S.; Ross, W.; Teytelman, D.; Drago, A.; Serio, M.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Stover, G.

    1997-01-01

    The operation of a longitudinal multibunch damping system using digital signal processing (DSP) techniques is shown via measurements from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS). The feedback system (developed for use by PEP-II, ALS, and DA{Phi}NE) uses a parallel array of signal processors to implement a bunch-by-bunch feedback system for sampling rates up to 500 MHz. The programmable DSP system allows feedback control as well as accelerator diagnostics. A diagnostic technique is illustrated which uses the DSP system to excite and then damp the beam. The resulting 12-ms time domain transient is Fourier analyzed to provide the simultaneous measurement of growth rates and damping rates of all unstable coupled-bunch beam modes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Adaptive landing gear concept—feedback control validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulowski, Grzegorz M.; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an integrated feedback control concept for adaptive landing gears (ALG) and its experimental validation. Aeroplanes are subjected to high dynamic loads as a result of the impact during each landing. Classical landing gears, which are in common use, are designed in accordance with official regulations in a way that ensures the optimal energy dissipation for the critical (maximum) sink speed. The regulations were formulated in order to ensure the functional capability of the landing gears during an emergency landing. However, the landing gears, whose characteristics are optimized for these critical conditions, do not perform well under normal impact conditions. For that situation it is reasonable to introduce a system that would adapt the characteristics of the landing gears according to the sink speed of landing. The considered system assumes adaptation of the damping force generated by the landing gear, which would perform optimally in an emergency situation and would adapt itself for regular landings as well. This research covers the formulation and design of the control algorithms for an adaptive landing gear based on MR fluid, implementation of the algorithms on an FPGA platform and experimental verification on a lab-scale landing gear device. The main challenge of the research was to develop a control methodology that could operate effectively within 50 ms, which is assumed to be the total duration of the phenomenon. The control algorithm proposed in this research was able to control the energy dissipation process on the experimental stand.

  5. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix{sub x} software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  6. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C. D.; Regan, A. H.; Lynch, M. T.; Bowling, P. S.

    1995-09-15

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of the RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feedforward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrixx software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  7. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L.; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems.

  8. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems. PMID:27415224

  9. Neural networks for feedback feedforward nonlinear control systems.

    PubMed

    Parisini, T; Zoppoli, R

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of designing feedback feedforward control strategies to drive the state of a dynamic system (in general, nonlinear) so as to track any desired trajectory joining the points of given compact sets, while minimizing a certain cost function (in general, nonquadratic). Due to the generality of the problem, conventional methods are difficult to apply. Thus, an approximate solution is sought by constraining control strategies to take on the structure of multilayer feedforward neural networks. After discussing the approximation properties of neural control strategies, a particular neural architecture is presented, which is based on what has been called the "linear-structure preserving principle". The original functional problem is then reduced to a nonlinear programming one, and backpropagation is applied to derive the optimal values of the synaptic weights. Recursive equations to compute the gradient components are presented, which generalize the classical adjoint system equations of N-stage optimal control theory. Simulation results related to nonlinear nonquadratic problems show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:18267810

  10. Optical distributed sensors for feedback control: Characterization of photorefractive resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Lindner, D. K.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the project was to explore, define, and assess the possibilities of optical distributed sensing for feedback control. This type of sensor, which may have some impacts in the dynamic control of deformable structures and the monitoring of small displacements, can be divided into data acquisition, data processing, and control design. Analogue optical techniques, because they are noninvasive and afford massive parallelism may play a significant role in the acquisition and the preprocessing of the data for such a sensor. Assessing these possibilities was the aim of the first stage of this project. The scope of the proposed research was limited to: (1) the characterization of photorefractive resonators and the assessment of their possible use as a distributed optical processing element; and (2) the design of a control system utilizing signals from distributed sensors. The results include a numerical and experimental study of the resonator below threshold, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator's transverse confinement on its dynamics above threshold, a numerical study of the resonator above threshold using a modal expansion approach, and the experimental test of this model. A detailed account of each investigation, including methodology and analysis of the results are also included along with reprints of published and submitted papers.

  11. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  12. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study. Volume 7: Tilt rotor flight control program feedback studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. R.; Eason, W.; Gillmore, K.; Morris, J.; Spittle, R.

    1973-01-01

    An exploratory study has been made of the use of feedback control in tilt rotor aircraft. This has included the use of swashplate cyclic and collective controls and direct lift control. Various sensor and feedback systems are evaluated in relation to blade loads alleviation, improvement in flying qualities, and modal suppression. Recommendations are made regarding additional analytical and wind tunnel investigations and development of feedback systems in the full scale flight vehicle. Estimated costs and schedules are given.

  13. Treatment with a position feedback-controlled head stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Harris, F A

    1979-08-01

    A position feedback-controlled head stabilizer has been developed to provide cerebral palsied individuals with resistive exercise to strengthen the neck musculature. This apparatus detects "involuntary" head motion and stabilizes the head by applying opposing forces; it also can be used to facilitate muscular contraction by resisting the subject's voluntary movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether voluntary head control in cerebral palsied individuals can be improved through systematic exercise using the stabilizer to strengthen the muscles of the neck and improve their balance of action. The findings support the author's contention that this is possible. The apparatus consists of a helmet and shoulder pads, interconnected so that the head is supported in the helmet by a manipulator arm. At its lower end, the manipulator arm is attached to the shoulder pad mounting frame via a gimbal assembly which allows head movement in two planes of tilt (pitch, or forward-and back, and roll, or side-to-side). Feedback control circuitry is so arranged that any deviation of the head from the desired position leads to actuation of pneumatic cylinders, which apply torques to the manipulator gimbal axes so as to oppose or conteract the incipient head movement. It is particularly significant that none of these patients participating in these experiments were at all apprehensive about or resisted being placed in the apparatus. (Even the youngest subject to use the apparatus--five year old-- did not mind being restrained by the shoulder pads or having his head gripped by helment.) While JG utilized the safety release valve quite often during the first few head control training sessions, he soon became confident enough in the action of the stabilizer that he did not even bother to grip the handle of the release valve. While DA had the action of safety valve explained and demonstrated for her, she never bothered to use it even from the outset of her experience

  14. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    This dissertation examines the use of reduced-order models for design of linear feedback controllers for fluid flows. The focus is on transitional channel flow, a canonical shear flow case with a simple geometry yet complex dynamics. Reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe the evolution of perturbations in transitional channel flow, are computed using two methods for snapshot-based balanced truncation, Balanced Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (BPOD) and Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). The performance of these models in feedback control is evaluated in both linearized and nonlinear Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow. The first part of the dissertation describes the application of BPOD to very large systems, and the detailed evaluation of the resulting reduced-order models. Exact balanced truncation, a standard method from control theory, is not computationally tractable for very large systems, such as those typically encountered in fluid flow simulations. The BPOD method, introduced by Rowley (2005), provides a close approximation. We first show that the approximation is indeed close by applying the method to a 1-D linear perturbation to channel flow at a single spatial wavenumber pair, for which exact balanced truncation is tractable. Next, as the first application of BPOD to a very high-dimensional linear system, we show that reduced-order BPOD models of a localized 3-D perturbation capture the dynamics very well. Moreover, the BPOD models significantly outperform standard Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) models, as illustrated by a striking example where models using the POD modes that capture most of the perturbation energy fail to capture the perturbation dynamics. Next, reduced-order models of a complete control system for linearized channel flow are obtained using ERA, a computationally efficient method that results in the same reduced-order models as BPOD. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG

  15. Kinesthetic Force Feedback and Belt Control for the Treadport Locomotion Interface.

    PubMed

    Hejrati, Babak; Crandall, Kyle L; Hollerbach, John M; Abbott, Jake J

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an improved control system for the Treadport immersive locomotion interface, with results that generalize to any treadmill that utilizes an actuated tether to enable self-selected walking speed. A new belt controller is implemented to regulate the user's position; when combined with the user's own volition, this controller also enables the user to naturally self-select their walking speed as they would when walking over ground. A new kinesthetic-force-feedback controller is designed for the tether that applies forces to the user's torso. This new controller is derived based on maintaining the user's sense of balance during belt acceleration, rather than by rendering an inertial force as was done in our prior work. Based on the results of a human-subjects study, the improvements in both controllers significantly contribute to an improved perception of realistic walking on the Treadport. The improved control system uses intuitive dynamic-system and anatomical parameters and requires no ad hoc gain tuning. The control system simply requires three measurements to be made for a given user: the user's mass, the user's height, and the height of the tether attachment point on the user's torso. PMID:25720019

  16. Movement goals and feedback and feedforward control mechanisms in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Perkell, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of speech motor control are described that support a theoretical framework in which fundamental control variables for phonemic movements are multi-dimensional regions in auditory and somatosensory spaces. Auditory feedback is used to acquire and maintain auditory goals and in the development and function of feedback and feedforward control mechanisms. Several lines of evidence support the idea that speakers with more acute sensory discrimination acquire more distinct goal regions and therefore produce speech sounds with greater contrast. Feedback modification findings indicate that fluently produced sound sequences are encoded as feedforward commands, and feedback control serves to correct mismatches between expected and produced sensory consequences. PMID:22661828

  17. Feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei

    2016-09-01

    In the literatures, to design state feedback controllers to make the response Boolean network synchronise with the drive Boolean network is rarely considered. Motivated by this, feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks is investigated in this paper. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller achieving the complete synchronisation is established first. Then, based on the necessary condition, the feedback control law is proposed. Finally, an example is worked out to illustrate the proposed design procedure.

  18. Global feedback control of Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakao, H.; Mikhailov, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Results of the first systematic study on feedback control of nonequilibrium pattern formation in networks are reported. Effects of global feedback control on Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor system have been investigated. The feedback signal was introduced into one of the parameters of the system and was proportional to the amplitude of the developing Turing pattern. Without the control, the Turing instability corresponded to a subcritical bifurcation and hysteresis effects were observed. Sufficiently strong feedback control rendered, however, the bifurcation supercritical and eliminated the hysteresis effects.

  19. Ecohydrology Controls on Feedbacks Between Northern Wetlands and Climate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetsky, M.; Harden, J.; McGuire, A.; Waddington, J.

    2007-12-01

    Boreal regions contain large stocks of soil carbon, mostly in poorly drained areas where peat accumulating wetlands have served as a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon. It is unknown whether northern wetlands globally will continue to represent a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide, or whether changes in the Earth's climate will cause these ecosystems to release stored carbon back to the atmosphere. Such feedbacks between northern wetlands and regional or global climate systems will depend on interactions between wetland vegetation, peat properties, and hydrology. Within many wetlands, hydrology is the dominant control on plant community structure and decomposition rates. In turn, both plant and microbial activity determine the quantity and quality of litter, which govern the nature of peat accumulation and soil properties critical to hydrology. Here, we will present research from our field and modeling studies investigating the effects of drought, permafrost degradation, and wildfire on vegetation, carbon cycling, and hydrological processes in northern wetlands at multiple spatial scales. At local scales, our findings show that interactions among vegetation, soil, and hydrology can lead to unexpected and often complex changes in soil environments, with potential 'carbon surprises'. For example, in a nonpermafrost peatland, we found that sustained drought led to peat subsidence that limited the development of oxic surface peat layers and inhibited ecosystem respiration. The decrease in porosity and water content with drought reduced seasonal ice thaw, which also likely limited microbial activity. In contrast, peatlands underlain by permafrost are increasingly experiencing thermokarst and soil flooding with increasing active layer depth. Changes in moss productivity post-thaw led to increased rates of organic matter accumulation, with very different hydrologic and soil properties than peat accumulated in permafrost settings. In addition to local

  20. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  1. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  2. Walking Flexibility after Hemispherectomy: Split-Belt Treadmill Adaptation and Feedback Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Julia T.; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Reisman, Darcy S.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Walking flexibility depends on use of feedback or reactive control to respond to unexpected changes in the environment, and the ability to adapt feedforward or predictive control for sustained alterations. Recent work has demonstrated that cerebellar damage impairs feedforward adaptation, but not feedback control, during human split-belt treadmill…

  3. Control Quality of a Feedback Control System under Cyclostationary Noise in Power Line Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrizo, Cesar; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Okada, Hiraku; Katayama, Masaaki

    This paper discusses a control system that employs a power line to transfer signals to control the motion of a single machine, and explores the influence of packet losses on the quality of the control. As an example of a controlled system, a controller with a rotary inverted pendulum as a controlled object, is considered. The feedback loop in between is the power line. The control performance is evaluated in the power line cyclostationary noise environment and compared against the performance in a stationary noise environment. As a result, it is confirmed that the power line and its cyclostationary noise features present an advantage against transmission in a channel with stationary noise.

  4. Temperature feedback control for long-term carrier-envelope phase locking

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Zenghu; Yun, Chenxia; Chen, Shouyuan; Wang, He; Chini, Michael

    2012-07-24

    A feedback control module for stabilizing a carrier-envelope phase of an output of a laser oscillator system comprises a first photodetector, a second photodetector, a phase stabilizer, an optical modulator, and a thermal control element. The first photodetector may generate a first feedback signal corresponding to a first portion of a laser beam from an oscillator. The second photodetector may generate a second feedback signal corresponding to a second portion of the laser beam filtered by a low-pass filter. The phase stabilizer may divide the frequency of the first feedback signal by a factor and generate an error signal corresponding to the difference between the frequency-divided first feedback signal and the second feedback signal. The optical modulator may modulate the laser beam within the oscillator corresponding to the error signal. The thermal control unit may change the temperature of the oscillator corresponding to a signal operable to control the optical modulator.

  5. Proximal Blade Twist Feedback Control for Heliogyro Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sarah Mitchell

    mode is on the order of 0.005%, meaning there is almost no inherent damping in the blade. Next, the proximal blade twist feedback control design was successful in overcoming friction in the root actuator and added damping to the blade. The damping ratio for the lowest frequency torsional mode was increased from 0.001% to 0.09%, which is a significant amount for a heliogyro spacecraft. Finally, the camera sensor used for the proximal differential twist measurement proved to be feasible and quantization from these measurements only decreased the damping ratio to 0.075%. This research provides the first indication that a physically realizable blade root controller can deal with friction in an effective way, thus taking a step towards advancing the technology readiness level of the heliogyro spacecraft.

  6. Failsafe device for air/fuel ratio feedback control system

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Narasaka, S.

    1983-11-15

    A fail safe device is disclosed, comprising means for detecting a failure in an air/fuel ratio feedback control system and generating a fault signal when such failure is detected, and means responsive to the fault signal to drive an actuator for driving an air/fuel ratio control valve and also responsive to a reference position signal supplied thereto during the above driving, which is generated when the actuator passes its reference position, to stop the actuator at the reference position. The actuator driving/stopping means may comprise means for repeatedly driving the actuator over a predetermined operating range inclusive of the reference position a plurality of times when it is not supplied with the reference position signal upon the actuator passing the reference position, and means for driving the actuator from its extreme operating position to a predetermined position and holding the same there when it is not supplied with the reference position signal even after a predetermined number of times of the above repeated driving of the actuator.

  7. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  8. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  9. Design and Validation of Optimized Feedforward with Robust Feedback Control of a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, Roman; He Weidong; Edwards, Robert M.

    2004-08-15

    Design applications for robust feedback and optimized feedforward control, with confirming results from experiments conducted on the Pennsylvania State University TRIGA reactor, are presented. The combination of feedforward and feedback control techniques complement each other in that robust control offers guaranteed closed-loop stability in the presence of uncertainties, and optimized feedforward offers an approach to achieving performance that is sometimes limited by overly conservative robust feedback control. The design approach taken in this work combines these techniques by first designing robust feedback control. Alternative methods for specifying a low-order linear model and uncertainty specifications, while seeking as much performance as possible, are discussed and evaluated. To achieve desired performance characteristics, the optimized feedforward control is then computed by using the nominal nonlinear plant model that incorporates the robust feedback control.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Web-Based Decisional Balance Feedback and Personalized Normative Feedback for College Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Susan E; Kirouac, Megan; Lewis, Melissa A; Witkiewitz, Katie; Carey, Kate B

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Web-based personalized feedback interventions, particularly personalized normative feedback (PNF), are efficacious in improving college drinking outcomes; however, no personalized feedback interventions to date have provided college drinkers with feedback about their own decisional balance. This study tested the relative efficacy of a novel decisional balance feedback (DBF) intervention, PNF, and an assessment-only control condition. Method: Participants (N = 724; 56% female) were undergraduate students at a 4-year university in the U.S. Pacific Northwest and were randomized to receive one-time exposure to web-based DBF, PNF, or assessment only. Web-based assessment occurred at baseline and at 1-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups and included measures of motivation to change, drinking quantity norms, drinking frequency/quantity, and alcohol-related problems. Results: At the 1-month follow-up, DBF and PNF participants reported reductions in alcohol-related problems; however, only PNF participants reduced their drinking frequency and quantity. At the 6-month follow-up, only DBF participants showed significant reductions in drinking quantity and alcohol-related problems. Neither group maintained reductions in alcohol use or alcohol-related problems at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: This study provided preliminary evidence that web-based DBF and PNF are efficacious interventions for college drinkers, with DBF having somewhat longer lasting effects. PMID:25343656

  11. Design of multivariable feedback control systems via spectral assignment. [as applied to aircraft flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liberty, S. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Tung, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Applied research in the area of spectral assignment in multivariable systems is reported. A frequency domain technique for determining the set of all stabilizing controllers for a single feedback loop multivariable system is described. It is shown that decoupling and tracking are achievable using this procedure. The technique is illustrated with a simple example.

  12. Composite Adaptive Fuzzy Output Feedback Control Design for Uncertain Nonlinear Strict-Feedback Systems With Input Saturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongming; Tong, Shaocheng; Li, Tieshan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a composite adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control approach is proposed for a class of single-input and single-output strict-feedback nonlinear systems with unmeasured states and input saturation. Fuzzy logic systems are utilized to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, and a fuzzy state observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. By utilizing the designed fuzzy state observer, a serial-parallel estimation model is established. Based on adaptive backstepping dynamic surface control technique and utilizing the prediction error between the system states observer model and the serial-parallel estimation model, a new fuzzy controller with the composite parameters adaptive laws are developed. It is proved that all the signals of the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output can follow the given bounded reference signal. A numerical example and simulation comparisons with previous control methods are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25438335

  13. Motivation in vigilance - Effects of self-evaluation and experimenter-controlled feedback.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warm, J. S.; Kanfer, F. H.; Kuwada, S.; Clark, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Vigilance experiments have been performed to study the relative efficiency of feedback operations in enhancing vigilance performance. Two feedback operations were compared - i.e., experimenter-controlled feedback in the form of knowledge of results (KR) regarding response times to signal detections, and subject-controlled feedback in the form of self-evaluation (SE) of response times to signal detections. The subjects responded to the aperiodic offset of a visual signal during a 1-hr vigil. Both feedback operations were found to enhance performance efficiency: subjects in the KR and SE conditions had faster response times than controls receiving no evaluative feedback. Moreover, the data of the KR and SE groups did not differ significantly from each other. The results are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that self-evaluation is a critical factor underlying the incentive value of KR in vigilance tasks.

  14. Acceleration Sensing, Feedback Cooling, and Nonlinear Dynamics with Nanoscale Cavity-Optomechanical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Alexander Grey

    Light has long been used for the precise measurement of moving bodies, but the burgeoning field of optomechanics is concerned with the interaction of light and matter in a regime where the typically weak radiation pressure force of light is able to push back on the moving object. This field began with the realization in the late 1960's that the momentum imparted by a recoiling photon on a mirror would place fundamental limits on the smallest measurable displacement of that mirror. This coupling between the frequency of light and the motion of a mechanical object does much more than simply add noise, however. It has been used to cool objects to their quantum ground state, demonstrate electromagnetically-induced-transparency, and modify the damping and spring constant of the resonator. Amazingly, these radiation pressure effects have now been demonstrated in systems ranging 18 orders of magnitude in mass (kg to fg). In this work we will focus on three diverse experiments in three different optomechanical devices which span the fields of inertial sensors, closed-loop feedback, and nonlinear dynamics. The mechanical elements presented cover 6 orders of magnitude in mass (ng to fg), but they all employ nano-scale photonic crystals to trap light and resonantly enhance the light-matter interaction. In the first experiment we take advantage of the sub-femtometer displacement resolution of our photonic crystals to demonstrate a sensitive chip-scale optical accelerometer with a kHz-frequency mechanical resonator. This sensor has a noise density of approximately 10 micro-g/rt-Hz over a useable bandwidth of approximately 20 kHz and we demonstrate at least 50 dB of linear dynamic sensor range. We also discuss methods to further improve performance of this device by a factor of 10. In the second experiment, we used a closed-loop measurement and feedback system to damp and cool a room-temperature MHz-frequency mechanical oscillator from a phonon occupation of 6.5 million down to

  15. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  16. Why self-controlled feedback enhances motor learning: Answers from electroencephalography and indices of motivation.

    PubMed

    Grand, Kirk F; Bruzi, Alessandro T; Dyke, Ford B; Godwin, Maurice M; Leiker, Amber M; Thompson, Andrew G; Buchanan, Taylor L; Miller, Matthew W

    2015-10-01

    It was tested whether learners who choose when to receive augmented feedback while practicing a motor skill exhibit enhanced augmented feedback processing and intrinsic motivation, along with superior learning, relative to learners who do not control their feedback. Accordingly, participants were assigned to either self-control (Self) or yoked groups and asked to practice a non-dominant arm beanbag toss. Self participants received augmented feedback at their discretion, whereas Yoked participants were given feedback schedules matched to Self counterparts. Participants' visual feedback was occluded, and when they received augmented feedback, their processing of it was indexed with the electroencephalography-derived feedback-related negativity (FRN). Participants self-reported intrinsic motivation via the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) after practice, and completed a retention and transfer test the next day to index learning. Results partially support the hypothesis. Specifically, Self participants reported higher IMI scores, exhibited larger FRNs, and demonstrated better accuracy on the transfer test, but not on the retention test, nor did they exhibit greater consistency on the retention or transfer tests. Additionally, post-hoc multiple regression analysis indicated FRN amplitude predicted transfer test accuracy (accounting for IMI score). Results suggest self-controlled feedback schedules enhance feedback processing, which enhances the transfer of a newly acquired motor skill. PMID:26163375

  17. Cavity control system advanced modeling and simulations for TESLA linear accelerator and free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The cavity control system for the TESLA -- TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project is initially introduced. The elementary analysis of the cavity resonator on RF (radio frequency) level and low level frequency with signal and power considerations is presented. For the field vector detection the digital signal processing is proposed. The electromechanical model concerning Lorentz force detuning is applied for analyzing the basic features of the system performance. For multiple cavities driven by one klystron the field vector sum control is considered. Simulink model implementation is developed to explore the feedback and feed-forward system operation and some experimental results for signals and power considerations are presented.

  18. Noise Control in Gene Regulatory Networks with Negative Feedback.

    PubMed

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    Genes and proteins regulate cellular functions through complex circuits of biochemical reactions. Fluctuations in the components of these regulatory networks result in noise that invariably corrupts the signal, possibly compromising function. Here, we create a practical formalism based on ideas introduced by Wiener and Kolmogorov (WK) for filtering noise in engineered communications systems to quantitatively assess the extent to which noise can be controlled in biological processes involving negative feedback. Application of the theory, which reproduces the previously proven scaling of the lower bound for noise suppression in terms of the number of signaling events, shows that a tetracycline repressor-based negative-regulatory gene circuit behaves as a WK filter. For the class of Hill-like nonlinear regulatory functions, this type of filter provides the optimal reduction in noise. Our theoretical approach can be readily combined with experimental measurements of response functions in a wide variety of genetic circuits, to elucidate the general principles by which biological networks minimize noise. PMID:27095600

  19. Development of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes and the advanced thermal control flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes (FCHP) are discussed. An analytical model was produced to describe the performance of the FCHP under steady state and transient conditions. An advanced thermal control flight experiment was designed to demonstrate the performance of the thermal control component in a space environment. The thermal control equipment was evaluated on the ATS-F satellite to provide performance data for the components and to act as a thermal control system which can be used to provide temperature stability of spacecraft components in future applications.

  20. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  1. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  2. Design study of a feedback control system for the Multicyclic Flap System rotor (MFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbrich, R.; Perley, R.; Howes, H.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of automatically providing higher harmonic control to a deflectable control flap at the tip of a helicopter rotor blade through feedback of selected independent parameter was investigated. Control parameters were selected for input to the feedback system. A preliminary circuit was designed to condition the selected parameters, weigh limiting factors, and provide a proper output signal to the multi-cyclic control actuators. Results indicate that feedback control for the higher harmonic is feasible; however, design for a flight system requires an extension of the present analysis which was done for one flight condition - 120 kts, 11,500 lbs gross weight and level flight.

  3. NODAL — The second life of the accelerator control language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, G.; Perriollat, F.; Ribeiro, P.; Kagarmanov, A.; Kovaltsov, V.

    1994-12-01

    NODAL has been a popular interpreter language for accelerator controls since the beginning of the 1970s. NODAL has been rewritten in the C language to be easily portable to the different computer platforms which are in use in accelerator controls. The paper describes the major features of this new version of NODAL, the major software packages which are available through this implementation, the platforms on which it is currently running, and some relevant performances. The experience gained during the rejuvenation project of the CERN accelerator control systems is presented. The benefit of this is discussed, in particular in a view of the prevailing strong constraints in personnel and money resources.

  4. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics.

  5. Accelerator control system at KEKB and the linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kurashina, Miho; Mikawa, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Satoh, Masanori; Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    KEKB has completed all of the technical milestones and has offered important insights into the flavor structure of elementary particles, especially CP violation. The accelerator control system at KEKB and the injector linac was initiated by a combination of scripting languages at the operation layer and EPICS (experimental physics and industrial control system) at the equipment layer. During the project, many features were implemented to achieve extreme performance from the machine. In particular, the online linkage to the accelerator simulation played an essential role. In order to further improve the reliability and flexibility, two major concepts were additionally introduced later in the project, namely, channel access everywhere and dual-tier controls. Based on the improved control system, a virtual accelerator concept was realized, allowing the single injector linac to serve as three separate injectors to KEKB's high-energy ring, low-energy ring, and Photon Factory, respectively. These control technologies are indispensable for future particle accelerators.

  6. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  7. Laser-ion acceleration through controlled surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Nees, John A.; He Zhaohan; Easter, James H.; Thomas, Alexander G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl M.; Petrov, George; Davis, Jack

    2011-04-15

    In laser-plasma ion accelerators, control of target contamination layers can lead to selection of accelerated ion species and enhancement of acceleration. To demonstrate this, deuterons up to 75 keV are accelerated from an intense laser interaction with a glass target simply by placing 1 ml of heavy water inside the experimental chamber prior to pumping to generate a deuterated contamination layer on the target. Using the same technique with a deuterated-polystyrene-coated target also enhances deuteron yield by a factor of 3 to 5, while increasing the maximum energy of the generated deuterons to 140 keV.

  8. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  9. Deterministic creation and stabilization of entanglement in circuit QED by homodyne-mediated feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhuo; Kuang Luelin; Hu Kai; Xu Luting; Wei Suhua; Guo Lingzhen; Li Xinqi

    2010-09-15

    In a solid-state circuit QED system, we demonstrate that a homodyne-current-based feedback can create and stabilize highly entangled two-qubit states in the presence of a moderate noisy environment. Particularly, we present an extended analysis for the current-based Markovian feedback, which leads to an improved feedback scheme. We show that this is essential to achieve a desirable control effect by the use of dispersive measurement.

  10. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  11. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  12. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  13. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  14. The predictability of frequency-altered auditory feedback changes the weighting of feedback and feedforward input for speech motor control.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Nichole E; Jones, Jeffery A

    2014-12-01

    Speech production requires the combined effort of a feedback control system driven by sensory feedback, and a feedforward control system driven by internal models. However, the factors that dictate the relative weighting of these feedback and feedforward control systems are unclear. In this event-related potential (ERP) study, participants produced vocalisations while being exposed to blocks of frequency-altered feedback (FAF) perturbations that were either predictable in magnitude (consistently either 50 or 100 cents) or unpredictable in magnitude (50- and 100-cent perturbations varying randomly within each vocalisation). Vocal and P1-N1-P2 ERP responses revealed decreases in the magnitude and trial-to-trial variability of vocal responses, smaller N1 amplitudes, and shorter vocal, P1 and N1 response latencies following predictable FAF perturbation magnitudes. In addition, vocal response magnitudes correlated with N1 amplitudes, vocal response latencies, and P2 latencies. This pattern of results suggests that after repeated exposure to predictable FAF perturbations, the contribution of the feedforward control system increases. Examination of the presentation order of the FAF perturbations revealed smaller compensatory responses, smaller P1 and P2 amplitudes, and shorter N1 latencies when the block of predictable 100-cent perturbations occurred prior to the block of predictable 50-cent perturbations. These results suggest that exposure to large perturbations modulates responses to subsequent perturbations of equal or smaller size. Similarly, exposure to a 100-cent perturbation prior to a 50-cent perturbation within a vocalisation decreased the magnitude of vocal and N1 responses, but increased P1 and P2 latencies. Thus, exposure to a single perturbation can affect responses to subsequent perturbations. PMID:25263844

  15. Feedback control of one's own action: Self-other sensory attribution in motor control.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohisa

    2015-12-15

    The sense of agency, the subjective experience of controlling one's own action, has an important function in motor control. When we move our own body or even external tools, we attribute that movement to ourselves and utilize that sensory information in order to correct "our own" movement in theory. The dynamic relationship between conscious self-other attribution and feedback control, however, is still unclear. Participants were required to make a sinusoidal reaching movement and received its visual feedback (i.e., cursor). When participants received a fake movement that was spatio-temporally close to their actual movement, illusory self-attribution of the fake movement was observed. In this situation, since participants tried to control the cursor but it was impossible to do so, the movement error was increased (Experiment 1). However, when the visual feedback was reduced to make self-other attribution difficult, there was no further increase in the movement error (Experiment 2). These results indicate that conscious self-other sensory attribution might coordinate sensory input and motor output. PMID:26587957

  16. Controlling electron injection in laser plasma accelerators using multiple pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Plateau, G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Chen, M.; Yu, L.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    Use of counter-propagating pulses to control electron injection in laser-plasma accelerators promises to be an important ingredient in the development of stable devices. We discuss the colliding pulse scheme and associated diagnostics.

  17. Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keehoon; Colgate, J Edward

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that haptic feedback would enhance grip force control of surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthetic hands for targeted reinnervation (TR) amputees. A new miniature haptic device, a tactor, that can deliver touch, pressure, shear, and temperature sensation, allows modality-matching haptic feedback. TR surgery that creates sensory regions on the patient's skin that refer to the surface of the missing limb allows somatotopic-matching haptic feedback. This paper evaluates the hypothesis via an sEMG-controlled virtual prosthetic arm operated by TR amputees under diverse haptic feedback conditions. The results indicate that the grip force control is significantly enhanced via the haptic feedback. However, the simultaneous display of two haptic channels (pressure and shear) does not enhance, but instead degrades, grip force control. PMID:22855230

  18. Cross Feedback Control of a Magnetic Bearing System: Controller Design Considering Gyroscopic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Markus; Kucera, Ladislav

    1996-01-01

    For flywheel rotors or other rotors with significant ratios of moments of inertia, the influence of gyroscopic effects has to be considered. While conservative or damped systems remain stable even under gyroscopic effects, magnetically suspended rotors can be destabilized with increasing rotational speed. The influence of gyroscopic effects on the stability and behavior of a magnetic bearing system is analyzed. The analysis is carried out with a rigid body model for the rotor and a nonlinear model for the magnetic bearing and its amplifier. Cross feedback control can compensate gyroscopic effects. This compensation leads to better system performance and can avoid instability. Furthermore, the implementation of this compensation is simple. The main structure of a decentralized controller can still be used. It has only to be expanded by the cross feedback path.

  19. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  20. Control your anger! The neural basis of aggression regulation in response to negative social feedback.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Michelle; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-05-01

    Negative social feedback often generates aggressive feelings and behavior. Prior studies have investigated the neural basis of negative social feedback, but the underlying neural mechanisms of aggression regulation following negative social feedback remain largely undiscovered. In the current study, participants viewed pictures of peers with feedback (positive, neutral or negative) to the participant's personal profile. Next, participants responded to the peer feedback by pressing a button, thereby producing a loud noise toward the peer, as an index of aggression. Behavioral analyses showed that negative feedback led to more aggression (longer noise blasts). Conjunction neuroimaging analyses revealed that both positive and negative feedback were associated with increased activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and bilateral insula. In addition, more activation in the right dorsal lateral PFC (dlPFC) during negative feedback vs neutral feedback was associated with shorter noise blasts in response to negative social feedback, suggesting a potential role of dlPFC in aggression regulation, or top-down control over affective impulsive actions. This study demonstrates a role of the dlPFC in the regulation of aggressive social behavior. PMID:26755768

  1. Interior Noise Reduction by Adaptive Feedback Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1998-01-01

    . The on-line identification algorithm developed in this research will be useful in constructing a state estimator for feedback vibration control.

  2. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  3. Eco-hydrological feedback mechanisms control ecological services in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, J.; Hinz, C.; Vogwill, R.; Tareque, H.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems contain various feedback mechanisms between their abiotc and biotic components. The feedbacks are triggered by climate and propagate into patterns of environment partitioning based on distinct zones of hydrological function that vary in time and space. This partitioning co-evolves with vegetation, defines carbon metabolism and creates niches that govern patterns of flora and fauna abundance and distribution. Using a minimalistic model for wetland eco-hydrology, we explore vegetation adaptation to climate variability and the net metabolism of a wetland ecosystem given a range of climate conditions. We then apply the model to characterize the changes in niche habitat availability for a tortoise population endangered by a drying climate.

  4. A Case Study of Representing Signal Transduction in Liver Cells as a Feedback Control Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Abhay; Jayaraman, Arul; Hahn, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways often contain feedback loops where proteins are produced that regulate signaling. While feedback regulatory mechanisms are commonly found in signaling pathways, there is no example available in the literature that is simple enough to be presented in an undergraduate control class. This paper presents a simulation study of…

  5. The Effects of Self-Controlled Video Feedback on the Learning of the Basketball Set Shot

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Christopher Adam; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T.; Post, Phillip Guy

    2012-01-01

    Allowing learners to control some aspect of instructional support (e.g., augmented feedback) appears to facilitate motor skill acquisition. No studies, however, have examined self-controlled (SC) video feedback without the provision of additional attentional cueing. The purpose of this study was to extend previous SC research using video feedback about movement form for the basketball set shot without explicitly directing attention to specific aspects of the movement. The SC group requested video feedback of their performance following any trial during the acquisition phase. The yoked group received feedback according to a schedule created by a SC counterpart. During acquisition participants were also allowed to view written instructional cues at any time. Results revealed that the SC group had significantly higher form scores during the transfer phase and utilized the instructional cues more frequently during acquisition. Post-training questionnaire responses indicated no preference for requesting or receiving feedback following good trials as reported by Chiviacowsky and Wulf (2002, 2005). The nature of the task was such that participants could have assigned both positive and negative evaluations to different aspects of the movement during the same trial. Thus, the lack of preferences along with the similarity in scores for feedback and no-feedback trials may simply have reflected this complexity. Importantly, however, the results indicated that SC video feedback conferred a learning benefit without the provision of explicit additional attentional cueing. PMID:22973257

  6. The effects of self-controlled video feedback on the learning of the basketball set shot.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Christopher Adam; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Post, Phillip Guy

    2012-01-01

    Allowing learners to control some aspect of instructional support (e.g., augmented feedback) appears to facilitate motor skill acquisition. No studies, however, have examined self-controlled (SC) video feedback without the provision of additional attentional cueing. The purpose of this study was to extend previous SC research using video feedback about movement form for the basketball set shot without explicitly directing attention to specific aspects of the movement. The SC group requested video feedback of their performance following any trial during the acquisition phase. The yoked group received feedback according to a schedule created by a SC counterpart. During acquisition participants were also allowed to view written instructional cues at any time. Results revealed that the SC group had significantly higher form scores during the transfer phase and utilized the instructional cues more frequently during acquisition. Post-training questionnaire responses indicated no preference for requesting or receiving feedback following good trials as reported by Chiviacowsky and Wulf (2002, 2005). The nature of the task was such that participants could have assigned both positive and negative evaluations to different aspects of the movement during the same trial. Thus, the lack of preferences along with the similarity in scores for feedback and no-feedback trials may simply have reflected this complexity. Importantly, however, the results indicated that SC video feedback conferred a learning benefit without the provision of explicit additional attentional cueing. PMID:22973257

  7. Longitudinal Bunch Position Control for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Rivetta, Claudio; Sullivam, Michael K.; Drago, Alessandro; /Frascati

    2009-05-15

    The use of normal conducting cavities and an ion-clearing gap will cause a significant RF accelerating voltage gap transient and longitudinal phase shift of the individual bunches along the bunch train in both rings of the SuperB accelerator. Small relative centroid position shifts between bunches of the colliding beams will have a large adverse impact on the luminosity due to the small {beta}*{sub y} at the interaction point (IP). We investigate the possibility of minimizing the relative longitudinal position shift between bunches by reducing the gap transient in each ring and matching the longitudinal bunch positions of the two rings at the IP using feedback/feedforward techniques in the LLRF. The analysis is conducted assuming maximum use of the klystron power installed in the system.

  8. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    DOEpatents

    Heard, H.G.

    1961-10-24

    A particle beam positioning control for a synchrotron or the like is described. The control includes means for selectively impressing a sinusoidal perturbation upon the rising voltage utilized to sweep the frequency of the f-m oscillator which is conventionally coupled to the accelerating electrode of a synchrotron. The perturbation produces a variation in the normal rate of change of frequency of the accelerating voltage applied to the accelerating electrode, resulting in an expansion or contraction of the particle beam orbit diameter during the perturbation. The beam may thus be controlled such that a portion strikes a target positioned close to the expanded or contracted orbit diameter and returns to the original orbit for further acceleration to the final energy. (AEC)

  9. Controlled Trial Using Computerized Feedback to Improve Physicians' Diagnostic Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poses, Roy M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study involving 14 experienced physicians investigated the effectiveness of a computer program (providing statistical feedback to teach a clinical diagnostic rule that predicts the probability of streptococcal pharyngitis), in conjunction with traditional lecture and periodic disease-prevalence reports. Results suggest the integrated method is a…

  10. The role of feed-forward and feedback processes for closed-loop prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely believed that both feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms are required for successful object manipulation. Open-loop upper-limb prosthesis wearers receive no tactile feedback, which may be the cause of their limited dexterity and compromised grip force control. In this paper we ask whether observed prosthesis control impairments are due to lack of feedback or due to inadequate feed-forward control. Methods Healthy subjects were fitted with a closed-loop robotic hand and instructed to grasp and lift objects of different weights as we recorded trajectories and force profiles. We conducted three experiments under different feed-forward and feed-back configurations to elucidate the role of tactile feedback (i) in ideal conditions, (ii) under sensory deprivation, and (iii) under feed-forward uncertainty. Results (i) We found that subjects formed economical grasps in ideal conditions. (ii) To our surprise, this ability was preserved even when visual and tactile feedback were removed. (iii) When we introduced uncertainty into the hand controller performance degraded significantly in the absence of either visual or tactile feedback. Greatest performance was achieved when both sources of feedback were present. Conclusions We have introduced a novel method to understand the cognitive processes underlying grasping and lifting. We have shown quantitatively that tactile feedback can significantly improve performance in the presence of feed-forward uncertainty. However, our results indicate that feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms serve complementary roles, suggesting that to improve on the state-of-the-art in prosthetic hands we must develop prostheses that empower users to correct for the inevitable uncertainty in their feed-forward control. PMID:22032545

  11. Grip force control during virtual object interaction: effect of force feedback,accuracy demands, and training.

    PubMed

    Gibo, Tricia L; Bastian, Amy J; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-03-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, people are able to efficiently modulate their grip force according to the experienced load force. Effective grip force control involves providing enough grip force to prevent the object from slipping, while avoiding excessive force to avoid damage and fatigue. During indirect object manipulation via teleoperation systems or in virtual environments, users often receive limited somatosensory feedback about objects with which they interact. This study examines the effects of force feedback, accuracy demands, and training on grip force control during object interaction in a virtual environment. The task required subjects to grasp and move a virtual object while tracking a target. When force feedback was not provided, subjects failed to couple grip and load force, a capability fundamental to direct object interaction. Subjects also exerted larger grip force without force feedback and when accuracy demands of the tracking task were high. In addition, the presence or absence of force feedback during training affected subsequent performance, even when the feedback condition was switched. Subjects' grip force control remained reminiscent of their employed grip during the initial training. These results motivate the use of force feedback during telemanipulation and highlight the effect of force feedback during training. PMID:24845744

  12. Combined Auditory and Vibrotactile Feedback for Human-Machine-Interface Control.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Elias B; Larson, Eric; Stepp, Cara E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the addition of binary vibrotactile stimulation to continuous auditory feedback (vowel synthesis) for human-machine interface (HMI) control. Sixteen healthy participants controlled facial surface electromyography to achieve 2-D targets (vowels). Eight participants used only real-time auditory feedback to locate targets whereas the other eight participants were additionally alerted to having achieved targets with confirmatory vibrotactile stimulation at the index finger. All participants trained using their assigned feedback modality (auditory alone or combined auditory and vibrotactile) over three sessions on three days and completed a fourth session on the third day using novel targets to assess generalization. Analyses of variance performed on the 1) percentage of targets reached and 2) percentage of trial time at the target revealed a main effect for feedback modality: participants using combined auditory and vibrotactile feedback performed significantly better than those using auditory feedback alone. No effect was found for session or the interaction of feedback modality and session, indicating a successful generalization to novel targets but lack of improvement over training sessions. Future research is necessary to determine the cognitive cost associated with combined auditory and vibrotactile feedback during HMI control. PMID:23912500

  13. Fake feedback on pain tolerance impacts proactive versus reactive control strategies.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Davide; Braem, Senne; Pourtois, Gilles; Brass, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that beliefs about one's own ability to execute a task influence task performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that beliefs about a specific self-control capacity, namely pain tolerance, modulate basic cognitive control processes. Participants received fake comparative social feedback that their ability to tolerate painful stimulations was either very poor or outstanding after which they performed an unrelated go/no-go task. Participants receiving low-tolerance feedback, relative to high-tolerance feedback, were less successful at inhibiting their responses and more influenced by previous trial conditions, as indicated by an increased slowdown following errors and more failed inhibitions following go-trials. These observations demonstrate a shift from a more proactive to a more reactive control mode. This study shows that providing feedback about one's own capacity to control impulsive reactions to painful stimulations directly influences low-level cognitive control dynamics. PMID:27149180

  14. A new direct torque control scheme for induction motors using linear state feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kandianis, A.; Manias, S.N.; Griva, G.; Profumo, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper a new Direct Torque Control (DTC) scheme for induction motor drives is described, based on the linear state feedback method with dynamic output feedback. The DTC has been shown to be a good solution in torque controlled drives applications when the speed control is not required (e.g. traction drives for electric vehicles). In such cases, the torque command comes directly from the user input. By considering the torque and flux as the outputs of the linearized motor model, it is possible to design an optimum controller with constant gain state feedback and dynamic output feedback through an integral term. The design procedure of the proposed control scheme is described and the simulation results are presented to show the overall performance of the system.

  15. Slewing maneuvers and vibration control of space structures by feedforward/feedback moment-gyro controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Li-Farn; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Park, K. C.; Su, Renjeng

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a moment-gyro control approach to the maneuver and vibration suppression of a flexible truss arm undergoing a constant slewing motion. The overall slewing motion is triggered by a feedforward input, and a companion feedback controller is employed to augment the feedforward input and subsequently to control vibrations. The feedforward input for the given motion requirement is determined from the combined CMG (Control Momentum Gyro) devices and the desired rigid-body motion. The rigid-body dynamic model has enabled us to identify the attendant CMG momentum saturation constraints. The task for vibration control is carried out in two stages; first in the search of a suitable CMG placement along the beam span for various slewing maneuvers, and subsequently in the development of Liapunov-based control algorithms for CMG spin-stabilization. Both analytical and numerical results are presented to show the effectiveness of the present approach.

  16. Fault tolerant attitude sensing and force feedback control for unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chirag

    Two aspects of an unmanned aerial vehicle are studied in this work. One is fault tolerant attitude determination and the other is to provide force feedback to the joy-stick of the UAV so as to prevent faulty inputs from the pilot. Determination of attitude plays an important role in control of aerial vehicles. One way of defining the attitude is through Euler angles. These angles can be determined based on the measurements of the projections of the gravity and earth magnetic fields on the three body axes of the vehicle. Attitude determination in unmanned aerial vehicles poses additional challenges due to limitations of space, payload, power and cost. Therefore it provides for almost no room for any bulky sensors or extra sensor hardware for backup and as such leaves no room for sensor fault issues either. In the face of these limitations, this study proposes a fault tolerant computing of Euler angles by utilizing multiple different computation methods, with each method utilizing a different subset of the available sensor measurement data. Twenty-five such methods have been presented in this document. The capability of computing the Euler angles in multiple ways provides a diversified redundancy required for fault tolerance. The proposed approach can identify certain sets of sensor failures and even separate the reference fields from the disturbances. A bank-to-turn maneuver of the NASA GTM UAV is used to demonstrate the fault tolerance provided by the proposed method as well as to demonstrate the method of determining the correct Euler angles despite interferences by inertial acceleration disturbances. Attitude computation is essential for stability. But as of today most UAVs are commanded remotely by human pilots. While basic stability control is entrusted to machine or the on-board automatic controller, overall guidance is usually with humans. It is therefore the pilot who sets the command/references through a joy-stick. While this is a good compromise between

  17. Parametric optimal bounded feedback control for smart parameter-controllable composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Z. G.; Ni, Y. Q.; Duan, Y. F.

    2015-03-01

    Deterministic and stochastic parametric optimal bounded control problems are presented for smart composite structures such as magneto-rheological visco-elastomer based sandwich beam with controllable bounded parameters subjected to initial disturbances and stochastic excitations. The parametric controls by actively adjusting system parameters differ from the conventional additive controls by systemic external inputs. The dynamical programming equations for the optimal parametric controls are derived based on the deterministic and stochastic dynamical programming principles. The optimal bounded functions of controls are firstly obtained from the equations with the bounded control constraints based on the bang-bang control strategy. Then the optimal bounded parametric control laws are obtained by the inversion of the nonlinear functions. The stability of the optimally controlled systems is proved according to the Lyapunov method. Finally, the proposed optimal bounded parametric feedback control strategy is applied to single-degree-of-freedom and two-degree-of-freedom dynamic systems with nonlinear parametric bounded control terms under initial disturbances and earthquake excitations and then to a magneto-rheological visco-elastomer based sandwich beam system with nonlinear parametric bounded control terms under stochastic excitations. The effective vibration suppression is illustrated with numerical results. The proposed optimal parametric control strategy is applicable to other smart composite structures with nonlinear controllable parameters.

  18. New synchronization criteria for memristor-based networks: adaptive control and feedback control schemes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate synchronization for memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delay via an adaptive and feedback controller. Under the framework of Filippov's solution and differential inclusion theory, and by using the adaptive control technique and structuring a novel Lyapunov functional, an adaptive updated law was designed, and two synchronization criteria were derived for memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delay. By removing some of the basic literature assumptions, the derived synchronization criteria were found to be more general than those in existing literature. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:25299765

  19. Comparing the Effects of Self-Controlled and Examiner-Controlled Feedback on Learning in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Mohamad Hosein; Fatemi, Rouholah; Soroushmoghadam, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Feedback can improve task learning in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, the frequency and type of feedback may play different role in learning and needs to more investigations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the acquisition and retention of new feedback skills in children with DCD under different frequency of self-control and control examiner feedback. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest design, participants based on their retention were divided into four feedback groups: self-controlled feedback groups with frequencies of 50% and75%, experimenter controls with frequencies of 50% and 75%. The study sample consisted of 24 boys with DCD aged between 9 to 11 years old in Ahvaz City, Iran. Then subjects practiced 30 throwing (6 blocks of 5 attempts) in eighth session. Acquisition test immediately after the last training session, and then the retention test were taken. Data were analyzed using the paired t-test, ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The results showed no significant difference between groups in the acquisition phase (P > 0.05). However,in the retention session, group of self-control showed better performance than the control tester group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Based on the current findings, self-control feedback with high frequency leads to more learning in DCD children. The results of this study can be used in rehabilitation programs to improve performance and learning in children with DCD. PMID:26834805

  20. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  1. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  2. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  3. An active feedback system to control synchrotron oscillations in the SLC Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1989-03-01

    Initially the SLC Damping Rings accomplished Robinson instability damping by operating the RF accelerating cavities slightly detuned. In order to be able to run the cavities tuned and achieve damping for Robinson instability and synchrotron oscillations at injection an active feedback system has been developed. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the feedback system and the development of the hardware. Extensive measurements of the loop response including stored beam were performed. Overall performance of the system is also reported. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  4. On stability theory. [of nonlinear feedback control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    It is found that under mild assumptions, feedback system stability can be concluded if one can 'topologically separate' the infinite-dimensional function space containing the system's dynamical input-output relations into two regions, one region containing the dynamical input-output relation of the 'feedforward' element of the system and the other region containing the dynamical output-input relation of the 'feedback' element. Nonlinear system stability criteria of both the input-output type and the state-space (Liapunov) type are interpreted in this context. The abstract generality and conceptual simplicity afforded by the topological separation perspective clarifies some of the basic issues underlying stability theory and serves to suggest improvements in existing stability criteria. A generalization of Zames' (1966) conic-relation stability criterion is proved, laying the foundation for improved multivariable generalizations of the frequency-domain circle stability criterion for nonlinear systems.

  5. A neighboring optimal feedback control scheme for systems using discontinuous control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foerster, R. E.; Flugge-Lotz, I.

    1971-01-01

    The calculation and implementation of the neighboring optimal feedback control law for multiinput, nonlinear dynamical systems, using discontinuous control, is discussed. An initialization procedure is described which removes the requirement that the neighboring initial state be in the neighborhood of the nominal initial state. This procedure is a bootstrap technique for determining the most appropriate control-law gain for the neighboring initial state. The mechanization of the neighboring control law described is closed loop in that the concept of time-to-go is utilized in the determination of the control-law gains appropriate for each neighboring state. The gains are chosen such that the time-to-go until the next predicted switch time or predicted final time is the same for both the neighboring and nominal trajectories. The procedure described is utilized to solve the minimum-time satellite attitude-acquisition problem.

  6. Feedback control of nuclear spin bath for a single hole spin in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongliang; Gong, Zhirui; Yao, Wang

    2014-03-01

    In a semiconductor quantum dot, the nuclear spin bath plays an important role as the ultimate environment of an electron or hole spin at low temperature. Through dynamic nuclear spin polarization driven by an oscillating electric field, we show that feedback controls can be implemented on the nuclear spin bath of a single hole spin. The feedback controls utilize the anisotropic hyperfine interaction between the hole spin and the nuclear spins. The negative feedback can suppress the statistical fluctuations of the nuclear hyperfine field and lead to longer coherence time of the hole spin. Positive feedback can possibly lead to cat like state of nuclear spin bath. The efficiency of the controls schemes is investigated under different parameters and control strategies. The work is supported by the Croucher Foundation under the Croucher Innovation Award, and the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong (HKU706309P, HKU8/CRF/11G).

  7. Comprehensive joint feedback control for standing by functional neuromuscular stimulation-a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2010-12-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, 3-D computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage. PMID:20923741

  8. Comprehensive Joint Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint-feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, three-dimensional computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint-feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage. PMID:20923741

  9. Asymmetric interjoint feedback contributes to postural control of redundant multi-link systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunderson, Nathan E.; Ting, Lena H.; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Maintaining the postural configuration of a limb such as an arm or leg is a fundamental neural control task that involves the coordination of multiple linked body segments. Biological systems are known to use a complex network of inter- and intra-joint feedback mechanisms arising from muscles, spinal reflexes and higher neuronal structures to stabilize the limbs. While previous work has shown that a small amount of asymmetric heterogenic feedback contributes to the behavior of these systems, a satisfactory functional explanation for this non-conservative feedback structure has not been put forth. We hypothesized that an asymmetric multi-joint control strategy would confer both an energetic and stability advantage in maintaining endpoint position of a kinematically redundant system. We tested this hypothesis by using optimal control models incorporating symmetric versus asymmetric feedback with the goal of maintaining the endpoint location of a kinematically redundant, planar limb. Asymmetric feedback improved endpoint control performance of the limb by 16%, reduced energetic cost by 21% and increased interjoint coordination by 40% compared to the symmetric feedback system. The overall effect of the asymmetry was that proximal joint motion resulted in greater torque generation at distal joints than vice versa. The asymmetric organization is consistent with heterogenic stretch reflex gains measured experimentally. We conclude that asymmetric feedback has a functionally relevant role in coordinating redundant degrees of freedom to maintain the position of the hand or foot.

  10. Suboptimal feedback control of turbulent flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seongwon; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present numerical study is to increase mixing in turbulent flow behind a backward-facing step using a systematic feedback control method. Spatially and temporally varying blowing and suction with zero-net mass flow rate are provided at the step edge, based on the sensing of the spanwise distribution of the wall pressure fluctuations at a downstream location. The cost functional to be increased is the root-mean-square spanwise pressure-gradient fluctuations at the sensing location, which may be associated with mixing behind the backward-facing step. Given the cost functional, the actuation at the step edge is determined through the suboptimal feedback control procedure of Choi et al. (1993). Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow are conducted at a Reynolds number of 5100 based on the step height and free-stream velocity. The results of suboptimal feedback controls are compared with those of non-feedback single-frequency actuations. In case of the suboptimal control, velocity and vorticity fluctuations substantially increase downstream of the backward-facing step as well as in the recirculation zone. As a result, the reattachment length is significantly reduced, as compared to those of uncontrolled flow and flow with single-frequency actuations. A simple open-loop control method is devised from the suboptimal feedback control result, producing nearly the same mixing enhancement as the feedback control.

  11. Optimization and static output-feedback control for half-car active suspensions with constrained information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Changzheng; Yu, Shenbo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the static output-feedback control problem of active suspension systems with information structure constraints is investigated. In order to simultaneously improve the ride comfort and stability, a half car model is used. Other constraints such as suspension deflection, actuator saturation, and controller constrained information are also considered. A novel static output-feedback design method based on the variable substitution is employed in the controller design. A single-step linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem is solved to derive the initial feasible solution with a sparsity constraint. The initial infeasibility issue of the static output-feedback is resolved by using state-feedback information. Specifically, an optimization algorithm is proposed to search for less conservative results based on the feasible controller gain matrix. Finally, the validity of the designed controller for different road profiles is illustrated through numerical examples. The simulation results indicate that the optimized static output-feedback controller can achieve better suspension performances when compared with the feasible static output-feedback controller.

  12. Adaptive control technique for accelerators using digital signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, L.; Jachim, S.; Natter, E.

    1987-01-01

    The use of present Digital Signal Processing (DSP) techniques can drastically reduce the residual rf amplitude and phase error in an accelerating rf cavity. Accelerator beam loading contributes greatly to this residual error, and the low-level rf field control loops cannot completely absorb the fast transient of the error. A feedforward technique using DSP is required to maintain the very stringent rf field amplitude and phase specifications. 7 refs.

  13. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

  14. Towards easier realization of time-delayed feedback control of odd-number orbits.

    PubMed

    Flunkert, V; Schöll, E

    2011-07-01

    We develop generalized time-delayed feedback schemes for the stabilization of periodic orbits with an odd number of positive Floquet exponents, which are particularly well suited for experimental realization. We construct the parameter regimes of successful control and validate these by numerical simulations and numerical continuation methods. In particular, it is shown how periodic orbits can be stabilized with symmetric feedback matrices by introducing an additional latency time in the control loop. Finally, we show using normal form analysis and numerical simulations how our results could be implemented in a laser setup using optoelectronic feedback. PMID:21867280

  15. Method for neural network control of motion using real-time environmental feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of motion control for robotics and other automatically controlled machinery using a neural network controller with real-time environmental feedback. The method is illustrated with a two-finger robotic hand having proximity sensors and force sensors that provide environmental feedback signals. The neural network controller is taught to control the robotic hand through training sets using back- propagation methods. The training sets are created by recording the control signals and the feedback signal as the robotic hand or a simulation of the robotic hand is moved through a representative grasping motion. The data recorded is divided into discrete increments of time and the feedback data is shifted out of phase with the control signal data so that the feedback signal data lag one time increment behind the control signal data. The modified data is presented to the neural network controller as a training set. The time lag introduced into the data allows the neural network controller to account for the temporal component of the robotic motion. Thus trained, the neural network controlled robotic hand is able to grasp a wide variety of different objects by generalizing from the training sets.

  16. Design of a Model-based Controller with Temperature Feedback for Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devesse, Wim; De Baere, Dieter; Guillaume, Patrick

    Laser cladding, also known as direct metal deposition, is an additive manufacturing technique for the production of freeform metallic parts. High quality parts can be created with the use of feedback control systems which stabilize the melt pool during the cladding process. Current laser cladding control systems are based on low order, empirical models of the process, which have low dynamic accuracy and limit the performance that can be achieved. In this paper, a control system based on a physical heat conduction model of the melt pool dynamics is presented. The control structure consists of a static linear state feedback control law designed using pole placement and combined with a PI controller. The controller is able to regulate the melt pool size by modulating the laser power using a number of surface temperature measurements as the feedback signal. Simulation results using a detailed finite element model show that the controller has good tracking behavior and disturbance rejection properties.

  17. RKH space approximations for the feedback operator in a linear hereditary control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reneke, J. A.; Fennell, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Computational implementation of feedback control laws for linear hereditary systems requires the approximation of infinite dimensional feedback operators with finite dimensional operators. The dense subspaces of K-polygonal functions in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, RKH spaces, suggest finite dimensional approximations of the matrix representations of the control operators. A convergence theorem is developed for the approximations and the numerical implementation of the approximations is discussed.

  18. Feedback control of a solid-state qubit using high-fidelity projective measurement.

    PubMed

    Ristè, D; Bultink, C C; Lehnert, K W; DiCarlo, L

    2012-12-14

    We demonstrate feedback control of a superconducting transmon qubit using discrete, projective measurement and conditional coherent driving. Feedback realizes a fast and deterministic qubit reset to a target state with 2.4% error averaged over input superposition states, and allows concatenating experiments more than 10 times faster than by passive initialization. This closed-loop qubit control is necessary for measurement-based protocols such as quantum error correction and teleportation. PMID:23368293

  19. A piezo-driven micro-inclination stage for calibration of a micro-acceleration transducer: structure and control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shubao; Song, Siyang; Xu, Minglong; Xie, Shilin; Li, Liang

    2016-02-01

    In some space applications, such as space navigation and vibration control of the large space structures, micro-acceleration transducers are required and have to be calibrated accurately. Unfortunately, providing extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) for the calibration of the micro-acceleration transducer has been a challenging task. This paper proposes a novel piezo-driven micro-inclination stage (PMIS) that can produce both discrete and continuous tumbles in a gravity field so that extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) can be obtained from a tiny component of the gravity constant. The proposed PMIS, which is driven by the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stack, employs a rhombic mechanism to provide the PZT stack with a proper preload for the purpose of outputting a bidirectional force. To produce accurate static and quasi-static stimuli, the hysteresis non-linearity inherent in PZT stack is compensated by employing the strain feedback based adaptive control where the hysteresis property is identified online using the controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Furthermore, to improve the resolution of strain feedback, the strain sensitivity is maximized through structure optimization of the rhombic mechanism. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed PMIS can produce minimal micro-inclination of {{0.1}\\prime \\prime} (corresponding to the induced micro-acceleration of 0.5μ g ) with the frequency ranging from 0 (DC) to 2 Hz.

  20. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-15

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of t{sub d}{approx_equal}10{tau}{sub w} is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  1. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  2. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  3. Load speed regulation in compliant mechanical transmission systems using feedback and feedforward control actions.

    PubMed

    Raul, P R; Dwivedula, R V; Pagilla, P R

    2016-07-01

    The problem of controlling the load speed of a mechanical transmission system consisting of a belt-pulley and gear-pair is considered. The system is modeled as two inertia (motor and load) connected by a compliant transmission. If the transmission is assumed to be rigid, then using either the motor or load speed feedback provides the same result. However, with transmission compliance, due to belts or long shafts, the stability characteristics and performance of the closed-loop system are quite different when either motor or load speed feedback is employed. We investigate motor and load speed feedback schemes by utilizing the singular perturbation method. We propose and discuss a control scheme that utilizes both motor and load speed feedback, and design an adaptive feedforward action to reject load torque disturbances. The control algorithms are implemented on an experimental platform that is typically used in roll-to-roll manufacturing and results are shown and discussed. PMID:27126600

  4. Feedback control of plasma instabilities with charged particle beams and study of plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tham, Philip Kin-Wah

    1994-01-01

    A new non-perturbing technique for feedback control of plasma instabilities has been developed in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM). The feedback control scheme involves the injection of a feedback modulated ion beam as a remote suppressor. The ion beam was obtained from a compact ion beam source which was developed for this purpose. A Langmuir probe was used as the feedback sensor. The feedback controller consisted of a phase-shifter and amplifiers. This technique was demonstrated by stabilizing various plasma instabilities to the background noise level, like the trapped particle instability, the ExB instability and the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven instability. An important feature of this scheme is that the injected ion beam is non-perturbing to the plasma equilibrium parameters. The robustness of this feedback stabilization scheme was also investigated. The principal result is that the scheme is fairly robust, tolerating about 100% variation about the nominal parameter values. Next, this scheme is extended to the unsolved general problem of controlling multimode plasma instabilities simultaneously with a single sensor-suppressor pair. A single sensor-suppressor pair of feedback probes is desirable to reduce the perturbation caused by the probes. Two plasma instabilities the ExB and the ITG modes, were simultaneously stabilized. A simple 'state' feedback type method was used where more state information was generated from the single sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing, in this case, by differentiation. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated for the first time that by designing a more sophisticated electronic feedback controller, many plasma instabilities may be simultaneously controlled. Simple theoretical models showed generally good agreement with the feedback experimental results. On a parallel research front, a better understanding of the saturated state of a plasma instability was sought partly with the help of feedback

  5. A combined stochastic feedforward and feedback control design methodology with application to autoland design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1987-01-01

    A combined stochastic feedforward and feedback control design methodology was developed. The objective of the feedforward control law is to track the commanded trajectory, whereas the feedback control law tries to maintain the plant state near the desired trajectory in the presence of disturbances and uncertainties about the plant. The feedforward control law design is formulated as a stochastic optimization problem and is embedded into the stochastic output feedback problem where the plant contains unstable and uncontrollable modes. An algorithm to compute the optimal feedforward is developed. In this approach, the use of error integral feedback, dynamic compensation, control rate command structures are an integral part of the methodology. An incremental implementation is recommended. Results on the eigenvalues of the implemented versus designed control laws are presented. The stochastic feedforward/feedback control methodology is used to design a digital automatic landing system for the ATOPS Research Vehicle, a Boeing 737-100 aircraft. The system control modes include localizer and glideslope capture and track, and flare to touchdown. Results of a detailed nonlinear simulation of the digital control laws, actuator systems, and aircraft aerodynamics are presented.

  6. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  7. High alpha feedback control for agile half-loop maneuvers of the F-18 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback control law for the F/A-18 airplane that provides time-optimal or agile maneuvering of the half-loop maneuver at high angles of attack is given. The feedback control law was developed using the mathematical approach of singular perturbations, in which the control devices considered were conventional aerodynamic control surfaces and thrusting. The derived nonlinear control law was used to simulate F/A-18 half-loop maneuvers. The simulated results at Mach 0.6 and 0.9 compared well with pilot simulations conducted at NASA.

  8. Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand

    PubMed Central

    Segil, Jacob L.; Clemente, Francesco; Weir, Richard F. ff; Edin, Benoni

    2015-01-01

    Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions. PMID:24992899

  9. Homeostasis of Brain Dynamics in Epilepsy: A Feedback Control Systems Perspective of Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Niranjan; Tsakalis, Kostas; Sabesan, Shivkumar; Iasemidis, Leon

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to understand basic functional mechanisms that can produce epileptic seizures, some key features are introduced in coupled lumped-parameter neural population models that produce “seizure”-like events and dynamics similar to the ones during the route of the epileptic brain towards seizures. In these models, modified from existing ones in the literature, internal feedback mechanisms are incorporated to maintain the normal low level of synchronous behavior in the presence of coupling variations. While the internal feedback is developed using basic feedback systems principles, it is also functionally equivalent to actual neurophysiological mechanisms such as homeostasis that act to maintain normal activity in neural systems that are subject to extrinsic and intrinsic perturbations. Here it is hypothesized that a plausible cause of seizures is a pathology in the internal feedback action; normal internal feedback quickly regulates an abnormally high coupling between the neural populations, whereas pathological internal feedback can lead to “seizure”-like high amplitude oscillations. Several external seizure-control paradigms, that act to achieve the operational objective of maintaining normal levels of synchronous behavior, are also developed and tested in this paper. In particular, closed-loop “modulating” control with predefined stimuli, and closed-loop feedback decoupling control are considered. Among these, feedback decoupling control is the consistently successful and robust seizure-control strategy. The proposed model and remedies are consistent with a variety of recent observations in the human and animal epileptic brain, and with theories from nonlinear systems, adaptive systems, optimization, and neurophysiology. The results from the analysis of these models have two key implications, namely, developing a basic theory for epilepsy and other brain disorders, and the development of a robust seizure-control device through electrical

  10. Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Christian; Segil, Jacob L; Clemente, Francesco; ff Weir, Richard F; Edin, Benoni

    2014-11-01

    Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions. PMID:24992899

  11. Neutron Production from Feedback Controlled Thermal Cycling of a Pyroelectric Crystal Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Meyer, G; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Kerr, P; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Naranjo, B; Putterman, S

    2007-08-09

    The LLNL Crystal Driven Neutron Source is operational and has produced record ion currents of {approx}10 nA and neutron output of 1.9 ({+-}0.3) x 10{sup 5} per thermal cycle using a crystal heating rate of 0.2 C/s from 10 C to 110 C. A 3 cm diameter by 1 cm thick LiTaO{sub 3} crystal with a socket secured field emitter tip is thermally cycled with feedback control for ionization and acceleration of deuterons onto a deuterated target to produce D-D fusion neutrons. The entire crystal and temperature system is mounted on a bellows which allows movement of the crystal along the beam axis and is completely contained on a single small vacuum flange. The modular crystal assembly permitted experimental flexibility. Operationally, flashover breakdowns along the side of the crystal and poor emitter tip characteristics can limit the neutron source. The experimental neutron results extend earlier published work by increasing the ion current and pulse length significantly to achieve a factor-of-two higher neutron output per thermal cycle. These findings are reviewed along with details of the instrument.

  12. Sandia SCADA Program Real-Time Feedback Control of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BENTLEY, ANTHONY E.; STAMP, JASON E.; CARLSON, ROLF E.

    2001-11-01

    This report documents work supporting the Sandia National Laboratories initiative in Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. One approach for real-time control of power generation assets using feedback control, Quantitative feedback theory (QFT), has recently been applied to voltage, frequency, and phase-control of power systems at Sandia. QFT provided a simple yet powerful philosophy for designing the control systems--allowing the designer to optimize the system by making design tradeoffs without getting lost in complex mathematics. The feedback systems were effective in reducing sensitivity to large and sudden changes in the power grid system. Voltage, frequency, and phase were accurately controlled, even with large disturbances to the power grid system.

  13. Decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback vibration control for piezoelectric smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-ping; Li, Dong-xu

    2010-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback vibration control for piezoelectric smart structures. A smart panel with collocated piezoelectric actuators and velocity sensors is modeled using a finite element method, and then the size of the model is reduced in the state space using the modal Hankel singular value. The necessary and sufficient conditions of decentralized guaranteed cost static output feedback control for the reduced system have been presented. The decentralized and centralized static output feedback matrices can be obtained from solving two linear matrix inequalities. A comparison between centralized control and decentralized control is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness in suppressing vibration of a smart panel. Numerical results show that when the system is subjected to initial displacement or white noise disturbance, the decentralized and centralized controls are both very effective and the control results are very close.

  14. Oncogene-tumor suppressor gene feedback interactions and their control.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Baltazar D; del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Chan, Michael W Y

    2015-12-01

    We propose the hypothesis that for a particular type of cancer there exists a key pair of oncogene (OCG) and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is normally involved in strong stabilizing negative feedback loops (nFBLs) of molecular interactions, and it is these interactions that are sufficiently perturbed during cancer development. These nFBLs are thought to regulate oncogenic positive feedback loops (pFBLs) that are often required for the normal cellular functions of oncogenes. Examples given in this paper are the pairs of MYC and p53, KRAS and INK4A, and E2F1 and miR-17-92. We propose dynamical models of the aforementioned OCG-TSG interactions and derive stability conditions of the steady states in terms of strengths of cycles in the qualitative interaction network. Although these conditions are restricted to predictions of local stability, their simple linear expressions in terms of competing nFBLs and pFBLs make them intuitive and practical guides for experimentalists aiming to discover drug targets and stabilize cancer networks. PMID:26775863

  15. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. PMID:15796343

  16. Feedback power control strategies in wireless sensor networks with joint channel decoding.

    PubMed

    Abrardo, Andrea; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Martalò, Marco; Perna, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we derive feedback power control strategies for block-faded multiple access schemes with correlated sources and joint channel decoding (JCD). In particular, upon the derivation of the feasible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region for the considered multiple access schemes, i.e., the multidimensional SNR region where error-free communications are, in principle, possible, two feedback power control strategies are proposed: (i) a classical feedback power control strategy, which aims at equalizing all link SNRs at the access point (AP), and (ii) an innovative optimized feedback power control strategy, which tries to make the network operational point fall in the feasible SNR region at the lowest overall transmit energy consumption. These strategies will be referred to as "balanced SNR" and "unbalanced SNR," respectively. While they require, in principle, an unlimited power control range at the sources, we also propose practical versions with a limited power control range. We preliminary consider a scenario with orthogonal links and ideal feedback. Then, we analyze the robustness of the proposed power control strategies to possible non-idealities, in terms of residual multiple access interference and noisy feedback channels. Finally, we successfully apply the proposed feedback power control strategies to a limiting case of the class of considered multiple access schemes, namely a central estimating officer (CEO) scenario, where the sensors observe noisy versions of a common binary information sequence and the AP's goal is to estimate this sequence by properly fusing the soft-output information output by the JCD algorithm. PMID:22291536

  17. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  18. Humans can integrate force feedback to toes in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand.

    PubMed

    Panarese, Alessandro; Edin, Benoni B; Vecchi, Fabrizio; Carrozza, Maria C; Johansson, Roland S

    2009-12-01

    Tactile sensory feedback is essential for dexterous object manipulation. Users of hand myoelectric prostheses without tactile feedback must depend essentially on vision to control their device. Indeed, improved tactile feedback is one of their main priorities. Previous research has provided evidence that conveying tactile feedback can improve prostheses control, although additional effort is required to solve problems related to pattern recognition learning, unpleasant sensations, sensory adaptation, and low spatiotemporal resolution. Still, these studies have mainly focused on providing stimulation to hairy skin regions close to the amputation site, i.e., usually to the upper arm. Here, we explored the possibility to provide tactile feedback to the glabrous skin of toes, which have mechanical and neurophysiological properties similar to the fingertips. We explored this paradigm in a grasp-and-lift task, in which healthy participants controlled two opposing digits of a robotic hand by changing the spacing of their index finger and thumb. The normal forces applied by the robotic fingertips to a test object were fed back to the right big and second toe. We show that within a few lifting trials, all the participants incorporated the force feedback received by the foot in their sensorimotor control of the robotic hand. PMID:19457753

  19. New MHD feedback control schemes using the MARTe framework in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Chiara; Manduchi, Gabriele; Marrelli, Lionello; Piovesan, Paolo; Zanca, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Real-time feedback control of MHD instabilities is a topic of major interest in magnetic thermonuclear fusion, since it allows to optimize a device performance even beyond its stability bounds. The stability properties of different magnetic configurations are important test benches for real-time control systems. RFX-mod, a Reversed Field Pinch experiment that can also operate as a tokamak, is a well suited device to investigate this topic. It is equipped with a sophisticated magnetic feedback system that controls MHD instabilities and error fields by means of 192 active coils and a corresponding grid of sensors. In addition, the RFX-mod control system has recently gained new potentialities thanks to the introduction of the MARTe framework and of a new CPU architecture. These capabilities allow to study new feedback algorithms relevant to both RFP and tokamak operation and to contribute to the debate on the optimal feedback strategy. This work focuses on the design of new feedback schemes. For this purpose new magnetic sensors have been explored, together with new algorithms that refine the de-aliasing computation of the radial sideband harmonics. The comparison of different sensor and feedback strategy performance is described in both RFP and tokamak experiments.

  20. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L K; Kulasiri, D

    2011-03-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigate how negative feedback loops manage noise within a biochemical cascade concurrently governed by multiple negative feedback loops, using the prokaryotic tryptophan (trp) operon system in Escherechia coli as the model system. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study of noise in the trp operon system. They show that the loops in the trp operon system possess distinct, even opposing, noise-controlling effects despite their seemingly analogous feedback structures. The enzyme inhibition loop, although controlling the last reaction of the cascade, was found to suppress noise not only for the tryptophan output but also for other upstream components. In contrast, the Repression (Rep) loop enhances noise for all systems components. Attenuation (Att) poses intermediate effects by attenuating noise for the upstream components but promoting noise for components downstream of its target. Regarding noise at the output tryptophan, Rep and Att can be categorised as noise-enhancing loops whereas Enzyme Inhibition as a noise-reducing loop. These findings suggest novel implications in how cellular systems with multiple feedback mechanisms control noise. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21405203

  1. Optimal output feedback control of linear systems in presence of forcing and measurement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of obtaining an optimal control law, which is constrained to be a linear feedback of the available measurements, for both continuous and discrete time linear systems subjected to additive white process noise and measurement noise was Necessary conditions are obtained for minimizing a quadratic performance function for both finite and infinite terminal time cases. The feedback gains are constrained to be time invariant for the infinite terminal time cases. For all the cases considered, algorithms are derived for generating sequences of feedback gain matrices which successively improve the performance function. A continuous time numerical example is included for the purpose of demonstration.

  2. Global Output-Feedback Control for Simultaneous Tracking and Stabilization of Wheeled Mobile Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Zhang, L. J.; Xue, D.

    A time-varying global output-feedback controller is presented that solves both tracking and stabilization for wheeled mobile robots simultaneously at the torque level. The controller synthesis is based on a coordinate transformation, Lyapunov direct method and backstepping technique. The performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated by simulation.

  3. Delayed Visual Feedback of One’s Own Action Promotes Sense of Control for Auditory Events

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Sense of control refers to one’s feelings to control environmental events through one’s own action. A prevailing view is that the sense of control is strong (or is not diminished) when predicted sensory signals, which are generated in motor control mechanisms, are consistent with afferent sensory signals. Such intact sense of control often leads to the misjudgment of temporal relation between timings of one’s action and its effect (so-called, intentional binding). The present study showed that the intentional binding could be enhanced by the delayed visual feedback of an agent’s action. We asked participants to press a button to produce a tone as action outcome. In some conditions, they were given the delayed visual feedback of their button press. Participants judged whether the onset of the auditory outcome was delayed from the timing of their button press. Consequently, delay detection thresholds were significantly higher when the feedback was given 0.2 and 0.4 s delays than when no feedback was displayed to the participants. The results indicate that action agents misjudge the timing of their action (button press) in the presence of the delayed visual feedback of their action. Interestingly, delay detection thresholds were strongly correlated with the subjective magnitude of the sense of control. Thus, the sense of control is possibly determined by cross-modal processing for action-related and outcome-related sensory signals. PMID:26635552

  4. Optimal control of nonlinear continuous-time systems in strict-feedback form.

    PubMed

    Zargarzadeh, Hassan; Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimal tracking control scheme for nonlinear continuous-time systems in strict-feedback form with uncertain dynamics. The optimal tracking problem is transformed into an equivalent optimal regulation problem through a feedforward adaptive control input that is generated by modifying the standard backstepping technique. Subsequently, a neural network-based optimal control scheme is introduced to estimate the cost, or value function, over an infinite horizon for the resulting nonlinear continuous-time systems in affine form when the internal dynamics are unknown. The estimated cost function is then used to obtain the optimal feedback control input; therefore, the overall optimal control input for the nonlinear continuous-time system in strict-feedback form includes the feedforward plus the optimal feedback terms. It is shown that the estimated cost function minimizes the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman estimation error in a forward-in-time manner without using any value or policy iterations. Finally, optimal output feedback control is introduced through the design of a suitable observer. Lyapunov theory is utilized to show the overall stability of the proposed schemes without requiring an initial admissible controller. Simulation examples are provided to validate the theoretical results. PMID:26111400

  5. Rotor-state feedback in the design of flight control laws for a hovering helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1994-01-01

    The use of rigid-body and rotor-state feedback gains in the design of helicopter flight control laws was investigated analytically on a blade element, articulated rotor, helicopter model. The study was conducted while designing a control law to meet an existing military rotorcraft handling qualities design specification (ADS-33C) in low-speed flight. A systematic approach to meet this specification was developed along with an assessment of the function of these gains in the feedback loops. Using the results of this assessment, the pitch and roll crossover behavior was easily modified by adjusting the body attitude and rotor-flap feedback gains. Critical to understanding the feedback gains is that the roll and pitch rate dynamics each have second-order behavior, not the classic first-order behavior, which arises from a quasi-static rotor, six degree-of-freedom model.

  6. PFC design via FRIT Approach for Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Discrete-time Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Takagi, Taro; Fukui, Sota; Shah, Sirish L.

    This paper deals with a design problem of an adaptive output feedback control for discrete-time systems with a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) which is designed for making the augmented controlled system ASPR. A PFC design scheme by a FRIT approach with only using an input/output experimental data set will be proposed for discrete-time systems in order to design an adaptive output feedback control system. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the proposed PFC design method will be confirmed through numerical simulations by designing adaptive control system with adaptive NN (Neural Network) for an uncertain discrete-time system.

  7. Advanced feedback control of indoor air quality using real-time computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, E.; Campbell, T.; Bradley, R.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the partial implementation of a novel method of controlling indoor air quality (IAQ) for critical applications. The proposed method uses a numerical modeling technique known as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling the effect of variable ventilation rates for intelligent and rapid control of air contamination in space. This paper describes how a CFD model is made to run in real time linked to a feedback control loop. The technique was simulated in a graphical programming language. The simulation results indicate that a quasi-transient potential flow CFD model is a viable technique for feedback control of IAQ, and it is currently being implemented in an experimental validation.

  8. The use of differential pressure feedback in an automatic flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Roskam, J.; Finn, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study has been performed to evaluate the performance of a system whereby a control surface is positioned with differential pressure as the feedback variable. Analogous to a position command system, the control surface is commanded to move until a certain differential pressure is achieved at a given point on the surface. Frequency response tests and theoretical considerations indicate that the pressure feedback transfer function is first order, with a break frequency up to 50 rad/sec. There exist applications to the outer loops of flight control systems as well. Stability augmentation, gust alleviation, and stall prevention appear to be possible by feeding back differential pressure across lifting and control surfaces.

  9. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  10. Adaptive stochastic output feedback control of resistive wall modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z.; Sen, A. K.; Longman, R. W.

    2006-09-15

    An adaptive optimal stochastic output feedback control is developed to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks. The system dynamics is experimentally determined via the extended least square method with an exponential forgetting factor and covariance resetting. The optimal output feedback controller is redesigned online periodically based on the system identification. The output measurements and past control inputs are used to construct new control inputs. The adaptive output controller can stabilize the time dependent RWM in a slowly evolving tokamak discharge. This is accomplished within a time delay of roughly three times the inverse of the growth rate. The design procedure is simpler and the computation time is shorter than the state feedback method reported earlier in Sun, Sen, and Longman [Phys. Plasmas13, 012512 (2006)].

  11. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  12. The Construction of Plasma Density Feedback Control System on J-TEXT Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xin; Chen, Zhipeng; Ba, Weigang; Shu, Shuangbao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-02-01

    The plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) has been established on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) for meeting the need for an accurate plasma density in physical experiments. It consists of a density measurement subsystem, a feedback control subsystem and a gas puffing subsystem. According to the characteristic of the gas puffing system, a voltage amplitude control mode has been applied in the feedback control strategy, which is accomplished by the proportion, integral and differential (PID) controller. In this system, the quantity calibration of gas injection, adjusted responding to the change of the density signal, has been carried out. Some experimental results are shown and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program (Nos. 2014GB103001 and 2013GB106001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11305070 and 11105028)

  13. Adaptive optimal stochastic state feedback control of resistive wall modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z.; Sen, A.K.; Longman, R.W.

    2006-01-15

    An adaptive optimal stochastic state feedback control is developed to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks. The extended least-square method with exponential forgetting factor and covariance resetting is used to identify (experimentally determine) the time-varying stochastic system model. A Kalman filter is used to estimate the system states. The estimated system states are passed on to an optimal state feedback controller to construct control inputs. The Kalman filter and the optimal state feedback controller are periodically redesigned online based on the identified system model. This adaptive controller can stabilize the time-dependent RWM in a slowly evolving tokamak discharge. This is accomplished within a time delay of roughly four times the inverse of the growth rate for the time-invariant model used.

  14. Delayed feedback control of the Lorenz system: An analytical treatment at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, V.; Pyragas, K.

    2006-03-01

    We develop an analytical approach for the delayed feedback control of the Lorenz system close to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. The periodic orbits arising at this bifurcation have no torsion and cannot be stabilized by a conventional delayed feedback control technique. We utilize a modification based on an unstable delayed feedback controller. The analytical approach employs the center manifold theory and the near identity transformation. We derive the characteristic equation for the Floquet exponents of the controlled orbit in an analytical form and obtain simple expressions for the threshold of stability as well as for an optimal value of the control gain. The analytical results are supported by numerical analysis of the original system of nonlinear differential-difference equations.

  15. Delayed feedback control of the Lorenz system: an analytical treatment at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, V; Pyragas, K

    2006-03-01

    We develop an analytical approach for the delayed feedback control of the Lorenz system close to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. The periodic orbits arising at this bifurcation have no torsion and cannot be stabilized by a conventional delayed feedback control technique. We utilize a modification based on an unstable delayed feedback controller. The analytical approach employs the center manifold theory and the near identity transformation. We derive the characteristic equation for the Floquet exponents of the controlled orbit in an analytical form and obtain simple expressions for the threshold of stability as well as for an optimal value of the control gain. The analytical results are supported by numerical analysis of the original system of nonlinear differential-difference equations. PMID:16605639

  16. The LQR/LTR procedure for multivariable feedback control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Gunter; Athans, Michael

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides a tutorial overview of the linear quadratic Gaussian with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) design procedure for linear multivariable feedback systems. LQR/LTR is interpreted as the solution of a specific weighted H-squared tradeoff between transfer functions in the frequency domain. Properties of this solution are examined for both minimum-phase and nonminimum-phase systems. This leads to a formal weight augmentation procedure for the minimum-phase case which permits essentially arbitrary specification of system sensitivity functions in terms of the weights. While such arbitrary specifications are not possible for nonminimum-phase problems, a direct relationship between weights and sensitivities is developed for nonminimum-phase SISO and certain nonminimum-phase MIMO cases which guides the weight selection process.

  17. Global exponential stability of recurrent neural networks for synthesizing linear feedback control systems via pole assignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunong; Wang, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Global exponential stability is the most desirable stability property of recurrent neural networks. The paper presents new results for recurrent neural networks applied to online computation of feedback gains of linear time-invariant multivariable systems via pole assignment. The theoretical analysis focuses on the global exponential stability, convergence rates, and selection of design parameters. The theoretical results are further substantiated by simulation results conducted for synthesizing linear feedback control systems with different specifications and design requirements. PMID:18244461

  18. Implementation of the beamline controls at the Florence accelerator laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraresi, L.; Mirto, F. A.

    2008-05-01

    The new Tandetron accelerator in Florence, with many different beamlines, has required a new organization of all the control signals of the used equipment (slow control). We present our solution, which allows us the control of all the employed instruments simultaneously from a number of different workplaces. All of our equipment has been designed to be Ethernet based and this is the key to accomplish two very important requirements: simultaneous remote control from many computers and electrical isolation to achieve a lower noise level. The control of the instruments requires only one Ethernet network and no particular interfaces or drivers on the computers.

  19. Feedback-Driven Mode Rotation Control by Electro-Magnetic Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; La Haye, R. J.; in, Y.; Hanson, J. M.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The recent experimental discovery of feedback-driven mode rotation control, supported by modeling, opens new approaches for avoidance of locked tearing modes that otherwise lead to disruptions. This approach is an application of electro-magnetic (EM) torque using 3D fields, routinely maximized through a simple feedback system. In DIII-D, it is observed that a feedback-applied radial field can be synchronized in phase with the poloidal field component of a large amplitude tearing mode, producing the maximum EM torque input. The mode frequency can be maintained in the 10 Hz to 100 Hz range in a well controlled manner, sustaining the discharges. Presently, in the ITER internal coils designed for edge localized mode (ELM) control can only be varied at few Hz, yet, well below the inverse wall time constant. Hence, ELM control system could in principle be used for this feedback-driven mode control in various ways. For instance, the locking of MHD modes can be avoided during the controlled shut down of multi hundreds Mega Joule EM stored energy in case of emergency. Feedback could also be useful to minimize mechanical resonances at the disruption events by forcing the MHD frequency away from dangerous ranges. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC-02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-08ER85195, and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  20. Social Context Rapidly Modulates the Influence of Auditory Feedback on Avian Vocal Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    Brainard, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory feedback is important for the learning and control of a variety of behaviors. Vocal motor production in songbirds is a powerful model system to study sensory influences on behavior because the learning, maintenance, and control of song are critically dependent on auditory feedback. Based on previous behavioral and neural experiments, it has been hypothesized that songs produced in isolation [undirected (UD) song] represent a form of vocal practice, whereas songs produced to females during courtship interactions [female-directed (FD) song] represent a form of vocal performance. According to this “practice versus performance” framework, auditory feedback should be more influential when birds engage in vocal practice than when they engage in vocal performance. To directly test this hypothesis, we used a computerized system to perturb auditory feedback at precise locations during the songs of Bengalese finches and compared the degree to which feedback perturbations caused song interruptions as well as changes to the sequencing and timing of syllables between interleaved renditions of UD and FD song. We found that feedback perturbation caused fewer song interruptions and smaller changes to syllable timing during FD song than during UD song. These data show that changes in the social context in which song is produced rapidly modulate the influence of auditory feedback on song control in a manner consistent with the practice versus performance framework. More generally, they indicate that, for song, as for other motor skills including human speech, the influence of sensory feedback on activity within vocal premotor circuitry can be dynamically modulated. PMID:19692513

  1. Three degree-of-freedom force feedback control for robotic mating of umbilical lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullmer, R. Rees

    1988-01-01

    The use of robotic manipulators for the mating and demating of umbilical fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch is investigated. Force feedback control is necessary to minimize the contact forces which develop during mating. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a working robotic force control system. Initial experimental force control tests with an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot using the system's Adaptive Control capabilities indicated that control stability would by a primary problem. An investigation of the ASEA system showed a 0.280 second software delay between force input commands and the output of command voltages to the servo system. This computational delay was identified as the primary cause of the instability. Tests on a second path into the ASEA's control computer using the MicroVax II supervisory computer show that time delay would be comparable, offering no stability improvement. An alternative approach was developed where the digital control system of the robot was disconnected and an analog electronic force controller was used to control the robot's servosystem directly, allowing the robot to use force feedback control while in rigid contact with a moving three-degree-of-freedom target. An alternative approach was developed where the digital control system of the robot was disconnected and an analog electronic force controller was used to control the robot's servo system directly. This method allowed the robot to use force feedback control while in rigid contact with moving three degree-of-freedom target. Tests on this approach indicated adequate force feedback control even under worst case conditions. A strategy to digitally-controlled vision system was developed. This requires switching between the digital controller when using vision control and the analog controller when using force control, depending on whether or not the mating plates are in contact.

  2. Model-based Feedback Control of an Ultrasonic Transducer for Ultrasonic Assisted Turning Using a Novel Digital Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ille, Igor; Twiefel, Jens

    Ultrasonic turning has time variant parameters due to temperature effects and changing load conditions during the process. This results in a change of the resonance frequency and vibration amplitude. To realize constant vibration amplitudes it is necessary to control the ultrasonic transducer by a suitable feedback controller. One approach to drive such a system is to use the resonance frequency as operating point in connection with an amplitude feedback controller. The advantages of resonant driven low damped systems are low voltages and high values of effective power. This paper presents a digital system used for parameter identification and model-based feedback control of the ultrasonic turning tool. During the turning process the system load depends on several factors like chip formation, material inhomogeneity, warming and tool wear. To achieve a stable process and a uniform surface of the work piece the feedback controller has to guarantee constant vibration amplitudes of the ultrasonic tool. The controller used in this paper consists of a digital resonance controller and a current amplitude controller with a frequency of 500 Hz. The current amplitude and phase between the excitation voltage and current are determined by phase sensitive demodulation (PSD). To determine the feedback parameters a model-based approach is used.

  3. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26099151

  4. Feedback-linearization-based neural adaptive control for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Li, Han-Xiong; Wu, Yi-Hu

    2008-09-01

    A new feedback-linearization-based neural network (NN) adaptive control is proposed for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems. An equivalent model in affine-like form is first derived for the original nonaffine discrete-time systems as feedback linearization methods cannot be implemented for such systems. Then, feedback linearization adaptive control is implemented based on the affine-like equivalent model identified with neural networks. Pretraining is not required and the weights of the neural networks used in adaptive control are directly updated online based on the input-output measurement. The dead-zone technique is used to remove the requirement of persistence excitation during the adaptation. With the proposed neural network adaptive control, stability and performance of the closed-loop system are rigorously established. Illustrated examples are provided to validate the theoretical findings. PMID:18779092

  5. Delayed feedback control via minimum entropy strategy in an economic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2008-02-01

    In this paper minimum entropy (ME) algorithm for controlling chaos, is applied to the Behrens-Feichtinger model, as a discrete-time dynamic system which models a drug market. The ME control is implemented through delayed feedback. It is assumed that the dynamic equations of the system are not known, so the proper feedback gain cannot be obtained analytically from the system equations. In the ME approach the feedback gain is obtained and adapted in such a way that the entropy of the system converges to zero, hence a fixed point of the system will be stabilized. Application of the proposed method with different economic control strategies is numerically investigated. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the ME method to control chaos in economic systems with unknown dynamic equations.

  6. Enhancement of mobility in an interacting colloidal system under feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernert, Robert; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2015-08-01

    Feedback control schemes are a promising way to manipulate transport properties of driven colloidal suspensions. In the present article, we suggest a feedback scheme to enhance the collective transport of colloidal particles with repulsive interactions through a one-dimensional tilted washboard potential. The control is modeled by a harmonic confining potential, mimicking an optical "trap," with the center of this trap moving with the (instantaneous) mean particle position. Our theoretical analysis is based on the Smoluchowski equation combined with dynamical density functional theory for systems with hard-core or ultrasoft (Gaussian) interactions. For either type of interaction, we find that the feedback control can lead to an enhancement of the mobility by several orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The largest effects occur for intermediate stiffness of the trap and large particle numbers. Moreover, in some regions of the parameter space the feedback control induces oscillations of the mean velocity. Finally, we show that the enhancement of mobility is robust against a small time delay in implementing the feedback control.

  7. A Kalman filter for feedback control of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; De Bono, Bryan; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Mauel, Michael E.; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Shiraki, Daisuke; James, Royce W.

    2009-05-15

    The simulation and experimental optimization of a Kalman filter feedback control algorithm for n=1 tokamak external kink modes are reported. In order to achieve the highest plasma pressure limits in ITER, resistive wall mode stabilization is required [T. C. Hender et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S128 (2007)] and feedback algorithms will need to distinguish the mode from noise due to other magnetohydrodynamic activity. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. This model is actively compared with real-time measurements to produce an optimal estimate for the mode's amplitude and phase. On the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse experiment [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)], the Kalman filter algorithm is implemented using a set of digital, field-programmable gate array controllers with 10 {mu}s latencies. Signals from an array of 20 poloidal sensor coils are used to measure the n=1 mode, and the feedback control is applied using 40 poloidally and toroidally localized control coils. The feedback system with the Kalman filter is able to suppress the external kink mode over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field. Scans of filter parameters show good agreement between simulation and experiment, and feedback suppression and excitation of the kink mode are enhanced in experiments when a filter made using optimal parameters from the scans is used.

  8. Performance optimization of force feedback control system in virtual vascular intervention surgery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  9. Output-feedback control of combined sewer networks through receding horizon control with moving horizon estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph-Duran, Bernat; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Cembrano, Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    An output-feedback control strategy for pollution mitigation in combined sewer networks is presented. The proposed strategy provides means to apply model-based predictive control to large-scale sewer networks, in-spite of the lack of measurements at most of the network sewers. In previous works, the authors presented a hybrid linear control-oriented model for sewer networks together with the formulation of Optimal Control Problems (OCP) and State Estimation Problems (SEP). By iteratively solving these problems, preliminary Receding Horizon Control with Moving Horizon Estimation (RHC/MHE) results, based on flow measurements, were also obtained. In this work, the RHC/MHE algorithm has been extended to take into account both flow and water level measurements and the resulting control loop has been extensively simulated to assess the system performance according different measurement availability scenarios and rain events. All simulations have been carried out using a detailed physically based model of a real case-study network as virtual reality.

  10. Performance Optimization of Force Feedback Control System in Virtual Vascular Intervention Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  11. SOS based robust H(∞) fuzzy dynamic output feedback control of nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seunghwan; Nguang, Sing Kiong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a methodology for designing a fuzzy dynamic output feedback controller for discrete-time nonlinear networked control systems is presented where the nonlinear plant is modelled by a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model and the network-induced delays by a finite state Markov process. The transition probability matrix for the Markov process is allowed to be partially known, providing a more practical consideration of the real world. Furthermore, the fuzzy controller's membership functions and premise variables are not assumed to be the same as the plant's membership functions and premise variables, that is, the proposed approach can handle the case, when the premise of the plant are not measurable or delayed. The membership functions of the plant and the controller are approximated as polynomial functions, then incorporated into the controller design. Sufficient conditions for the existence of the controller are derived in terms of sum of square inequalities, which are then solved by YALMIP. Finally, a numerical example is used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed methodology. PMID:24108002

  12. Nonlinear Time Delayed Feedback Control of Aeroelastic Systems: A Functional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to its intrinsic practical importance, nonlinear time delayed feedback control applied to lifting surfaces can result in interesting aeroelastic behaviors. In this paper, nonlinear aeroelastic response to external time-dependent loads and stability boundary for actively controlled lifting surfaces, in an incompressible flow field, are considered. The structural model and the unsteady aerodynamics are considered linear. The implications of the presence of time delays in the linear/nonlinear feedback control and of geometrical parameters on the aeroelasticity of lifting surfaces are analyzed and conclusions on their implications are highlighted.

  13. Effect of Feedback during Virtual Training of Grip Force Control with a Myoelectric Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether virtual training improves grip force control in prosthesis use, and to examine which type of augmented feedback facilitates its learning most. Thirty-two able-bodied participants trained grip force with a virtual ball-throwing game for five sessions in a two-week period, using a myoelectric simulator. They received either feedback on movement outcome or on movement execution. Sixteen controls received training that did not focus on force control. Variability over learning was examined with the Tolerance-Noise-Covariation approach, and the transfer of grip force control was assessed in five test-tasks that assessed different aspects of force control in a pretest, a posttest and a retention test. During training performance increased while the variability in performance was decreased, mainly by reduction in noise. Grip force control only improved in the test-tasks that provided information on performance. Starting the training with a task that required low force production showed no transfer of the learned grip force. Feedback on movement execution was detrimental to grip force control, whereas feedback on movement outcome enhanced transfer of grip force control to tasks other than trained. Clinical implications of these results regarding virtual training of grip force control are discussed. PMID:24865570

  14. State-of-the-Art developments in accelerator controls at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.

    1999-04-13

    The performance requirements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) challenge the control system in a number of areas. This paper will review a few applications of advanced technology in the control and monitoring of the APS. The application of digital signal processors (DSPs) and techniques will be discussed, both from the perspective of a large distributed multiprocessor system and from that of embedded systems. In particular, two embedded applications will be highlighted, a beam position monitor processor and a DSP-based power supply controller. Fast data distribution is often a requirement. The application of a high-speed network based on reflective memory will also be discussed in the context of the APS global orbit feedback system. Timing systems provide opportunities to apply technologies such as high-speed logic and fiber optics. Examples of the use of these technologies will also be included. Finally, every modern accelerator control system of any size requires networking. Features of the APS accelerator controls network will be discussed.

  15. Circadian neuron feedback controls the Drosophila sleep--activity profile.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Junwei; Jung, Hyung Jae; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Luo, Weifei; Griffith, Leslie C; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-08-18

    Little is known about the ability of Drosophila circadian neurons to promote sleep. Here we show, using optogenetic manipulation and video recording, that a subset of dorsal clock neurons (DN1s) are potent sleep-promoting cells that release glutamate to directly inhibit key pacemaker neurons. The pacemakers promote morning arousal by activating these DN1s, implying that a late-day feedback circuit drives midday siesta and night-time sleep. To investigate more plastic aspects of the sleep program, we used a calcium assay to monitor and compare the real-time activity of DN1 neurons in freely behaving males and females. Our results revealed that DN1 neurons were more active in males than in females, consistent with the finding that male flies sleep more during the day. DN1 activity is also enhanced by elevated temperature, consistent with the ability of higher temperatures to increase sleep. These new approaches indicate that DN1s have a major effect on the fly sleep-wake profile and integrate environmental information with the circadian molecular program. PMID:27479324

  16. Design of an optimal output feedback control system with modal insensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. V.; Calise, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of an output feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. The approach taken here is to characterize the class of attainable eigenvectors for a given set of eigenvalues (distinct or non-distinct) which lie in a subspace called the 'Modal Insensitivity Subspace'. A constraint is established on the feedback matrix which results in modal insensitivity. Necessary conditions for optimality subject to the constraint on the feedback matrix are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain which analyzed for convergence. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  17. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.; King, R.D.; Sanza, P.C.; Haefner, K.B.

    1992-11-24

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation. 1 figure.

  18. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    SciTech Connect

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.; King, Robert D.; Sanza, Peter C.; Haefner, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation.

  19. Implementation of local feedback controllers for vibration supression of a truss using active struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Robert; Lim, Tae W.; Bosse, Albert; Fisher, Shalom

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of local feedback controllers for active vibration suppression of a laboratory truss referred to as the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space truss. The NRL space truss is a 3.7 meter, 12-bay aluminum laboratory truss used as a testbed to explore smart structures technologies for future Navy spacecraft missions. To conduct real-time control and data acquisition for the implementation of controllers, a digital signal processor based system is used. Two piezoceramic active struts are employed in this experimental study. Each strut is instrumented with a force transducer and a displacement sensor. Modal strain energy computed using a refined finite element model was used to select the optimum locations of the two actuators to ensure controllability of the first two structural modes. Two local feedback controllers were designed and implemented, an integral force feedback and an integral plus double-integral force feedback. The controllers were designed independently for each active strut using classical control design techniques applied to an identified model of the system dynamics. System identification results and controller design procedure are described along with closed loop test results. The test results show up to a factor of 1/110 attenuation of the truss tip motion due to sinusoidal resonant input disturbances and up to 100 times increase in damping of the lower frequency modes of the truss.

  20. Structural tailoring and feedback control synthesis - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    Structural tailoring provides an attractive method to optimize the performance of actively controlled space structures. However, the simultaneous optimization of control gains and structural properties often becomes prohibitively expensive for large systems and physical insight is often lost in the resulting control law. This paper presents a method for optimization of the closed loop structural system using only structural tailoring. Optimal Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control theory is used with weighting matrices chosen based on physical considerations. The LQR control law depends only on two scalar gains and the structural properties. Hence, the closed loop-performance can be expressed in terms of the structural parameters. Results are given for a beam and a truss-beam to show the simplicity of the method and the importance of structural tailoring to increase dynamic performance and to reduce the control effort.

  1. Optimal decentralized feedback control for a truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, A.; Ozguner, U.

    1989-01-01

    One approach to the decentralized control of large flexible space structures involves the design of controllers for the substructures of large systems and their subsequent application to the entire coupled system. This approach is presently developed for the case of active vibration damping on an experimental large struss structure. The isolated boundary loading method is used to define component models by FEM; component controllers are designed using an interlocking control concept which minimizes the motion of the boundary nodes, thereby reducing the exchange of mechanical disturbances among components.

  2. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  3. An Application of Fictitious Reference Iterative Tuning to State Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yoshihiro; Akamatsu, Shunichi; Kimura, Tomohiko; Nakano, Kazushi; Sakurama, Kazunori

    In this paper, an application method of Fictitious Reference Iterative Tuning (FRIT), which has been developed for controller gain tuning for single-input single-output systems, to state feedback gain tuning for single-input multivariable systems is proposed. Transient response data of a single-input multivariable plant obtained under closed-loop operation is used for model matching by the FRIT in time domain. The data is also used in frequency domain to estimate the stability and to improve the control performance of the closed-loop system with the state feedback gain tuned by the method. The method is applied to a state feedback control system for an inverted pendulum with an inertia rotor and its usefulness is illustrated through experiments.

  4. The Total Synthesis Problem of linear multivariable control. II - Unity feedback and the design morphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Antsaklis, P. J.; Gejji, R. R.; Wyman, B. F.; Peczkowski, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Zames (1981) has observed that there is, in general, no 'separation principle' to guarantee optimality of a division between control law design and filtering of plant uncertainty. Peczkowski and Sain (1978) have solved a model matching problem using transfer functions. Taking into consideration this investigation, Peczkowski et al. (1979) proposed the Total Synthesis Problem (TSP), wherein both the command/output-response and command/control-response are to be synthesized, subject to the plant constraint. The TSP concept can be subdivided into a Nominal Design Problem (NDP), which is not dependent upon specific controller structures, and a Feedback Synthesis Problem (FSP), which is. Gejji (1980) found that NDP was characterized in terms of the plant structural matrices and a single, 'good' transfer function matrix. Sain et al. (1981) have extended this NDP work. The present investigation is concerned with a study of FSP for the unity feedback case. NDP, together with feedback synthesis, is understood as a Total Synthesis Problem.

  5. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of aerodynamic pressure differentials to position a control surface is evaluated. The system is a differential pressure command loop, analogous to a position command loop, where the surface is commanded to move until a desired differential pressure across the surface is achieved. This type of control is more direct and accurate because it is the differential pressure which causes the control forces and moments. A frequency response test was performed in a low speed wind tunnel to measure the performance of the system. Both pressure and position feedback were tested. The pressure feedback performed as well as position feedback implying that the actuator, with a break frequency on the order of 10 Rad/sec, was the limiting component. Theoretical considerations indicate that aerodynamic lags will not appear below frequencies of 50 Rad/sec, or higher.

  6. Optimal velocity model with consideration of the lateral effect and its feedback control research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. Z.; Ge, H. X.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a car-following model with the consideration of lateral effect is constructed. An improved control signal with considering more comprehensive information is introduced according to the feedback control theory. The stability conditions with control signal or not are derived. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the advantage of the modified model with and without the control signal, and the results are consistent with the analytical ones.

  7. Feedback control of a cupola - concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.L.; Abdelrahman, M.A.; Larsen, E.; Clark, D.; King, P.

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we present some final results from a research project focused on introducing automatic control to the operation of cupola iron furnaces. The main aim of this research is to improve the operational efficiency and performance of the cupola furnace, an important foundry process used to melt iron. Previous papers have described the development of appropriate control system architectures for the cupola. These results are summarized. Then we describe the experimental results obtained with the U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center`s research cupola. First, experimental data is used to calibrate the model, which is taken as a first-order multivariable system with time delay. Then relative gain analysis is used to select loop pairings to be used in a multi-loop controller. The resulting controller pairs meltrate with blast volume, iron temperature with oxygen addition, and carbon composition with percent coke. Special (nonlinear) filters are used to compute meltrate from actual scale readings of the amount of iron produced and to smooth the temperature measurement. The temperature and meltrate loops use single-loop PI control. The composition loop uses a Smith predictor to discount the deadtime associated with mass transport through the furnace. Experimental results validate the conceptual controller design and provide proof-of-concept of the idea of controlling a foundry cupola. Future research directions are discussed, including the concept of an integrated, intelligent industrial process controller, or I{sup 3}PC.

  8. Using Feedback for Coherent Control of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinacht, Thomas

    2001-05-01

    The control of atoms and molecules using coherent light fields has been a longstanding goal in chemical physics. I will discuss experiments which use a programmable pulse shaper to control the quantum state of electronic wavepackets in Rydberg atoms and nuclear dynamics in molecular liquids. The shape of Rydberg wavepackets was controlled by using tailored ultrafast laser pulses to excite a beam of cesium atoms. The quantum state of these atoms was measured using holographic techniques borrowed from optics. The experiments with molecular liquids involved the contstruction of an automated learning machine. A Genetic Algorithm directed the choice of shaped pulses which interacted with the molecular system inside a learning control loop. Analysis of successful pulse shapes that were found by the algorithm yield insight into the systems being controlled.

  9. A feedback linearization approach to spacecraft control using momentum exchange devices. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzielski, John Edward

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of nonlinear control theory have shown how coordiante changes in the state and input spaces can be used with nonlinear feedback to transform certain nonlinear ordinary differential equations into equivalent linear equations. These feedback linearization techniques are applied to resolve two problems arising in the control of spacecraft equipped with control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). The first application involves the computation of rate commands for the gimbals that rotate the individual gyroscopes to produce commanded torques on the spacecraft. The second application is to the long-term management of stored momentum in the system of control moment gyroscopes using environmental torques acting on the vehicle. An approach to distributing control effort among a group of redundant actuators is described that uses feedback linearization techniques to parameterize sets of controls which influence a specified subsystem in a desired way. The approach is adapted for use in spacecraft control with double-gimballed gyroscopes to produce an algorithm that avoids problematic gimbal configurations by approximating sets of gimbal rates that drive CMG rotors into desirable configurations. The momentum management problem is stated as a trajectory optimization problem with a nonlinear dynamical constraint. Feedback linearization and collocation are used to transform this problem into an unconstrainted nonlinear program. The approach to trajectory optimization is fast and robust. A number of examples are presented showing applications to the proposed NASA space station.

  10. Design of proportional-derivative-type state feedback controllers for congestion control of transmission control protocol networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, Masoumeh; Beheshti, Mohammad T. H.; Tavassoli, Babak

    2015-07-01

    A new proportional-derivative-type state feedback controller is proposed for congestion control of transmission control protocol (TCP) networks. An analytical TCP model is adopted. In the proposed control scheme, it is possible to efficiently control the TCP traffic using only the queue length at the router without the need to know the TCP window size which is not available locally. The results are presented in terms of delay-dependent linear matrix inequality. The proposed method is verified by simulation examples using NS software, and the effectiveness and superiority of our method over other control schemes, such as the proportional-integral, random early detection and generalised minimum variancemethods, are also shown.

  11. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  12. An accelerator controls network designed for reliability and flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W. P.; Sidorowicz, K. V.

    1997-12-02

    The APS accelerator control system is a typical modern system based on the standard control system model, which consists of operator interfaces to a network and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. The network provides a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The network is an integral part of all modern control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper describes the methods used to provide redundancy for various network system components as well as methods used to provide comprehensive monitoring of this network. The effect of archiving tens of thousands of data points on a regular basis and the effect on the controls network will be discussed. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  13. Maintenance and operation procedure, and feedback controls of the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H- ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H- ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The maintenance and operation procedure to minimize the plasma chamber (PCH) replacement time on the beam line, which is very important to maximize the J-PARC beam time especially for an antenna failure, is presented in this paper. The PCH preserved by filling argon (Ar) gas inside after pre-conditioning including pre-cesiation to produce the required beam at a test-stand successfully produced the required beam on the beam line with slight addition of cesium (Cs). The methods of the feedback controls of a 2MHz-RF-matching, an H- ion beam intensity and the addition of Cs are also presented. The RF-matching feedback by using two vacuum variable capacitors (VVCs) and RF-frequency shift produced the almost perfect matching with negligibly small reflected RF-power. The H- ion beam intensity was controlled within errors of ±0.1mA by the RF-power feedback. The amount of Cs was also controlled by remotely opening a Cs-valve to keep the RF-power lower than a settled value.

  14. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using sensory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Tsai, J. S. H.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Shieh, L. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary study of the combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or to be extended to the multijoint robot manipulator problem, has been performed. The additional degrees of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control on the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  15. A predictive and feedback control algorithm maintains a constant glucose concentration in fed-batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-04-01

    A combined predictive and feedback control algorithm based on measurements of the concentration of glucose on-line has been developed to control fed-batch fermentations of Escherichia coli. The predictive control algorithm was based on the on-line calculation of glucose demand by the culture and plotting a linear regression to the next datum point to obtain a predicted glucose demand. This provided a predictive "coarse" control for the glucose-based nutrient feed. A direct feedback control using a proportional controller, based on glucose measurements every 2 min, fine-tuned the feed rate. These combined control schemes were used to maintain glucose concentrations in fed-batch fermentations as tight as 0.49 +/- 0.04 g/liter during growth of E. coli to high cell densities. PMID:2059049

  16. A predictive and feedback control algorithm maintains a constant glucose concentration in fed-batch fermentations.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-01-01

    A combined predictive and feedback control algorithm based on measurements of the concentration of glucose on-line has been developed to control fed-batch fermentations of Escherichia coli. The predictive control algorithm was based on the on-line calculation of glucose demand by the culture and plotting a linear regression to the next datum point to obtain a predicted glucose demand. This provided a predictive "coarse" control for the glucose-based nutrient feed. A direct feedback control using a proportional controller, based on glucose measurements every 2 min, fine-tuned the feed rate. These combined control schemes were used to maintain glucose concentrations in fed-batch fermentations as tight as 0.49 +/- 0.04 g/liter during growth of E. coli to high cell densities. PMID:2059049

  17. Biomolecular implementation of a quasi sliding mode feedback controller based on DNA strand displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Sawlekar, Rucha; Montefusco, Francesco; Kulkarni, Vishwesh; Bates, Declan G

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental aim of synthetic biology is to achieve the capability to design and implement robust embedded biomolecular feedback control circuits. An approach to realize this objective is to use abstract chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a programming language for the design of complex circuits and networks. Here, we employ this approach to facilitate the implementation of a class of nonlinear feedback controllers based on sliding mode control theory. We show how a set of two-step irreversible reactions with ultrasensitive response dynamics can provide a biomolecular implementation of a nonlinear quasi sliding mode (QSM) controller. We implement our controller in closed-loop with a prototype of a biological pathway and demonstrate that the nonlinear QSM controller outperforms a traditional linear controller by facilitating faster tracking response dynamics without introducing overshoots in the transient response. PMID:26736420

  18. Nonlinear H-infinity feedback control for asynchronous motors of electric trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Wira, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    A new method for feedback control of asynchronous electrical machines is introduced, with application example the problem of the traction system of electric trains. The control method consists of a repetitive solution of an H-infinity control problem for the asynchronous motor, that makes use of a locally linearized model of the motor and takes place at each iteration of the control algorithm. The asynchronous motor's model is locally linearized round its current operating point through the computation of the associated Jacobian matrices. Using the linearized model of the electrical machine an H-infinity feedback control law is computed. The known robustness features of H-infinity control enable to compensate for the errors of the approximative linearization, as well as to eliminate the effects of external perturbations. The efficiency of the proposed control scheme is shown analytically and is confirmed through simulation experiments.

  19. Feedback control and beam diagnostic algorithms for a multiprocessor DSP system

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Claus, R.; Fox, J.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Prabhakar, S.; Drago, A.; Stover, G.

    1996-09-01

    The multibunch longitudinal feedback system developed for use by PEP-II, ALS and DA{Phi}NE uses a parallel array of digital signal processors to calculate the feedback signals from measurements of beam motion. The system is designed with general-purpose programmable elements which allow many feedback operating modes as well as system diagnostics, calibrations and accelerator measurements. The overall signal processing architecture of the system is illustrated. The real-time DSP algorithms and off-line postprocessing tools are presented. The problems in managing 320 K samples of data collected in one beam transient measurement are discussed and the solutions are presented. Example software structures are presented showing the beam feedback process, techniques for modal analysis of beam motion(used to quantify growth and damping rates of instabilities) and diagnostic functions (such as timing adjustment of beam pick-up and kicker components). These operating techniques are illustrated with example results obtained from the system installed at the Advanced Light Source at LBL.

  20. Feedback control and beam diagnostic algorithms for a multiprocessor DSP system

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Claus, R.; Fox, J.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Prabhakar, S.; Drago, A.; Stover, G.

    1997-01-01

    The multibunch longitudinal feedback system developed for use by PEP-II, ALS, and DA{Phi}NE uses a parallel array of digital signal processors (DSPs) to calculate the feedback signals from measurements of beam motion. The system is designed with general-purpose programmable elements which allow many feedback operating modes as well as system diagnostics, calibrations, and accelerator measurements. The overall signal processing architecture of the system is illustrated. The real-time DSP algorithms and off-line postprocessing tools are presented. The problems in managing 320k samples of data collected in one beam transient measurement are discussed and our solutions are presented. Example software structures are presented showing the beam feedback process, techniques for modal analysis of beam motion (used to quantify growth and damping rates of instabilities), and diagnostic functions (such as timing adjustment of beam pick-up and kicker components). These operating techniques are illustrated with example results obtained from the system installed at the Advanced Light Source at LBL. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Frequency modulated cutaneous orientation feedback from artificial arms. [dynamic control model of human arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomonow, M.; Freedy, A.; Lyman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the human arm, emphasizing the neuromuscular mechanisms of feedback control, has been constructed. The various parameters and functions of physiological receptors in the feedback section have been classified into an automated category that can be incorporated in the prosthesis servo loop, and into a sensory category that should be communicated to the operator if control and dynamic performance are to be optimized. A scheme for simultaneous display of two such sensory parameters, i.e., fingertip pressure and elbow position, has been developed, implemented and evaluated. The neurophysiological mechanism of such displays, and the feasibility of sensory transformation, is discussed in this paper.

  2. Multivariable output feedback robust adaptive tracking control design for a class of delayed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Gutman, Per-Olof

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a model reference adaptive control scheme for a class of multi-input multi-output nonlinearly perturbed dynamic systems with unknown time-varying state delays which is also robust with respect to an external disturbance with unknown bounds. The output feedback adaptive control scheme uses feedback actions only, and thus does not require a direct measurement of the command or disturbance signals. A suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii type functional is introduced to design the adaptation algorithms and to prove stability.

  3. Haptic feedback enhances rhythmic motor control by reducing variability, not improving convergence rate.

    PubMed

    Ankarali, M Mert; Tutkun Sen, H; De, Avik; Okamura, Allison M; Cowan, Noah J

    2014-03-01

    Stability and performance during rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion are critical for survival across taxa: falling down would bode well for neither cheetah nor gazelle. Little is known about how haptic feedback, particularly during discrete events such as the heel-strike event during walking, enhances rhythmic behavior. To determine the effect of haptic cues on rhythmic motor performance, we investigated a virtual paddle juggling behavior, analogous to bouncing a table tennis ball on a paddle. Here, we show that a force impulse to the hand at the moment of ball-paddle collision categorically improves performance over visual feedback alone, not by regulating the rate of convergence to steady state (e.g., via higher gain feedback or modifying the steady-state hand motion), but rather by reducing cycle-to-cycle variability. This suggests that the timing and state cues afforded by haptic feedback decrease the nervous system's uncertainty of the state of the ball to enable more accurate control but that the feedback gain itself is unaltered. This decrease in variability leads to a substantial increase in the mean first passage time, a measure of the long-term metastability of a stochastic dynamical system. Rhythmic tasks such as locomotion and juggling involve intermittent contact with the environment (i.e., hybrid transitions), and the timing of such transitions is generally easy to sense via haptic feedback. This timing information may improve metastability, equating to less frequent falls or other failures depending on the task. PMID:24371296

  4. Force or pressure feedback control for seismic vibrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bedenbender, J.W.; Kelly, G.H.

    1985-05-21

    A seismic vibrator source having an hydraulic vibrator coupled to vibrate a ground pad is provided with one or more force transducers such as, for example, load cells, strain gauges, or piezoelectric elements for measuring the force applied to the earth. Signals indicative of the pressure force are applied to a controller for the hydraulic vibrator to adjust control signals to prevent decoupling of the ground pad from the earth during ground seismic operations.

  5. Application of nonlinear feedback control theory to supermaneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Enns, Dale F.

    1991-01-01

    Controlled flight at extremely high angles of attack, far exceeding the stall angle, and/or at high angular rates is sometimes referred to as supermaneuvering flight. The objective was to examine methods for design of control laws for aircraft performing supermaneuvers. Since the equations which govern the motion of aircraft during supermaneuvers are nonlinear, this study concentrated on nonlinear control law design procedures. The two nonlinear techniques considered were Nonlinear Quadratic Regulator (NLQR) theory and nonlinear dynamic inversion. A conventional gain scheduled proportional plus integral (P + I) controller was also developed to serve as a baseline design typical of current control laws used in aircraft. A mathematical model of a generic supermaneuverable aircraft was developed from data obtained from the literature. A detailed computer simulation of the aircraft was also developed. This simulation allowed the flying of proposed supermaneuvers and was used to evaluate the performance of the control law designs and to generate linearized models of the aircraft at different flight conditions.

  6. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulou, Georgia; Maaswinkel, Erwin; Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a stable or unstable surface, with or without each of four sensory manipulations: visual (eyes open/closed), vestibular (left and right galvanic vestibular stimulation alternating at 0.25 Hz), proprioceptive (left and right paraspinal muscle vibration alternating at 0.25 Hz), and tactile (minimal finger contact with object moving in the frontal plane at 0.25 Hz). The root mean square (RMS) and the power at 0.25 Hz (P25) of the ML trunk acceleration were the dependent variables. The latter was analyzed only for the rhythmic sensory manipulations and the reference condition. RMS was always significantly larger on the unstable than the stable surface. Closing the eyes caused a significant increase in RMS, more so on the unstable surface. Vestibular stimulation significantly increased RMS and P25 and more so on the unstable surface. Main effects of the proprioceptive manipulation were significant, but the interactions with surface condition were not. Finally, also tactile manipulation increased RMS and P25, but did not interact with surface condition. Sensory information in feedback control of trunk posture appears to be reweighted depending on stability of the environment. The absolute effects of visual and vestibular manipulations increase on an unstable surface, suggesting a relative decrease in the weights of proprioceptive and tactile information. PMID:25537472

  7. Decentralised memory static output feedback control for the nonlinear time-delay similar interconnected systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuechao; Jin, Shujie; Gu, Nannan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the problem of decentralised memory static output feedback control for a class of nonlinear time-delayed interconnected systems with similar structure is investigated, where both the linear and nonlinear state vectors involve time delay. The contributions of the paper include the following: (1) a new similar structure is presented via memory static output feedback; (2) by exploiting the structure of interconnected systems, the new integral inequalities, constrained Lyapunov equations and LMI method, the decentralised memory static output derivative feedback controllers with similar structure are designed, which is dependent of time delays, to stabilise the interconnected systems uniformly asymptotically; and (3) the stability domain is estimated. The conservatism of the results obtained is reduced by full using the system output information. Finally, the numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the results obtained in this paper.

  8. Feedback in the brainstem: An excitatory disynaptic pathway for control of whisking

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, David W.; Deschênes, Martin; Furuta, Takahiro; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Fan; Karten, Harvey J.; Kleinfeld, David

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor processing relies on hierarchical neuronal circuits to mediate sensory-driven behaviors. In the mouse vibrissa system, trigeminal brainstem circuits are thought to mediate the first stage of vibrissa scanning control via sensory feedback that provides reflexive protraction in response to stimulation. However, these circuits are not well defined. Here, we describe a complete disynaptic sensory receptor-to-muscle circuit for positive feedback in vibrissa movement. We identified a novel region of trigeminal brainstem, spinal trigeminal nucleus pars muralis, that contains a class of vGluT2+ excitatory projection neurons involved in vibrissa motor control. Complementary single- and duallabeling with traditional and virus tracers demonstrate that these neurons both receive primary inputs from vibrissa sensory afferent fibers and send monosynaptic connections to facial nucleus motoneurons that directly innervate vibrissa musculature. These anatomical results suggest a general role of disynaptic architecture in fast positive feedback for motor output driving active sensation. PMID:25503925

  9. Feedback in the brainstem: an excitatory disynaptic pathway for control of whisking.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David W; Deschênes, Martin; Furuta, Takahiro; Moore, Jeffrey D; Wang, Fan; Karten, Harvey J; Kleinfeld, David

    2015-04-15

    Sensorimotor processing relies on hierarchical neuronal circuits to mediate sensory-driven behaviors. In the mouse vibrissa system, trigeminal brainstem circuits are thought to mediate the first stage of vibrissa scanning control via sensory feedback that provides reflexive protraction in response to stimulation. However, these circuits are not well defined. Here we describe a complete disynaptic sensory receptor-to-muscle circuit for positive feedback in vibrissa movement. We identified a novel region of trigeminal brainstem, spinal trigeminal nucleus pars muralis, which contains a class of vGluT2+ excitatory projection neurons involved in vibrissa motor control. Complementary single- and dual-labeling with traditional and virus tracers demonstrate that these neurons both receive primary inputs from vibrissa sensory afferent fibers and send monosynaptic connections to facial nucleus motoneurons that directly innervate vibrissa musculature. These anatomical results suggest a general role of disynaptic architecture in fast positive feedback for motor output that drives active sensation. PMID:25503925

  10. Intelligent control of robotic paint stripping using color vision feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, D. N.; Rogers, T. W.

    1993-08-01

    The paper describes a color-based machine vision system which is capable of functioning as a real-time process control system for a robotic work cell currently being developed for stripping paint from both large and small aircraft. The system is based on hue, saturation, and intensity representation of the image data and on rapid analysis techniques and is capable of differentiating between painted, primed, stripped, and roughened aircraft surfaces. These techniques were tested on a large number of aircraft paint schemes under actual stripping conditions, and were found to be fast and robust enough for real-time process control.

  11. [Internal quality control for antimicrobial susceptibility test: an experience feedback].

    PubMed

    Vedy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) position in antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be evaluated attentively before using. Ours S. aureus ATCC 25923 use during year 2011 has given precious information that can be useful for other laboratories. First, IQC should never be used before checking that all the realisation process steps are controlled. It will then appear that reagents are the most susceptible to give false results. That's what happens in 2.74% of antimicrobial susceptibility test. IQC is then useful to limit their clinical's impact. However, IQC use also shows that quality improvement will be difficult without industrial producer's involvement. PMID:22826843

  12. State feedback integral control for a rotary direct drive servo valve using a Lyapunov function approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue; Zhuang, Jian; Yu, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns a state feedback integral control using a Lyapunov function approach for a rotary direct drive servo valve (RDDV) while considering parameter uncertainties. Modeling of this RDDV servovalve reveals that its mechanical performance is deeply influenced by friction torques and flow torques; however, these torques are uncertain and mutable due to the nature of fluid flow. To eliminate load resistance and to achieve satisfactory position responses, this paper develops a state feedback control that integrates an integral action and a Lyapunov function. The integral action is introduced to address the nonzero steady-state error; in particular, the Lyapunov function is employed to improve control robustness by adjusting the varying parameters within their value ranges. This new controller also has the advantages of simple structure and ease of implementation. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed controller can achieve higher control accuracy and stronger robustness. PMID:25234140

  13. Feedback linearisation control of an induction machine augmented by single-hidden layer neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Abbas, Hamou; Belkheiri, Mohammed; Zegnini, Boubakeur

    2016-01-01

    We consider adaptive output feedback control methodology of highly uncertain nonlinear systems with both parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics. The approach is also applicable to systems of unknown, but bounded dimension. However, the relative degree of the regulated output is assumed to be known. This new control strategy is proposed to address the tracking problem of an induction motor based on a modified field-oriented control method. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modelling errors. The network weight adaptation rule is derived from the Lyapunov stability analysis, that guarantees boundedness of all the error signals of the closed-loop system. Computer simulations of an output feedback controlled induction machine, augmented via single-hidden-layer neural networks, demonstrate the practical potential of the proposed control algorithm.

  14. Robust torque control of an elastic robotic arm based on invertibility and feedback stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to the control of elastic robotic systems for space applications using inversion, servocompensation, and feedback stabilization is presented. For simplicity, a robot arm (PUMA-type) with three rotational joints is considered. The third link is assumed to be elastic. Using an inversion algorithm, a nonlinear decoupling control law, u sub d, is derived such that in the closed loop system, independent control of joint angles by the three joint torquers is accomplished. For the stabilization of elastic oscillations, a linear feedback torquer control law, u sub s, is obtained applying linear quadratic optimization to the linearized arm model augmented with a servocompensator about the terminal state. Simulation results show that, in spite of uncertainties in the payload and vehicle angular velocity, good joint angle control and damping of elastic oscillations are obtained with the torquer control law u = u sub d + u sub s.

  15. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015)] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation. PMID:26382493

  16. Hybrid Invariance and Stability of a Feedback Linearizing Controller for Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anne E.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of powered lower-limb prostheses has the potential to significantly improve amputees’ quality of life. By applying advanced control schemes, such as hybrid zero dynamics (HZD), to prostheses, more intelligent prostheses could be designed. Originally developed to control bipedal robots, HZD-based control specifies the motion of the actuated degrees of freedom using output functions to be zeroed, and the required torques are calculated using feedback linearization. Previous work showed that an HZD-like prosthesis controller can successfully control the stance period of gait. This paper shows that an HZD-based prosthesis controller can be used for the entire gait cycle and that feedback linearization can be performed using only information measured with on-board sensors. An analytic metric for orbital stability of a two-step periodic gait is developed. The results are illustrated in simulation. PMID:26604427

  17. Feedback Linearization approach for Standard and Fault Tolerant control: Application to a Quadrotor UAV Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandour, J.; Aberkane, S.; Ponsart, J.-C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the control problem of a quadrotor vehicle experiencing a rotor failure is investigated. We develop a Feedback linearization approach to design a controller whose task is to make the vehicle performs trajectory following. Then we use the same approach to design a controller whose task is to make the vehicle enter a stable spin around its vertical axis, while retaining zero angular velocities around the other axis when a rotor failure is present. These conditions can be exploited to design a second control loop, which is used to perform trajectory following. The proposed double control loop architecture allows the vehicle to perform both trajectory and roll/pitch control. At last, to test the robustness of the feedback linearization technique, we applied wind to the quadrotor in mid flight.

  18. Investigation of Space Interferometer Control Using Imaging Sensor Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse A.; Cheng, Victor H. L.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous space interferometry missions are planned for the next decade to verify different enabling technologies towards very-long-baseline interferometry to achieve high-resolution imaging and high-precision measurements. These objectives will require coordinated formations of spacecraft separately carrying optical elements comprising the interferometer. High-precision sensing and control of the spacecraft and the interferometer-component payloads are necessary to deliver sub-wavelength accuracy to achieve the scientific objectives. For these missions, the primary scientific product of interferometer measurements may be the only source of data available at the precision required to maintain the spacecraft and interferometer-component formation. A concept is studied for detecting the interferometer's optical configuration errors based on information extracted from the interferometer sensor output. It enables precision control of the optical components, and, in cases of space interferometers requiring formation flight of spacecraft that comprise the elements of a distributed instrument, it enables the control of the formation-flying vehicles because independent navigation or ranging sensors cannot deliver the high-precision metrology over the entire required geometry. Since the concept can act on the quality of the interferometer output directly, it can detect errors outside the capability of traditional metrology instruments, and provide the means needed to augment the traditional instrumentation to enable enhanced performance. Specific analyses performed in this study include the application of signal-processing and image-processing techniques to solve the problems of interferometer aperture baseline control, interferometer pointing, and orientation of multiple interferometer aperture pairs.

  19. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary–thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26787873

  20. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary-thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26787873