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Sample records for acceleration marker background

  1. STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE PROBLEM OF BACKGROUND PLASMA OVERHEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2012-11-10

    The origin of hard X-ray (HXR) excess emission from clusters of galaxies is still an enigma, whose nature is debated. One of the possible mechanisms to produce this emission is the bremsstrahlung model. However, previous analytical and numerical calculations showed that in this case the intracluster plasma had to be overheated very fast because suprathermal electrons emitting the HXR excess lose their energy mainly by Coulomb losses, i.e., they heat the background plasma. It was concluded also from these investigations that it is problematic to produce emitting electrons from a background plasma by stochastic (Fermi) acceleration because the energy supplied by external sources in the form of Fermi acceleration is quickly absorbed by the background plasma. In other words, the Fermi acceleration is ineffective for particle acceleration. We revisited this problem and found that at some parameter of acceleration the rate of plasma heating is rather low and the acceleration tails of nonthermal particles can be generated and exist for a long time while the plasma temperature is almost constant. We showed also that for some regime of acceleration the plasma cools down instead of being heated up, even though external sources (in the form of external acceleration) supply energy to the system. The reason is that the acceleration withdraws effectively high-energy particles from the thermal pool (analog of Maxwell demon).

  2. Distribution of the background gas in the MITICA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Dal Bello, S.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2013-02-01

    MITICA is the ITER neutral beam test facility to be built in Padova for the generation of a 40A D- ion beam with a 16×5×16 array of 1280 beamlets accelerated to 1MV. The background gas pressure distribution and the particle flows inside MITICA accelerator are critical aspects for stripping losses, generation of secondary particles and beam non-uniformities. To keep the stripping losses in the extraction and acceleration stages reasonably low, the source pressure should be 0.3 Pa or less. The gas flow in MITICA accelerator is being studied using a 3D Finite Element code, named Avocado. The gas-wall interaction model is based on the cosine law, and the whole vacuum system geometry is represented by a view factor matrix based on surface discretization and gas property definitions. Pressure distribution and mutual fluxes are then solved linearly. In this paper the result of a numerical simulation is presented, showing the steady-state pressure distribution inside the accelerator when gas enters the system at room temperature. The accelerator model is limited to a horizontal slice 400 mm high (1/4 of the accelerator height). The pressure profile at solid walls and through the beamlet axis is obtained, allowing the evaluation and the discussion of the background gas distribution and nonuniformity. The particle flux at the inlet and outlet boundaries (namely the grounded grid apertures and the lateral conductances respectively) will be discussed.

  3. Simulation of PEP-II Accelerator Backgrounds Using TURTLE

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.J.; Fieguth, T.; Kozanecki, W.; Majewski, S.A.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; /Orsay, LAL

    2006-02-15

    We present studies of accelerator-induced backgrounds in the BaBar detector at the SLAC B-Factory, carried out using LPTURTLE, a modified version of the DECAY TURTLE simulation package. Lost-particle backgrounds in PEP-II are dominated by a combination of beam-gas bremstrahlung, beam-gas Coulomb scattering, radiative-Bhabha events and beam-beam blow-up. The radiation damage and detector occupancy caused by the associated electromagnetic shower debris can limit the usable luminosity. In order to understand and mitigate such backgrounds, we have performed a full program of beam-gas and luminosity-background simulations, that include the effects of the detector solenoidal field, detailed modeling of limiting apertures in both collider rings, and optimization of the betatron collimation scheme in the presence of large transverse tails.

  4. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  5. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Background Radiation From Electron Acceleration Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; van der Velde, Oscar; Farges, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently proposed that the acceleration of electrons during the growth and branching of streamers above thunderclouds initiated by intense lightning discharges could result in detectable low frequency electromagnetic radiation from several tens of kHz up to several hundreds of kHz (Qin et al., GRL, 2012). The intensity of the predicted radiation scales with the streamer density which is particularly large during spectacular sprite occurrences such as jellyfish sprites and/or dancing sprites. Dancing sprites are up to one second long sequences of consecutive sprites or sprite groups which are typically separated by some hundreds of milliseconds and which tend to follow the spatial development of large scale intracloud lightning discharges. A particularly spectacular series of 10 dancing sprite events over a Mediterranean mesoscale convective system was recorded with a low light video camera in south-eastern France during the early morning hours of August 31, 2012. Each dancing sprite event was composed of ~3-4 consecutive sprites or groups of sprites. All of these sprite occurrences were associated with a sudden enhancement ~2 uV/m/Hz-1/2 of the low frequency electromagnetic background radiation as measured with a radio receiver in south-west England. It is estimated that ~1000 streamers at a height of ~40 km are necessary to epxlain the observed electric field strengths. These sudden enhancements are superimposed on a more continuous low frequency electromagnetic background radiation which accompanies each dancing sprite event. It is speculated that this low frequency 'radio glow' results from filamentary streamers near the cloud top as a result of the large scale electrostatic charging of the thundercloud and that it may be used as an indicator for sprite occurrences in future studies.

  6. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  7. Rapid and Targeted Introgression of Genes into Popular Cultivars Using Marker-Assisted Background Selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have optimized a marker-assisted background selection (MABS)-based gene introgression approach in wheat where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome can be recovered in just two backcrosses (BCs). A four-step MABS method was developed based on ‘Plabsim’ computer simulations and wheat genome str...

  8. Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular markers for detecting Aegilops uniaristata chromosomes in a wheat background.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Li, Guangrong; Zhou, Jianping; Li, Genying; Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chengyan; Zhao, Zhendong; Yang, Zujun

    2014-09-01

    Aegilops uniaristata has many agronomically useful traits that can be used for wheat breeding. So far, a Triticum turgidum - Ae. uniaristata amphiploid and one set of Chinese Spring (CS) - Ae. uniaristata addition lines have been produced. To guide Ae. uniaristata chromatin transformation from these lines into cultivated wheat through chromosome engineering, reliable cytogenetic and molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes need to be developed. Standard C-banding shows that C-bands mainly exist in the centromeric regions of Ae. uniaristata but rarely at the distal ends. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using (GAA)8 as a probe showed that the hybridization signal of chromosomes 1N-7N are different, thus (GAA)8 can be used to identify all Ae. uniaristata chromosomes in wheat background simultaneously. Moreover, a total of 42 molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes were developed by screening expressed sequence tag - sequence tagged site (EST-STS), expressed sequence tag - simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR), and PCR-based landmark unique gene (PLUG) primers. The markers were subsequently localized using the CS - Ae. uniaristata addition lines and different wheat cultivars as controls. The cytogenetic and molecular markers developed herein will be helpful for screening and identifying wheat - Ae. uniaristata progeny.

  10. Multi-wavelength emission from the Fermi bubbles. I. Stochastic acceleration from background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C. M.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze processes of electron acceleration in the Fermi bubbles in order to define parameters and restrictions of the models, which are suggested for the origin of these giant radio and gamma-ray structures. In the case of the leptonic origin of the nonthermal radiation from the bubbles, these electrons should be produced somehow in situ because of the relatively short lifetime of high-energy electrons, which lose their energy by synchrotron and inverse-Compton processes. It has been suggested that electrons in bubbles may be accelerated by shocks produced by tidal disruption of stars accreting onto the central black hole or a process of re-acceleration of electrons ejected by supernova remnants. These processes will be investigated in subsequent papers. In this paper, we focus on in situ stochastic (Fermi) acceleration by a hydromagnetic/supersonic turbulence, in which electrons can be directly accelerated from the background plasma. We showed that the acceleration from the background plasma is able to explain the observed fluxes of radio and gamma-ray emission from the bubbles, but the range of permitted parameters of the model is strongly restricted.

  11. Rapid and Targeted Introgression of Genes into Popular Wheat Cultivars Using Marker-Assisted Background Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Kim; Morris, Craig F.; Chen, Xianming; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2009-01-01

    A marker-assisted background selection (MABS)-based gene introgression approach in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was optimized, where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome (RPG) can be recovered in just two backcross (BC) generations. A four-step MABS method was developed based on ‘Plabsim’ computer simulations and wheat genome structure information. During empirical optimization of this method, double recombinants around the target gene were selected in a step-wise fashion during the two BC cycles followed by selection for recurrent parent genotype on non-carrier chromosomes. The average spacing between carrier chromosome markers was <4 cM. For non-carrier chromosome markers that flanked each of the 48 wheat gene-rich regions, this distance was ∼12 cM. Employed to introgress seedling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) resistance gene Yr15 into the spring wheat cultivar ‘Zak’, marker analysis of 2,187 backcross-derived progeny resulted in the recovery of a BC2F2∶3 plant with 97% of the recurrent parent genome. In contrast, only 82% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in phenotypically selected BC4F7 plants developed without MABS. Field evaluation results from 17 locations indicated that the MABS-derived line was either equal or superior to the recurrent parent for the tested agronomic characteristics. Based on these results, MABS is recommended as a strategy for rapidly introgressing a targeted gene into a wheat genotype in just two backcross generations while recovering 97% or more of the recurrent parent genotype. PMID:19484121

  12. Genetic typing of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Higuchi, K; Shimizu, M; Matsushita, T; Kogishi, K; Wang, J; Chiba, T; Festing, M F; Hosokawa, M

    1999-03-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains constitute a murine model of accelerated senescence originating from the ancestral AKR/J strains and consist of nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and four senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. The chromosomes (Chrs) of the SAM strains were typed with 581 microsatellite markers amplified by PCR, and the fundamental genetic information of the SAM strains was obtained. One-third of the examined markers displayed polymorphism among the strains, and only two alleles were detected in almost all loci among the SAM and AKR/J strains. However, in 12 loci (5.6% of total 215 polymorphic markers), the third allele was detected among the SAM strains. The genetic typing and developmental history suggested that the SAM strains were related inbred strains developed by the accidental crossing between the AKR/J strain and other unknown strain(s). Comparison of the distribution of the loci in the SAMP and the SAMR series revealed notable differences in the four regions on Chrs 4, 14, 16, and 17. This indicated that some of these chromosomal sites might contain the genes responsible for accelerated senescence in the SAMP series. PMID:10051317

  13. Blazar Gamma-Rays, Shock Acceleration, and the Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2007-01-01

    The observed spectra of blazars, their intrinsic emission, and the underlying populations of radiating particles are intimately related. The use of these sources as probes of the extragalactic infrared background, a prospect propelled by recent advances in TeV-band telescopes, soon to be augmented by observations by NASA's upcoming Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), has been a topic of great recent interest. Here, it is demonstrated that if particles in blazar jets are accelerated at relativistic shocks, then GAMMA-ray spectra with indices less than 1.5 can be produced. This, in turn, loosens the upper limits on the near infrared extragalactic background radiation previously proposed. We also show evidence hinting that TeV blazars with flatter spectra have higher intrinsic TeV GAMMA-ray luminosities and we indicate that there may be a correlation of flatness and luminosity with redshift.

  14. Identification of Single-Locus PCR-Based Markers Linked to Shell Background Color in the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Ge, Jianlong; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2015-10-01

    A number of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) with golden shell background color were obtained which show great potential to develop a niche market. To improve the selective breeding progress of true-breeding strains with complete golden oysters, research was conducted to identify genetic markers linked to the shell color locus. An F1-segregating population was obtained by crossing two oysters with golden shell and white shell. Genomic DNA from eight progenies with golden shell and eight progenies with white shell were equally pooled for amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) screening. In bulked segregant analysis, six out of 225 selective primer pair combinations produced seven polymorphic fragments tightly linked to shell color across the segregating population. The seven AFLP markers were all derived from the golden dam and mapped onto a single linkage group flanking the shell color locus. In conversion of the AFLPs into single-locus PCR-based markers, a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker, named SCARJ8-2, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker, named SNPL2-4, and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, named SSRO11-2, were obtained. These markers obtained in this study will be useful for marker-assisted selection of the Pacific oyster.

  15. Background seismicity in Boso Peninsula, Japan: Long-term acceleration, and relationship with slow slip events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverso, T.; Marsan, D.; Helmstetter, A.; Enescu, B.

    2016-06-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) in subduction zones can trigger earthquake swarms, especially at shallow depth. The monitoring of seismicity rates has therefore the potential to help detect and characterize SSEs, and transient changes in coupling. However, the relationship between seismicity rate and slow slip rate during a SSE is unknown and made complicated by aftershock triggering within the swarm. Here we propose to complement geodetic methods with an objective measure of the seismicity rate that is directly associated with changes in slip rate. We show that this measure, applied to known occurrences of SSEs in the Boso area, Japan, yields an estimate, albeit indirect, of their seismic moment, hence their slip rate. We finally prove that the background rate in Boso has been accelerating since 1990; this explains previous observations of the shortening of the recurrence time between SSEs in Boso, that clearly predate the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  16. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  17. FUELING LOBES OF RADIO GALAXIES: STATISTICAL PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE EXTRAGALACTIC {gamma}-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.

    2011-03-01

    The recent discovery of the {gamma}-ray emission from the lobes of the closest radio galaxy Centaurus A by Fermi implies the presence of high-energy electrons at least up to {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}. These high-energy electrons are required to interpret the observed {gamma}-ray radiation in terms of inverse Compton emission off the cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB), the widely accepted scenario to describe the X-ray emission of radio galaxy lobes. In this Letter, we consider the giant radio lobes of FR II radio galaxies showing that it is possible to maintain electrons at energies {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}, assuming an acceleration scenario (driven by turbulent magnetic fields) that compensates radiative losses. In addition, we consider the contribution to the diffuse extragalactic {gamma}-ray background due to the IC/CMB emission of FR IIs' lobes, showing its relevance in the keV to MeV energy range.

  18. Low-rank and Sparse Matrix Decomposition for Accelerated Dynamic MRI with Separation of Background and Dynamic Components

    PubMed Central

    Otazo, Ricardo; Candès, Emmanuel; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To apply the low-rank plus sparse (L+S) matrix decomposition model to reconstruct undersampled dynamic MRI as a superposition of background and dynamic components in various problems of clinical interest. Theory and Methods The L+S model is natural to represent dynamic MRI data. Incoherence between k−t space (acquisition) and the singular vectors of L and the sparse domain of S is required to reconstruct undersampled data. Incoherence between L and S is required for robust separation of background and dynamic components. Multicoil L+S reconstruction is formulated using a convex optimization approach, where the nuclear-norm is used to enforce low-rank in L and the l1-norm to enforce sparsity in S. Feasibility of the L+S reconstruction was tested in several dynamic MRI experiments with true acceleration including cardiac perfusion, cardiac cine, time-resolved angiography, abdominal and breast perfusion using Cartesian and radial sampling. Results The L+S model increased compressibility of dynamic MRI data and thus enabled high acceleration factors. The inherent background separation improved background suppression performance compared to conventional data subtraction, which is sensitive to motion. Conclusion The high acceleration and background separation enabled by L+S promises to enhance spatial and temporal resolution and to enable background suppression without the need of subtraction or modeling. PMID:24760724

  19. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  20. Anthropogenic marker evidence for accelerated sedimentation in Lake Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, B. E.; Yassini, I.; Depers, A. M.; Caitcheon, G.; Jones, B. G.; Batley, G. E.; Ohmsen, G. S.

    1995-09-01

    The chronology of near-surface sediments in Lake Illawarra has been investigated using radiocarbon dating and anthropogenically derived substances including trace metals, ash, and137Cs. Sediments at depths about 1 m below the water-sediment interface ranged in age from Modern to 786 calendar years bp on the basis of radiocarbon dating of Notospisula trigonella valves. Multiple marker (for example ash-trace metals) depth-concentration sediment profiles yielded estimates of sedimentation rate ranging from 3 to 5 mm yr-1 at Griffins Bay to more than 16 mm yr-1 at Macquarie Rivulet. Sedimentation rates of approximately 10 mm yr-1 appeared to be typical of the western and southwestern portions of the lagoon. Rates of sediment accretion, prior to catchment clearing, urbanization, and industrialization have been estimated at less than 1 mm yr-1, thus indicating a general tenfold increase in sediment accumulation adjacent to the western foreshore caused by catchment development. Accelerated sedimentation in shallow coastal lagoons constitutes significant environmental impacts including shoaling, degradation of seagrass beds, and increased turbidity with consequent loss of aesthetic appeal. Management policy should be directed at attempts to reduce the amount of sediment input by the construction of strategically placed sediment retention ponds. Siltation within the shallow embayments of Lake Illawarra could be ameliorated by a carefully planned program of dredging.

  1. Accelerating the cosmic microwave background map-making procedure through preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlarski, M.; Grigori, L.; Stompor, R.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the sky signal from sequences of time ordered data is one of the key steps in cosmic microwave background (CMB) data analysis, commonly referred to as the map-making problem. Some of the most popular and general methods proposed for this problem involve solving generalised least-squares (GLS) equations with non-diagonal noise weights given by a block-diagonal matrix with Toeplitz blocks. In this work, we study new map-making solvers potentially suitable for applications to the largest anticipated data sets. They are based on iterative conjugate gradient (CG) approaches enhanced with novel, parallel, two-level preconditioners. We apply the proposed solvers to examples of simulated non-polarised and polarised CMB observations and a set of idealised scanning strategies with sky coverage ranging from a nearly full sky down to small sky patches. We discuss their implementation for massively parallel computational platforms and their performance for a broad range of parameters that characterise the simulated data sets in detail. We find that our best new solver can outperform carefully optimised standard solvers used today by a factor of as much as five in terms of the convergence rate and a factor of up to four in terms of the time to solution, without significantly increasing the memory consumption and the volume of inter-processor communication. The performance of the new algorithms is also found to be more stable and robust and less dependent on specific characteristics of the analysed data set. We therefore conclude that the proposed approaches are well suited to address successfully challenges posed by new and forthcoming CMB data sets.

  2. Validating Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine K.; Pritz, Jakub; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Forster, Kenneth M.; Harris, Eleanor E.R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) may be beneficial for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). The goal was to validate the use of intraparenchymal textured gold fiducials in patients receiving APBI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were enrolled on this prospective study that had three or four textured gold intraparenchymal fiducials placed at the periphery of the lumpectomy cavity and were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal APBI. Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were obtained pre- and posttreatment, as were daily online megavoltage (MV) orthogonal images. Intrafraction motion, variations in respiratory motion, and fiducial marker migration were calculated using the 3D coordinates of individual fiducials and a calculated center of mass (COM) of the fiducials. We also compared the relative position of the fiducial COM with the geometric center of the seroma. Results: There was less than 1 mm of intrafraction respiratory motion, variation in respiratory motion, or fiducial marker migration. The change in seroma position relative to the fiducial COM was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The average position of the geometric seroma relative to the fiducial COM pretreatment compared with posttreatment was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The largest daily variation in displacement when using bony landmark was in the anteroposterior direction and two standard deviations (SD) of this variation was 10 mm. The average variation in daily separation between the fiducial pairs from daily MV images was 3 mm {+-} 3 mm therefore 2 SD is 6 mm. Conclusion: Fiducial markers are stable throughout the course of APBI. Planning target volume margins when using bony landmarks should be 10 mm and can be reduced to 6 mm if using fiducials.

  3. Investigation of the Effects of Facility Background Pressure on the Performance and Voltage-Current Characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Spektor, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In-Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the facility background pressure on the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster performance and voltage-current characteristics. This present study evaluated the HiVHAc thruster performance in the lowest attainable background pressure condition at NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 to best simulate space-like conditions. Additional tests were performed at selected thruster operating conditions to investigate and elucidate the underlying physics that change during thruster operation at elevated facility background pressure. Tests were performed at background pressure conditions that are three and ten times higher than the lowest realized background pressure. Results indicated that the thruster discharge specific impulse and efficiency increased with elevated facility background pressure. The voltage-current profiles indicated a narrower stable operating region with increased background pressure. Experimental observations of the thruster operation indicated that increasing the facility background pressure shifted the ionization and acceleration zones upstream towards the thruster's anode. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned at background pressure conditions that are expected to be two to three times lower than what was achieved during this test campaign. These tests will not only assess the impact of reduced facility background pressure on thruster performance, voltage-current characteristics, and plume properties; but will also attempt to quantify the magnitude of the ionization and acceleration zones upstream shifting as a function of increased background pressure.

  4. Behaviour and cognitive changes correlated with hippocampal neuroinflammaging and neuronal markers in female SAMP8, a model of accelerated senescence.

    PubMed

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Palomera-Ávalos, Verónica; Puigoriol-Illamola, Dolors; Camins, Antoni; Porquet, David; Plá, Virginia; Aguado, Fernando; Pallàs, Mercè

    2016-07-01

    Senescence accelerated mice P8 (SAMP8) is a phenotypic model of age, characterized by deficits in memory and altered behaviour. Here, we determined the effect of age in SAMP8, and compared with the resistant strain, SAMR1, in behaviour and learning parameters linking these disturbances with oxidative stress environment. We found impairment in emotional behaviour with regard to fear and anxiety in young SAMP8 vs. age-mated SAMR1. Differences were attenuated with age. In contrast, learning capabilities are worse in SAMP8, both in young and aged animals, with regard to SAMR1. These waves in behaviour and cognition were correlated with an excess of oxidative stress (OS) in SAMP8 at younger ages that diminished with age. In this manner, we found changes in the hippocampal expression of ALDH2, IL-6, HMOX1, COX2, CXCL10, iNOS, and MCP-1 with an altered amyloidogenic pathway by increasing the Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and BACE1, and reduced ADAM10 expression; in addition, astrogliosis and neuronal markers decreased. Moreover, Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kβ) expression and protein levels were higher in younger SAMP8 than in SAMR1. In conclusion, the accelerated senescence process present in SAMP8 can be linked with an initial deregulation in redox homeostasis, named neuroinflammaging, by inducing molecular changes that lead to neuroinflammation and the neurodegenerative process. These changes are reflected in the emotional and cognitive behaviour of SAMP8 that differs from that of SAMR1 and that highlighted the importance of earlier oxidative processes in the onset of neurodegeneration.

  5. Environmental Enrichment Improves Behavior, Cognition, and Brain Functional Markers in Young Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Gutiérrez-Zetina, Sofía Martínez; Camins, Antoni; Palomera-Avalos, Verónica; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M Teresa; Pallàs, M

    2016-05-01

    The environment in which organisms live can greatly influence their development. Consequently, environmental enrichment (EE) is progressively recognized as an important component in the improvement of brain function and development. It has been demonstrated that rodents raised under EE conditions exhibit favorable neuroanatomical effects that improve their learning, spatial memory, and behavioral performance. Here, by using senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) and these as a model of adverse genetic conditions for brain development, we determined the effect of EE by raising these mice during early life under favorable conditions. We found a better generalized performance of SAMP8 under EE in the results of four behavioral and learning tests. In addition, we demonstrated broad molecular correlation in the hippocampus by an increase in NeuN and Ki67 expression, as well as an increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as pleiotrophin (PTN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with a parallel decrease in neurodegenerative markers such as GSK3, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and phosphorylated beta-catenin, and a reduction of SBDP120, Bax, GFAP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), resulting in a neuroprotective panorama. Globally, it can be concluded that EE applied to SAMP8 at young ages resulted in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give rise to significant beneficial effects at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels during brain development, particularly in the hippocampus.

  6. Environmental Enrichment Improves Behavior, Cognition, and Brain Functional Markers in Young Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Gutiérrez-Zetina, Sofía Martínez; Camins, Antoni; Palomera-Avalos, Verónica; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M Teresa; Pallàs, M

    2016-05-01

    The environment in which organisms live can greatly influence their development. Consequently, environmental enrichment (EE) is progressively recognized as an important component in the improvement of brain function and development. It has been demonstrated that rodents raised under EE conditions exhibit favorable neuroanatomical effects that improve their learning, spatial memory, and behavioral performance. Here, by using senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) and these as a model of adverse genetic conditions for brain development, we determined the effect of EE by raising these mice during early life under favorable conditions. We found a better generalized performance of SAMP8 under EE in the results of four behavioral and learning tests. In addition, we demonstrated broad molecular correlation in the hippocampus by an increase in NeuN and Ki67 expression, as well as an increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as pleiotrophin (PTN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with a parallel decrease in neurodegenerative markers such as GSK3, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and phosphorylated beta-catenin, and a reduction of SBDP120, Bax, GFAP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), resulting in a neuroprotective panorama. Globally, it can be concluded that EE applied to SAMP8 at young ages resulted in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give rise to significant beneficial effects at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels during brain development, particularly in the hippocampus. PMID:26014386

  7. Application of the National Ignition Facility distinguishable-from-background program to accelerator facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Packard, Eric D; Mac Kenzie, Carolyn

    2013-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory must control potentially activated materials and equipment in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, which requires DOE approval of the process used to release volumetrically contaminated personal property and establishes a dose constraint of 10 µSv y(-1) (1 mrem y(-1)) for clearance of such property. The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a technical basis document and protocol for determining the radiological status of property that is potentially activated from exposure to neutron radiation produced via fusion of tritium and deuterium. The technical basis included assessment of the neutron energy, the type of materials potentially exposed and the likely activation products, and the sensitivity of radiation detectors used to survey the property. This paper evaluates the National Ignition Facility technical basis document for applicability to the release of property from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's various accelerator facilities considering the different types of particles accelerated, radiations produced, and resultant activation products. Extensive process knowledge regarding the accelerators' operations, accompanied by years of routine surveys, provides an excellent characterization of these facilities. Activation studies conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan corroborate that the long-lived radionuclides produced at accelerator facilities are of the same variety produced at the National Ignition Facility. Consequently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory concludes that the release protocol developed for the National Ignition Facility can be used appropriately at all its accelerator facilities.

  8. Investigation of the Effects of Facility Background Pressure on the Performance and Voltage-Current Characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Spektor, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In-Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the facility background pressure on the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster performance and voltage-current characteristics. This present study evaluated the HiVHAc thruster performance in the lowest attainable background pressure condition at NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 to best simulate space-like conditions. Additional tests were performed at selected thruster operating conditions to investigate and elucidate the underlying physics that change during thruster operation at elevated facility background pressure. Tests were performed at background pressure conditions that are three and ten times higher than the lowest realized background pressure. Results indicated that the thruster discharge specific impulse and efficiency increased with elevated facility background pressure. The voltage-current profiles indicated a narrower stable operating region with increased background pressure. Experimental observations of the thruster operation indicated that increasing the facility background pressure shifted the ionization and acceleration zones upstream towards the thrusters anode. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned at background pressure conditions that are expected to be two to three times lower than what was achieved during this test campaign. These tests will not only assess the impact of reduced facility background pressure on thruster performance, voltage-current characteristics, and plume properties; but will also attempt to quantify the magnitude of the ionization.

  9. Pomegranate Supplementation Accelerates Recovery of Muscle Damage and Soreness and Inflammatory Markers after a Weightlifting Training Session

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Achraf; Turki, Mouna; Chtourou, Hamdi; Hammouda, Omar; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Choumous; Abdelkarim, Osama; Hoekelmann, Anita; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Driss, Tarak; Souissi, Nizar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of natural Pomegranate juice supplementation on performance and acute and delayed responses of muscle soreness and biomarkers of muscle damage after a weightlifting training session. Methods Nine elite weightlifters (21±0.5 years) performed two Olympic-Weightlifting-sessions after either placebo (PLA) or natural pomegranate juice (POMj) supplementations. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood samples (hematological parameters, muscle damage and C-reactive protein (CRP)) were collected at rest, 3min and 48h after each session. Weightlifting performance, RPE, and DOMS were also assessed after each training session. Results T-test showed higher performance (+8.30%) and lower RPE values (-4.37%) using POMj supplementation (p<0.05) in comparison with PLA. For the DOMS values, a significant improvement (13.4%) was shown only for the knee extensors (p<0.01) using the POMj. Compared to PLA condition, POMj attenuated the acute (i.e., 3min) increase of systolic blood pressure (SBP), HR, CK and LDH (p<0.05; -4.46%, -1.81%, -8.75%, -1.64%, respectively) and blunted the significant increase of ASAT, PAL and CRP (p>0.05). Additionally, during the 48h following the training session, POMj improved the recovery kinetic of SBP (p<0.01, 7.97%), CK (p<0.001, 11.34%), LDH (p<0.05, 7.30%) and ASAT (p<0.05, 6.77%). Indeed, the present study showed that 48h of recovery associated to natural POMj supplementation was sufficient to reach the resting values of the selected muscle damage markers after intensive training session. Conclusion Natural POMj seems to ameliorate the capacity to adhere to an intensive training program. Therefore, elite weightlifters are advised to use natural POMj during intensive training program and competition to accelerate muscle recovery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02697903 PMID:27764091

  10. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  11. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  12. Changes in oxidative stress parameters and neurodegeneration markers in the brain of the senescence-accelerated mice SAMP-8.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Francesc X; Gutierrez-Cuesta, Javier; Romeu, Marta; Mulero, Miquel; Canudas, Anna Maria; Camins, Antoni; Mallol, Jordi; Pallàs, Mercè

    2006-04-01

    The senescence-accelerated strains of mice (SAMP) are well-characterized animal models of senescence. Senescence may be related to enhanced production or defective control of reactive oxygen species, which lead to neuronal damage. Therefore, the activity of various oxidative-stress related enzymes was determined in the cortex of 5 months-old senescence-accelerated mice prone-8 (SAMP-8) of both sexes and compared with senescence-accelerated mice-resistant-1 (SAMR-1). Glutathione reductase and peroxidase activities in SAMP-8 male mice were lower than in male SAMR-1, and a decreased catalase activity was found in both male and female SAMP-8 mice, which correlates with the lower catalase expression found by Western blotting. Nissl staining showed marked loss of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of five month-old SAMP-8 mice. SAMP-8 mice also had marked astrogliosis and microgliosis. We also found an increase in caspase-3 and calpain activity in the cortex. In addition, we observed morphological changes in the immunostaining of tau protein in SAMP-8, indicative of a loss of their structural function. Altogether, these results show that, at as early as 5 months of age, SAMP-8 mice have cytological and molecular alterations indicative of neurodegeneration in the cerebral cortex and suggestive of altered control of the production of oxidative species and hyper-activation of calcium-dependent enzymes. PMID:16542809

  13. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  14. Improvement of registration accuracy in accelerated partial breast irradiation using the point-based rigid-body registration algorithm for patients with implanted fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio Sato, Sayaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Hirata, Kimiko; Ogura, Masakazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate image-registration errors when using fiducial markers with a manual method and the point-based rigid-body registration (PRBR) algorithm in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patients, with accompanying fiducial deviations. Methods: Twenty-two consecutive patients were enrolled in a prospective trial examining 10-fraction APBI. Titanium clips were implanted intraoperatively around the seroma in all patients. For image-registration, the positions of the clips in daily kV x-ray images were matched to those in the planning digitally reconstructed radiographs. Fiducial and gravity registration errors (FREs and GREs, respectively), representing resulting misalignments of the edge and center of the target, respectively, were compared between the manual and algorithm-based methods. Results: In total, 218 fractions were evaluated. Although the mean FRE/GRE values for the manual and algorithm-based methods were within 3 mm (2.3/1.7 and 1.3/0.4 mm, respectively), the percentages of fractions where FRE/GRE exceeded 3 mm using the manual and algorithm-based methods were 18.8%/7.3% and 0%/0%, respectively. Manual registration resulted in 18.6% of patients with fractions of FRE/GRE exceeding 5 mm. The patients with larger clip deviation had significantly more fractions showing large FRE/GRE using manual registration. Conclusions: For image-registration using fiducial markers in APBI, the manual registration results in more fractions with considerable registration error due to loss of fiducial objectivity resulting from their deviation. The authors recommend the PRBR algorithm as a safe and effective strategy for accurate, image-guided registration and PTV margin reduction.

  15. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Farr, Susan A; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya B; Allan Butterfield, D

    2013-12-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model for investigating the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease.

  16. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  17. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  18. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  19. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  20. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  1. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  2. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  3. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. Grave Markers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Junior high school students studied the cultural uses, symbolic meanings, and general physical forms of tombs and tombstones and then used basic slab building techniques to construct large clay grave markers. (RM)

  6. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  7. Development of new PCR-based markers specific for chromosome arms of rye (Secale cereale L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Tang, Zong-xiang; Li, Meng; Fu, Shu-lan

    2016-03-01

    PCR-based rye (Secale cereale L.) chromosome-specific markers can contribute to the effective utilization of elite genes of rye in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding programs. In the present study, 578 new PCR-based rye-specific markers have been developed by using specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology, and 76 markers displayed different polymorphism among rye Kustro, Imperial, and King II. A total of 427 and 387 markers were, respectively, located on individual chromosomes and chromosome arms of Kustro by using a set of wheat-rye monosomic addition lines and 13 monotelosomic addition lines, which were derived from T. aestivum L. 'Mianyang11' × S. cereale L. 'Kustro'. In addition, two sets of wheat-rye disomic addition lines, which were derived from T. aestivum L. var. Chinese Spring × S. cereale L. var. Imperial and T. aestivum L. 'Holdfast' × S. cereale L. var. King II, were used to test the chromosomal specificity of the 427 markers. The chromosomal locations of 281 markers were consistent among the three sets of wheat-rye addition lines. The markers developed in this study can be used to identify a given segment of rye chromosomes in wheat background and accelerate the utilization of elite genes on rye chromosomes in wheat breeding programs.

  8. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  9. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  10. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  13. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  14. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantarians, Narbe

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  15. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  16. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, K; Sanders, J; Stegeman, C; Smit, A; Kallenberg, C; Bijl, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Several autoimmune disorders are complicated by excess cardiovascular disease. In addition to traditional risk factors, non-traditional risk factors such as endothelial activation and excessive vascular remodelling might be determinants of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with an autoimmune disease. Objective: To evaluate whether patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) have an increased prevalence of atherosclerosis and to determine predisposing factors. Methods: 29 WG patients (19 men; mean (SD) age, 53 (14) years) with inactive disease and 26 controls (16 men; age 53 (15) years) were studied. Common carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound. In all individuals traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease were determined. High sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured. Endothelial activation was assessed by measuring thrombomodulin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and von Willebrand factor. As a marker of vascular remodelling matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-9) and TIMP-1 were measured. Results: IMT was increased in WG patients compared with controls (p<0.05). No differences in traditional risk factors and endothelial activation markers between patients and controls were found. Levels of hsCRP, MMPs, and TIMP-1 were increased in WG patients (p<0.05). Conclusions: Increased IMT found in WG patients cannot be explained by an increased prevalence of traditional risk factors. Although endothelial activation markers in WG patients with inactive disease were not increased, the raised levels of hsCRP, MMPs, and TIMP-1 suggest that enhanced inflammation and excessive vascular remodelling are contributing factors in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis in WG. PMID:15374854

  17. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  18. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  19. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  20. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  1. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. PMID:25553855

  2. Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

  3. Development and application of EST-based markers specific for chromosome arms of rye (Secale cereale L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Yin, D; Li, L; Wang, Q; Li, X; Yang, X; Liu, W; An, D

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of molecular markers specific for the chromosome arms of rye, a total of 1,098 and 93 primer pairs derived from the expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences distributed on all 21 wheat chromosomes and 7 rye chromosomes, respectively, were initially screened on common wheat 'Chinese Spring' and rye cultivar 'Imperial'. Four hundred and fourteen EST-based markers were specific for the rye genome. Seven disomic chromosome addition lines, 10 telosomic addition lines and 1 translocation line of 'Chinese Spring-Imperial' were confirmed by genomic in situ hybridization and fluorescencein situ hybridization, and used to screen the rye-specific markers. Thirty-one of the 414 markers produced stable specific amplicons in 'Imperial', as well as individual addition lines and were assigned to 13 chromosome arms of rye except for 6RS. Six rye cultivars, wheat cultivar 'Xiaoyan 6' and accessions of 4 wheat relatives were then used to test the specificity of the 31 EST-based markers. To confirm the specificity, 4 wheat-rye derivatives of 'Xiaoyan 6 × German White', with chromosomes 1RS, 2R and 4R, were amplified by some of the EST-based markers. The results indicated that they can effectively be used to detect corresponding rye chromosomes or chromosome arms introgressed into a wheat background, and hence to accelerate the utilization of rye genes in wheat breeding.

  4. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  5. Amyloid and tau pathology of familial Alzheimer's disease APP/PS1 mouse model in a senescence phenotype background (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Porquet, D; Andrés-Benito, P; Griñán-Ferré, C; Camins, A; Ferrer, I; Canudas, A M; Del Valle, J; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    The amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of familial AD-like pattern at early ages, whereas senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) has a remarkable early senescence phenotype with pathological similarities to AD. The aim of this study was the investigation and characterization of cognitive and neuropathological AD markers in a novel mouse model that combines the characteristics of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model with a senescence-accelerated background of SAMP8 mice. Initially, significant differences were found regarding amyloid plaque formation and cognitive abnormalities. Bearing these facts in mind, we determined a general characterization of the main AD brain molecular markers, such as alterations in amyloid pathway, neuroinflammation, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in these mice along their lifetimes. Results from this analysis revealed that APP/PS1 in SAMP8 background mice showed alterations in the pathways studied in comparison with SAMP8 and APP/PS1, demonstrating that a senescence-accelerated background exacerbated the amyloid pathology and maintained the cognitive dysfunction present in APP/PS1 mice. Changes in tau pathology, including the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), differs, but not in a parallel manner, with amyloid disturbances. PMID:25663420

  6. Accelerated expansion through interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdahl, Winfried

    2009-05-01

    Interactions between dark matter and dark energy with a given equation of state are known to modify the cosmic dynamics. On the other hand, the strength of these interactions is subject to strong observational constraints. Here we discuss a model in which the transition from decelerated to accelerated expansion of the Universe arises as a pure interaction phenomenon. Various cosmological scenarios that describe a present stage of accelerated expansion, like the {lambda}CDM model or a (generalized) Chaplygin gas, follow as special cases for different interaction rates. This unifying view on the homogeneous and isotropic background level is accompanied by a non-adiabatic perturbation dynamics which can be seen as a consequence of a fluctuating interaction rate.

  7. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  8. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  9. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  10. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  11. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  12. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  13. Imputation of unordered markers and the impact on genomic selection accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection, a breeding method that promises to accelerate rates of genetic gain, requires dense, genome-wide marker data. Sequence-based genotyping methods can generate de novo large numbers of markers. However, without a reference genome, these markers are unordered and typically have a lar...

  14. Imputation of unordered markers and the impact on genomic selection accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection, a breeding method that promises to accelerate rates of genetic gain, requires dense, genome-wide marker data. Genotyping-by-sequencing can generate a large number of de novo markers. However, without a reference genome, these markers are unordered and typically have a large propo...

  15. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  16. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  17. VitisGen: accelerating grape cultivar improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VitisGen is a multiple institute collaborative project funded by the USDA SCRI program, with a long term goal to accelerate grape cultivar improvement by using cutting-edge molecular marker technologies, rigorous centralized facilities to characterize traits, and molecular breeding expertise. The ge...

  18. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  19. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  20. VIEW OF FLAT GRAVE MARKERS AL0NG SAINT MIHIEL AVENUE, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF FLAT GRAVE MARKERS AL0NG SAINT MIHIEL AVENUE, WITH UPRIGHT MARKERS IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Los Angeles National Cemetery, 950 South Sepulveda Boulevard, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Temporal evolution of biomarkers and cognitive markers in the asymptomatic, MCI and dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bertens, Daniela; Knol, Dirk L.; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the pattern of disease progression in the asymptomatic, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia stage of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Methods We selected 284 subjects with AD pathology, defined as abnormal levels of amyloid beta 1-42 (Aß1-42) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disease outcome measures included six biomarkers and five cognitive markers. We compared differences in baseline measures and decline over 4 years between the AD stages and tested whether these changes differed from subjects, without AD pathology (N=132). Results CSF Aß1-42 reached the maximum abnormality level in the asymptomatic stage and tau in the MCI stage. The imaging and cognitive markers started to decline in the asymptomatic stage, and decline accelerated with advancing clinical stage. Conclusion This study provides further evidence for a temporal evolution of AD biomarkers. Our findings may be helpful to determine stage specific outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:25150730

  2. Description of durum wheat linkage map and comparative sequence analysis of wheat mapped DArT markers with rice and Brachypodium genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of wheat to the world economy, together with progresses in high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, have accelerated initiatives of genetic research for wheat improvement. The availability of high density linkage maps is crucial to identify genotype-phenotype associations, but also for anchoring BAC contigs to genetic maps, a strategy followed for sequencing the wheat genome. Results Here we report a genetic linkage map in a durum wheat segregating population and the study of mapped DArT markers. The linkage map consists of 126 gSSR, 31 EST-SSR and 351 DArT markers distributed in 24 linkage groups for a total length of 1,272 cM. Through bioinformatic approaches we have analysed 327 DArT clones to reveal their redundancy, syntenic and functional aspects. The DNA sequences of 174 DArT markers were assembled into a non-redundant set of 60 marker clusters. This explained the generation of clusters in very small chromosome regions across genomes. Of these DArT markers, 61 showed highly significant (Expectation < E-10) BLAST similarity to gene sequences in public databases of model species such as Brachypodium and rice. Based on sequence alignments, the analysis revealed a mosaic gene conservation, with 54 and 72 genes present in rice and Brachypodium species, respectively. Conclusions In the present manuscript we provide a detailed DArT markers characterization and the basis for future efforts in durum wheat map comparing. PMID:24304553

  3. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  4. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Recent limits on spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The various backgrounds are described, and the theoretical implications are assessed. Constraints on inflationary cosmology dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) and on open cosmological models dominated by baryonic dark matter (BDM), with, respectively, primordial random phase scale-invariant curvature fluctuations or non-gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are described. More exotic theories are addressed, and I conclude with the 'bottom line': what theorists expect experimentalists to be measuring within the next two to three years without having to abandon their most cherished theories.

  5. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  6. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  7. School Law: Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splitt, David A.

    1988-01-01

    In an Oklahoma case, the district court ruled that the school district had failed to investigate the background of a teacher convicted of a second sexual abuse charge. School districts should examine personnel polices and practices, and the school lawyer should review state laws, regulations, and court cases. (MLF)

  8. Foregrounding the Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Argues that when introductory activities to the classics begin with background information, it can upstage or confine the life of the story, and shows little faith in the students as readers or in the literature itself. Suggests sometimes letting the literature begin, and then helping students make sense of it. Discusses examples from "To Kill a…

  9. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  10. Thermal background noise limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  11. Paraelectric gas flow accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Daniel M. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Roth, J. Reece (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A substrate is configured with first and second sets of electrodes, where the second set of electrodes is positioned asymmetrically between the first set of electrodes. When a RF voltage is applied to the electrodes sufficient to generate a discharge plasma (e.g., a one-atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma) in the gas adjacent to the substrate, the asymmetry in the electrode configuration results in force being applied to the active species in the plasma and in turn to the neutral background gas. Depending on the relative orientation of the electrodes to the gas, the present invention can be used to accelerate or decelerate the gas. The present invention has many potential applications, including increasing or decreasing aerodynamic drag or turbulence, and controlling the flow of active and/or neutral species for such uses as flow separation, altering heat flow, plasma cleaning, sterilization, deposition, etching, or alteration in wettability, printability, and/or adhesion.

  12. SECTION O, SHOWING FLAT MARKERS, WITH SECTIONS K AND L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION O, SHOWING FLAT MARKERS, WITH SECTIONS K AND L IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. Diffuse UV Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Murthy, J.

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse UV sky is expected to glow with significant amounts of starlight that is scattered from the interstellar dust. The albedo and scattering pattern of the dust in the ultraviolet are both well established, and are both fairly independent of wavelength from 912 Å to 3000 Å. We present 1943 Voyager spectra of the diffuse cosmic background radiation from 500 Å to 1200 Å, and we compare their brightnesses, and their distribution on the sky, to those observed (Murthy et al., ApJ 724, 1389, 2010) from the GALEX mission at longer wavelengths (1530 Å). Significant differences appear, suggesting that background radiation components in addition to dust-scattered starlight may be present in both spectral regions.

  14. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are reviewed. Particular attention is given to spectral distortions and CMBR temperature anisotropies at large, intermediate, and small angular scales. The implications of the observations for inflationary cosmological models with curvature fluctuation are explored, and it is shown that the limits determined for intermediate-scale CMBR anisotropy almost rule out a baryon-dominated cosmology.

  15. Executive Summary: Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Background information on, and the objectives of, the NASA Global Biology Research Program are given. The following issues were addressed: (1) geographic distribution of wetland parameters, (2) the processes of wetland material fluxes, and (3) the relation of local fluxes with global processes. Wetland inventorying and categorizing, gas-phase exchanges with the atmosphere, material exchange with the aquatic environment, and material storage in wetland sediments were identified as topics requiring further research.

  16. DETECTORS FOR ACCELERATOR-BASED NUCLEAR SECURITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Stave, Sean C.; Miller, Erin A.

    2015-08-31

    We present of review of detector systems used in accelerator-based national security applications. In gen-eral, the detectors used for these applications are also used in passive measurements. The critical difference is that detector systems for accelerator-based applications in general need to discriminate beam-generated background from the intended signal. Typical techniques to remove background include shielding, timing, selection of sensitive materials, and choice of accelerator.

  17. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  18. Absolute calibration and beam background of the Squid Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.M.; Cameron, P.R.; Shea, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of beam background in Squid Polarimetry is not without residual benefits. The authors may deliberately generate beam background by gently kicking the beam at the spin tune frequency. This signal may be used to accomplish a simple and accurate absolute calibration of the polarimeter. The authors present details of beam background calculations and their application to polarimeter calibration, and suggest a simple proof-of-principle accelerator experiment.

  19. Today's oxidative stress markers.

    PubMed

    Czerska, Marta; Mikołajewska, Karolina; Zieliński, Marek; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wąsowicz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) or malondialdehyde (MDA), are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs) and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin), taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. PMID:26325052

  20. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  1. [Serological markers of fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varo, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    Liver biopsy has classically been considered the gold standard to evaluate the degree of fibrosis, since it allows direct measurement of this entity. However, this technique carries an inherent risk of complications and observer variability and technical limitations can provoke sampling errors, all of which has prompted the search for alternative, noninvasive methods. The use of routine clinical laboratory tests has been investigated and various indexes that combine indirect serological markers have been developed and validated. These indexes are useful, low-cost, noninvasive tests to detect significant fibrosis or cirrhosis. Direct serological markers are those that reflect changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix. Several studies have analyzed the utility of these markers (either individually or combined with other direct and indirect markers) in the detection of the severity and progression of liver fibrosis and in the follow-up of changes related to antiviral therapy. In the last few years, imaging tests based on the measurement of liver stiffness, such as FibroScan or acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI), have been found to be rapid and reproducible methods to evaluate liver fibrosis. Recently, the results obtained by combining distinct serological markers and imaging techniques have shown a higher diagnostic yield and this strategy seems promising. The present article reviews the most widely discussed noninvasive markers, the most recent alternatives, and the perspectives for their use in clinical practice. PMID:23298654

  2. Background level care.

    PubMed

    Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    The framework enabled by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System to allow appropriate, patient-centred caries management includes a frequently encountered scenario in which a comprehensive assessment of the teeth and the patient reveals no lesions in need of active preventive or operative care. The issue addressed here is: what background care is appropriate for patients attending a dental practice for routine caries care who, at present, appear to have no active or progressing caries lesions? It is proposed that, in addition to the use of criteria for lesion extent, treatment planning systems should also express the results of lesion assessments in terms of background level care (BLC), preventive treatment options and operative treatment options. The specific treatment options recommended for specific lesions and patients will depend upon a variety of other factors, including lesion activity, monitoring lesion behaviour over time and a range of other prognostic factors. Over recent decades, there has been comparatively little focus on appropriate BLC in a general practice setting. There are a range of issues around the need to support caries prevention and health maintenance from a behavioural and patient-focussed perspective. Even if a patient is deemed to be at low risk of future caries at a particular examination, there is a need for maintenance care. Intrinsic issues which need to be managed for both patients and their caries lesions in this patient group are: (1) the possibility of a change in caries risk status and (2) the impact of incorrect lesion assessments/diagnoses.

  3. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  4. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  5. A new small accelerator for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, M.; Huber, R.; Jacob, S. A. W.; Synal, H.-A.; Schroeder, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    A new small and compact radiocarbon dating facility based on a 500 kV Pelletron accelerator has been built. The novel feature is that it operates with 1{sup +} ions. The interfering molecules are destroyed by collisions in the gas stripper. The results of first test measurements demonstrate that stability, background and transmission are equal to the performance of conventional AMS systems based on larger accelerators.

  6. Universe acceleration in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou-Lahanas, C.; Diamandis, G. A.; Georgalas, B. C.

    2014-05-01

    We examine the cosmology induced on a brane moving in the background of a five-dimensional black hole, solution of the string effective action. The evolution, determined by the Israel junction conditions is found to be compatible with an accelerating universe with the present day acceleration coming after a decelerating phase. The possible species of the energy-momentum tensor, localized on the brane, for these solutions to be valid are discussed.

  7. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  8. Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.

    1993-12-01

    The UVX experiment was carried on the Space Shuttle Columbia between 1986 January 12 and 19 (STS-61C). Several ultraviolet spectrometers were used to obtain measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet background at 8 locations in the sky. We have reanalysed the UVX measurements of the surface brightness of the diffuse ultraviolet background above b = 40 using the dust-scattering model of Onaka & Kodaira (1991), which explicitly takes into account the variation of the source function with galactic longitude. The range of allowed values of interstellar grain albedoJa, and scattering asymmetry parameter g, is considerably expanded over those of a previous analysis. The new chi square probability contours come close to, but do not include, the values of a and g found for the interstellar grains by Witt et al. (1992) using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) on the Astro mission. If we hypothesize in additon to the dust-scattered light an extragalactic component, of 300 1 100 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1, attenuated by a cosecant b law, the new reduction of the UVX data gives complete consistency with the Witt et al. determination of the optical parameters of the grains in the ultraviolet. This work was supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004, and by National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NASA NAG5-619. We are grateful for the encouragement of Dr. Stephan Price, and we thank Dr. L. Danly for information. Onaka, T., & Kodaira, K. 1991, ApJ, 379, 532 Witt, A. N., Petersohn, J. K., Bohlin, R. C., O'Connell, R. W., Roberts, M. S., Smith, A. M., & Stecher, T. P. 1992, ApJ, 395, L5

  9. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  10. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  11. Genetical background of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  12. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  13. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  14. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  15. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  16. Linear accelerator: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutzberg, J.

    1972-01-01

    Design is proposed for inexpensive accelerometer which would work by applying pressure to fluid during acceleration. Pressure is used to move shuttle, and shuttle movement is sensed and calibrated to give acceleration readings.

  17. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  18. Glycomics and Disease Markers

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; de Leoz, Maria Lorna A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Glycomics is the comprehensive study of all glycans expressed in biological systems. The biosynthesis of glycan relies on a number of highly competitive processes involving glycosyl transferase. Glycosylation is therefore highly sensitive to the biochemical environment and has been implicated in many diseases including cancer. Recently, interest in profiling the glycome has increased due to the potential of glycans for disease markers. In this regard, mass spectrometry is emerging as a powerful technique for profiling the glycome. Global glycan profiling of human serum based on mass spectrometry has already led to several potentially promising markers for several types of cancer and diseases. PMID:19775929

  19. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  20. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  1. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  2. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  3. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  4. Background sources in optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characterization and measurement of background radiation relevant to optical communications system performance is addressed. The necessary optical receiver parameters are described, and radiometric concepts required for the calculation of collected background power are developed. The most important components of optical background power are discussed, and their contribution to the total collected background power in various communications scenarios is examined.

  5. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  6. Cosmic microwave background images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, D.; Vielva, P.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmology concerns itself with the fundamental questions about the formation, structure, and evolution of the Universe as a whole. Cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the foremost pillars of physical cosmology. Joint analyses of CMB and other astronomical observations are able to determine with ever increasing precision the value of the fundamental cosmological parameters and to provide us with valuable insight about the dynamics of the Universe in evolution. The CMB radiation is a relic of the hot and dense first moments of the Universe: a extraordinarily homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation, which shows small temperature anisotropies that are the key for understanding the conditions of the primitive Universe, testing cosmological models and probing fundamental physics at the very dawn of time. CMB observations are obtained by imaging of the sky at microwave wavelengths. However, the CMB signal is mixed with other astrophysical signals of both Galactic and extragalactic origin. To properly exploit the cosmological information contained in CMB images, they must be cleansed of these other astrophysical emissions first. Blind source separation (BSS) has been a very active field in the last few years. Conversely, the term "compact sources" is often used in the CMB literature referring to spatially bounded, small features in the images, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. Compact sources and diffuse sources are usually treated separately in CMB image processing. We devote this tutorial to the case of compact sources. Many of the compact source-detection techniques that are widespread inmost fields of astronomy are not easily applicable to CMB images. In this tutorial, we present an overview of the fundamentals of compact object detection theory keeping in mind at every moment these particularities. Throughout the article, we briefly consider Bayesian object detection, model selection, optimal linear filtering, nonlinear filtering, and

  7. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  8. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  9. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  10. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  11. Accelerated ageing and renal dysfunction links lower socioeconomic status and dietary phosphate intake

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Ruth; Christensen, Kelly; Mohammed, Suhaib; McGuinness, Dagmara; Cooney, Josephine; Bakshi, Andisheh; Demou, Evangelia; MacDonald, Ewan; Caslake, Muriel; Stenvinkel, Peter; Shiels, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have sought to explore the impact of dietary Pi intake on human age related health in the pSoBid cohort (n=666) to explain the disparity between health and deprivation status in this cohort. As hyperphosphataemia is a driver of accelerated ageing in rodent models of progeria we tested whether variation in Pi levels in man associate with measures of biological ageing and health. Results We observed significant relationships between serum Pi levels and markers of biological age (telomere length (p=0.040) and DNA methylation content (p=0.028), gender and chronological age (p=0.032). When analyses were adjusted for socio-economic status and nutritional factors, associations were observed between accelerated biological ageing (telomere length, genomic methylation content) and dietary derived Pi levels among the most deprived males, directly related to the frequency of red meat consumption. Conclusions Accelerated ageing is associated with high serum Pi levels and frequency of red meat consumption. Our data provide evidence for a mechanistic link between high intake of Pi and age-related morbidities tied to socio-economic status. PMID:27132985

  12. Referential Markers and Agreement Markers in Functional Discourse Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengeveld, Kees

    2012-01-01

    It follows from the ordering principles that are applied in Functional Discourse Grammar that the positional possibilities of markers of agreement and those of cross-reference are different. Markers of cross reference are predicted to occur closer to the verb stem, while markers of agreement would occupy peripheral positions. This paper tests…

  13. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  14. Origin of the high energy cosmic neutrino background.

    PubMed

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2014-11-01

    The diffuse background of very high energy extraterrestrial neutrinos recently discovered with IceCube is compatible with that expected from cosmic ray interactions in the Galactic interstellar medium plus that expected from hadronic interactions near the source and in the intergalactic medium of the cosmic rays which have been accelerated by the jets that produce gamma ray bursts. PMID:25415894

  15. Cosmology on compact and stable supergravity background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailu, Girma

    2012-11-01

    We propose a cosmological model of a D3-brane universe on a compact and stable supergravity background of wrapped D7-branes in type IIB string theory, previously argued to be dual to pure N=1 SU(N) gauge theory in four dimensions. A model universe of order Planck size near the UV boundary dynamically flows toward the IR with constant total energy density and accelerating expansion, followed by smooth transition to decelerating expansion, and collides with the wrapped D7-branes at the IR boundary. The model addresses the horizon and flatness problems, with most of the expansion produced during the decelerating expansion phase. The inflationary scenario is used to generate sources of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background radiation and seeds for large-scale structure formation from quantum fluctuations which exit the Hubble radius early during the accelerating expansion phase, and the model addresses the inhomogeneity problem with red tilt in the power spectrum. We propose that the kinetic energy of the model universe is converted to matter and radiation by the collision followed by the formation of baryons, stabilizing the model universe against gravitational force from the background at a finite distance from the IR boundary, with the wrapped D7-branes serving as sources of color. Friedmann evolution then takes over, with a positive cosmological constant term coming from the remaining potential energy density, which is interpreted as dark energy. The magnitude of the dark energy density is smaller than the total energy density during the flow by a ratio of the scale factor when the model universe appears in the UV to the scale factor at the moment of collision, and stays constant while the matter-radiation density falls during Friedmann expansion.

  16. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  17. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  18. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  19. Functional molecular markers for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Kage, Udaykumar; Kumar, Arun; Dhokane, Dhananjay; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C

    2016-10-01

    A tremendous decline in cultivable land and resources and a huge increase in food demand calls for immediate attention to crop improvement. Though molecular plant breeding serves as a viable solution and is considered as "foundation for twenty-first century crop improvement", a major stumbling block for crop improvement is the availability of a limited functional gene pool for cereal crops. Advancement in the next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies integrated with tools like metabolomics, proteomics and association mapping studies have facilitated the identification of candidate genes, their allelic variants and opened new avenues to accelerate crop improvement through development and use of functional molecular markers (FMMs). The FMMs are developed from the sequence polymorphisms present within functional gene(s) which are associated with phenotypic trait variations. Since FMMs obviate the problems associated with random DNA markers, these are considered as "the holy grail" of plant breeders who employ targeted marker assisted selections (MAS) for crop improvement. This review article attempts to consider the current resources and novel methods such as metabolomics, proteomics and association studies for the identification of candidate genes and their validation through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) for the development of FMMs. A number of examples where the FMMs have been developed and used for the improvement of cereal crops for agronomic, food quality, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance traits have been considered. PMID:26171816

  20. Beam induced backgrounds: CDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    We summarize the experiences of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment in the presence of backgrounds originating from the counter circulating beams in the Fermilab Tevatron. These backgrounds are measured and their sources identified. Finally, we outline the strategies employed to reduce the effects of these backgrounds on the experiment.

  1. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  2. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  3. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  4. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  5. [Tumor markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Hisanao

    2002-04-01

    There are two markers, pepsinogen isoenzymes and antibody against Helicobactor pyroli, for screening of high-risk group for gastric cancer. Most of markers are used in diagnosis, staging, monitoring and differentiating subgroups of gastric cancer. Markers in ascitic fluid are used for diagnosing peritoneal invasion of gastric cancer. PMID:11977555

  6. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  7. Self-accelerating Warped Braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Braneworld models with induced gravity have the potential to replace dark energy as the explanation for the current accelerating expansion of the Universe. The original model of Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) demonstrated the existence of a ''self-accelerating'' branch of background solutions, but suffered from the presence of ghosts. We present a new large class of braneworld models which generalize the DGP model. Our models have negative curvature in the bulk, allow a second brane, and have general brane tensions and localized curvature terms. We exhibit three different kinds of ghosts, associated to the graviton zero mode, the radion, and the longitudinal components of massive graviton modes. The latter two species occur in the DGP model, for negative and positive brane tension respectively. In our models, we find that the two kinds of DGP ghosts are tightly correlated with each other, but are not always linked to the feature of self-acceleration. Our models are a promising laboratory for understanding the origins and physical meaning of braneworld ghosts, and perhaps for eliminating them altogether.

  8. Self-accelerating warped braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Santiago, Jose; Park, Minjoon

    2007-01-15

    Braneworld models with induced gravity have the potential to replace dark energy as the explanation for the current accelerating expansion of the Universe. The original model of Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati (DGP) demonstrated the existence of a 'self-accelerating' branch of background solutions, but suffered from the presence of ghosts. We present a new large class of braneworld models which generalize the DGP model. Our models have negative curvature in the bulk, allow a second brane, and have general brane tensions and localized curvature terms. We exhibit three different kinds of ghosts, associated to the graviton zero mode, the radion, and the longitudinal components of massive graviton modes. The latter two species occur in the DGP model, for negative and positive brane tension, respectively. In our models, we find that the two kinds of DGP ghosts are tightly correlated with each other, but are not always linked to the feature of self-acceleration. Our models are a promising laboratory for understanding the origins and physical meaning of braneworld ghosts, and perhaps for eliminating them altogether.

  9. Radiation Shielding at High-Energy Electron and Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.; Cossairt, J.Donald; Liu, James C.; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The goal of accelerator shielding design is to protect the workers, general public, and the environment against unnecessary prompt radiation from accelerator operations. Additionally, shielding at accelerators may also be used to reduce the unwanted background in experimental detectors, to protect equipment against radiation damage, and to protect workers from potential exposure to the induced radioactivity in the machine components. The shielding design for prompt radiation hazards is the main subject of this chapter.

  10. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  11. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  12. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  13. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  14. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  15. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  16. Background issues for defensive interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    Mean nuclear backgrounds are large, but are arguably amenable to frame-to-frame subtraction. Striated backgrounds on the sensors for defensive interceptors could, however, cause clutter leak-through, which could make detection and track difficult. Nominal motions and backgrounds give signal to clutter ratios too low to be useful. Clutter leakage due to line-of-sight drift can be reduced by stabilizing the line of sight around the background clutter itself. Current interceptors have detector arrays large enough for operation independent of nuclear backgrounds in their fields of view. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Accelerating DSMC data extraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2006-10-01

    In many direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations, the majority of computation time is consumed after the flowfield reaches a steady state. This situation occurs when the desired output quantities are small compared to the background fluctuations. For example, gas flows in many microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have mean speeds more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal speeds of the molecules themselves. The current solution to this problem is to collect sufficient samples to achieve the desired resolution. This can be an arduous process because the error is inversely proportional to the square root of the number of samples so we must, for example, quadruple the samples to cut the error in half. This work is intended to improve this situation by employing more advanced techniques, from fields other than solely statistics, for determining the output quantities. Our strategy centers on exploiting information neglected by current techniques, which collect moments in each cell without regard to one another, values in neighboring cells, nor their evolution in time. Unlike many previous acceleration techniques that modify the method itself, the techniques examined in this work strictly post-process so they may be applied to any DSMC code without affecting its fidelity or generality. Many potential methods are drawn from successful applications in a diverse range of areas, from ultrasound imaging to financial market analysis. The most promising methods exploit relationships between variables in space, which always exist in DSMC due to the absence of shocks. Disparate techniques were shown to produce similar error reductions, suggesting that the results shown in this report may be typical of what is possible using these methods. Sample count reduction factors of approximately three to five were found to be typical, although factors exceeding ten were shown on some variables under some techniques.

  18. Detection of 36Cl with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Songsheng; Ma, Tiejung; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Bingfan; Wang, Xun; Huang, Qi

    1989-12-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system based on the HI-13 tandem accelerator at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) is described, and the first detection of 36Cl with our AMS system is reported. The electrostatic deflector completely rejects isotopic background, 35Cl and 37Cl. The ioinzation chamber distinguishs 36Cl from isobaric background, 36S. The measurement of 36Cl with two samples is presented.

  19. Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats

    PubMed Central

    Stefanova, Natalia A; Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S; Vitovtov, Anton O; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi; Logvinov, Sergey V; Rudnitskaya, Ekaterina A; Korbolina, Elena E; Muraleva, Natalia A; Kolosova, Nataliya G

    2014-01-01

    Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats are an experimental model of accelerated aging that was established from Wistar stock via selection for susceptibility to cataractogenic effects of a galactose-rich diet and via subsequent inbreeding of highly susceptible rats. Currently, we have the 102nd generation of OXYS rats with spontaneously developing cataract and accelerated senescence syndrome, which means early development of a phenotype similar to human geriatric disorders, including accelerated brain aging. In recent years, our group found strong evidence that OXYS rats are a promising model for studies of the mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegenerative processes similar to those seen in Alzheimer disease (AD). The manifestation of behavioral alterations and learning and memory deficits develop since the fourth week of age, i.e., simultaneously with first signs of neurodegeneration detectable on magnetic resonance imaging and under a light microscope. In addition, impaired long-term potentiation has been demonstrated in OXYS rats by the age of 3 months. With age, neurodegenerative changes in the brain of OXYS rats become amplified. We have shown that this deterioration happens against the background of overproduction of amyloid precursor protein (AβPP), accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), and hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein in the hippocampus and cortex. The development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is also accompanied by increased accumulation of Aβ in the retina. These published data suggest that the OXYS strain may serve as a spontaneous rat model of AD-like pathology and could help to decipher the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24552807

  20. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  1. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  2. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  3. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  4. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  5. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  6. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  7. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  8. Accelerators (5/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-09

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  9. Accelerators (4/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-08

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  10. Accelerators (3/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-07

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  11. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  12. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  13. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  14. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. KEK digital accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  16. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  17. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  18. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  19. [Markers of hepatitis virus].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Fumitaka

    2008-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the major viruses known to cause viral hepatitis. Serological markers are commonly used as diagnostic and/or prognostic indicators of acute or chronic HBV or HCV infection. The ability to detect HBV DNA in serum has been reported to have prognostic value for the outcome of chronic HBV infection. A rapid and sustained drop in HBV DNA or HCV RNA levels in patients under therapy has been shown to be a predictive factor for a favourable treatment outcome. Various techniques for detecting HBV DNA or HCV RNA have already been described; however, there are various problems with the sensitivity or detection range of those methods. New virus measuring methods have recently been reported and used. The Cobas Taq Man HCV Test is a new method to detect HBV DNA and HCV RNA with higher sensitivity and a broader range of quantitation than conventional methods. Some reports have shown that these methods improve therapy monitoring and the management of HBV or HCV infection. Moreover, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been reported in Japan. The clinical features and viral markers of HEV have also been described. PMID:19086457

  20. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  1. Background-Oriented Schlieren Characterization of Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo, Cynthia; Hargather, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Characterizing the energy release from large explosions is a difficult process using traditional point-pressure gages. The background oriented schlieren technique is used here to provide large-field-of-view visualization of the shock wave propagation from large-scale explosions. This technique is used to allow field-measurements of blast wave properties instead of traditional point-wise measurements. By analyzing the shock wave propagation Mach number the peak overpressure and overpressure duration are estimated for different explosions. The technique is applied to the visualization of encased explosions, including car bombs, to estimate the amount of shock energy lost to the fragmentation and acceleration of the casing. Comparisons are made to un-encased explosions. The optically measured data is compared to experimental data recorded using piezoelectric pressure transducers. Scaling relationships are examined to determine scalability of encased explosions.

  2. Accelerated universes from type IIA compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blåbäck, Johan; Danielsson, Ulf; Dibitetto, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    We study slow-roll accelerating cosmologies arising from geometric compactifications of type IIA string theory on T6/(Bbb Z2 × Bbb Z2). With the aid of a genetic algorithm, we are able to find quasi-de Sitter backgrounds with both slow-roll parameters of order 0.1. Furthermore, we study their evolution by numerically solving the corresponding time-dependent equations of motion, and we show that they actually display a few e-folds of accelerated expansion. Finally, we comment on their perturbative reliability.

  3. Transient acceleration in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jing-Zhao; Yang, Rong-Jia; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2016-02-01

    Recently an f(T) gravity based on the modification of teleparallel gravity was proposed to explain the accelerated expansion of the universe. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cosmic microwave background to constrain this f(T) theory and reconstruct the effective equation of state and the deceleration parameter. We obtain the best-fit values of parameters and find an interesting result that the constrained f(T) theory allows for the accelerated Hubble expansion to be a transient effect.

  4. Accelerated universes from type IIA compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blåbäck, Johan; Danielsson, Ulf; Dibitetto, Giuseppe E-mail: ulf.danielsson@physics.uu.se

    2014-03-01

    We study slow-roll accelerating cosmologies arising from geometric compactifications of type IIA string theory on T{sup 6}/(Z{sub 2}  ×  Z{sub 2}). With the aid of a genetic algorithm, we are able to find quasi-de Sitter backgrounds with both slow-roll parameters of order 0.1. Furthermore, we study their evolution by numerically solving the corresponding time-dependent equations of motion, and we show that they actually display a few e-folds of accelerated expansion. Finally, we comment on their perturbative reliability.

  5. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  6. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  7. Accelerated epigenetic aging in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Steve; Garagnani, Paolo; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Salvioli, Stefano; Gentilini, Davide; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Giuliani, Cristina; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Franceschi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) entails an increased risk of many chronic diseases that are typically associated with older age. The clinical manifestations of accelerated aging suggest that trisomy 21 increases the biological age of tissues, but molecular evidence for this hypothesis has been sparse. Here, we utilize a quantitative molecular marker of aging (known as the epigenetic clock) to demonstrate that trisomy 21 significantly increases the age of blood and brain tissue (on average by 6.6 years, P = 7.0 × 10−14). PMID:25678027

  8. Accelerated epigenetic aging in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Steve; Garagnani, Paolo; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Salvioli, Stefano; Gentilini, Davide; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Giuliani, Cristina; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Franceschi, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) entails an increased risk of many chronic diseases that are typically associated with older age. The clinical manifestations of accelerated aging suggest that trisomy 21 increases the biological age of tissues, but molecular evidence for this hypothesis has been sparse. Here, we utilize a quantitative molecular marker of aging (known as the epigenetic clock) to demonstrate that trisomy 21 significantly increases the age of blood and brain tissue (on average by 6.6 years, P = 7.0 × 10(-14)). PMID:25678027

  9. Background Reduction in Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.

    2005-09-08

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  10. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  11. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  12. Background Television and Reading Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, G. Blake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Tests G. Armstrong's and B. Greenberg's model of the effect of background television on cognitive performance, applied to reading comprehension and memory. Finds significant deleterious effects of background television, stronger and more consistent effects when testing immediately after reading, and more consistently negative effects resulting…

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam; Pigge, F. Christopher; Anderson, James; Kim, Yusung

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  14. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  15. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  16. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  17. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  18. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  19. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  20. Markers of vulnerability in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Prelipceanu, D

    2009-01-01

    Vulnerability in schizophrenia is an integrative concept, which tries to explain the development of schizophrenia as an interaction between different individual susceptibility factors and environmental risk factors. Vulnerability markers used in genetic studies include biochemical indicators, neuroanatomical, neurophysiologic, and cognitive abnormalities. Among those, the most extensive studied markers were: evoked potentials, smooth pursuit eye movements, and attentional deficits. Some of the potential indicators presented in this paper satisfy most of the criteria necessary for a vulnerability marker, but none meets all of them. Nevertheless, they represent important markers of risk to schizophrenia. Key words: vulnerability, evoked potentials, eye movements, attentional deficits PMID:20108534

  1. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  4. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  5. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  6. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  7. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  8. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  9. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  11. De Novo Assembly, Gene Annotation and Marker Development Using Illumina Paired-End Transcriptome Sequences in Celery (Apium graveolens L.)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Nan; Wang, Qian; Shen, Huo-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Celery is an increasing popular vegetable species, but limited transcriptome and genomic data hinder the research to it. In addition, a lack of celery molecular markers limits the process of molecular genetic breeding. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing is an efficient method to generate a large transcriptome sequence dataset for gene discovery, molecular marker development and marker-assisted selection breeding. Principal Findings Celery transcriptomes from four tissues were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 42,280 unigenes (average length of 502.6 bp) that represent the first transcriptome of the species. 78.43% and 48.93% of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) non-redundant protein database (Nr) and Swiss-Prot database respectively, and 10,473 (24.77%) unigenes were assigned to Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG). 21,126 (49.97%) unigenes harboring Interpro domains were annotated, in which 15,409 (36.45%) were assigned to Gene Ontology(GO) categories. Additionally, 7,478 unigenes were mapped onto 228 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG). Large numbers of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were indentified, and then the rate of successful amplication and polymorphism were investigated among 31 celery accessions. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of generating a large scale of sequence information by Illumina paired-end sequencing and efficient assembling. Our results provide a valuable resource for celery research. The developed molecular markers are the foundation of further genetic linkage analysis and gene localization, and they will be essential to accelerate the process of breeding. PMID:23469050

  12. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  13. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  14. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  15. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  16. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  17. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  18. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  19. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  20. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  1. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  2. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  3. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Evidence for Prodromal States and Early Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Joan L.; Navsaria, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Background: Childhood bipolar disorder remains a controversial but increasingly diagnosed disorder that is associated with significant impairment, chronic course and treatment resistance. Therefore, the search for prodromes or early markers of risk for later childhood bipolar disorder may be of great importance for prevention and/or early…

  4. Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Reconnection Acceleration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A.; Stone, E.; Decker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shock waves, as shown by simulations and observations, can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence, including magnetic islands. We consider a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes as an energization mechanism for charged particles. Observations of electron and ion distributions downstream of interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) are frequently inconsistent with the predictions of classical DSA. We utilize a recently developed transport theory for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets. Particle energization associated with the anti-reconnection electric field, a consequence of magnetic island merging, and magnetic island contraction, are considered. For the former only, we find that (i) the spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed, and (ii) the downstream solution is constant. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, (i) the accelerated spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed; (ii) the particle intensity for a given energy peaks downstream of the shock, and the distance to the peak location increases with increasing particle energy, and (iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x,c/{c}0)/f(0,c/{c}0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA, but increases with increasing particle energy. The general solution combines both the reconnection-induced electric field and plasmoid contraction. The observed energetic particle intensity profile observed by Voyager 2 downstream of the HTS appears to support a particle acceleration mechanism that combines both DSA and magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes.

  5. Is cosmic acceleration slowing down?

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the course of cosmic expansion in its recent past using the Constitution SN Ia sample, along with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy (DE) to vary, we find that a coasting model of the universe (q{sub 0}=0) fits the data about as well as Lambda cold dark matter. This effect, which is most clearly seen using the recently introduced Om diagnostic, corresponds to an increase of Om and q at redshifts z < or approx. 0.3. This suggests that cosmic acceleration may have already peaked and that we are currently witnessing its slowing down. The case for evolving DE strengthens if a subsample of the Constitution set consisting of SNLS+ESSENCE+CfA SN Ia data is analyzed in combination with BAO+CMB data. The effect we observe could correspond to DE decaying into dark matter (or something else)

  6. Low background techniques in XMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsushi

    2011-04-27

    The XMASS project aims to detect pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, neutrino-less double beta decay, and dark matter searches using ultra-pure liquid xenon. The first stage of XMASS project is concentrated on dark matter searches using 800 kg liquid xenon detector which requires low background and low threshold. Several techniques applied to XMASS detector for low background will be presented.

  7. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  8. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  9. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  10. Extracting the cosmic history from diffuse backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Jonathan Robin

    The modern picture of the Universe resembles a detective novel with the first page and the middle chapters removed and the ending unwritten. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have given cosmologists a snapshot of the Universe when it was only a few hundred thousand years old. At the same time, large galaxy surveys, such as SDSS and 2dF, have shed light on the distribution of matter in the local Universe. From the combination of these two data sets, cosmological parameters can be measured to percent accuracy. Two main frontiers remain: inflation, the domain of high-energy physics, and the epoch of reionization, the period connecting the linear age of the CMB with that of the present day. Added to this are the indications from supernovae of an acceleration in the expansion rate suggesting modifications to gravity or the presence of an esoteric new form of energy.In this work, we investigate uses of various radiation backgrounds for probing the different epochs of this cosmic history. We examine (i) the use of B-mode polarization of the CMB induced by an inflationary gravitational wave background to probe inflation, (ii) the importance of higher Lyman series photons in pumping of the 21 cm line and the consequences for the 21 cm signal from the first stars, (iii) the atomic physics of Lyman series photon scattering in the intergalactic medium and the consequences for heating and coupling of the 21 cm line, (iv) the possibility of using the 21 cm line to probe inhomogeneous X-ray heating of the IGM by a population of early X-ray sources, and (v) the impact of inhomogeneous reionization on galaxy formation and the consequences for our ability to use large galaxy surveys to constrain dark energy. Together, these chapters significantly extend our understanding of important windows into the early Universe.

  11. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  12. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  13. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  14. Using minimum DNA marker loci for accurate population classification in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using few DNA markers to classify genetic background of a germplasm pool will help breeders make a quick decision while saving time and resources. WHICHLOCI is a computer program that selects the best combination of loci for population assignment through empiric analysis of molecular marker data. Th...

  15. What Determines GCSE Marking Accuracy? An Exploration of Expertise among Maths and Physics Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suto, W. M. Irenka; Nadas, Rita

    2008-01-01

    Examination marking utilises a variety of cognitive processes, and from a psychological perspective, the demands that different questions place on markers will vary considerably. To what extent does marking accuracy vary among markers with differing backgrounds and experiences? More fundamentally, what makes some questions harder to mark…

  16. Development of genomic SSR markers for fingerprinting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and mapping genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major vegetable from the group of leafy vegetables. Several types of molecular markers were developed that are effictively used in lettuce breeding and genetic studies. However only a very limited number of microsattelite-based markers are publicly avai...

  17. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  18. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  19. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-15

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the {Lambda}CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  20. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  1. A next-generation marker genotyping platform (AmpSeq) in heterozygous crops: A case study for marker assisted selection in grapevine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become widely used in perennial crop breeding programs to accelerate and enhance cultivar development via selection during the juvenile phase and parental selection prior to crossing. Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used for whole genome molecular...

  2. A next-generation marker genotyping platform (AmpSeq) in heterozygous crops: a case study for marker assisted selection in grapevine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marker assisted selection (MAS) is often employed in crop breeding programs to accelerate and enhance cultivar development, via selection during the juvenile phase and parental selection prior to crossing. Next generation sequencing (NGS) and its derivative technologies have been used for genome-wid...

  3. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-27

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  4. Beamlets from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Perri, Silvia; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a realization of the stochastic Fermi acceleration mechanism. The model consists of test particles moving between two oscillating magnetic clouds and differs from the usual Fermi-Ulam model in two ways. (i) Particles can penetrate inside clouds before being reflected. (ii) Particles can radiate a fraction of their energy during the process. Since the Fermi mechanism is at work, particles are stochastically accelerated, even in the presence of the radiated energy. Furthermore, due to a kind of resonance between particles and oscillating clouds, the probability density function of particles is strongly modified, thus generating beams of accelerated particles rather than a translation of the whole distribution function to higher energy. This simple mechanism could account for the presence of beamlets in some space plasma physics situations.

  5. Acceleration radioisotope production simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-12-31

    We have identified 96 radionuclides now being used or under consideration for use in medical applications. Previously, we calculated the production of {sup 99}Mo from enriched and depleted uranium targets at the 800-MeV energy used in the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos. We now consider the production of isotopes using lower energy beams, which may become available as a result of new high-intensity spallation target accelerators now being planned. The production of four radionuclides ({sup 7}Be, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 99}Mo, and {sup 195m}Pt) in a simplified proton accelerator target design is being examined. The LAHET, MCNP, and CINDER90 codes were used to model the target, transport a beam of protons and secondary produced particles through the system, and compute the nuclide production from spallation and low-energy neutron interactions. Beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV were used, and several targets were considered for each nuclide.

  6. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  7. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  8. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  9. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  10. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.

  11. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries. PMID:20867363

  12. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  13. Photocathodes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Gray, E.R.; Giles, P.M.; Springer, R.W.; Loebs, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Some electron accelerator applications require bursts of short pulses at high microscopic repetition rates and high peak brightness. A photocathode, illuminated by a mode-locked laser, is well suited to filling this need. The intrinsic brightness of a photoemitter beam is high; experiments are under way at Los Alamos to study the brightness of short bunches with high space charge after acceleration. A laser-illuminated Cs/sub 3/Sb photoemitter is located in the first rf cavity of an injector linac. Diagnostics include a pepper-pot emittance analyzer, a magnetic spectrometer, and a streak camera.

  14. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  15. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  16. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  17. Marker-trait association analysis of functional gene markers for provitamin A levels across diverse tropical yellow maize inbred lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biofortification of staple crops is a cost effective and sustainable approach that can help combat vitamin A and other micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries. PCR -based DNA markers distinguishing alleles of three key genes of maize endosperm carotenoid biosynthesis (PSY1, lcyE and crtRB1) have been developed to facilitate maize provitamin A biofortification via marker assisted selection. Previous studies of these functional DNA markers revealed inconsistent effects. The germplasm previously employed for discovering and validating these functional markers was mainly of temperate origin containing low frequencies of the favourable allele of the most significant polymorphism, crtRB1-5′TE. Here, we investigate the vitamin A biofortification potential of these DNA markers in a germplasm panel of diverse tropical yellow maize inbred lines, with mixed genetic backgrounds of temperate and tropical germplasm to identify the most effective diagnostic markers for vitamin A biofortification. Results The functional DNA markers crtRB1-5′TE and crtRB1-3′TE were consistently and strongly associated with provitamin A content across the tropical maize inbred lines tested. The alleles detected by these two functional markers were in high linkage disequilibrium (R2 = 0.75) and occurred in relatively high frequency (18%). Genotypes combining the favourable alleles at the two loci (N = 20) displayed a 3.22 fold average increase in β-carotene content compared to those genotypes lacking the favourable alleles (N = 106). The PSY1 markers were monomorphic across all of the inbred lines. The functional DNA markers for lcyE were associated with lutein, and with the ratio of carotenoids in the alpha and beta branches, but not with provitamin A levels. However, the combined effects of the two genes were stronger than their individual effects on all carotenoids. Conclusions Tropical maize inbred lines harbouring the favourable alleles of the crtRB1-5

  18. Atmospheric Neutrinos: Background and Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Mocioiu, Irina

    2010-11-24

    We discuss a brief history of atmospheric neutrinos, from background to proton decay searches to proving neutrino oscillations. We then discuss how high statistics atmospheric neutrino measurements in the IceCube Deep Core Array can provide useful information about neutrino oscillation parameters and other neutrino properties.

  19. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Naktani, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-08-01

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  20. Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, G.B.; Franklin, J.F.; Kohler, A.; Croze, H.; Boelcke, C.

    1986-12-01

    One of the more significant problems when trying to determine what impact is having on global cycles is not knowing what ''natural'' levels should be for both abiotic (gases, trace elements) and biotic (ecosystem functions) processes. The authors believe that a well designed, coordinated network of baseline stations in remote areas around the world can provide a data base will allow best current estimates to be made of biotic and abiotic baseline conditions. These baseline conditions will then help us make better comparisons with more impacted areas, and thus help us more fully understand the impact man is having on his world. This paper examines the history of background pollution monitoring at the international level, describes current activities in the field of ''integrated'' background monitoring, and proposes criteria for the development of a global network of baseline stations to coordinate background monitoring for the presence, accumulation and behavior of pollutants in remote ecosystems. In this paper, this network is called the Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network.

  1. Educational Choice. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This paper addresses school choice, one proposal to address parental involvement concerns, focusing on historical background, definitions, rationale for advocating choice, implementation strategies, and implications for minorities and low-income families. In the past, transfer payment programs such as tuition tax credits and vouchers were…

  2. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  3. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  4. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  5. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  6. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  7. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  8. Prospects for Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Accelerator technology today is a greater than US$5 billion per annum business. Development of higher-performance technology with improved reliability that delivers reduced system size and life cycle cost is expected to significantly increase the total accelerator technology market and open up new application sales. Potential future directions are identified and pitfalls in new market penetration are considered. Both of the present big market segments, medical radiation therapy units and semiconductor ion implanters, are approaching the "maturity" phase of their product cycles, where incremental development rather than paradigm shifts is the norm, but they should continue to dominate commercial sales for some time. It is anticipated that large discovery-science accelerators will continue to provide a specialty market beset by the unpredictable cycles resulting from the scale of the projects themselves, coupled with external political and economic drivers. Although fraught with differing market entry difficulties, the security and environmental markets, together with new, as yet unrealized, industrial material processing applications, are expected to provide the bulk of future commercial accelerator technology growth.

  9. Radioisotope Dating with Accelerators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Explains a new method of detecting radioactive isotopes by counting their accelerated ions rather than the atoms that decay during the counting period. This method increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and allows one to find the ages of much older and smaller samples. (GA)

  10. The neutrino electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Bethe, H.A.; Dawson, J.M.; Mendonca, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that a wake of electron plasma oscillations can be created by the nonlinear ponderomotive force of an intense neutrino flux. The electrons trapped in the plasma wakefield will be accelerated to high energies. Such processes may be important in supernovas and pulsars. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. FPGA Verification Accelerator (FVAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Jane; Burke, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Is Verification Acceleration Possible? - Increasing the visibility of the internal nodes of the FPGA results in much faster debug time - Forcing internal signals directly allows a problem condition to be setup very quickly center dot Is this all? - No, this is part of a comprehensive effort to improve the JPL FPGA design and V&V process.

  12. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the axial velocity profile and electromagnetic structure of a high power, quasi-steady MPD discharge are used to formulate a gasdynamic model of the acceleration process. Conceptually dividing the accelerated plasma into an inner flow and an outer flow, it is found that more than two-thirds of the total power in the plasma is deposited in the inner flow, accelerating it to an exhaust velocity of 12.5 km/sec. The outer flow, which is accelerated to a velocity of only 6.2 km/sec, appears to provide a current conduction path between the inner flow and the anode. Related cathode studies have shown that the critical current for the onset of terminal voltage fluctuations, which was recently shown to be a function of the cathode area, appears to reach an asymptote for cathodes of very large surface area. Detailed floating potential measurements show that the fluctuations are confined to the vicinity of the cathode and hence reflect a cathode emission process rather than a fundamental limit on MPD performance.

  13. Combined generating-accelerating buncher for compact linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, E. A.; Matsievskiy, S. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Sokolov, I. D.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Described in the previous article [1] method of the power extraction from the modulated electron beam has been applied to the compact standing wave electron linear accelerator feeding system, which doesnt require any connection waveguides between the power source and the accelerator itself [2]. Generating and accelerating bunches meet in the hybrid accelerating cell operating at TM020 mode, thus the accelerating module is placed on the axis of the generating module, which consists from the pulsed high voltage electron sources and electrons dumps. This combination makes the accelerator very compact in size which is very valuable for the modern applications such as portable inspection sources. Simulations and geometry cold tests are presented.

  14. [Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Enooku, Kenichiro; Shiina, Shuichiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Three tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are available in Japan: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II (PIVKA-II), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3). Although AFP has drawbacks in its specificity, it is widely utilized in treatment evaluation and prognosis prediction. PIVKA-II is a unique marker that does not correlate with AFP value and can predict microvascular invasion. AFP-L3 is a highly specific marker and strong predictor of poor prognosis. These three markers are indispensable in every aspect of clinical practice of hepatocellular carcinoma including surveillance, diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and prognosis prediction.

  15. Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: B2M; B 2 M; β2-Microglobulin; Thymotaxin Formal name: Beta 2 ...

  16. Menopause accelerates biological aging.

    PubMed

    Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Chen, Brian H; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D J; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Horvath, Steve

    2016-08-16

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the "epigenetic clock"), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  17. [Laboratory markers of melanoma progression].

    PubMed

    Bánfalvi, Teodóra; Edesné, Mariann B; Gergye, Mária; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Orosz, Zsolt; Gilde, Katalin; Kremmer, Tibor; Ottó, Szabolcs; Tímár, József

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular tumour markers may have potential role in the follow-up of patients with malignant melanoma, in therapy monitoring and in prediction of prognosis. In our article circulating tumour markers in melanoma (melanoma inhibitory activity, lipid bound sialic acid, neuron specific enolase, TA90 immune complex, S-100B protein, 5-S-cysteinyldopa, tyrosinase, cytokines, metalloproteinases, LDH) were reviewed. Among laboratory melanoma markers the S-100B protein is the most investigated. S-100B protein has high specificity, appropriate sensitivity and proved to be significant prognostic factor independent from stages. High serum values are associated with shorter survival. However, before S-100B monitoring immunohistochemistry for the detection of S-100B is required. In the case of malignant melanomas with low expression serum S-100B monitoring may not be sensitive enough to follow disease progression. Although the serum concentration of 5-S-cysteinyldopa did not prove to be independent prognostic factor in our previous studies comprising the highest patient number in the literature, the marker was suggested for therapy monitoring. The survival analysis indicated that the elevated 5-S-cysteinyldopa level predicts shorter survival. In spite of the calculated low correlation between the two markers, parallel elevation of S-100B protein and 5-S-cysteinyldopa indicated shorter survival. On the basis of the literature LDH is the most appropriate tumour marker in stage IV to predict prognosis, but its sensitivity and specificity could not achieve that of S-100B protein. S-100B and LDH proved to be similarly reliable in respect to the clinical outcome. Determination of serum concentration of MIA and tyrosinase are also reliable markers in malignant melanoma. The other investigated markers are not well known yet or do not provide useful information to the clinicians. PMID:12704461

  18. Opportunities of marker-assisted selection for rice fragrance through marker-trait association analysis of microsatellites and gene-based markers.

    PubMed

    Golestan Hashemi, F S; Rafii, M Y; Razi Ismail, M; Mohamed, M T M; Rahim, H A; Latif, M A; Aslani, F

    2015-09-01

    Developing fragrant rice through marker-assisted/aided selection (MAS) is an economical and profitable approach worldwide for the enrichment of an elite genetic background with a pleasant aroma. The PCR-based DNA markers that distinguish the alleles of major fragrance genes in rice have been synthesised to develop rice scent biofortification through MAS. Thus, the present study examined the aroma biofortification potential of these co-dominant markers in a germplasm panel of 189 F2 progeny developed from crosses between a non-aromatic variety (MR84) and a highly aromatic but low-yielding variety (MRQ74) to determine the most influential diagnostic markers for fragrance biofortification. The SSRs and functional DNA markers RM5633 (on chromosome 4), RM515, RM223, L06, NKSbad2, FMbadh2-E7, BADEX7-5, Aro7 and SCU015RM (on chromosome 8) were highly associated with the 2AP (2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) content across the population. The alleles traced via these markers were also in high linkage disequilibrium (R(2) > 0.70) and explained approximately 12.1, 27.05, 27.05, 27.05, 25.42, 25.42, 20.53, 20.43 and 20.18% of the total phenotypic variation observed for these biomarkers, respectively. F2 plants harbouring the favourable alleles of these effective markers produced higher levels of fragrance. Hence, these rice plants can be used as donor parents to increase the development of fragrance-biofortified tropical rice varieties adapted to growing conditions and consumer preferences, thus contributing to the global rice market. PMID:25865409

  19. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  20. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  1. WFC3/UVIS Sky Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia; Anderson, Jay

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the on-orbit background levels present in WFC3/UVIS full-frame images. The results are based on nearly all standard readout images taken since the installation of WFC3 on HST in May 2009, with a relatively small number of exclusions e.g. images with obvious anomalous backgrounds (such as extended targets filling the field of view) or those taken with the quad filters (different bandpass in each amp). Comparisons are provided to estimates from the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC). We anticipate these results to be helpful in fine-tuning the level of post-flash required to achieve the optimum balance of charge transfter efficiency (CTE) loss mitigation versus noise penalty. Observers considering the use of post-flash should refer to the White Paper (MacKenty & Smith 2012) on the CTE WWW page (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/ins_performance/CTE/).

  2. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks. I. Acceleration efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2014-03-10

    We use two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations to investigate particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification at non-relativistic astrophysical shocks. We show that diffusive shock acceleration operates for quasi-parallel configurations (i.e., when the background magnetic field is almost aligned with the shock normal) and, for large sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers, produces universal power-law spectra ∝p {sup –4}, where p is the particle momentum. The maximum energy of accelerated ions increases with time, and it is only limited by finite box size and run time. Acceleration is mainly efficient for parallel and quasi-parallel strong shocks, where 10%-20% of the bulk kinetic energy can be converted to energetic particles and becomes ineffective for quasi-perpendicular shocks. Also, the generation of magnetic turbulence correlates with efficient ion acceleration and vanishes for quasi-perpendicular configurations. At very oblique shocks, ions can be accelerated via shock drift acceleration, but they only gain a factor of a few in momentum and their maximum energy does not increase with time. These findings are consistent with the degree of polarization and the morphology of the radio and X-ray synchrotron emission observed, for instance, in the remnant of SN 1006. We also discuss the transition from thermal to non-thermal particles in the ion spectrum (supra-thermal region) and we identify two dynamical signatures peculiar of efficient particle acceleration, namely, the formation of an upstream precursor and the alteration of standard shock jump conditions.

  3. Quantum chromodynamics in background fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Zheng

    1989-02-01

    We try to build a framework for quantum chromodynamics in background fields. The nonvanishing vacuum condensates are described by the classical fields, while the corresponding quantum fields are quantized in the Furry representation and the physical states are defined in the physical QCD vacuum. The complete quark and gluon propagators are discussed in this framework and running condensate parameters are introduced by the renormalization requirement. A modified Callan-Symanzik equation is derived by taking account of the nonperturbative corrections.

  4. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  5. The isotropic radio background revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  6. Plutonium measurements near background levels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of a nationwide nuclear weapons research, development, and production complex administered by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Low-levels of environmental Plutonium occurs in and about RFP as a result of plant operations. Plutonium is a key element in remediation investigations and surface water discharge limits. Most of the plutonium analyses at RFP measure concentrations at or near background levels. Measurements often show little, if any, plutonium in the media being sampled, except at known contamination sites. Many plutonium results are less than the calculated minimum detectable-level (MDL). (MDL is an a priori estimate of the activity concentration that can be practically achieved under a specified set of typical measurement conditions.) This paper investigates the relationship between plutonium concentrations and the counting uncertainty when measurements are near background, and suggests why the MDL should not be used as a criteria for limiting data. Issues with defining site background and determining attainment of standards are presented.

  7. Plutonium measurements near background levels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of a nationwide nuclear weapons research, development, and production complex administered by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Low-levels of environmental Plutonium occurs in and about RFP as a result of plant operations. Plutonium is a key element in remediation investigations and surface water discharge limits. Most of the plutonium analyses at RFP measure concentrations at or near background levels. Measurements often show little, if any, plutonium in the media being sampled, except at known contamination sites. Many plutonium results are less than the calculated minimum detectable-level (MDL). (MDL is an a priori estimate of the activity concentration that can be practically achieved under a specified set of typical measurement conditions.) This paper investigates the relationship between plutonium concentrations and the counting uncertainty when measurements are near background, and suggests why the MDL should not be used as a criteria for limiting data. Issues with defining site background and determining attainment of standards are presented.

  8. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  9. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  10. Can background cosmology hold the key for modified gravity tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceron-Hurtado, Juan J.; He, Jian-hua; Li, Baojiu

    2016-09-01

    Modified gravity theories are a popular alternative to dark energy as a possible explanation for the observed accelerating cosmic expansion, and their cosmological tests are currently an active research field. Studies in recent years have been increasingly focused on testing these theories in the nonlinear regime, which is computationally demanding. Here we show that, under certain circumstances, a whole class of theories can be ruled out by using background cosmology alone. This is possible because certain classes of models (i) are fundamentally incapable of producing specific background expansion histories, and (ii) said histories are incompatible with local gravity tests. As an example, we demonstrate that a popular class of models, f (R ) gravity, would not be viable if observations suggest even a slight deviation of the background expansion history from that of the Λ CDM paradigm.

  11. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  12. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Geza S

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  13. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  14. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  15. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  16. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  17. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data were combined with one-dimensional conservation relations to yield information on the energy deposition ratio in a parallel-plate accelerator, where the downstream flow was confined to a constant area channel. Approximately 70% of the total input power was detected in the exhaust flow, of which only about 20% appeared as directed kinetic energy, thus implying that a downstream expansion to convert chamber enthalpy into kinetic energy must be an important aspect of conventional high power MPD arcs. Spectroscopic experiments on a quasi-steady MPD argon accelerator verified the presence of A(III) and the absence of A(I), and indicated an azimuthal structure in the jet related to the mass injection locations. Measurements of pressure in the arc chamber and impact pressure in the exhaust jet using a piezocrystal backed by a Plexiglas rod were in good agreement with the electromagnetic thrust model.

  19. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.; Saadatmand, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth`s magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth`s atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  20. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  1. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  2. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  3. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  4. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  5. Acceleration of cosmic rays in Tycho's SNR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Caprioli, D.

    We apply the non-linear diffusive shock acceleration theory in order to describe the properties of SN 1572 (G120.1+1.4, hereafter simply Tycho). By analyzing its multi-wavelength spectrum, we show how Tycho's forward shock (FS) is accelerating protons up to ˜ 500 TeV, channeling into cosmic rays more than 10 per cent of its kinetic energy. We find that the streaming instability induced by cosmic rays is consistent with all the observational evidences indicating a very efficient magnetic field amplification (up to ˜ 300 mu G), in particular the X-ray morphology of the remnant. We are able to explain the gamma-ray spectrum from the GeV up to the TeV band, recently measured respectively by Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, as due to pion decay produced in nuclear collisions by accelerated nuclei scattering against the background gas. We also show that emission due to the accelerated electrons does not play a relevant role in the observed gamma-ray spectrum.

  6. Computer assisted accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.

    1993-04-14

    The challenge of tuning an induction accelerator in real time has been addressed with the new TUNE GUIDE code. The code initializes a beam at a particular position using a tracer particle representation of the phase space. The particles are transported, using a matrix formulation, element by element along the beamline assuming that the field of a solenoid, or steering element is constant over its length. The other allowed elements are gaps and drift sections. A great deal of effort has been spent programming TUNE GUIDE to operate under the IBMPC Windows 3.1 system. This system features an intuitive, menu driven interface, which provides an ability to rapidly change beamline component parameter values. Consequently various accelerator setups can be explored and new values determined in real time while the accelerator is operating. In addition the code has the capability of varying a capability value over a range and then plotting the resulting beam properties, such as radius or centroid position, at a down stream position. Element parameter editing is also included along with an on-line hyper text oriented help package.

  7. TRACKING ACCELERATOR SETTINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    D OTTAVIO,T.; FU, W.; OTTAVIO, D.P.

    2007-10-15

    Recording setting changes within an accelerator facility provides information that can be used to answer questions about when, why, and how changes were made to some accelerator system. This can be very useful during normal operations, but can also aid with security concerns and in detecting unusual software behavior. The Set History System (SHS) is a new client-server system developed at the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide these capabilities. The SHS has been operational for over two years and currently stores about IOOK settings per day into a commercial database management system. The SHS system consists of a server written in Java, client tools written in both Java and C++, and a web interface for querying the database of setting changes. The design of the SHS focuses on performance, portability, and a minimal impact on database resources. In this paper, we present an overview of the system design along with benchmark results showing the performance and reliability of the SHS over the last year.

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples.

  9. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  10. ACCELERATION INTEGRATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, D.F.

    1961-08-29

    An acceleration responsive device is described. A housing has at one end normally open electrical contacts and contains a piston system with a first part of non-magnetic material having metering orifices in the side walls for forming an air bearing between it and the walls of the housing; this first piston part is normally held against the other end of the housing from the noted contacts by a second piston or reset part. The reset part is of partly magnetic material, is separable from the flrst piston part, and is positioned within the housing intermediate the contacts and the first piston part. A magnet carried by the housing imposes a retaining force upon the reset part, along with a helical compression spring that is between the reset part and the end with the contacts. When a predetermined acceleration level is attained, the reset part overcomes the bias or retaining force provided by the magnet and the spring'' snaps'' into a depression in the housing adjacent the contacts. The first piston part is then free to move toward the contacts with its movement responsive tc acceleration forces and the metering orifices. (AEC)

  11. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  12. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  13. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  14. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    PubMed

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background. PMID:26181392

  15. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field.

  16. Improved Heterosis Prediction by Combining Information on DNA- and Metabolic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Tanja; Steinfath, Matthias; Andorf, Sandra; Lisec, Jan; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Altmann, Thomas; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background Hybrids represent a cornerstone in the success story of breeding programs. The fundamental principle underlying this success is the phenomenon of hybrid vigour, or heterosis. It describes an advantage of the offspring as compared to the two parental lines with respect to parameters such as growth and resistance against abiotic or biotic stress. Dominance, overdominance or epistasis based models are commonly used explanations. Conclusion/Significance The heterosis level is clearly a function of the combination of the parents used for offspring production. This results in a major challenge for plant breeders, as usually several thousand combinations of parents have to be tested for identifying the best combinations. Thus, any approach to reliably predict heterosis levels based on properties of the parental lines would be highly beneficial for plant breeding. Methodology/Principal Findings Recently, genetic data have been used to predict heterosis. Here we show that a combination of parental genetic and metabolic markers, identified via feature selection and minimum-description-length based regression methods, significantly improves the prediction of biomass heterosis in resulting offspring. These findings will help furthering our understanding of the molecular basis of heterosis, revealing, for instance, the presence of nonlinear genotype-phenotype relationships. In addition, we describe a possible approach for accelerated selection in plant breeding. PMID:19370148

  17. Computerized background-oriented schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, G. E. A.

    2002-06-01

    A schlieren measurement technique based on computer evaluation of image variations due to refractive index variations in the propagation medium is presented; in what follows, this concept is referred to as the "background-oriented schlieren" (BOS) method. The differences between BOS and other optical techniques for refractive index measurement are the governing role of numerical methods, the extremely small amount of optical equipment, the high accuracy, the bidirectional sensitivity, the fast evaluation, and the missing field limitations. The principle of the method is the numerical comparison of a schlieren distorted and an undistorted image of a deliberate background. The method has become usable in practice owing to the immense progress in computing power and to newly developed fast-correlation algorithms. The extension of this method to space resolving techniques is possible. Some experimental studies show the applicability. Examples are a mixing turbulent jet, a supersonic jet, a shed vortex, and the sound wave of a gun shot. These few results underline the encouraging prospect for the future applicability of this technique. The BOS method offers not only the possibility of qualitative and quantitative schlieren investigations but also has the potential to determine density fields by integration of the measured gradient fields.

  18. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  19. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  20. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  1. Particle acceleration on Galactic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, W. I.

    The history of and current ideas concerning the origin of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and in extragalactic sources are surveyed. The observed properties of Galactic cosmic rays and shock acceleration are discussed. It is argued that shock acceleration in various guises is an essential and conceptually the most economical acceleration mechanism.

  2. Marker imputation in barley association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping requires higher marker density than linkage mapping, potentially leading to more missing marker data and to higher genotyping costs. In human genetics, methods exist to impute missing marker data and whole markers that were typed in a reference panel but not in the experimental d...

  3. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  4. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  5. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  6. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  7. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  8. Markers of bile duct tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Paladina, Isabella; Rando, Alessandra; Uccello, Mario; Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Carnazzo, Santo; Alessandria, Innocenza; Mazzarino, Clorinda

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas are relatively rare, representing less than 1% of cancers. However, their incidence has increased in Japan and in industrialized countries like the USA. Biliary tract tumors have a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because they are usually detected late in the course of the disease; therapeutic treatment options are often limited and of minimal utility. Recent studies have shown the importance of serum and molecular markers in the diagnosis and follow up of biliary tract tumors. This review aims to introduce the main features of the most important serum and molecular markers of biliary tree tumors. Some considerable tumor markers are cancer antigen 125, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, chromogranin A, mucin 1, mucin 5, alpha-fetoprotein, claudins and cytokeratins. PMID:21528090

  9. A High-Resolution InDel (Insertion–Deletion) Markers-Anchored Consensus Genetic Map Identifies Major QTLs Governing Pod Number and Seed Yield in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rishi; Singh, Mohar; Bajaj, Deepak; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    Development and large-scale genotyping of user-friendly informative genome/gene-derived InDel markers in natural and mapping populations is vital for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding applications of chickpea with minimal resource expenses. The present investigation employed a high-throughput whole genome next-generation resequencing strategy in low and high pod number parental accessions and homozygous individuals constituting the bulks from each of two inter-specific mapping populations [(Pusa 1103 × ILWC 46) and (Pusa 256 × ILWC 46)] to develop non-erroneous InDel markers at a genome-wide scale. Comparing these high-quality genomic sequences, 82,360 InDel markers with reference to kabuli genome and 13,891 InDel markers exhibiting differentiation between low and high pod number parental accessions and bulks of aforementioned mapping populations were developed. These informative markers were structurally and functionally annotated in diverse coding and non-coding sequence components of genome/genes of kabuli chickpea. The functional significance of regulatory and coding (frameshift and large-effect mutations) InDel markers for establishing marker-trait linkages through association/genetic mapping was apparent. The markers detected a greater amplification (97%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (58–87%) among a diverse panel of cultivated desi, kabuli, and wild accessions even by using a simpler cost-efficient agarose gel-based assay implicating their utility in large-scale genetic analysis especially in domesticated chickpea with narrow genetic base. Two high-density inter-specific genetic linkage maps generated using aforesaid mapping populations were integrated to construct a consensus 1479 InDel markers-anchored high-resolution (inter-marker distance: 0.66 cM) genetic map for efficient molecular mapping of major QTLs governing pod number and seed yield per plant in chickpea. Utilizing these high-density genetic maps as anchors, three major

  10. A High-Resolution InDel (Insertion–Deletion) Markers-Anchored Consensus Genetic Map Identifies Major QTLs Governing Pod Number and Seed Yield in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rishi; Singh, Mohar; Bajaj, Deepak; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    Development and large-scale genotyping of user-friendly informative genome/gene-derived InDel markers in natural and mapping populations is vital for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding applications of chickpea with minimal resource expenses. The present investigation employed a high-throughput whole genome next-generation resequencing strategy in low and high pod number parental accessions and homozygous individuals constituting the bulks from each of two inter-specific mapping populations [(Pusa 1103 × ILWC 46) and (Pusa 256 × ILWC 46)] to develop non-erroneous InDel markers at a genome-wide scale. Comparing these high-quality genomic sequences, 82,360 InDel markers with reference to kabuli genome and 13,891 InDel markers exhibiting differentiation between low and high pod number parental accessions and bulks of aforementioned mapping populations were developed. These informative markers were structurally and functionally annotated in diverse coding and non-coding sequence components of genome/genes of kabuli chickpea. The functional significance of regulatory and coding (frameshift and large-effect mutations) InDel markers for establishing marker-trait linkages through association/genetic mapping was apparent. The markers detected a greater amplification (97%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (58–87%) among a diverse panel of cultivated desi, kabuli, and wild accessions even by using a simpler cost-efficient agarose gel-based assay implicating their utility in large-scale genetic analysis especially in domesticated chickpea with narrow genetic base. Two high-density inter-specific genetic linkage maps generated using aforesaid mapping populations were integrated to construct a consensus 1479 InDel markers-anchored high-resolution (inter-marker distance: 0.66 cM) genetic map for efficient molecular mapping of major QTLs governing pod number and seed yield per plant in chickpea. Utilizing these high-density genetic maps as anchors, three major

  11. Urine markers of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the current state of the art with regard to urine markers of interstitial cystitis (IC), and describes the areas that need continuing research. Articles referenced in MEDLINE that describe urine alterations in IC were reviewed. Additional articles were identified by cross-referencing. The different marker alterations were tabulated. The relevant articles were discussed, considering different purposes for urine markers including: (1) diagnosing IC; (2) confirming a specific pathophysiology for IC; and (3) predicting or following response to a specific treatment. Currently, 2 markers (glycoprotein-51 and antiproliferative factor [APF]) clearly separate IC and control subjects, with minimal overlap. Markers that correlate with specific bladder biopsy features include 1,4-methylimidazole acetic acid and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which correlate with mast cell density, and interleukin (IL)-6, which correlates with mononuclear inflammation. Markers that changed after treatment were as follows: (1) nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased with oral L-arginine; (2) ECP decreased with subcutaneous heparin; (3) prostaglandin E(2) and kallikrein decreased after bladder distention; (4) neutrophil chemotactic activity decreased after dimethyl sulfoxide; (5) IL-2 inhibitor decreased after oral nifedipine; (6) IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 decreased after bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine; and (7) APF and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor changed to or toward normal levels after bladder distention or sacral nerve stimulation. A larger number of urine alterations have been reported, and a few are being pursued further by correlating with bladder biopsy findings or treatment responses. Further research is needed.

  12. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  13. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  14. A Support System for Motion Training Using Motion Capture and Acceleration Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Onai, Rikio

    This paper presents a support system for motion training for dances, sports, gestures, etc. In our previous study, we developed a prototype system for supporting motion training using motion caputure, i.e., marker tracking using a DV camera. The prototype system scores a user's motion by comparing tracking data of the user and a model with DP matching. The prototype system has a limit that it cannot accurately obtain acceleration of each part of the body because marker tracking using a DV camera cannot obtain three dimensional motion. By this limit, two different motions sometimes cannot be distinguished. For more effective motion training, in this study, we propose a system combining motion capture and acceleration sensors. We have examined the effectiveness of using acceleration sensors in motion training by comparing the proposed system with the prototype system. Experimental results have shown that two different motions can be more clearly distinguished by using the acceleration sensors.

  15. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U B; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world's first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145 K markers along with 5 K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of 'mono' repeat (76.82%) over 'di' repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ∼2 cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6 Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait of

  16. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U B; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world's first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145 K markers along with 5 K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of 'mono' repeat (76.82%) over 'di' repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ∼2 cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6 Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait of

  17. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U.B.; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world’s first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145 K markers along with 5 K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of ‘mono’ repeat (76.82%) over ‘di’ repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ∼2 cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6 Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait

  18. Markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    COPD is a complex disease with multiple pathological components, which we unfortunately tend to ignore when spirometry is used as the only method to evaluate the disorder. Additional measures are needed to allow a more complete and clinically relevant assessment of COPD. The earliest potential risk factors of disease in COPD are variations in the genetic background. Genetic variations are present from conception and can determine lifelong changes in enzyme activities and protein concentrations. In contrast, measurements in blood, sputum, exhaled breath, broncho-alveolar lavage, and lung biopsies may vary substantially over time. This review explores potential markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD by examining genetic markers in the α1-antitrypsin, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and MBL-2 genes, and by examining the biochemical markers fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP), which correlate with degree of pulmonary inflammation during stable conditions of COPD. Chronic lung inflammation appears to contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD, and markers of this process have promising predictive value in COPD. To implement markers for COPD in clinical practice, besides those already established for the α1-antitrypsin gene, further research and validation studies are needed. PMID:19436688

  19. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Because angular anisotropies and spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation are judged to be inevitable at some level, in a realistic cosmological model, the evidence for spectral distortions and its theoretical implications are described. The evidence for anisotropy is then discussed, and theoretical predictions of radiation anisotropy are summarized and compared with the data available. It is found that spectral distortions at the 3-sigma level near the peak of the blackbody spectrum, although inconsistent with the predicted distortions due to Compton scattering in the early universe, are elegantly interpreted in terms of radiation from an early, pregalactic generation of massive stars which had been thermalized by a modest amount of dust at high redshift. The quadrupole anisotropy at the 4-sigma level is most simply interpreted in terms of the large-scale structure of the universe.

  20. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  2. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  3. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  4. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  5. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  6. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  7. The microwave background anisotropies: observations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation-fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 microK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1 degrees and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe--the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century.

  8. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  9. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  10. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  11. Isolation and characterization of new highly polymorphic DNA markers from the Huntington disease region

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.; Hedrick, A.; Andrew, S.; Riess, O.; Collins, C.; Kowbel, D.; Hayden, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    The defect causing Huntington disease (HD) has been mapped to 4p16.3, distal to the DNA marker D4S10. Subsequently, additional polymorphic markers closer to the HD gene have been isolated, which has led to the establishment of predictive testing programs for individuals at risk for HD. Approximately 17% of persons presenting to the Canadian collaborative study for predictive testing for HD have not received any modification of risk, in part because of limited informativeness of currently available DNA markers. Therefore, more highly polymorphic DNA markers are needed, which well further increase the accuracy and availability of predictive testing, specifically for families with complex or incomplete pedigree structures. In addition, new markers are urgently needed in order to refine the breakpoints in the few known recombinant HD chromosomes, which could allow a more accurate localization of the HD gene within 4p16.3 and, therefore, accelerate the cloning of the disease gene. In this study, the authors present the identification and characterization of nine new polymorphic DNA markers, including three markers which detect highly informative multiallelic VNTR-like polymorphisms with PIC values of up to .84. These markers have been isolated from a cloned region of DNA which has been previously mapped approximately 1,000 kb from the 4p telomere.

  12. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  13. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  14. Ion wave breaking acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Bamberg, K.-U.; Ma, W. J.; Liu, J.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-07-01

    Laser driven ion wave breaking acceleration (IWBA) in plasma wakefields is investigated by means of a one-dimensional (1D) model and 1D/3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. IWBA operates in relativistic transparent plasma for laser intensities in the range of 1020- 1023 W /cm2 . The threshold for IWBA is identified in the plane of plasma density and laser amplitude. In the region just beyond the threshold, self-injection takes place only for a fraction of ions and in a limited time period. This leads to well collimated ion pulses with peaked energy spectra, in particular for 3D geometry.

  15. Novel Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of molecular biomarkers assures that breast cancer (BC) patients receive optimal treatment. Established biomarkers, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and Ki67, have been playing significant roles in the subcategorization of BC to predict the prognosis and decide the specific therapy to each patient. Antihormonal therapy using 4-hydroxytamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors have been employed in patients whose tumor cells express hormone receptors, while monoclonal antibody to HER2 has been administered to HER2-positive BCs. Although new therapeutic agents have been developed in the past few decades, many patients still die of the disease due to relapse; thus, novel molecular markers that predict therapeutic failure and those that can be targets for specific therapy are expected. We have chosen four of such molecules by reviewing recent publications, which are cyclin E, B-Myb, Twist, and DMP1β. The oncogenicity of these molecules has been demonstrated in vivo and/or in vitro through studies using transgenic mice or siRNAs, and their expressions have been shown to be associated with shortened overall or disease-free survival of BC patients. The former three molecules have been shown to accelerate epithelial–mesenchymal transition that is often associated with cancer stem cell-ness and metastasis; all these four can be novel therapeutic targets as well. Thus, large prospective studies employing immunohistochemistry will be needed to establish the predictive values of these molecules in patients with BC. PMID:26997872

  16. Data Series Subtraction with Unknown and Unmodeled Background Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Congedo, Giuseppe; Dolesi, Rita; Ferroni, Valerio; Hueller, Mauro; Vetrugno, Daniele; Weber, William Joseph; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Hewitson, Martin; Korsakova, Natalia; Ferraioli, Luigi; Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Inchauspe, Henri; Plagnol, Eric; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul W.; Armano, Michele; Thorpe, James Ira; Wass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the precursor mission to a gravitational wave observatory of the European Space Agency, will measure the degree to which two test masses can be put into free fall, aiming to demonstrate a suppression of disturbance forces corresponding to a residual relative acceleration with a power spectral density (PSD) below (30 fm/sq s/Hz)(sup 2) around 1 mHz. In LPF data analysis, the disturbance forces are obtained as the difference between the acceleration data and a linear combination of other measured data series. In many circumstances, the coefficients for this linear combination are obtained by fitting these data series to the acceleration, and the disturbance forces appear then as the data series of the residuals of the fit. Thus the background noise or, more precisely, its PSD, whose knowledge is needed to build up the likelihood function in ordinary maximum likelihood fitting, is here unknown, and its estimate constitutes instead one of the goals of the fit. In this paper we present a fitting method that does not require the knowledge of the PSD of the background noise. The method is based on the analytical marginalization of the posterior parameter probability density with respect to the background noise PSD, and returns an estimate both for the fitting parameters and for the PSD. We show that both these estimates are unbiased, and that, when using averaged Welchs periodograms for the residuals, the estimate of the PSD is consistent, as its error tends to zero with the inverse square root of the number of averaged periodograms. Additionally, we find that the method is equivalent to some implementations of iteratively reweighted least-squares fitting. We have tested the method both on simulated data of known PSD and on data from several experiments performed with the LISA Pathfinder end-to-end mission simulator.

  17. Data series subtraction with unknown and unmodeled background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Congedo, Giuseppe; Dolesi, Rita; Ferroni, Valerio; Hueller, Mauro; Vetrugno, Daniele; Weber, William Joseph; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Hewitson, Martin; Korsakova, Natalia; Ferraioli, Luigi; Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Inchauspe, Henri; Plagnol, Eric; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul W.; Armano, Michele; Thorpe, James Ira; Wass, Peter

    2014-08-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the precursor mission to a gravitational wave observatory of the European Space Agency, will measure the degree to which two test masses can be put into free fall, aiming to demonstrate a suppression of disturbance forces corresponding to a residual relative acceleration with a power spectral density (PSD) below (30 fm/s2/√Hz )2 around 1 mHz. In LPF data analysis, the disturbance forces are obtained as the difference between the acceleration data and a linear combination of other measured data series. In many circumstances, the coefficients for this linear combination are obtained by fitting these data series to the acceleration, and the disturbance forces appear then as the data series of the residuals of the fit. Thus the background noise or, more precisely, its PSD, whose knowledge is needed to build up the likelihood function in ordinary maximum likelihood fitting, is here unknown, and its estimate constitutes instead one of the goals of the fit. In this paper we present a fitting method that does not require the knowledge of the PSD of the background noise. The method is based on the analytical marginalization of the posterior parameter probability density with respect to the background noise PSD, and returns an estimate both for the fitting parameters and for the PSD. We show that both these estimates are unbiased, and that, when using averaged Welch's periodograms for the residuals, the estimate of the PSD is consistent, as its error tends to zero with the inverse square root of the number of averaged periodograms. Additionally, we find that the method is equivalent to some implementations of iteratively reweighted least-squares fitting. We have tested the method both on simulated data of known PSD and on data from several experiments performed with the LISA Pathfinder end-to-end mission simulator.

  18. [CA 125--a tumor marker?].

    PubMed

    Pabst, T; Ludwig, C

    1995-06-17

    Tumor markers are useful tools in monitoring malignancies postoperatively or under hormone-/chemotherapy. In contrast, they usually lack diagnostic relevance and uncritical use may result in confusing situations. We describe three cases of diagnostic determinations of the tumor marker CA 125 resulting in subsequent partially invasive procedures. Based on these three cases, serum CA 125 levels were examined in 49 patients with abdominal diseases. We found CA 125 to be less a tumor product than an unspecific expression of stimulated mesothelial cells of the peritoneum. CA 125 was a marker for ascites (16 of 16 patients) and an indicator of infra-diaphragmatic involvement in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (11 of 12 patients). Furthermore, 5 of 6 patients with inflammatory abdominal diseases showed elevated CA 125 levels, as did 13 of 15 patients with solid abdominal tumors of different histology (all non-ovarian cancer, no ascites). In conclusion, CA 125 remains a good marker for follow-up of ovarian cancer, but should not be used for diagnosis of abdominal processes.

  19. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  20. Laser acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.L.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B.; Schroeder, C.B.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1997-02-01

    This paper explores the use of the large electric fields of high-brightness lasers (e.g., up to order TV/cm) to accelerate particles. Unfortunately, as is well known, it is difficult to couple the vacuum field of the laser to particles so as to achieve a net energy gain. In principle, the energy gain near the focus of the laser can be quite high, i.e., on the order of the work done in crossing the focus {Delta}{gamma}={radical}({pi})eEw{approximately}30MeV{radical}(P/1TW), where P is the laser power. In order to retain this energy, the particles must be in the highly nonlinear regime (Vosc/c{gt}1) or must be separated from the laser within a distance on the order of a Rayleigh length from the focus. In this work, we explore the acceleration and output energy distribution of an electron beam injected at various angles and injection energies into a focused laser beam. Insight into the physical mechanism of energy gain is obtained by separating the contributions from the longitudinal and transverse laser field components. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The cosmic microwave background in a causal set universe

    SciTech Connect

    Zuntz, Joe

    2008-02-15

    We discuss cosmic microwave background constraints on the causal set theory of quantum gravity, which has made testable predictions about the nature of dark energy. We flesh out previously discussed heuristic constraints by showing how the power spectrum of causal set dark energy fluctuations can be found from the overlap volumes of past light cones of points in the universe. Using a modified Boltzmann code we put constraints on the single parameter of the theory that are somewhat stronger than previous ones. We conclude that causal set theory cannot explain late-time acceleration without radical alterations to general relativity.

  2. Introduction to Korean Accelerator Science and Activities in Industrial Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Won

    2012-03-01

    After 20 years of the first large-scale accelerator in Korea, the Pohang Light Source (PLS) of 2.0 GeV at POSTECH, its upgrade (PLS-II) is now under commissioning with energy of 3.0 GeV. The users' service for synchrotron radiation is scheduled in April 2012. There are five big accelerator projects in various stages of construction, namely a high-intensity proton linac of 100 MeV, the PAL-XFEL of 10-GeV, a carbon therapy cyclotron of 400 MeV/u, and rare isotope accelerators for isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and In-flight Fragmentation (IFF). There are also strong demands for industrial uses of accelerators, especially in sterilization applications. In this paper, we report the current status of accelerator projects and its science in Korea, along with a brief review of accelerator R&D going back to the early 1960s at universities.

  3. Acceleration in Linear and Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellington, S. H.; Docherty, W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a simple accelerometer and explains its use in demonstrating acceleration, deceleration, constant speed, measurement of acceleration, acceleration and the inclined plane and angular and radial acceleration. (GS)

  4. The Diffuse Extreme Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John; Slavin, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse EUV background towards 138 different directions using the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) have been combined into a spectrum from 150A to 730A and represent an effective exposure of 18 million seconds. There is no significant evidence of any non-local line flux in the resultant spectrum such as that from a hot coronal plasma. These results are inconsistent with the Wisconsin C and B broad-band surveys assuming the source is a logT = 5.8 - 6.1 hot plasma in ionization equilibrium with solar abundances, confirming the previous result of Jelinksy, Vallerga and Edelstein) (hereafter Paper 1) using an observation along the ecliptic with the same instrument. To make these results consistent with the previous broad-band surveys, the plasma responsible for the emission must either be depleted in Fe by a factor of approximately 6, be behind an absorbing slab of neutral H with a column of 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, or not be in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE). One such non-CIE model (Breitswerdt and Schmutzier) that explains the soft x-ray results is also inconsistent with this EUV data.

  5. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  6. DIANA - An Underground Accelerator Facility for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Arthur

    2011-10-01

    Measuring nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest at stellar energies is usually a daunting task because the cross sections are very small and background rates can be comparatively large. Often, cosmic-ray interactions set the limit on experimental sensitivity, but can be reduced to an insignificant level by placing an accelerator underground -- as has been demonstrated by the LUNA accelerators in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. The Dual Ion Accelerator facility for Nuclear Astrophysics (DIANA) is a proposed next-generation underground accelerator facility, which would be constructed at the 4850 ft level of the Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. This talk will describe DIANA and the questions in nuclear astrophysics that can be explored at such a laboratory.

  7. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  8. The Accelerating Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-05-15

    From keV electrons in terrestrial aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a plutocratic proclivity to concentrate energy in a tiny minority of suprathermal particles. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have observed and that much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory and diverse astronomical locations. It will be argued that new mechanisms are required to account for recent observations of galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebulae and interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic media and some candidates will be discussed.

  9. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  10. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  11. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Finkel, R.; Nelson, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) can be used for efficient detection of long-lived isotopes at part-per-quadrillion sensitivities with good precision. In this article we present an overview of AMS and its recent use in archaeology, geochemistry and biomolecular tracing. All AMS systems use cesium sputter ion sources to produce negative ions from a small button of a solid sample containing the element of interest, such as graphite, metal halide, or metal oxide, often mixed with a metal powder as binder and thermal conductor. Experience shows that both natural and biomedical samples are compatible in a single AMS system, but few other AMS sites make routine {sup 14}C measurements for both dating and tracing. AMS is, in one sense, just `a very sensitive decay counter`, but if AMS sensitivity is creatively coupled to analytical chemistry of certain isotopes, whole new areas of geosciences, archaeology, and life sciences can be explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  14. Pulsed electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurements of the power deposited in the anode of a multimegawatt MPD accelerator using thermocouples attached to a thin shell anode reveal a dramatic decrease in the fractional anode power from 50% at 200 KW input power to less than 10% at 20 MW power. The corresponding local power flux peak at a value of 10,000 W/sq cm at the lip of the anode exhaust orifice, a distribution traced to a corresponding peak in the local current density at the anode. A comparison of voltage-current characteristics and spectral photographs of the MPD discharge using quartz, boron nitride and plexiglas insulators with various mass injection configurations led to the identification of different voltage modes and regions of ablation free operation. The technique of piezoelectric impact pressure measurement in the MPD exhaust flow was refined to account for the effects due to probe yaw angle.

  15. Dynamics of pyroelectric accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaderi, R.; Davani, F. Abbasi

    2015-01-26

    Pyroelectric crystals are used to produce high energy electron beams. We have derived a method to model electric potential generation on LiTaO{sub 3} crystal during heating cycle. In this method, effect of heat transfer on the potential generation is investigated by some experiments. In addition, electron emission from the crystal surface is modeled by measurements and analysis. These spectral data are used to present a dynamic equation of electric potential with respect to thickness of the crystal and variation of its temperature. The dynamic equation's results for different thicknesses are compared with measured data. As a result, to attain more energetic electrons, best thickness of the crystals could be extracted from the equation. This allows for better understanding of pyroelectric crystals and help to study about current and energy of accelerated electrons.

  16. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  17. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  18. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  19. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  20. Markers for the non-invasive diagnosis of mesothelioma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van der Bij, S; Schaake, E; Koffijberg, H; Burgers, J A; de Mol, B A J M; Moons, K G M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Numerous markers have been evaluated to facilitate the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of mesothelioma. The purpose of this study was to conduct a structured review of the diagnostic performance of non-invasive marker tests for the detection of mesothelioma in patients with suspected mesothelioma. Methods: Studies on the diagnostic accuracy of serum and cytological markers published till 31 December 2009, available in either PUBMED or Embase, to detect or exclude the presence of mesothelioma were extracted. Study quality was assessed with use of the Quadas criteria. Results: In total, 82 articles were included in this systemic review. Overall, quality of the incorporated studies to address our objective was poor. The most frequently studied immunohistochemical markers for cytological analysis were EMA, Ber-Ep4, CEA, and calretinin. The most frequently investigated serum marker was soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP). The markers CEA, Ber-EP4, and calretinin were most valuable in discriminating mesothelioma from other malignant diseases. Markers EMA and SMRP were most valuable in discriminating mesothelioma from non-malignant diseases. No marker performed well in discriminating between mesothelioma and all other diseases. Conclusion: Currently, there is only limited evidence to properly assess the value of non-invasive marker tests in the diagnosis of mesothelioma. Studies were of limited value to address our objective and results showed considerable unexplained study heterogeneity. PMID:21448170

  1. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  2. Underground Accelerators for Precise Nuclear Physics: LUNA and DIANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    Current stellar model simulations are at a level of precision that uncertainties in the nuclear-reaction rates are becoming significant for theoretical predictions and for the analysis of observational signatures. To address several open questions in cosmology, astrophysics, and non-Standard-Model neutrino physics, new high precision measurements of direct-capture nuclear fusion cross sections will be essential. At these low energies, fusion cross sections decrease exponentially with energy and are expected to approach femtobarn levels or less. The experimental difficulties in determining the low-energy cross sections are caused by large background rates associated with cosmic ray-induced reactions, background from natural radioactivity in the laboratory environment, and the beam-induced background on target impurities. Natural background can be reduced by careful shielding of the target and detector environment, and beam-induced background can be reduced by active shielding techniques through event identification, but it is difficult to reduce the background component from cosmic ray muons. An underground location has the advantage that the cosmic ray-induced background is reduced by several orders of magnitude, allowing the measurements to be pushed to far lower energies than feasible above ground. This has been clearly demonstrated at LUNA by the successful studies of critical reactions in the pp-chains and first reaction studies in the CNO cycles. The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, Michigan State University, Colorado School of Mines, Regis University, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility deep underground. The DIANA accelerator facility is being designed to achieve large laboratory reaction rates by delivering two orders of magnitude higher ion beams to a

  3. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  4. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  5. Novel SSR Markers from BAC-End Sequences, DArT Arrays and a Comprehensive Genetic Map with 1,291 Marker Loci for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Varghese, Nicy; Shah, Trushar M.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Gudipati, Srivani; Gaur, Pooran M.; Kulwal, Pawan L.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; KaviKishor, Polavarapu B.; Winter, Peter; Kahl, Günter; Town, Christopher D.; Kilian, Andrzej; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes. PMID:22102885

  6. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  7. Self-force on an accelerated particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Thomas M.; Friedman, John L.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the singular field of an accelerated point particle (scalar charge, electric charge or small gravitating mass) moving on an accelerated (nongeodesic) trajectory in a generic background spacetime. Using a mode-sum regularization scheme, we obtain explicit expressions for the self-force regularization parameters. We use a Lorentz gauge for the electromangetic and gravitational cases. This work extends the work of Barack and Ori [1] who demonstrated that the regularization parameters for a point particle in geodesic motion in a Schwarzschild spacetime can be described solely by the leading and subleading terms in the mode-sum (commonly known as the A and B terms) and that all terms of higher order in ℓ vanish upon summation (later they showed the same behavior for geodesic motion in Kerr [2], [3]). We demonstrate that these properties are universal to point particles moving through any smooth spacetime along arbitrary (accelerated) trajectories. Our renormalization scheme is based on, but not identical to, the Quinn-Wald axioms. As we develop our approach, we review and extend work showing that that different definitions of the singular field used in the literature are equivalent to our approach. Because our approach does not assume geodesic motion of the perturbing particle, we are able use our mode-sum formalism to explicitly recover a well-known result: The self-force on static scalar charges near a Schwarzschild black hole vanishes.

  8. Cosmic acceleration from matter-curvature coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaregonbadi, Raziyeh; Farhoudi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    We consider f( {R,T} ) modified theory of gravity in which, in general, the gravitational Lagrangian is given by an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar and the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We indicate that in this type of the theory, the coupling energy-momentum tensor is not conserved. However, we mainly focus on a particular model that matter is minimally coupled to the geometry in the metric formalism and wherein, its coupling energy-momentum tensor is also conserved. We obtain the corresponding Raychaudhuri dynamical equation that presents the evolution of the kinematic quantities. Then for the chosen model, we derive the behavior of the deceleration parameter, and show that the coupling term can lead to an acceleration phase after the matter dominated phase. On the other hand, the curvature of the universe corresponds with the deviation from parallelism in the geodesic motion. Thus, we also scrutinize the motion of the free test particles on their geodesics, and derive the geodesic deviation equation in this modified theory to study the accelerating universe within the spatially flat FLRW background. Actually, this equation gives the relative accelerations of adjacent particles as a measurable physical quantity, and provides an elegant tool to investigate the timelike and the null structures of spacetime geometries. Then, through the null deviation vector, we find the observer area-distance as a function of the redshift for the chosen model, and compare the results with the corresponding results obtained in the literature.

  9. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  10. Short-Term Hypoxia Accelerates Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats by Suppressing Osteoblastogenesis but Enhancing Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guixin; Wang, Jia; Sun, Dawei; Xin, Jingyi; Wang, Liping; Huang, Dong; Wu, Weichi; Xian, Cory J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although it has been reported that hypoxic exposure can attenuate hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and some other diseases, effects of hypoxia on osteoporosis are still unknown. Material/Methods The current study investigated whether short-term hypoxic exposure (in comparison with normoxic conditions) affects bone metabolism in normal or ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats in an vivo study. Micro-computed tomography bone volume/structural analyses, histological examination, and serum bone turnover biochemical assays were used. In addition, the expressions of some associated major regulatory molecules were measured in osteoblastic cultures. Results While the 14-day hypoxic exposure did not change the bone-remodeling process in normal adult female rats, it decreased bone volume, osteoclast density, and serum bone formation marker (alkaline phosphatase) level, but increased osteoclast density and serum bone resorption marker (C-telopeptide of collagen) level in OVX rats. The bone marrow adipocyte number and serum fatty acid binding protein-4 level were increased in OVX-hypoxic rats compared with OVX-normoxic rats. Consistently, in human MG-63 osteoblastic cultures, the hypoxic condition suppressed protein expression of osteogenic transcriptional factors Runx2 and osterix, elevated protein expression of osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, but reduced that of osteoclastogenic inhibitor osteoprotegerin. Conclusions Our results suggest that, although no change occurred in the bone-remodeling process in normal adult female rats after hypoxic exposure, under the estrogen-deficient osteoporotic condition, the hypoxic condition can alter the bone microenvironment so that it may further impair osteoblastic differentiation and enhance osteoclastic formation, and thus reduce bone formation, enhance bone resorption, and accelerate bone loss. PMID:27550548

  11. Short-Term Hypoxia Accelerates Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats by Suppressing Osteoblastogenesis but Enhancing Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guixin; Wang, Jia; Sun, Dawei; Xin, Jingyi; Wang, Liping; Huang, Dong; Wu, Weichi; Xian, Cory J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although it has been reported that hypoxic exposure can attenuate hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and some other diseases, effects of hypoxia on osteoporosis are still unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS The current study investigated whether short-term hypoxic exposure (in comparison with normoxic conditions) affects bone metabolism in normal or ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats in an vivo study. Micro-computed tomography bone volume/structural analyses, histological examination, and serum bone turnover biochemical assays were used. In addition, the expressions of some associated major regulatory molecules were measured in osteoblastic cultures. RESULTS While the 14-day hypoxic exposure did not change the bone-remodeling process in normal adult female rats, it decreased bone volume, osteoclast density, and serum bone formation marker (alkaline phosphatase) level, but increased osteoclast density and serum bone resorption marker (C-telopeptide of collagen) level in OVX rats. The bone marrow adipocyte number and serum fatty acid binding protein-4 level were increased in OVX-hypoxic rats compared with OVX-normoxic rats. Consistently, in human MG-63 osteoblastic cultures, the hypoxic condition suppressed protein expression of osteogenic transcriptional factors Runx2 and osterix, elevated protein expression of osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, but reduced that of osteoclastogenic inhibitor osteoprotegerin. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that, although no change occurred in the bone-remodeling process in normal adult female rats after hypoxic exposure, under the estrogen-deficient osteoporotic condition, the hypoxic condition can alter the bone microenvironment so that it may further impair osteoblastic differentiation and enhance osteoclastic formation, and thus reduce bone formation, enhance bone resorption, and accelerate bone loss. PMID:27550548

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  13. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  14. Accelerators for research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs.

  15. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  16. Biochemical markers of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matull, W R; Pereira, S P; O'Donohue, J W

    2006-04-01

    Serum amylase remains the most commonly used biochemical marker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but its sensitivity can be reduced by late presentation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and chronic alcoholism. Urinary trypsinogen-2 is convenient, of comparable diagnostic accuracy, and provides greater (99%) negative predictive value. Early prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis can be made by well validated scoring systems at 48 hours, but the novel serum markers procalcitonin and interleukin 6 allow earlier prediction (12 to 24 hours after admission). Serum alanine transaminase >150 IU/l and jaundice suggest a gallstone aetiology, requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. For obscure aetiologies, serum calcium and triglycerides should be measured. Genetic polymorphisms may play an important role in "idiopathic" acute recurrent pancreatitis.

  17. Allelic association between marker loci.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1999-02-16

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker x oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage.

  18. Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YAN-JIE; JU, QIANG; LI, GUAN-CHENG

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. HCC affects approximately one million individuals annually worldwide, with the incidence equal to the mortality rate. In 2008, HCC was listed as the third most lethal cancer. Thus, early diagnosis is crucial for improving the survival rate for patients. α-fetoprotein (AFP) together with iconography and pathology detection are commonly used in the clinical early diagnosis of liver cancer. However, the specificity and sensitivity of AFP used in screening for liver cancer are not satisfactory. Athough the development of molecular biology has led to the identification of new tumor markers, including proteantigens, cytokines, enzymes and isoenzymes, as well as related genes that can be used in the treatment and prognosis of liver cancer, more tumor markers are required for effective early diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of the curative effect. PMID:24649215

  19. Lessons from mouse chimaera experiments with a reiterated transgene marker: revised marker criteria and a review of chimaera markers.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean; Hodson, Benjamin A; Shen, Guan-Yi; Birtley, James R; Notarnicola-Harwood, Antonio; West, John D

    2015-08-01

    Recent reports of a new generation of ubiquitous transgenic chimaera markers prompted us to consider the criteria used to evaluate new chimaera markers and develop more objective assessment methods. To investigate this experimentally we used several series of fetal and adult chimaeras, carrying an older, multi-copy transgenic marker. We used two additional independent markers and objective, quantitative criteria for cell selection and cell mixing to investigate quantitative and spatial aspects of developmental neutrality. We also suggest how the quantitative analysis we used could be simplified for future use with other markers. As a result, we recommend a five-step procedure for investigators to evaluate new chimaera markers based partly on criteria proposed previously but with a greater emphasis on examining the developmental neutrality of prospective new markers. These five steps comprise (1) review of published information, (2) evaluation of marker detection, (3) genetic crosses to check for effects on viability and growth, (4) comparisons of chimaeras with and without the marker and (5) analysis of chimaeras with both cell populations labelled. Finally, we review a number of different chimaera markers and evaluate them using the extended set of criteria. These comparisons indicate that, although the new generation of ubiquitous fluorescent markers are the best of those currently available and fulfil most of the criteria required of a chimaera marker, further work is required to determine whether they are developmentally neutral.

  20. Cutaneous Markers of Internal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, R. R.; Reardon, P. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Cutaneous markers of internal disease are legion. This article discusses the pigmentary disorders, acanthosis nigricans, pruritus, the xanthomas and problems of photosensitivity, outlining the appropriate procedures to establish a definite diagnosis, and in some cases the management of such patients. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:21286147

  1. Obesity-related known and candidate SNP markers can significantly change affinity of TATA-binding protein for human gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity affects quality of life and life expectancy and is associated with cardiovascular disorders, cancer, diabetes, reproductive disorders in women, prostate diseases in men, and congenital anomalies in children. The use of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers of diseases and drug responses (i.e., significant differences of personal genomes of patients from the reference human genome) can help physicians to improve treatment. Clinical research can validate SNP markers via genotyping of patients and demonstration that SNP alleles are significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy people. The search for biomedical SNP markers of interest can be accelerated by computer-based analysis of hundreds of millions of SNPs in the 1000 Genomes project because of selection of the most meaningful candidate SNP markers and elimination of neutral SNPs. Results We cross-validated the output of two computer-based methods: DNA sequence analysis using Web service SNP_TATA_Comparator and keyword search for articles on comorbidities of obesity. Near the sites binding to TATA-binding protein (TBP) in human gene promoters, we found 22 obesity-related candidate SNP markers, including rs10895068 (male breast cancer in obesity); rs35036378 (reduced risk of obesity after ovariectomy); rs201739205 (reduced risk of obesity-related cancers due to weight loss by diet/exercise in obese postmenopausal women); rs183433761 (obesity resistance during a high-fat diet); rs367732974 and rs549591993 (both: cardiovascular complications in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus); rs200487063 and rs34104384 (both: obesity-caused hypertension); rs35518301, rs72661131, and rs562962093 (all: obesity); and rs397509430, rs33980857, rs34598529, rs33931746, rs33981098, rs34500389, rs63750953, rs281864525, rs35518301, and rs34166473 (all: chronic inflammation in comorbidities of obesity). Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay under nonequilibrium conditions, we

  2. Progress in radiocarbon dating with the Chalk River MP tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, H.R.; Ball, G.C.; Brown, R.M.; Davies, W.G.; Imahori, Y.; Milton, J.C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of a tandem accelerator /sup 14/C dating system at Chalk River is recounted. Background problems and sources of instability are discussed and solutions are described. Details of sample chemistry and source preparation are presented.

  3. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  4. SHORT ACCELERATION TIMES FROM SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-10

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  5. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  6. Development of genomic SSR markers for fingerprinting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and mapping genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major crop from the group of leafy vegetables. Several types of molecular markers were developed that are effectively used in lettuce breeding and genetic studies. However only a very limited number of microsattelite-based markers are publicly available. We have employed the method of enriched microsatellite libraries to develop 97 genomic SSR markers. Results Testing of newly developed markers on a set of 36 Lactuca accession (33 L. sativa, and one of each L. serriola L., L. saligna L., and L. virosa L.) revealed that both the genetic heterozygosity (UHe = 0.56) and the number of loci per SSR (Na = 5.50) are significantly higher for genomic SSR markers than for previously developed EST-based SSR markers (UHe = 0.32, Na = 3.56). Fifty-four genomic SSR markers were placed on the molecular linkage map of lettuce. Distribution of markers in the genome appeared to be random, with the exception of possible cluster on linkage group 6. Any combination of 32 genomic SSRs was able to distinguish genotypes of all 36 accessions. Fourteen of newly developed SSR markers originate from fragments with high sequence similarity to resistance gene candidates (RGCs) and RGC pseudogenes. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of L. sativa accessions showed that approximately 3% of genetic diversity was within accessions, 79% among accessions, and 18% among horticultural types. Conclusions The newly developed genomic SSR markers were added to the pool of previously developed EST-SSRs markers. These two types of SSR-based markers provide useful tools for lettuce cultivar fingerprinting, development of integrated molecular linkage maps, and mapping of genes. PMID:23339733

  7. 49 CFR 195.410 - Line markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.410 Line markers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... the following: (1) Markers must be located at each public road crossing, at each railroad...

  8. 49 CFR 195.410 - Line markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.410 Line markers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this... the following: (1) Markers must be located at each public road crossing, at each railroad...

  9. Mineralocorticoid Accelerates Transition to Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Via “Non-Genomic Effects”

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Selma F.; Ohtani, Tomohito; Korinek, Josef; Lam, Carolyn S.P.; Larsen, Katarina; Simari, Robert D.; Valencik, Maria L.; Burnett, John C.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mechanisms promoting the transition from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are poorly understood. When inappropriate for salt status, mineralocorticoid (deoxycorticosterone acetate, DOCA) excess causes hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. As cardiac mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) are protected from mineralocorticoid binding by the absence of 11-ß hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, salt-mineralocorticoid induced inflammation is postulated to cause oxidative stress and mediate cardiac effects. While previous studies have focused on salt/nephrectomy in accelerating mineralocorticoid induced cardiac effects, we hypothesized that HHD is associated with oxidative stress and sensitizes the heart to mineralocorticoid, accelerating hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results Cardiac structure and function, oxidative stress and MR-dependent gene transcription were measured in SHAM operated and transverse aortic constriction (TAC; studied two weeks later) mice without and with DOCA administration, all in the setting of normal salt diet. Compared to SHAM mice, SHAM+DOCA mice had mild hypertrophy without fibrosis or diastolic dysfunction. TAC mice displayed compensated HHD with hypertrophy, increased oxidative stress (osteopontin and NOX4 gene expression) and normal systolic function, filling pressures and diastolic stiffness. Compared to TAC mice, TAC+DOCA mice had similar LV systolic pressure and fractional shortening but more hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction with increased lung weights consistent with HFpEF. There was progressive activation of markers of oxidative stress across the groups but no evidence of classic MR-dependent gene transcription. Conclusions Pressure overload hypertrophy sensitizes the heart to mineralocorticoid excess which promotes the transition to HFpEF independent of classic MR-dependent gene transcription. PMID:20625113

  10. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Pummelo and Molecular Marker Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hang; Su, Shiying; Yi, Hualin; Chai, Lijun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Pummelo (Citrus grandis) is an important fruit crop worldwide because of its nutritional value. To accelerate the pummelo breeding program, it is essential to obtain extensive genetic information and develop relative molecular markers. Here, we obtained a 12-Gb transcriptome dataset of pummelo through a mixture of RNA from seven tissues using Illumina pair-end sequencing, assembled into 57,212 unigenes with an average length of 1010 bp. The annotation and classification results showed that a total of 39,584 unigenes had similar hits to the known proteins of four public databases, and 31,501 were classified into 55 Gene Ontology (GO) functional sub-categories. The search for putative molecular markers among 57,212 unigenes identified 10,276 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 64,720 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-quality primers of 1174 SSR loci were designed, of which 88.16% were localized to nine chromosomes of sweet orange. Of 100 SSR primers that were randomly selected for testing, 87 successfully amplified clear banding patterns. Of these primers, 29 with a mean PIC (polymorphic information content) value of 0.52 were effectively applied for phylogenetic analysis. Of the 20 SNP primers, 14 primers, including 54 potential SNPs, yielded target amplifications, and 46 loci were verified via Sanger sequencing. This new dataset will be a valuable resource for molecular biology studies of pummelo and provides reliable information regarding SNP and SSR marker development, thus expediting the breeding program of pummelo. PMID:25799271

  11. Resonant ion acceleration by plasma jets: Effects of jet breaking and the magnetic-field curvature.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Vasiliev, A A

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we consider resonant ion acceleration by a plasma jet originating from the magnetic reconnection region. Such jets propagate in the background magnetic field with significantly curved magnetic-field lines. Decoupling of ion and electron motions at the leading edge of the jet results in generation of strong electrostatic fields. Ions can be trapped by this field and get accelerated along the jet front. This mechanism of resonant acceleration resembles surfing acceleration of charged particles at a shock wave. To describe resonant acceleration of ions, we use adiabatic theory of resonant phenomena. We show that particle motion along the curved field lines significantly influences the acceleration rate. The maximum gain of energy is determined by the particle's escape from the system due to this motion. Applications of the proposed mechanism to charged-particle acceleration in the planetary magnetospheres and the solar corona are discussed. PMID:26066269

  12. Secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Schwille, H.; Pollvogt, U.

    1974-01-01

    The secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope is calculated using both a simplified and a more complete Monte Carlo model. These results are compared with experimental data from a small multiwire proportional counter hodoscope operated in a 530 MeV/nucleon accelerator beam of nitrogen nuclei. Estimates of the secondary electron background produced by heavy relativistic nuclei are presented along with the detailed results from calculations of energy deposition in the hodoscope counter cells.

  13. 49 CFR 195.410 - Line markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Line markers. 195.410 Section 195.410... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.410 Line markers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each operator shall place and maintain line markers over each buried pipeline in accordance...

  14. 49 CFR 195.410 - Line markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Line markers. 195.410 Section 195.410... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.410 Line markers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each operator shall place and maintain line markers over each buried pipeline in accordance...

  15. Judging Quality through Substantive Conversations between Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Purnell, Ken; Zipf, Reyna

    2008-01-01

    Decisions by markers about quality in student work remain confusing to most students and markers. This may in part be due to the relatively subjective nature of what constitutes a quality response to an assessment task. This paper reports on an experiment that documented the process of decision-making by multiple markers at a university who…

  16. 49 CFR 195.410 - Line markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Line markers. 195.410 Section 195.410... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.410 Line markers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each operator shall place and maintain line markers over each buried pipeline in accordance...

  17. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio.

  18. Early Prognostication Markers in Cardiac Arrest Patients Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Karapetkova, Maria; Koenig, Matthew A.; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Established prognostication markers, such as clinical findings, electroencephalography (EEG), and biochemical markers, used by clinicians to predict neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest (CA) are altered under therapeutic hypothermia (TH) conditions and their validity remains uncertain. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for evidence on the current standards for neurologic outcome prediction for out-of-hospital CA patients treated with TH and the validity of a wide range of prognostication markers. Relevant studies that suggested one or several established biomarkers, and multimodal approaches for prognostication were included and reviewed. Results While the prognostic accuracy of various tests has been questioned after TH, pupillary light reflexes and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are still strongly associated with negative outcome for early prognostication. Increasingly, EEG background activity has also been identified as a valid predictor for outcome after 72 hours after CA and a preferred prognostic method in clinical settings. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and CT, can identify functional and structural brain injury, but are not readily available at the patient’s bedside because of limited availability and high costs. Conclusions A multimodal algorithm composed of neurological examination, EEG-based quantitative testing, and SSEP, in conjunction with newer MRI sequences, if available, holds promise for accurate prognostication in CA patients treated with TH. In order to avoid premature withdrawal of care, prognostication should be performed later than 72 hours after CA. PMID:26228521

  19. New directions in linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Current work on linear particle accelerators is placed in historical and physics contexts, and applications driving the state of the art are discussed. Future needs and the ways they may force development are outlined in terms of exciting R and D challenges presented to today's accelerator designers. 23 references, 7 figures.

  20. Thomas Edison Accelerated Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.; Chasin, Gene

    This paper describes early outcomes of a Sacramento, California, elementary school that participated in the Accelerated Schools Project. The school, which serves many minority and poor students, began training for the project in 1992. Accelerated Schools were designed to advance the learning rate of students through a gifted and talented approach,…

  1. General purpose programmable accelerator board

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Perry J.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose accelerator board and acceleration method comprising use of: one or more programmable logic devices; a plurality of memory blocks; bus interface for communicating data between the memory blocks and devices external to the board; and dynamic programming capabilities for providing logic to the programmable logic device to be executed on data in the memory blocks.

  2. Natural Acceleration: Supporting Creative Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, LeoNora M.

    2011-01-01

    "Natural acceleration" happens through an internal fire that burns to learn and may transcend school boundaries. Based on their passionate interests and connections with a domain, children who hunger for domain understandings outside school curricula require different types of acceleration, motivated by these interests. The lifeworks, domains, and…

  3. The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Jialin, Xie; Kirk, H.G.; Parsa, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Tsang, T.Y.F.; Ulc, S.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Zhang, R.S. ); McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P. ); Jiang, Z.Y. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (Un

    1990-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), presently under construction at Brookhaven National laboratory, is described. It consists of a 50-MeV electron beam synchronizable to a high-peak power CO{sub 2} laser. The interaction of electrons with the laser field will be probed, with some emphasis on exploring laser-based acceleration techniques. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Remote handling and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. T.

    The high-current levels of contemporary and proposed accelerator facilities induce radiation levels into components, requiring consideration be given to maintenance techniques that reduce personnel exposure. Typical components involved include beamstops, targets, collimators, windows, and instrumentation that intercepts the direct beam. Also included are beam extraction, injection, splitting, and kicking regions, as well as purposeful spill areas where beam tails are trimmed and neutral particles are deposited. Scattered beam and secondary particles activate components all along a beamline such as vacuum pipes, magnets, and shielding. Maintenance techniques vary from hands-on to TV-viewed operation using state-of-the-art servomanipulators. Bottom- or side-entry casks are used with thimble-type target and diagnostic assemblies. Long-handled tools are operated from behind shadow shields. Swinging shield doors, unstacking block, and horizontally rolling shield roofs are all used to provide access. Common to all techniques is the need to make operations simple and to provide a means of seeing and reaching the area.

  5. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  6. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  7. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  8. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tims, S. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    2012-10-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium), and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  9. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  10. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1990-01-01

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations.

  11. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1990-07-03

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations. 3 figs.

  12. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  13. Accelerating momentum for change!

    PubMed

    Wenzel, S; Panetta, J

    1995-05-01

    As we develop strategies to compete globally, we are challenged with integrating our resources to execute these strategies effectively. Many companies are in the midst of dramatic shifts in corporate cultures, giving more responsibility to employees while raising expectations for their performance. The extent of these changes is far reaching and brings significant challenges to both employees and corporations. This article is a continuation of the evolution (over five years) of a corrective action/continuous improvement process implemented at Exide Electronics. It discusses organizational structures, including steering committees, corrective action teams, task teams, and work cells. Specific expectations, goals, and results of the teams are presented, along with ground rules for functioning within the organization. After structuring the organization and coordinating the resources effectively, the next challenge is accelerating momentum for change. The presentation also discusses the evolutionary process required to make a culture focused on change, including ongoing communication and feedback, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance.

  14. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  15. The ISAC post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  16. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  17. Electron acceleration in a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Liu, Jiansheng; Xia, Changquan; Wang, Wentao; Lu, Haiyang; Wang, Cheng; Deng, Aihua; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhou; Shen, Baifei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-07-01

    Near-GeV electron beam generation from a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is reported. Electron injection and acceleration are separated into two distinct LWFA stages and controlled independently from each other by employing two gas cells filled with a He/O2 mixture and pure He gas, respectively. Electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum, generated from the injection stage assisted by ionization-induced injection, are seeded into the acceleration stage with a 3-mm long gas cell and accelerated to produce a 0.8-GeV quasimonoenergetic electron beam for a 45 TW 40 fs laser pulse, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 187 GV/m. In the injection stage, the produced electron beam properties can be optimized by adjusting the input laser intensity and the plasma density so that quasimonoenergetic electron beams are obtained owing to the self-focusing effects of the laser beam. The ionization-induced injection scheme has been extensively employed for a capillary discharge plasma waveguide to demonstrate channel-guided LWFA beyond 1 GeV. Using a 4-cm capillary made of oxygen containing acrylic resin results in optically guiding 130 TW 55 fs laser pulse that accelerates electrons up to 1.8 GeV in contrast with no electron acceleration in a polyethylene capillary free of oxygen.

  18. Multipurpose background for standardization in medical photography.

    PubMed

    Hallock, G G

    1985-08-01

    A dual photography background system consisting of a quadrilled format on one side and a plain background on the other is described. It is mobile and efficient as a space- and time-saving device for medical photography.

  19. [Neuropathologic markers in degenerative dementias].

    PubMed

    Hauw, J J; Seilhean, D; Colle, M A; Hogenhuys, J; Duyckaerts, C

    1998-01-01

    The number of neuropathological markers used for the diagnosis of degenerative dementias is rapidly increasing, and this is somewhat confusing: some lesions described a long time ago, such as ballooned cells, proved to be less specific than they were supposed to be; this is also the case for Lewy bodies, that have been recognised in a larger spectrum of disorders than thought a few years ago. On the contrary, for an increasing number of neuropathologists, Pick bodies are now mandatory for the diagnosis of Pick disease, and this contrasts with the prevalent opinions of the late sixties or seventies. There are a number of reasons for the changing significance of neuropathological markers. Three of them can be easily identified: 1) the burst of immunohistochemistry into neuropathology allowed an easier recognition, a better delineation and new pathophysiological approaches to old lesions, and a dramatic increase in the description of new markers, especially in glial cells; 2) in some conditions characterized by the number and distribution of some lesions rather than by their mere presence, such as aging and Alzheimer disease, a better neuroanatomical point of view permitted new insights into the concept of disease versus age-related changes; 3) more accurate clinicopathologic correlations showed clearly the need of grouping or lumping together some entities: for example, obvious relationship aroused between progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration; in contrast, distinguishing different disorders in the frontal lobe dementias grouped together into "Pick disease" was felt necessary. This review summarizes the main criteria for identification, and the presumed meaning of the chief markers indicating the presence of abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins, A beta peptides, and PrP proteins. Abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins can be stored in the neurons, and participate in the constitution of many lesions (neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads

  20. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  1. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  2. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  3. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  4. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  5. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  6. Genetic markers as instrumental variables

    PubMed Central

    von Hinke, Stephanie; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Propper, Carol; Windmeijer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetic markers as instrumental variables (IV) is receiving increasing attention from economists, statisticians, epidemiologists and social scientists. Although IV is commonly used in economics, the appropriate conditions for the use of genetic variants as instruments have not been well defined. The increasing availability of biomedical data, however, makes understanding of these conditions crucial to the successful use of genotypes as instruments. We combine the econometric IV literature with that from genetic epidemiology, and discuss the biological conditions and IV assumptions within the statistical potential outcomes framework. We review this in the context of two illustrative applications. PMID:26614692

  7. Whole-body kinematics of a fruit bat reveal the influence of wing inertia on body accelerations.

    PubMed

    Iriarte-Díaz, José; Riskin, Daniel K; Willis, David J; Breuer, Kenneth S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2011-05-01

    The center of mass (COM) of a flying animal accelerates through space because of aerodynamic and gravitational forces. For vertebrates, changes in the position of a landmark on the body have been widely used to estimate net aerodynamic forces. The flapping of relatively massive wings, however, might induce inertial forces that cause markers on the body to move independently of the COM, thus making them unreliable indicators of aerodynamic force. We used high-speed three-dimensional kinematics from wind tunnel flights of four lesser dog-faced fruit bats, Cynopterus brachyotis, at speeds ranging from 2.4 to 7.8 m s(-1) to construct a time-varying model of the mass distribution of the bats and to estimate changes in the position of their COM through time. We compared accelerations calculated by markers on the trunk with accelerations calculated from the estimated COM and we found significant inertial effects on both horizontal and vertical accelerations. We discuss the effect of these inertial accelerations on the long-held idea that, during slow flights, bats accelerate their COM forward during 'tip-reversal upstrokes', whereby the distal portion of the wing moves upward and backward with respect to still air. This idea has been supported by the observation that markers placed on the body accelerate forward during tip-reversal upstrokes. As in previously published studies, we observed that markers on the trunk accelerated forward during the tip-reversal upstrokes. When removing inertial effects, however, we found that the COM accelerated forward primarily during the downstroke. These results highlight the crucial importance of the incorporation of inertial effects of wing motion in the analysis of flapping flight. PMID:21490262

  8. Background frequency of Bacillus species at the Canberra Airport: A 12 month study.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Michelle E; Thomas, Rory; Rossi, Rebecca; Nelson, Michelle; Roffey, Paul; Richardson, Michelle M; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, is a naturally occurring disease in Australia. Whilst mainly limited to livestock in grazing regions of Victoria and New South Wales, movement of people, stock and vehicles means B. anthracis could be present outside this region. Of particular interest is the "background" prevalence of B. anthracis at transport hubs including airports. The aim of this study was to determine the background frequency of B. anthracis and the commonly used hoax agent Bacillus thuringiensis at the Canberra Airport over a 12 month period. Samples were collected daily for seven days each month from August 2011-July 2012 and analyzed using species specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen samples (of a total of 575) were positive for the B. anthracis PL3 genomic marker, 24 for the cya (pXO1) plasmid marker and five for the capB (pXO2) plasmid marker. Whilst five samples were positive for both PL3 and cya, no samples were positive for all three markers hence there is no evidence to suggest the presence of pathogenic B. anthracis strains. B. anthracis targets were detected primarily in February 2012 and B. thuringiensis peaked in October and November 2011 and again in April and May 2012. This study provides a rapid method to screen for, and differentiate, Bacillus species. Armed with this information investigators will be able to discriminate a "threat" from "background" frequencies should the need arise.

  9. Operation of the accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Batzka, B.; Billquist, P.J.

    1995-08-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 was the first year of seven-day operation since ATLAS became a national user facility in 1985. ATLAS made the most of the opportunity this year by providing 5200 hours of beam on-target to the research program. A record number of 60 experiments were completed and the {open_quotes}facility reliability{close_quotes} remained near the 90% level. Seven-day operation was made possible with the addition to the staff of two operator positions providing single-operator coverage during the weekend period. The normally scheduled coverage was augmented by an on-call list of system experts who respond to emergencies with phone-in advice and return to the Laboratory when necessary. This staffing approach continues but we rearranged our staffing patterns so that we now have one cryogenics engineer working a shift pattern which includes 8-hour daily coverage during the weekend. ATLAS provided a beam mix to users consisting of 26 different isotopic species, 23% of which were for A>100 in FY 1994. Approximately 60% of the beam time was provided by the Positive Ion Injector, slightly less than the usage rate of FY 1993. Experiments using uranium or lead beams accounted for 16.4% of the total beam time. The ECR ion source and high-voltage platform functioned well throughout the year. A new technique for solid material production in the source was developed which uses a sputtering process wherein the sample of material placed near the plasma chamber wall is biased negatively. Plasma ions are accelerated into the sample and material is sputtered from the surface into the plasma. This technique is now used routinely for many elements. Runs of calcium, germanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, and uranium were carried out with this technique.

  10. Accelerated coffee pulp composting.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G; Olguín, E J; Mercado, G

    1999-02-01

    The effect of two abundant, easily available and very low-cost agro-industrial organic residues, i.e., filter cake from the sugar industry and poultry litter, on the composting stabilization time of coffee pulp and on the quality of the produced compost, was evaluated. Piles of one cubic meter were built and monitored within the facilities of a coffee processing plant in the Coatepec region of the State of Veracruz, Mexico. Manual aeration was carried out once a week. A longer thermophilic period (28 days) and a much lower C/N ratio (in the range of 6.9-9.1) were observed in the piles containing the amendments, as compared to the control pile containing only coffee pulp (14 days and a C/N ratio of 14.4, respectively). The maximum assimilation rate of the reducing sugars was 1.6 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.5 to 5.3%) during the first two weeks when accelerators were present in the proportion of 20% filter cake plus 20% poultry litter, while they accumulated at a rate of 1.2 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.4 to 9.13%) during the same period in the control pile. The best combination of amendments was 30% filter cake with 20% poultry litter, resulting in a final nitrogen content as high as 4.81%. The second best combination was 20% filter cake with 10% poultry litter, resulting in a compost which also contained a high level of total nitrogen (4.54%). It was concluded that the use of these two residues enhanced the composting process of coffee pulp, promoting a shorter stabilization period and yielding a higher quality of compost.

  11. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker.

    PubMed

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or "MR Conditional" (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less.

  12. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker

    PubMed Central

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M.; Shellock, Frank G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or “MR Conditional” (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less. PMID:26266051

  13. Internal Fiducial Markers and Susceptibility Effects in MRI-Simulation and Measurement of Spatial Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Joakim H.; Garpebring, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Nyholm, Tufve

    2012-04-01

    Background: It is well-known that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferable to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy target delineation. To benefit from this, there are two options available: transferring the MRI delineated target volume to the planning CT or performing the treatment planning directly on the MRI study. A precondition for excluding the CT study is the possibility to define internal structures visible on both the planning MRI and on the images used to position the patient at treatment. In prostate cancer radiotherapy, internal gold markers are commonly used, and they are visible on CT, MRI, x-ray, and portal images. The depiction of the markers in MRI are, however, dependent on their shape and orientation relative the main magnetic field because of susceptibility effects. In the present work, these effects are investigated and quantified using both simulations and phantom measurements. Methods and Materials: Software that simulated the magnetic field distortions around user defined geometries of variable susceptibilities was constructed. These magnetic field perturbation maps were then reconstructed to images that were evaluated. The simulation software was validated through phantom measurements of four commercially available gold markers of different shapes and one in-house gold marker. Results: Both simulations and phantom measurements revealed small position deviations of the imaged marker positions relative the actual marker positions (<1 mm). Conclusion: Cylindrical gold markers can be used as internal fiducial markers in MRI.

  14. Improvement in Interobserver Accuracy in Delineation of the Lumpectomy Cavity Using Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Talha; Chen Ting; Khan, Atif; Yue, Ning J.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine, whether the presence of gold fiducial markers would improve the inter- and intraphysician accuracy in the delineation of the surgical cavity compared with a matched group of patients who did not receive gold fiducial markers in the setting of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 22 lumpectomy cavities were reviewed in a cohort of 22 patients; 11 patients received four to six gold fiducial markers placed at the time of surgery. Three physicians categorized the seroma cavity according to cavity visualization score criteria and delineated each of the 22 seroma cavities and the clinical target volume. Distance between centers of mass, percentage overlap, and average surface distance for all patients were assessed. Results: The mean seroma volume was 36.9 cm{sup 3} and 34.2 cm{sup 3} for fiducial patients and non-fiducial patients, respectively (p = ns). Fiducial markers improved the mean cavity visualization score, to 3.6 {+-} 1.0 from 2.5 {+-} 1.3 (p < 0.05). The mean distance between centers of mass, average surface distance, and percentage overlap for the seroma and clinical target volume were significantly improved in the fiducial marker patients as compared with the non-fiducial marker patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The placement of gold fiducial markers placed at the time of lumpectomy improves interphysician identification and delineation of the seroma cavity and clinical target volume. This has implications in radiotherapy treatment planning for accelerated partial-breast irradiation and for boost after whole-breast irradiation.

  15. Possible geometrical origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Ariadna; Bretón, Nora; Cordero, Rubén; Rojas, Efraín

    2015-07-01

    The modified geodetic brane cosmology (MGBC) is tested with observational data. The MGBC is derived from the geodetic brane gravity action corrected by the extrinsic curvature of the braneworld. The density parameter coming from this additional term produces an accelerated expansion of geometrical origin. Subject to the supernovae Ia, observable Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations and cosmic microwave background probes, the obtained fit provides enough evidence in the sense that the extrinsic curvature effect is able to reproduce the accelerated expansion of the universe without the need for invoking dark energy, exotic matter or a cosmological constant. Moreover, the MGBC is free of the problems present in other braneworld models.

  16. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  17. Acceleration: Still an Option for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinbokel, Annette

    2002-01-01

    In response to an article (Hany, 2001) discouraging the practice of acceleration through grade skipping for gifted students, this article defends acceleration as one option for gifted students, describes use of acceleration in Germany including early school entrance, individual grade skipping, acceleration in one subject, and acceleration in…

  18. Chemical markers for bacteria in extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alvin

    2002-11-01

    Interplanetary missions to collect pristine Martian surface samples for analysis of organic molecules, and to search for evidence of life, are in the planning phases. The only extraterrestrial samples currently on Earth are lunar dust and rocks, brought back by the Apollo (U.S.) and Luna (Soviet Union) missions to the moon, and meteorites. Meteorites are contaminated when they pass through the Earth's atmosphere, and during environmental exposure on Earth. Lunar fines have been stored on Earth for over 30 years under conditions designed to avoid chemical but not microbiological contamination. It has been extremely difficult to draw firm conclusions about the origin of chemicals (including amino acids) in extraterrestrial samples. Of particular concern has been the possibility of bacterial contamination. Recent work using state-of-the-art gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has dramatically lowered the chemical background, allowing a clear demonstration that lunar fines are remarkably different from terrestrial dust in that they generally lack certain chemical markers (muramic acid and 3-hydroxy fatty acids) characteristic of Earth's bacteria. Thus, lunar dust might be used as a negative control, in conjunction with GC-MS/MS analyses, in future analytical studies of lunar dust and meteorites. Such analyses may also be important in studies designed to search for the presence of life on Mars.

  19. Linguistic Markers of Inference Generation While Reading.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Virginia; Carlson, Sarah E; Seipel, Ben

    2016-06-01

    Words can be informative linguistic markers of psychological constructs. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between word use and the process of making meaningful connections to a text while reading (i.e., inference generation). To achieve this purpose, think-aloud data from third-fifth grade students ([Formula: see text]) reading narrative texts were hand-coded for inferences. These data were also processed with a computer text analysis tool, Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count, for percentages of word use in the following categories: cognitive mechanism words, nonfluencies, and nine types of function words. Findings indicate that cognitive mechanisms were an independent, positive predictor of connections to background knowledge (i.e., elaborative inference generation) and nonfluencies were an independent, negative predictor of connections within the text (i.e., bridging inference generation). Function words did not provide unique variance towards predicting inference generation. These findings are discussed in the context of a cognitive reflection model and the differences between bridging and elaborative inference generation. In addition, potential practical implications for intelligent tutoring systems and computer-based methods of inference identification are presented.

  20. Is the Universe's Acceleration Eternal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Rachel; Magueijo, Joao; Barrow, John

    2002-12-01

    We present a new interpretation of recent observations suggesting that the expansion of the Universe has recently started to accelerate. First we introduce a cosmological model with a minimally coupled quintessence field driven by a potential motivated by M-theory. We find that late-time acceleration does not have to lead to the usual predictions of perpetual acceleration. The model allows another broad class of scenarios in which today's acceleration is a transient phenomenon which is succeeded by a return to matter domination and decelerating expansion. Quintessence scenarios provide a simple explanation for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Yet, explaining why acceleration did not start a long time ago remains a challenge. The idea that the transition from radiation to matter domination played a dynamical role in triggering acceleration has been put forward in various guises. We, secondly, propose a simple dilaton-derived quintessence model in which temporary vacuum domination is naturally triggered by the radiation to matter transition. In this model Einstein's gravity is preserved but quintessence couples non-minimally to the cold dark matter, but not to "visible" matter. Such couplings have been attributed to the dilaton in the low-energy limit of string theory beyond tree level.

  1. Teleportation with Multiple Accelerated Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagheer, A.; Hamdoun, H.; Metwally, N.

    2015-09-01

    As the current revolution in communication is underway, quantum teleportation can increase the level of security in quantum communication applications. In this paper, we present a quantum teleportation procedure that capable to teleport either accelerated or non-accelerated information through different quantum channels. These quantum channels are based on accelerated multi-qubit states, where each qubit of each of these channels represents a partner. Namely, these states are the W state, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, and the GHZ-like state. Here, we show that the fidelity of teleporting accelerated information is higher than the fidelity of teleporting non-accelerated information, both through a quantum channel that is based on accelerated state. Also, the comparison among the performance of these three channels shows that the degree of fidelity depends on type of the used channel, type of the measurement, and value of the acceleration. The result of comparison concludes that teleporting information through channel that is based on the GHZ state is more robust than teleporting information through channels that are based on the other two states. For future work, the proposed procedure can be generalized later to achieve communication through a wider quantum network.

  2. Onset of electron acceleration in a flare loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, Ivan; Liu, Siming; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-09-20

    We carried out a detailed analysis of X-ray and radio observations of a simple flare loop that occurred on 2002 August 12, with the impulsive hard X-ray (HXR) light curves dominated by a single pulse. The emission spectra of the early impulsive phase are consistent with an isothermal model in the coronal loop with a temperature reaching several keV. A power-law high-energy spectral tail is evident near the HXR peak time, in accordance with the appearance of footpoints at high energies, and is well correlated with the radio emission. The energy content of the thermal component keeps increasing gradually after the disappearance of this nonthermal component. These results suggest that electron acceleration only covers the central period of a longer and more gradual energy dissipation process and that the electron transport within the loop plays a crucial role in the formation of the inferred power-law electron distribution. The spectral index of power-law photons shows a very gradual evolution, indicating that the electron accelerator is in a quasi-steady state, which is confirmed by radio observations. These results are consistent with the theory of stochastic electron acceleration from a thermal background. Advanced modeling with coupled electron acceleration and spatial transport processes is needed to explain these observations more quantitatively, which may reveal the dependence of the electron acceleration on the spatial structure of the acceleration region.

  3. Acceleration of polarized protons in the IHEP accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Anferov, V.A.; Ado, Yu.M.; Shoumkin, D.

    1995-04-01

    The paper considers possibility to accelerate polarized beam in the IHEP accelerator complex (including first stage of the UNK). The scheme of preserving beam polarization is described for all acceleration stages up to 400 GeV beam energy. Polarization and intensity of the polarized proton beam are estimated. The suggested scheme includes using two Siberian snakes in opposite straight sections of the UNK-1, where each snake consists of five dipole magnets. In the U-70 it is suggested to use one helical Siberian snake, which is turned on adiabatically at 10 GeV, and four pulsed quadrupoles. To incorporate the snake into the accelerator lattice it is proposed to make modification of one superperiod. This would make a 13 m long straight section. Spin depolarization in the Booster is avoided by decreasing the extraction energy to 0.9 GeV. Then no additional hardware is required in the Booster.

  4. Phase motion of accelerated electrons in vacuum laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, J. F.; Lin, Y. Z.; Tang, Ch. X.; Ho, Y. K.; Kong, Q.

    2007-01-15

    The phase stability in the capture and acceleration scenario (CAS) is studied and compared with that of conventional linear electron accelerators (CLEAs). For the CAS case, it has been found that a slow phase slippage occurs due to the difference between the electron velocity and the phase velocity of the longitudinal accelerating electric field. Thus, CAS electrons cannot remain in a fixed small phase region of the accelerating field to obtain a quasimonoenergy gain in contrast to the stability of phase oscillation in CLEAs. Also, the energy spread of the output electron beam for the CAS case cannot be kept as small as the CLEA because there is no good phase bunching phenomenon generated by phase oscillation.

  5. Genomewide markers as cofactors for precision mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, R

    2013-04-01

    In composite interval mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), subsets of background markers are used to account for the effects of QTL outside the marker interval being tested. Here, I propose a QTL mapping approach (called G model) that utilizes genomewide markers as cofactors. The G model involves backward elimination on a given chromosome after correcting for genomewide marker effects, calculated under a random effects model, at all the other chromosomes. I simulated a trait controlled by 15 or 30 QTL, mapping populations of N = 96, 192, and 384 recombinant inbreds, and N M = 192 and 384 evenly spaced markers. In the C model, which utilized subsets of background markers, the number of QTL detected and the number of false positives depended on the number of cofactors used, with five cofactors being too few with N = 384 and 20-40 cofactors being too many with N = 96. A window size of 0 cM for excluding cofactors maintained the number of true QTL detected while decreasing the number of false positives. The number of true QTL detected was generally higher with the G model than with the C model, and the G model led to good control of the type I error rate in simulations where the null hypothesis of no marker-QTL linkage was true. Overall, the results indicated that the G model is useful in QTL mapping because it is less subjective and has equal, if not better, performance when compared with the traditional approach of using subsets of markers to account for background QTL.

  6. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for 14C and 129I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  7. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  8. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  9. Electromagnetic modeling in accelerator designs

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Through the years, electromagnetic modeling using computers has proved to be a cost-effective tool for accelerator designs. Traditionally, electromagnetic modeling of accelerators has been limited to resonator and magnet designs in two dimensions. In recent years with the availability of powerful computers, electromagnetic modeling of accelerators has advanced significantly. Through the above conferences, it is apparent that breakthroughs have been made during the last decade in two important areas: three-dimensional modeling and time-domain simulation. Success in both these areas have been made possible by the increasing size and speed of computers. In this paper, the advances in these two areas will be described.

  10. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  11. Lymphocyte Activation Markers in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Fatina I.; Elghoroury, Eman A.; Elshamaa, Manal F.; Bazaraa, Hafez M.; Salah, Doaa M.; Kassem, Neemat M. A.; Ibrahim, Mona H.; El-Saaid, Gamila S.; Nasr, Soha A.; Koura, Hala M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: The role of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) in immune tolerance in experimental transplantation is very important but the clinical significance of circulating Tregs in the peripheral blood is undetermined. We evaluated the association between the frequency of T cell activation markers CD25 and CD71 and clinical parameters that may affect the level of these T cell markers. Methods: In 47peditric kidney transplant (KT) recipients and 20 healthy controls, the frequency of T cell activation markers, CD25 and CD71 was measured with flow cytometry after transplantation. Two clinical protocols of induction immunosuppression were used: (1) anti-thymocyte globulin (THYMO) group (n =29) and Basiliximab (BSX) group (n=10). Results: The percentage of circulating CD25 after KT was significantly lower than that in the controls. There is no significant difference between KT and the controls s regard to circulating CD71. The percentage of CD25 was significantly increased in children with acute rejection compared with those without acute rejection. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) decreased the frequency of CD25 but mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor did not. The proportion of CD25 significantly decreased in THYMO group during the first year after transplantation. Conclusion: The frequency of circulating T cell activation marker CD25 in pediatric KT recipients is strongly affected by CNIs, and a high frequency of CD25 is associated with acute rejection during the early posttransplant period. The measurement of T cell activation markers, may become a useful immune monitoring tool after kidney transplantation. PMID:26508906

  12. Theoretical Investigations of Plasma-Based Accelerators and Other Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Shuets, G.

    2004-05-21

    Theoretical investigations of plasma-based accelerators and other advanced accelerator concepts. The focus of the work was on the development of plasma based and structure based accelerating concepts, including laser-plasma, plasma channel, and microwave driven plasma accelerators.

  13. SNEAP 80: symposium of Northeastern Accelerator personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Reports of operations are presented for twenty-seven facilities, along with reports on accelerators in progress, ion sources, insulating gases, charging systems, stripping foils, accelerating tubes, and upgraded accelerator systems. (GHT)

  14. US Particle Accelerators at Age 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the development of accelerators over the past 50 years. Topics include: types of accelerators, including cyclotrons; sociology of accelerators (motivation, financing, construction, and use); impact of war; national laboratories; funding; applications; future projects; foreign projects; and international collaborations. (JN)

  15. High acceleration cable deployment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, T. N.; Barns, C. E.; Murphy, J. P.; Gin, B.; King, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A deployment system that will safely pay one cable from a ballistic forebody when the forebody is separated from an afterbody (to which the cable is secured and when the separation is marked by high acceleration and velocity) is described.

  16. Exercise Training During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Chou, J. L.; Simonson, S. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose is to study the effect of passive (without exercise) and active (with exercise) +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration training, using a short-arm (1.9m radius) centrifuge, on post- training maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max, work capacity) and 70 deg head-up tilt (orthostatic) tolerance in ambulatory subjects to test the hypothesis that (a) both passive and active acceleration training will improve post-training tilt-tolerance, and (b) there will be no difference in tilt-tolerance between passive and active exercise acceleration training because increased hydrostatic and blood pressures, rather than increased muscular metabolism, will provide the major adaptive stimulus. The purpose of the pilot study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the metabolic responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  17. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  18. Simple formulation of magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, A. )

    1994-03-01

    A simple formulation of magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration has been made based on energy conservation relations and a generalized Ohm's law. An exhaust velocity is expressed using three characteristic parameters: (1) a dimensionless characteristic velocity [ital [tilde U

  19. Computing tools for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-06-01

    An algorithm has been developed that calculates and obtains information about nonlinear contributions in accelerators. The comparison of the results obtained from this program ''NONLIN'' and HARMON is discussed and illustrated for the SSC-CDR clustered lattices.

  20. Accelerating to New Aviation Horizons

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA has a 10-year plan to accelerate aviation research that includes the design, build and flight of a series of piloted X-planes -- experimental aircraft -- which will test advanced technologies ...

  1. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  2. Fermi acceleration of auroral particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of a number of nighttime acceleration mechanisms proposed in the literature for the role of producing the keV nighttime auroral-particle fluxes. Parallel electric fields are rejected for several reasons, but particularly because of the observed simultaneous precipitation of electrons and protons. Acceleration in the neutral sheet is inadequate for producing the particle energies, the observed field-aligned pitch-angle distribution at high latitudes, and the spectral hardening toward lower latitudes. Neutral point mechanisms, although often suggested in principle, have never been demonstrated satisfactorily in theory or in practice. Pitch-angle scattering from a trapped population produced by transverse adiabatic compression is also incapable of producing the field-aligned distribution. It is therefore suggested that longitudinal or Fermi acceleration, which results from the known magnetospheric convection, is the main nighttime auroral acceleration mechanism. The argument is supported by data obtained with the soft-particle spectrometer on Isis 1.

  3. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  4. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Gluckstern, R.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N. |

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  5. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  6. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise induces adaptations in metabolism considered beneficial for health. Athletic performance is linked to adaptations, training, and correct nutrition in individuals with genetic traits that can facilitate such adaptations. Intense and continuous exercise, training, and competitions, however, can induce changes in the serum concentrations of numerous laboratory parameters. When these modifications, especially elevated laboratory levels, result outside the reference range, further examinations are ordered or participation in training and competition is discontinued or sports practice loses its appeal. In order to correctly interpret commonly used laboratory data, laboratory professionals and sport physicians need to know the behavior of laboratory parameters during and after practice and competition. We reviewed the literature on liver, kidney, muscle, heart, energy, and bone parameters in athletes with a view to increase the knowledge about clinical chemistry applied to sport and to stimulate studies in this field. In liver metabolism, the interpretation of serum aminotransferases concentration in athletes should consider the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from muscle and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) mainly from the liver, when bilirubin can be elevated because of continuous hemolysis, which is typical of exercise. Muscle metabolism parameters such as creatine kinase (CK) are typically increased after exercise. This parameter can be used to interpret the physiological release of CK from muscle, its altered release due to rhabdomyolysis, or incomplete recovery due to overreaching or trauma. Cardiac markers are released during exercise, and especially endurance training. Increases in these markers should not simply be interpreted as a signal of cardiac damage or wall stress but rather as a sign of regulation of myocardial adaptation. Renal function can be followed in athletes by measuring serum creatinine concentration, but it should

  7. An improved correlation method for amplitude estimation of gravitational background signal with time-varying frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Huang; Tian, Yuan; Luo, Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Jia-Hao; Wang, Dian-Hong

    2016-09-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the accurate estimation of the amplitude of the useful angular acceleration generated by source masses depends on the effective subtraction of the spurious gravitational signal caused by room fixed background masses. The gravitational background signal is of time-varying frequency, and mainly consists of the prominent fundamental frequency and second harmonic components. We propose an improved correlation method to estimate the amplitudes of the prominent components of the gravitational background signal with high precision. The improved correlation method converts a sinusoidal signal with time-varying frequency into a standard sinusoidal signal by means of the stretch processing of time. Based on Gaussian white noise model, the theoretical result shows the uncertainty of the estimated amplitude is proportional to /σ √{ N T } , where σ and N are the standard deviation of noise and the number of the useful signal period T, respectively.

  8. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  9. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  10. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  11. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  12. Interactive Design of Accelerators (IDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1987-06-30

    IDA is a beam transport line calculation program which runs interactively on an IBM PC computer. It can be used for a large fraction of the usual calculations done for beam transport systems or periods of accelerators or storage rings. Because of the interactive screen editor nature of the data input, this program permits one to rather quickly arrive at general properties of a beam line or an accelerator period.

  13. Dynamics of Radiation Pressure Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, A.; Benedetti, C.; Pegoraro, F.; Veghini, S.

    2010-02-02

    We describe recent theoretical results on Radiation Pressure Acceleration of ions by ultraintense, circularly polarized laser pulses, giving an insight on the underlying dynamics and suggestions for the development of applications. In thick targets, we show how few-cycle pulses may generate single ion bunches in inhomogeneous density profiles. In thin targets, we present a refinement of the simple model of the accelerating mirror and a comparison of its predictions with simulation results, solving an apparent paradox.

  14. EST and EST-SSR marker resources for Iris

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shunxue; Okashah, Rebecca A; Cordonnier-Pratt, Marie-Michele; Pratt, Lee H; Ed Johnson, Virgil; Taylor, Christopher A; Arnold, Michael L; Knapp, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Background Limited DNA sequence and DNA marker resources have been developed for Iris (Iridaceae), a monocot genus of 200–300 species in the Asparagales, several of which are horticulturally important. We mined an I. brevicaulis-I. fulva EST database for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and developed ortholog-specific EST-SSR markers for genetic mapping and other genotyping applications in Iris. Here, we describe the abundance and other characteristics of SSRs identified in the transcript assembly (EST database) and the cross-species utility and polymorphisms of I. brevicaulis-I. fulva EST-SSR markers among wild collected ecotypes and horticulturally important cultivars. Results Collectively, 6,530 ESTs were produced from normalized leaf and root cDNA libraries of I. brevicaulis (IB72) and I. fulva (IF174), and assembled into 4,917 unigenes (1,066 contigs and 3,851 singletons). We identified 1,447 SSRs in 1,162 unigenes and developed 526 EST-SSR markers, each tracing a different unigene. Three-fourths of the EST-SSR markers (399/526) amplified alleles from IB72 and IF174 and 84% (335/399) were polymorphic between IB25 and IF174, the parents of I. brevicaulis × I. fulva mapping populations. Forty EST-SSR markers were screened for polymorphisms among 39 ecotypes or cultivars of seven species – 100% amplified alleles from wild collected ecotypes of Louisiana Iris (I.brevicaulis, I.fulva, I. nelsonii, and I. hexagona), whereas 42–52% amplified alleles from cultivars of three horticulturally important species (I. pseudacorus, I. germanica, and I. sibirica). Ecotypes and cultivars were genetically diverse – the number of alleles/locus ranged from two to 18 and mean heterozygosity was 0.76. Conclusion Nearly 400 ortholog-specific EST-SSR markers were developed for comparative genetic mapping and other genotyping applications in Iris, were highly polymorphic among ecotypes and cultivars, and have broad utility for genotyping applications within the genus. PMID

  15. 75 FR 59620 - Natchez Fireworks Safety Zone; Lower Mississippi River, Mile Marker 365.5 to Mile Marker 363...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ..., Mile Marker 365.5 to Mile Marker 363, Natchez, MS AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final...; Lower Mississippi River, Mile Marker 365.5 to Mile Marker 363, Natchez, MS (a) Location. The...

  16. Radiation from violently accelerated bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Ulrich H.

    2001-11-01

    A determination is made of the radiation emitted by a linearly uniformly accelerated uncharged dipole transmitter. It is found that, first of all, the radiation rate is given by the familiar Larmor formula, but it is augmented by an amount which becomes dominant for sufficiently high acceleration. For an accelerated dipole oscillator, the criterion is that the center of mass motion become relativistic within one oscillation period. The augmented formula and the measurements which it summarizes presuppose an expanding inertial observation frame. A static inertial reference frame will not do. Secondly, it is found that the radiation measured in the expanding inertial frame is received with 100% fidelity. There is no blueshift or redshift due to the accelerative motion of the transmitter. Finally, it is found that a pair of coherently radiating oscillators accelerating (into opposite directions) in their respective causally disjoint Rindler-coordinatized sectors produces an interference pattern in the expanding inertial frame. Like the pattern of a Young double slit interferometer, this Rindler interferometer pattern has a fringe spacing which is inversely proportional to the proper separation and the proper frequency of the accelerated sources. The interferometer, as well as the augmented Larmor formula, provide a unifying perspective. It joins adjacent Rindler-coordinatized neighborhoods into a single spacetime arena for scattering and radiation from accelerated bodies.

  17. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  18. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  19. Tumour marker detection in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mealy, K; Feely, J; Reid, I; McSweeney, J; Walsh, T; Hennessy, T P

    1996-10-01

    Levels of the tumour markers CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC were measured in 58 patients presenting with oesophageal carcinoma and compared with levels in patients with benign oesophageal disease and levels in normal volunteers. CEA and CA 19-9 were significantly increased in the patients with oesophageal cancer, however, individual sensitivity for CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC was only 28, 34, 10, and 32%, respectively. The combined sensitivity of all markers was 64% and specificity was 80%. There was no difference in combined tumour marker sensitivity between squamous or adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. No consistent change in marker levels occurred with treatment, and tumour marker levels could not be significantly correlated with stage of disease or short-term survival. These results indicate that tumour marker sensitivity is too low for oesophageal cancer screening and has poor prognostic significance in those undergoing treatment.

  20. Newer markers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Jorge A; Lok, Anna S F

    2004-11-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing worldwide; the overall survival of patients with HCC is grim because most patients are diagnosed late, when curative treatment is not possible. Cirrhosis is the strongest risk factor for the development of HCC. HCC surveillance with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and ultrasonography has been recommended for persons with cirrhosis. However, AFP level is insensitive for the early detection of HCC, and ultrasonography is expensive and operator dependent. Clearly, there is a need for novel strategies for the early detection of HCC. The ideal biomarker assay for HCC would be sensitive, specific, noninvasive, reproducible, inexpensive, and acceptable to patients. The Early Detection Research Network of the National Cancer Institute has proposed 5 phases for biomarker validation: preclinical exploratory studies, clinical assay development for disease, retrospective longitudinal study to detect preclinical disease, prospective screening study, and cancer control studies. Several biomarkers, such as des-gamma carboxyprothrombin, lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive AFP, human hepatocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1, are promising, but none of these markers has been validated for clinical use. Limitations of the current literature include inadequate sample size, heterogeneity in biomarker assay methods and result reporting, limited analysis of demographics and cause of liver disease as covariates in the expression of these markers, and a scarcity of longitudinal studies evaluating the ability of biomarkers to detect preclinical disease. There is an urgent need for novel biomarkers for the detection of early HCC; the National Cancer Institute proposal provides a framework for future validation studies. PMID:15508074