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Sample records for acceleration measurement systems

  1. Space Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This training video, presented by the Lewis Research Center's Space Experiments Division, gives a background and detailed instructions for preparing the space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) for use. The SAMS measures, conditions, and records forces of low gravity accelerations, and is used to determine the effect of these forces on various experiments performed in microgravity. Inertial sensors are used to measure positive and negative acceleration over a specified frequency range. The video documents the SAMS' uses in different configurations during shuttle missions.

  2. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  3. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS-II) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  4. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is part of the Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical (MEMS) acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical-sensor-based systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used in characterizing both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data has cross-disciplinary utility to the microgravity life and physical sciences and the structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, while providing enhanced stability.

  5. Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimenters from the fluids, combustion, materials, and life science disciplines all use the microgravity environment of space to enhance their understanding of fundamental physical phenomena caused by disturbances from events such as spacecraft maneuvers, equipment operations, atmospheric drag, and (for manned flights) crew movement. Space conditions reduce gravity but do not eliminate it. To quantify the level of these disturbances, NASA developed the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) series to collect data characterizing the acceleration environment on the space shuttles. This information is provided to investigators so that they can evaluate how the microgravity environment affects their experiments. Knowledge of the microgravity environment also helps investigators to plan future experiments. The original SAMS system flew 20 missions on the shuttle as well as on the Russian space station Mir. Presently, Lewis is developing SAMS-II for the International Space Station; it will be a distributed system using digital output sensor heads. The latest operational version of SAMS, SAMS-FF, was originally designed for free flyer spacecraft and unmanned areas. SAMS-FF is a flexible, modular system, housed in a lightweight package, and it uses advances in technology to improve performance. The hardware package consists of a control and data acquisition module, three different types of sensors, data storage devices, and ground support equipment interfaces. Three different types of sensors are incorporated to measure both high- and low-frequency accelerations and the roll rate velocity. Small, low-power triaxial sensor heads (TSH's) offer high resolution and selectable bandwidth, and a special low-frequency accelerometer is available for high-resolution, low-frequency applications. A state-of-the-art, triaxial fiberoptic gyroscope that measures extremely low roll rates is housed in a compact package. The versatility of the SAMS-FF system is shown in the three

  6. Design of MEMS accelerometer based acceleration measurement system for automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, K. Arun; Mathivanan, N.

    2012-10-01

    Design of an acceleration measurement system using a MEMS accelerometer to measure acceleration of automobiles in all the three axes is presented. Electronic stability control and anti-lock breaking systems in automobiles use the acceleration measurements to offer safety in driving. The system uses an ARM microcontroller to quantize the outputs of accelerometer and save the measurement data on a microSD card. A LabVIEW program has been developed to analyze the longitudinal acceleration measurement data and test the measurement system. Random noises generated and added with measurement data during measurement are filtered by a Kalman filter implemented in LabVIEW. Longitudinal velocity of the vehicle is computed from the measurement data and displayed on a graphical chart. Typical measurement of velocity of a vehicle at different accelerations and decelerations is presented.

  7. Presentation on a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Theodore L.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the Space Acceleration Measurement Systems (SAMS) project is to provide an acceleration measurement system capable of serving a wide variety of space experiments. The design of the system being developed under this project takes into consideration requirements for experiments located in the middeck, in the orbiter bay, and in Spacelab. In addition to measuring, conditioning, and recording accelerations, the system will be capable of performing complex calculations and interactive control. The main components consist of a remote triaxial optical storage device. In operation, the triaxial sensor head produces output signals in response to acceleration inputs. These signals are preamplified, filtered and converted into digital data which is then transferred to optical memory. The system design is modular, facilitating both software and hardware upgrading as technology advances. Two complete acceleration measurement flight systems will be build and tested under this project.

  8. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project is part of NASA s Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical sensor systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used to characterize both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data is useful to the microgravity life sciences, microgravity physical sciences, and structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, with enhanced long-term calibration stability.

  9. Development of a wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration responses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Spencer, Billie F

    2013-01-01

    Displacement measurements are useful information for various engineering applications such as structural health monitoring (SHM), earthquake engineering and system identification. Most existing displacement measurement methods are costly, labor-intensive, and have difficulties particularly when applying to full-scale civil structures because the methods require stationary reference points. Indirect estimation methods converting acceleration to displacement can be a good alternative as acceleration transducers are generally cost-effective, easy to install, and have low noise. However, the application of acceleration-based methods to full-scale civil structures such as long span bridges is challenging due to the need to install cables to connect the sensors to a base station. This article proposes a low-cost wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration. Developed with smart sensors that are low-cost, wireless, and capable of on-board computation, the wireless displacement measurement system has significant potential to impact many applications that need displacement information at multiple locations of a structure. The system implements an FIR-filter type displacement estimation algorithm that can remove low frequency drifts typically caused by numerical integration of discrete acceleration signals. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed system, laboratory tests are carried out using a shaking table and on a three storey shear building model, experimentally confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:23881123

  10. Compact all-fiber interferometer system for shock acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Pi, Shaohua; Hong, Guangwei; Zhao, Dong; Jia, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Acceleration measurement plays an important role in a variety of fields in science and engineering. In particular, the accurate, continuous and non-contact recording of the shock acceleration profiles of the free target surfaces is considered as a critical technique in shock physics. Various kinds of optical interferometers have been developed to monitor the motion of the surfaces of shocked targets since the 1960s, for instance, the velocity interferometer system for any reflector, the fiber optic accelerometer, the photonic Doppler velocimetry system and the displacement interferometer. However, most of such systems rely on the coherent quasi-monochromatic illumination and discrete optic elements, which are costly in setting-up and maintenance. In 1996, L. Levin et al reported an interferometric fiber-optic Doppler velocimeter with high-dynamic range, in which fiber-coupled components were used to replace the discrete optic elements. However, the fringe visibility of the Levin's system is low because of the coupled components, which greatly limits the reliability and accuracy in the shock measurement. In this paper, a compact all-fiber interferometer system for measuring the shock acceleration is developed and tested. The advantage of the system is that not only removes the non-interfering light and enhances the fringe visibility, but also reduces polarization induced signal fading and the polarization induced phase shift. Moreover, it also does not require a source of long coherence length. The system bases entirely on single-mode fiber optics and mainly consists of a polarization beam splitter, a faraday rotator, a depolarizer and a 3×3 single-mode fiber coupler which work at 1310 nm wavelength. The optical systems of the interferometer are described and the experimental results compared with a shock acceleration calibration system with a pneumatic exciter (PneuShockTM Model 9525C by The Modal Shop) are reported. In the shock acceleration test, the

  11. Space acceleration measurement system triaxial sensor head error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John E.; Peters, Rex B.; Finley, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is to measure and record the microgravity environment for a given experiment aboard the Space Shuttle. To accomplish this, SAMS uses remote triaxial sensor heads (TSH) that can be mounted directly on or near an experiment. The errors of the TSH are reduced by calibrating it before and after each flight. The associated error budget for the calibration procedure is discussed here.

  12. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelby, F.

    It is common for failures to occur when attempting to acquire acceleration structural response measurements during crash, impact, and pyrotechnic testing. The structural response of a mechanical system to severe transient loading is commonly measured by accelerometers which are less than ideal. In particular, their amplitude-frequency response has one or more resonant peaks so that the output of the accelerometer may not be an exact replica of the input if the transient input stimulus contains frequencies near these resonant peaks, signal distortion, over-ranging of signal conditioning electronics, or even failure of the sensing element may occur. These and other problems have spurred the development of a new acceleration-measuring system which incorporates the following features; Transduction Element; Connectors; Mounting; Electronics; and Transducer Resonance.

  13. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) Flight Configuration Verification and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagar, William

    2000-01-01

    The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is a precision spaceflight instrument designed to measure and characterize the microgravity environment existing in the US Lab Module of the International Space Station. Both vibratory and quasi-steady triaxial acceleration data are acquired and provided to an Ethernet data link. The MAMS Double Mid-Deck Locker (DMDL) EXPRESS Rack payload meets all the ISS IDD and ICD interface requirements as discussed in the paper which also presents flight configuration illustrations. The overall MAMS sensor and data acquisition performance and verification data are presented in addition to a discussion of the Command and Data Handling features implemented via the ISS, downlink and the GRC Telescience Center displays.

  14. Optical system for measurement of pyrotechnic test accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Paul; Czajkowski, John; Rehard, John

    1992-12-01

    This effort was directed at comparing the response of several different accelerometer and amplifier combinations to the pyrotechnic pulse simulating the ordnance separation of stages of multistage missiles. These pyrotechnic events can contain peak accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and a frequency content exceeding 100,000 Hz. The main thrust of this work was to compare the several accelerometer systems with each other and with a very accurate laser Doppler displacement meter in order to establish the frequency bands and acceleration amplitudes where the accelerometer systems are in error. The comparisons were made in simple sine-wave and low-acceleration amplitude environments, as well as in very severe pyroshock environments. An optical laser Doppler displacement meter (LDDM) was used to obtain the displacement velocity and acceleration histories, as well as the corresponding shock spectrum.

  15. Low-cost tape system measures velocity of acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, R.

    1964-01-01

    By affixing perforated magnetic recording tape to the falling end of a body, acceleration and velocity were measured. The measurement was made by allowing the tape to pass between a light source and a photoelectric sensor. Data was obtained from a readout device.

  16. The Awful Truth About Zero-Gravity: Space Acceleration Measurement System; Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Earth's gravity holds the Shuttle in orbit, as it does satellites and the Moon. The apparent weightlessness experienced by astronauts and experiments on the Shuttle is a balancing act, the result of free-fall, or continuously falling around Earth. An easy way to visualize what is happening is with a thought experiment that Sir Isaac Newton did in 1686. Newton envisioned a mountain extending above Earth's atmosphere so that friction with the air would be eliminated. He imagined a cannon atop the mountain and aimed parallel to the ground. Firing the cannon propels the cannonball forward. At the same time, Earth's gravity pulls the cannonball down to the surface and eventual impact. Newton visualized using enough powder to just balance gravity so the cannonball would circle the Earth. Like the cannonball, objects orbiting Earth are in continuous free-fall, and it appears that gravity has been eliminated. Yet, that appearance is deceiving. Activities aboard the Shuttle generate a range of accelerations that have effects similar to those of gravity. The crew works and exercises. The main data relay antenna quivers 17 times per second to prevent 'stiction,' where parts stick then release with a jerk. Cooling pumps, air fans, and other systems add vibration. And traces of Earth's atmosphere, even 200 miles up, drag on the Shuttle. While imperceptible to us, these vibrations can have a profound impact on the commercial research and scientific experiments aboard the Shuttle. Measuring these forces is necessary so that researchers and scientists can see what may have affected their experiments when analyzing data. On STS-107 this service is provided by the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers (SAMS-FF) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE). Precision data from these two instruments will help scientists analyze data from their experiments and eliminate outside influences from the phenomena they are studying during the mission.

  17. Improved VLBI measurement of the solar system acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Lambert, S.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We propose new estimates of the secular aberration drift, which is mainly caused by the rotation of the solar system about the Galactic center, based on up-to-date VLBI observations and improved method of outlier elimination. Methods: We fitted degree-2 vector spherical harmonics to the extragalactic radio source proper motion field derived from geodetic VLBI observations during 1979-2013. We paid particular attention to the outlier elimination procedure that removes outliers from (i) radio source coordinate time series and (ii) the proper motion sample. Results: We obtain more accurate values of the Solar system acceleration than in our previous paper. The acceleration vector is oriented towards the Galactic center within ~7°. The component perpendicular to the Galactic plane is statistically insignificant. We show that an insufficient cleaning of the data set can lead to strong variations in the dipole amplitude and orientation, and hence to statistically biased results. Proper motion data used for the DR solution is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/559/A95

  18. ACCELERATORS: RF system design and measurement of HIRF-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhe; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Xia, Jia-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Long; Bian, Zhi-Bin

    2009-05-01

    An RF system for the CSRe (cooling storage experimental ring) is designed and manufactured domestically. The present paper mainly describes the RF system design in five main sections: ferrite ring, RF cavity, RF generator, low level system and cavity cooling. The cavity is based on a type of coaxial resonator which is shorted at the end with one gap and loaded with domestic ferrite rings. The RF generator is designed in the push-pull mode and the low level control system is based on a DSP+FGPA+DDS+USB interface and has three feedback loops. Finally we give the results of the measurement on our system.

  19. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelby, F.

    A shock measurement system was developed in which the quartz seismic system, two poole active filter and an FET source follower are incorporated in a transducer housing. It is shown that the system will survive + or 100,000g without damage. The PCB can supply different ranges as required. The PCB Model 305M23, can obtain data comparable to those of standard piezoelectric and piezoresistive accelerometers when high frequencies are absent. In the presence of high frequency stimuli, the accelerometer has obtained data without over ranging its data channel and without introducing error signals from excitation of the resonant frequency of its seismic system. It is useful for impact and pyrotechnic measurements. The development effort and test program have enhanced the probability of acquiring successful structural measurements in harsh mechanical loading environments.

  20. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    SciTech Connect

    Schelby, F.

    1983-01-01

    A shock measurement system has been developed in which the quartz seismic system, two-poole active filter and an FET source follower are incorporated in a transducer housing measuring 5/16'' hex.x 5/8''. Tests have shown that the system will survive +- 100,000g without damage. Although the results reported here are for accelerometers ranged to +- 20,000g, there is no reason to limit the accelerometers to that range and PCB can supply different ranges as required. The PCB Model 305M23, developed to Sandia's specifications, has proved capable of obtaining data comparable to that of standard piezoelectric and piezoresistive accelerometers when high frequencies are absent. In the presence of high frequency stimuli, the accelerometer has obtained data without over-ranging its data channel and without introducing error signals from excitation of the resonant frequency of its seismic system. It should, therefore, be especially useful for impact and pyrotechnic measurements. These shock accelerometers are in the process of being fielded in earth penetrator vehicles; in shale rubblization experiments will soon be available. It appears this joint development effort and test program has greatly enhanced the probability of acquiring successful structural measurements in harsh mechanical loading environments.

  1. Method for direct measurement of cosmic acceleration by 21-cm absorption systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-25

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively. PMID:25105607

  2. Unsupervised classification of Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) data using ART2-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. D.; Sinha, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) has been developed by NASA to monitor the microgravity acceleration environment aboard the space shuttle. The amount of data collected by a SAMS unit during a shuttle mission is in the several gigabytes range. Adaptive Resonance Theory 2-A (ART2-A), an unsupervised neural network, has been used to cluster these data and to develop cause and effect relationships among disturbances and the acceleration environment. Using input patterns formed on the basis of power spectral densities (psd), data collected from two missions, STS-050 and STS-057, have been clustered.

  3. A fiber optic strain measurement and quench localization system for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; Scanlan, R.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1994-10-17

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system or as an absolute strain detector. Combined, one can monitor the mechanical behaviour of the magnet system over time during construction, long time storage and operation. The sensing mechanism is described, together with various tests in laboratory environments. The test results of a multichannel test matrix to be incorporated first in the dummy coils and then in the final version of a 13T Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator dipole magnet are presented. Finally, the possible use of this system as a quench localization system is proposed.

  4. Development of and flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Finley, Brian D.; Baugher, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of and the flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) flight units used in the Orbiter middeck, Spacelab module, and the Orbitercargo bay. The SAMS units are general purpose microgravity accelerometers designed to support a variety of science experiments with microgravity acceleration measurements. A total of six flight units have been fabricated; four for use in the Orbiter middeck and Spacelab module, and two for use in the Orbiter cargo bay. The design of the units is briefly described. The initial two flights of SAMS units on STS-40 (June 1991) and STS-43 (August 1991) resulted in 371 megabytes and 2.6 gigabytes of data respectively. Analytical techniques developed to examine this quantity of acceleration data are described and sample plots of analyzed data are illustrated. Future missions for the SAMS units are listed.

  5. Space acceleration measurement system description and operations on the First Spacelab Life Sciences Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Finley, Brian D.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) project and flight units are briefly described. The SAMS operations during the STS-40 mission are summarized, and a preliminary look at some of the acceleration data from that mission are provided. The background and rationale for the SAMS project is described to better illustrate its goals. The functions and capabilities of each SAMS flight unit are first explained, then the STS-40 mission, the SAMS's function for that mission, and the preparation of the SAMS are described. Observations about the SAMS operations during the first SAMS mission are then discussed. Some sample data are presented illustrating several aspects of the mission's microgravity environment.

  6. The LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System for Biochemical 14C-Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T J; Bench, G; Brown, T A; Vogel, J S

    2002-10-31

    We report on recent improvements made to our 1 MV accelerator mass spectrometry system that is dedicated to {sup 14}C quantification of biochemical samples. Increased vacuum pumping capacity near the high voltage terminal has resulted in a 2-fold reduction of system backgrounds to 0.04 amol {sup 14}C/mg carbon. Carbon ion transmission through the accelerator has also improved a few percent. We have also developed tritium measurement capability on this spectrometer. The {sup 3}H/{sup 1}H isotopic ratio of a milligram-sized processed tap water sample has been measured at 4 {+-} 1 x 10{sup -16} (430 {+-} 110 {micro}Bq/mg H). Measurement throughput for a typical biochemical {sup 3}H sample is estimated to be {approx}10 minutes/sample.

  7. Requirements and Development of an Acceleration Measurement System for International Space Station Microgravity Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Space Station is being developed by NASA and international partners as a versatile user platform to allow long term on-orbit investigations of a variety of scientific and technology arenas. In particular, scientific studies are planned within a research class known as microgravity science in areas such as biotechnology, combustion, fluid physics, and materials sciences. An acceleration measurement system is in development to aid such research conducted in the on-orbit conditions of apparent weightlessness. This system provides a general purpose acceleration measurement capability in support of these payloads and investigators. Such capability allows for systematic study of scientific phenomena by obtaining information regarding the local accelerations present during experiment operations. Preparations for implementing this flight measurement system involves two distinct stages: requirements development prior to initiating the design activity, and the design activity itself. This paper defines the requirements definition approach taken, provides an overview of the results of the requirements phase, and outlines the initial design considerations being addressed for this measurement system. Some preliminary engineering approaches are also described.

  8. Summary Status of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), September 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was developed to measure the microgravity acceleration environment to which NASA science payloads are exposed during microgravity science missions on the shuttle. Six flight units have been fabricated to date. The inaugural flight of a SAMS unit was on STS-40 in June 1991 as part of the First Spacelab Life Sciences mission. Since that time, SAMS has flown on six additional missions and gathered eighteen gigabytes of data representing sixty-eight days of microgravity environment. The SAMS units have been flown in the shuttle middeck and cargo bay, in the Spacelab module, and in the Spacehab module. This paper summarizes the missions and experiments which SAMS has supported. The quantity of data and the utilization of the SAMS data is described. Future activities are briefly described for the SAMS project and the Microgravity Measurement and Analysis project (MMAP) to support science experiments and scientists with microgravity environment measurement and analysis.

  9. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II: Microgravity Instrumentation for the International Space Station Research Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station opens for business in the year 2000, and with the opening, science investigations will take advantage of the unique conditions it provides as an on-orbit laboratory for research. With initiation of scientific studies comes a need to understand the environment present during research. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II provides researchers a consistent means to understand the vibratory conditions present during experimentation on the International Space Station. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II, or SAMS-II, detects vibrations present while the space station is operating. SAMS-II on-orbit hardware is comprised of two basic building block elements: a centralized control unit and multiple Remote Triaxial Sensors deployed to measure the acceleration environment at the point of scientific research, generally within a research rack. Ground Operations Equipment is deployed to complete the command, control and data telemetry elements of the SAMS-II implementation. Initially, operations consist of user requirements development, measurement sensor deployment and use, and data recovery on the ground. Future system enhancements will provide additional user functionality and support more simultaneous users.

  10. A hybrid data acquisition system for magnetic measurements of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Martchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G. L.

    2011-06-03

    A hybrid data acquisition system was developed for magnetic measurement of superconducting accelerator magnets at LBNL. It consists of a National Instruments dynamic signal acquisition (DSA) card and two Metrolab fast digital integrator (FDI) cards. The DSA card records the induced voltage signals from the rotating probe while the FDI cards records the flux increment integrated over a certain angular step. This allows the comparison of the measurements performed with two cards. In this note, the setup and test of the system is summarized. With a probe rotating at a speed of 0.5 Hz, the multipole coefficients of two magnets were measured with the hybrid system. The coefficients from the DSA and FDI cards agree with each other, indicating that the numerical integration of the raw voltage acquired by the DSA card is comparable to the performance of the FDI card in the current measurement setup.

  11. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  12. Self-organizing map (SOM) of space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A; Smith, A D

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data have been classified using self-organizing map (SOM) networks without any supervision; i.e., no a priori knowledge is assumed regarding input patterns belonging to a certain class. Input patterns are created on the basis of power spectral densities of SAMS data. Results for SAMS data from STS-50 and STS-57 missions are presented. Following issues are discussed in details: impact of number of neurons, global ordering of SOM weight vectors, effectiveness of a SOM in data classification, and effects of shifting time windows in the generation of input patterns. The concept of 'cascade of SOM networks' is also developed and tested. It has been found that a SOM network can successfully classify SAMS data obtained during STS-50 and STS-57 missions. PMID:11543426

  13. Self-organizing map (SOM) of space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, A.; Smith, A. D.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data have been classified using self-organizing map (SOM) networks without any supervision; i.e., no a priori knowledge is assumed regarding input patterns belonging to a certain class. Input patterns are created on the basis of power spectral densities of SAMS data. Results for SAMS data from STS-50 and STS-57 missions are presented. Following issues are discussed in details: impact of number of neurons, global ordering of SOM weight vectors, effectiveness of a SOM in data classification, and effects of shifting time windows in the generation of input patterns. The concept of 'cascade of SOM networks' is also developed and tested. It has been found that a SOM network can successfully classify SAMS data obtained during STS-50 and STS-57 missions.

  14. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Finkelstein, Robert; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 3 (September 1996 to January 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 11 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-81. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE) and Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-81 operations, a Progress engine burn, attitude control thruster operation, and crew exercise. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  15. Low Frequency Vibration Characteristics of the Space Acceleration Measurement System 2 Tape Drive Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Russell, James W.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes results of force and moment measurements of the Space Acceleration Measurement System 2 (SAMS 2) Tape Drive Assembly (TDA) over the frequency range from 0.35 Hz to 256 Hz for steady state operations including write, read, rewind, and fast forward. Time domain force results are presented for transient TDA operations that include software eject, manual eject, and manual load. Three different mounting configurations were employed for attaching the inner box with the tape drive unit to the outer box. Two configurations employed grommet sets with spring rates of 42 and 62 pounds per inch respectively. The third configuration employed a set of metallic washers. For all four steady state operations the largest average forces were on the Y axis with the metallic washers and were less than 0.005 pounds. The largest average moments were on the X axes with the washers and were less than 0.030 pound inches. At the third octave centerband frequency of 31.5 Hz, the 42 pound per inch grommets showed the greatest forces and moments for read and write operations. At the third octave centerband frequency of 49.6 Hz, the 62 pound per inch grommets showed the greatest forces and moments for rewind operation. Transient operation forces ranged from 0.75 pounds for the software eject to greater than 1 pound for manual load and eject.

  16. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  17. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  18. Acceleration measurements in JEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Toshitami; Murakami, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    Since summer in 1996, National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has continued a concept study for a microgravity measurement apparatus (MMA) to be installed in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The concept study was finished in 1998, and then we have been proceeding for a basic design. For experiments conducted with some of NASDA payloads in JEM-PM (Pressurized Module), measuring detailed microgravity environment was required. In addition, experiments to be performed with payload equipment attached on the JEM-EF (Exposed Facility) are requiring for obtaining the microgravity measurement data. Thus, we are adding some modification to the concept design of MMA in order to make the common hardware available for measurement of both environment in the JEM-PM and that of the JEM-EF. In this paper, the current development status of Japanese payloads and the modified concept of the MMA are introduced. .

  19. KEKB accelerator control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Nobumasa; Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Araki, Sakae; Furukawa, Kazuro; Katoh, Tadahiko; Kawamoto, Takashi; Komada, Ichitaka; Kudo, Kikuo; Naito, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Suetake, Masaaki; Takeda, Shigeru; Takeuchi, Yasunori; Yamamoto, Noboru; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kikutani, Eji

    2003-02-01

    The KEKB accelerator control system including a control computer system, a timing distribution system, and a safety control system are described. KEKB accelerators were installed in the same tunnel where the TRISTAN accelerator was. There were some constraints due to the reused equipment. The control system is based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). In order to reduce the cost and labor for constructing the KEKB control system, as many CAMAC modules as possible are used again. The guiding principles of the KEKB control computer system are as follows: use EPICS as the controls environment, provide a two-language system for developing application programs, use VMEbus as frontend computers as a consequence of EPICS, use standard buses, such as CAMAC, GPIB, VXIbus, ARCNET, RS-232 as field buses and use ergonomic equipment for operators and scientists. On the software side, interpretive Python and SAD languages are used for coding application programs. The purpose of the radiation safety system is to protect personnel from radiation hazards. It consists of an access control system and a beam interlock system. The access control system protects people from strong radiation inside the accelerator tunnel due to an intense beam, by controlling access to the beamline area. On the other hand, the beam interlock system prevents people from radiation exposure by interlocking the beam operation. For the convenience of accelerator operation and access control, the region covered by the safety system is divided into three major access control areas: the KEKB area, the PF-AR area, and the beam-transport (BT) area. The KEKB control system required a new timing system to match a low longitudinal acceptance due to a low-alpha machine. This timing system is based on a frequency divider/multiply technique and a digital delay technique. The RF frequency of the KEKB rings and that of the injector Linac are locked with a common divisor frequency. The common

  20. Microgravity acceleration measurement and environment characterization science (17-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is a general purpose instrumentation system designed to measure the accelerations onboard the Shuttle Orbiter and Shuttle/Spacelab vehicles. These measurements are used to support microgravity experiments and investigation into the microgravity environment of the vehicle. Acceleration measurements can be made at locations remote from the SAMS main instrumentation unit by the use of up to three remote triaxial sensor heads. The prime objective for SAMS on the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission will be to measure the accelerations experienced by the Fluid Experiment System (FES). The SAMS acceleration measurements for FES will be complemented by low level, low frequency acceleration measurements made by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) installed on the shuttle. Secondary objectives for SAMS will be to measure accelerations at several specific locations to enable the acceleration transfer function of the Spacelab module to be analyzed. This analysis effort will be in conjunction with similar measurements analyses on other Spacelab missions.

  1. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  2. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1990-07-03

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations. 3 figs.

  3. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1990-01-01

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations.

  4. Atomic References for Measuring Small Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Accelerometer systems that would combine the best features of both conventional (e.g., mechanical) accelerometers and atom interferometer accelerometers (AIAs) have been proposed. These systems are intended mainly for use in scientific research aboard spacecraft but may also be useful on Earth in special military, geological, and civil-engineering applications. Conventional accelerometers can be sensitive, can have high dynamic range, and can have high frequency response, but they lack accuracy and long-term stability. AIAs have low frequency response, but they offer high sensitivity, and high accuracy for measuring small accelerations. In a system according to the proposal, a conventional accelerometer would be used to perform short-term measurements of higher-frequency components of acceleration, while an AIA would be used to provide consistent calibration of, and correction of errors in, the measurements of the conventional accelerometer in the lower-frequency range over the long term. A brief description of an AIA is prerequisite to a meaningful description of a system according to the proposal. An AIA includes a retroreflector next to one end of a cell that contains a cold cloud of atoms in an ultrahigh vacuum. The atoms in the cloud are in free fall. The retroreflector is mounted on the object, the acceleration of which is to be measured. Raman laser beams are directed through the cell from the end opposite the retroreflector, then pass back through the cell after striking the retroreflector. The Raman laser beams together with the cold atoms measure the relative acceleration, through the readout of the AIA, between the cold atoms and the retroreflector.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Program on STS-95 Supported by Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    John Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS 95 space shuttle mission; however, the 83 science payloads aboard were the focus of the flight activities. One of the payloads, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital System Test (HOST), was flown in the cargo bay by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It served as a space flight test of upgrade components for the telescope before they are installed in the shuttle for the next Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. One of the upgrade components is a cryogenic cooling system for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). The cooling is required for low noise in the receiver's sensitive electronic instrumentation. Originally, a passive system using dry ice cooled NICMOS, but the ice leaked away and must be replaced. The active cryogenic cooler can provide the cold temperatures required for the NICMOS, but there was a concern that it would create vibrations that would affect the fine pointing accuracy of the Hubble platform.

  6. g--Acceleration of Gravity: Its Measurement from the Shape of Water by Using a Computerized Rotational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintao, Carlos A. F.; de Souza Filho, Moacir P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a different experimental setup compared with the traditional ones, in order to determine the acceleration of gravity, which is carried out by using a fluid at a constant rotation. A computerized rotational system--by using a data acquisition system with specific software, a power amplifier and a rotary motion sensor--is…

  7. Trends in accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley-Milling, M.C.

    1984-04-01

    Over the years, we have seen a revolution in control systems that has followed the ever decreasing cost of computer power and memory. It started with the data gathering, when people distrusted the computer to perform control actions correctly, through the stage of using a computer to perform control actions correctly, through the stage of using a computer system to provide a convenient remote look and adjust facility, to the present day, when more and more emphasis is being placed on using a computer system to simulate or model all or parts of the accelerator, feed in the required performance and calling for the computers to set the various parameters and then measure the actual performance, with iteration if necessary. The progress that has been made in the fields of architecture, communications, computers, interface, software design and operator interface is reviewed.

  8. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  9. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  10. Mobile accelerator neutron radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, W. E.; Carollo, S. F.; Bumgardner, H. M.

    1984-10-01

    The use of neutron radiography for the inspection and maintenance of large structures such as aircraft has been delayed by the absence of a mobile system particularly suited to the requirements of field use. This report describes the production, extensive field testing, evaluation and disposition of the first mobile neutron radiography system to satisfy the majority of requirements for field use. The system is based upon the concept of a mobile on-off neutron radiography system based on a sealed-tube ion accelerator as neutron source demonstrated earlier by the Vought Corporation. Primary features of the system are its self-propelled mobility, versatile positioning capability scaled to Army helicopter dimensions, an on-off beam capability, exposure capability measured in minutes, and suitability for AMMRC laboratory and field use. Included in the report are a description of all components of the system, an evaluation of the operation of the system, an evaluation of its radiographic capabilities, a description of installation elements for the AMMRC site, and recommendations for next-generation systems.

  11. High acceleration cable deployment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, T. N.; Barns, C. E.; Murphy, J. P.; Gin, B.; King, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A deployment system that will safely pay one cable from a ballistic forebody when the forebody is separated from an afterbody (to which the cable is secured and when the separation is marked by high acceleration and velocity) is described.

  12. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaku, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern…

  13. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  14. Improvement of Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Frequency Acceleration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stec, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise floor of low frequency acceleration data acquired on the Space Shuttle Main Engines is higher than desirable. Difficulties of acquiring high quality acceleration data on this engine are discussed. The approach presented in this paper for reducing the acceleration noise floor focuses on a search for an accelerometer more capable of measuring low frequency accelerations. An overview is given of the current measurement system used to acquire engine vibratory data. The severity of vibration, temperature, and moisture environments are considered. Vibratory measurements from both laboratory and rocket engine tests are presented.

  15. Control systems for Coline accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Artur; Latała, Agata; Ceglińska, Kaja; Andrasiak, Michał

    2008-01-01

    Medical linear accelerators are the largest group of devices for therapy of cancer diseases because of their compact design, relatively low operating costs, advanced features and broad range of treatment procedures. Their reliability and ease of operation are very important but the most crucial is to ensure personnel and patient safety. For this reason the development of control and safety systems is the current "leading edge" in medical linear accelerators technology. Provided internal monitoring, machine control and steering, interlock system as well as the automatic recording of the device and patient parameters are nowadays fully controlled by the computer. This paper describes in details projects connected to advanced development of Coline accelerators. As it is crucial to assure reliable steering and monitoring of all the machine settings and actual dose delivered to the patient, advanced control systems composed of steering, control and interlock systems, communication protocol as well as data management system have been developed.

  16. Measuring residual accelerations in the Spacelab environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, William K.

    1991-01-01

    A triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystal growth experiment carried out in Spacelab 3 flown onboard the Shuttle orbiter in 1985 is described. The TGS experiment was aimed at examining diffusion limited crystal growth by minimizing convection in the microgravity environment of the Spacelab. During the experiment tiny crystals were found floating free in the growth solution. Since the free crystals were in a viscous fluid, the 'noise' accelerations of the Shuttle were damped out. This made it possible to measure the constant gravitational acceleration by tracking the positions of these crystals. The velocities and accelerations obtained by these measurements are presented.

  17. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  18. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern smartphones come with a raft of built-in sensors, we have a unique opportunity to experimentally determine the Coriolis acceleration conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment at modest cost by using student-owned smartphones. Here we employ the gyroscope and accelerometer in a smartphone to verify the dependence of Coriolis acceleration on the angular velocity of a rotatingtrack and the speed of the sliding smartphone.

  19. Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment: Calibration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.; Larman, Kevin T.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), which has flown on STS-40, STS-50, and STS-58, contains a three-axis accelerometer with a single, nonpendulous, electrostatically suspended proofmass, which can resolve accelerations to the 10(sub -9) g level. The experiment also contains a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale-factor calibration. This on-orbit calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty of ground-based calibrations encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the Orbiter, and thus provides absolute acceleration measurement accuracy heretofore unachievable. This is the first time accelerometer scale-factor measurements have been performed on orbit. A detailed analysis of the calibration process is given, along with results of the calibration factors from the on-orbit OARE flight measurements on STS-58. In addition, the analysis of OARE flight-maneuver data used to validate the scale-factor measurements in the sensor's most sensitive range are also presented. Estimates on calibration uncertainties are discussed. These uncertainty estimates provides bounds on the STS-58 absolute acceleration measurements for future applications.

  20. Gravity Acceleration Measurements Using a Soundcard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abellan-Garcia, Francisco J.; Garcia-Gamuz, Jose Antonio; Valerdi-Perez, Ramon P.; Ibanez-Mengual, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the acceleration due to gravity "g", using a simple and low-cost experimental device. The time taken for a metallic ball to travel a predetermined distance is measured and recorded by a series of optical sensors. Four pairs of sensors are placed along the external surface of a vertical methacrylate tube at…

  1. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  2. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic strain sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.

  3. [Weekly control measurement at the linear accelerator].

    PubMed

    Christ, G

    1983-05-01

    Weekly control measurements taken at the linear accelerator of the Medizinisches Strahleninstitut der Universität Tübingen are described which largely exceed those prescribed by the "Richtlinien Strahlenschutz in der Medizin" (instructions about radioprotection in medicine). Since the determination of the field homogeneity and the energy of electron and X-ray radiation is very time-consuming, a largely automatized procedure has been elaborated which is presented in this study. PMID:6857748

  4. Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brophy, J.R.; Aston, G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems are performed using commercially available finite element software executed on a desktop computer. Finite element models of a 30-cm-diameter accelerator system formulated using plate/shell elements give calculated results which agree well with similar published obtained on a mainframe computer. Analyses of a 50-cm-diameter, three-grid accelerator system using measured grid temperatures (corresponding to discharge powers of 653 and 886 watts) indicate that thermally induced grid movements need not be the performance limiting phenomena for accelerator systems of this size. 8 refs.

  5. Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analyses of large diameter ion accelerator systems are performed using commercially available finite element software executed on a desktop computer. Finite element models of a 30-cm-diameter accelerator system formulated using plate/shell elements give calculated results which agree well with similar published obtained on a mainframe computer. Analyses of a 50-cm-diameter, three-grid accelerator system using measured grid temperatures (corresponding to discharge powers of 653 and 886 watts) indicate that thermally induced grid movements need not be the performance limiting phenomena for accelerator systems of this size.

  6. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-89

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Support of microgravity research on the 89th flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-89) and a continued effort to characterize the acceleration environment of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Mir Space Station form the basis for this report. For the STS-89 mission, the Space Shuttle Endeavour was equipped with a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) unit, which collected more than a week's worth of data. During docked operations with Mir, a second SAMS unit collected approximately a day's worth of data yielding the only set of acceleration measurements recorded simultaneously on the two spacecraft. Based on the data acquired by these SAMS units, this report serves to characterize a number of acceleration events and quantify their impact on the local nature of the accelerations experienced at the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment location. Crew activity was shown to nearly double the median root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration level calculated below 10 Hz, while the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator/Freezer operating at about 22 Hz was a strong acceleration source in the vicinity of the MGM location. The MGM science requirement that the acceleration not exceed plus or minus 1 mg was violated numerous times during their experiment runs; however, no correlation with sample instability has been found to this point. Synchronization between the SAMS data from Endeavour and from Mir was shown to be close much of the time, but caution with respect to exact timing should be exercised when comparing these data. When orbiting as a separate vehicle prior to docking, Endeavour had prominent structural modes above 3 Hz, while Mir exhibited a cluster of modes around 1 Hz. When mated, a transition to common modes was apparent in the two SAMS data sets. This report is not a comprehensive analysis of the acceleration data, so those interested in further details should contact the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services team at the National Aeronautics

  7. Measurement of Impact Acceleration: Mouthpiece Accelerometer Versus Helmet Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael; Halstead, P. David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Barlow, David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Instrumented helmets have been used to estimate impact acceleration imparted to the head during helmet impacts. These instrumented helmets may not accurately measure the actual amount of acceleration experienced by the head due to factors such as helmet-to-head fit. Objective: To determine if an accelerometer attached to a mouthpiece (MP) provides a more accurate representation of headform center of gravity (HFCOG) acceleration during impact than does an accelerometer attached to a helmet fitted on the headform. Design: Single-factor research design in which the independent variable was accelerometer position (HFCOG, helmet, MP) and the dependent variables were g and Severity Index (SI). Setting: Independent impact research laboratory. Intervention(s): The helmeted headform was dropped (n = 168) using a National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) drop system from the standard heights and impact sites according to NOCSAE test standards. Peak g and SI were measured for each accelerometer position during impact. Main Outcome Measures: Upon impact, the peak g and SI were recorded for each accelerometer location. Results: Strong relationships were noted for HFCOG and MP measures, and significant differences were seen between HFCOG and helmet g measures and HFCOG and helmet SI measures. No statistically significant differences were noted between HFCOG and MP g and SI measures. Regression analyses showed a significant relationship between HFCOG and MP measures but not between HFCOG and helmet measures. Conclusions: Upon impact, MP acceleration (g) and SI measurements were closely related to and more accurate in measuring HFCOG g and SI than helmet measurements. The MP accelerometer is a valid method for measuring head acceleration. PMID:17597937

  8. Accelerated degradation of silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Clemson University has been engaged for the past five years in a program to determine the reliability attributes of solar cells by means of accelerated test procedures. The cells are electrically measured and visually inspected and then subjected for a period of time to stress in excess of that normally encountered in use, and then they are reinspected. Changes are noted and the process repeated. This testing has thus far involved 23 different unencapsulated cell types from 12 different manufacturers, and 10 different encapsulated cell types from 9 different manufacturers. Reliability attributes of metallization systems can be classified as major or minor, depending on the severity of the effects observed. As a result of the accelerated testing conducted under the Clemson program, major effects have been observed related to contact resistance and to mechanical adherence and solderability. This paper does not attempt a generalized survey of accelerated test results, but rather concentrates on one particular attribute of metallization that has been observed to cause electrical degradation - increased contact resistance due to Schottky barrier formation. In this example basic semiconductor theory was able to provide an understanding of the electrical effects observed during accelerated stress testing.

  9. Measurement of vehicle-load using capacitance and acceleration transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Yang, W.; Yang, Y.

    2007-07-01

    Over-loading is a common problem in some developing countries. Currently, large and fixed measurement systems are used to measure the load of vehicles travelling on highways. This paper presents an on-vehicle measuring device, which is based on measurement of change in capacitance due to variation in distance between electrodes mounted on vehicles. The on-vehicle leaf springs are used as a key part of the weighing transducer. Acceleration transducers are used to measure the vehicle's forward and the vertical accelerations. A feature of this on-vehicle measuring device is that it can provide both static and dynamic load measurements. The drivers can check the load in the cab, and the highway inspectors can check the load at any time and any place through radio communication, thus identifying over-loaded vehicles.

  10. Tripartite entanglement of fermionic system in accelerated frames

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Salman

    2014-09-15

    The dynamics of tripartite entanglement of fermionic system in noninertial frames through linear contraction criterion when one or two observers are accelerated is investigated. In one observer accelerated case the entanglement measurement is not invariant with respect to the partial realignment of different subsystems and for two observers accelerated case it is invariant. It is shown that the acceleration of the frame does not generate entanglement in any bipartite subsystems. Unlike the bipartite states, the genuine tripartite entanglement does not completely vanish in both one observer accelerated and two observers accelerated cases even in the limit of infinite acceleration. The degradation of tripartite entanglement is fast when two observers are accelerated than when one observer is accelerated. It is shown that tripartite entanglement is a better resource for quantum information processing than the bipartite entanglement in noninertial frames. - Highlights: • Tripartite entanglement of fermionic system in noninertial frames is studied. • Linear contraction criterion for quantifying tripartite entanglement is used. • Acceleration does not produce any bipartite entanglement. • The invariance of entanglement quantifier depends on accelerated observers. • The tripartite entanglement degrades against the acceleration, it never vanishes.

  11. Measurement of acceleration using an instrumented railgun projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littrell, Donald M.; Jamison, Keith A.; Hudson, Roger D.; Fernandez, Michael J.; Ager, Scott A.

    1992-06-01

    An instrumented package has been accelerated in a railgun projectile to measure the inbore acceleration as a function of time. Direct, continuous acceleration profiles have been repeatedly obtained with this package during electromagnetic launch and downrange soft catch. These proof-of-principle experiments were conducted using a square bore railgun and off-the-shelf components for the in situ measurement, digitization, and storage of acceleration data. A continuous record of the entire launch event clearly shows gas injection, electromagnetic propulsion, and downrange deceleration in a soft catch recovery system. The launch package was subject to peak accelerations of nearly 30 kilogees (2.8 x 105 m/sq. sec) in the electromagnetic propulsion phase of the launch. Velocity and position data obtained through integration of this data are correlated with velocity data derived from conventional static diagnostic (e.g., magnetic flux loops) to validate the technique. The peak acceleration was slightly more than anticipated from the electrical current delivered to the railgun, and this deviation is examined. The paper presents a description of the experimental apparatus, acquired data, a comparison of the data with code simulations, and suggestions for future work.

  12. Precise charge measurement for laser plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, Dave; Donahue, Rick; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-10-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics was conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. Using an integrating current transformer as a calibration reference, the sensitivity of the Lanex Fast was found to decrease by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. By using electron beams from LPA, cross calibrations of the charge were carried out with an integrating current transformer, scintillating screen (Lanex from Kodak), and activation based measurement. The diagnostics agreed within ~8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided necessary cares. Work supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  14. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  15. Absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50 from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.

    1994-01-01

    Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on Space Transportation System (STS)-50 have been examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels have been derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. During the interval, the tri-axial OARE raw telemetered acceleration measurements have been filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval have been analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z-axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process using orbiter maneuvers and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axis. Results indicate that there is a force being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces have been reexamined, but none produces the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the orbiter is creating the environment observed. At least part of this force is thought to be due to the Flash Evaporator System.

  16. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  17. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  18. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  19. Energy Measurement in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ischebeck, R

    2007-07-06

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment, electrons with an initial energy of 42GeV are accelerated in a meter-scale lithium plasma. Particles are leaving plasma with a large energy spread. To determine the spectrum of the accelerated particles, a two-plane spectrometer has been set up.

  20. Tritium measurements with a tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.

    1990-06-01

    Tritium concentrations ( 3H: 2H) of less than 10 -15 are readily measurable with almost any tandem accelerator and with an overall detection efficiency as high as 4.5%. The isobar, 3He, and other potential sources of interference (mainly 6Li, 2H and 1H) can all be removed by an absorber in front of the triton detector, so there is little need for analyzing elements other than the negative-and positive-ion magnets found on most tandems. The technique is particularly well suited for detecting tritium in deuterium absorbed in a metal and testing for cold fusion. We caution that tritium can occur in commercial deuterium and heavy water from sources other than cold fusion; one sample was observed to have a tritium-to-deuterium ratio of 10 -10.

  1. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  2. Accelerator System Development at High Voltage Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M. G.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R. G.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2009-03-10

    Throughout the years, HVE has continuously extended the capabilities of its accelerator systems to meet the rising demands from a diverse field of applications, among which are deep level ion implantation, micro-machining, neutron production for biomedical research, isotope production or accelerator mass spectrometry. Characteristic for HVE accelerators is the coaxial construction of the all solid state power supply around the acceleration tubes. With the use of solid state technology, the accelerators feature high stability and very low ripple. Terminal voltages range from 1 to 6 MV for HVE Singletrons and Tandetrons. The high-current versions of these accelerators can provide ion beams with powers of several kW. In the last years, several systems have been built with terminal voltages of 1.25 MV, 2 MV and 5 MV. Recently, the first system based on a 6 MV Tandetron has passed the factory tests. In this paper we describe the characteristics of the HVE accelerator systems and present as example recent systems.

  3. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C

    2001-10-17

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  4. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  5. Toward a Direct Measurement of the Cosmic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremiah K.

    2013-01-01

    We present precise redshift measurements and place model-free constraints on cosmic acceleration and the acceleration of the Solar System in a universal context. HI 21 cm absorption lines observed over multiple epochs can constrain the secular redshift drift or the proper acceleration, Δv/Δto, with high precision. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration almost certainly attributable to systematic instrumental or calibration errors. However, robust constraints have been obtained by using digital data from a single telescope, the Green Bank Telescope. An ensemble of 10 objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show Δz/Δto = (-1.8 ± 1.2) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = -4.0 ± 3.0 m s-1 yr-1. The best constraint from a single object, 3C286 at = 0.692153275(85), is dz/dto = (1.5 ± 4.7) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 2.7 ± 8.4 m s-1 yr-1. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the expected acceleration in the concordance dark energy cosmology at z=0.5, Δz/Δto = 2 × 10-11 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 0.3 cm s-1 yr-1, but they demonstrate a lack of secular redshift drift in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. This measurement likewise constrains the barycentric proper acceleration in a cosmological reference frame (as opposed to the Galactic pulsar-defined reference frame), but currently lacks the precision of quasar proper motion observations. A comparison of rest-frame UV metal absorption lines to the HI 21 cm line places improved constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: Δ(α2 gp μ)/(α2 gp μ) = (-3.5 ± 1.4) × 10-6 in the redshift range z=0.24-2.04, consistent with no variation. We estimate that the cosmic acceleration could be directly measured with this technique in about 300 years using modern telescopes or in about 12 years using a Square Kilometer Array, provided that new systematic effects do

  6. SAMS Acceleration Measurement on Mir From March to September 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Ken; Truong, Duc; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 2 (March to September 1996), over 15 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 55 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-79. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Kristall and Kvant modules, and in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), the Technological Evaluation of the MIM (TEM), the Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), and Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-76 operations, an extravehicular activity (EVA) to install and deploy solar panels on the Kvant module, a Progress engine burn to raise Mir's altitude, and an on-orbit SAMS calibration procedure. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  7. Microgravity acceleration modeling for orbital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knabe, Walter; Baugher, Charles R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In view of the decisive importance of a disturbance-free environment on the Space Station, and on other orbital systems, for materials processing experiments, a theoretical and semi-experimental analysis of the acceleration environment to be expected on large orbiting spacecraft was undertaken. A unified model of such spacecraft cannot be established; therefore, a number of sub-models representing major components of typical large spacecraft must be investigated. In order to obtain experimental data of forces, a typical spacecraft - an engineering model of the Spacelab - was suspended on long ropes in a high-bay hangar, and equipped with a number of accelerometers. Active components on the Spacelab (fans, pumps, air conditioners, valves, levers) were operated, and astronautics moved boxes, drawers, sleds, and their own bodies. Generally speaking, the response of the Spacelab structure was very similar to the environment measured on Spacelabs SL-1, SL-2, and D-1. At frequencies in the broad range between 1 and about 100 Hz, acceleration peaks reached values of 10(exp -3) and 10(exp -2) g sub o, and even higher.

  8. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-15

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  9. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-25

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  10. Don't Use Airtracks to Measure Gravity Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluk, Edward; Lopez, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Presents one way, using simple materials available in hardware stores, to obtain accurate measurements of gravity acceleration in student laboratories. Analyzes a time-of-flight measuring scheme and discusses the experimental arrangements to make the measurements. (MDH)

  11. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, J.L.; Juras, R.C.

    1998-11-04

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in eaeh area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundan~ circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several vears at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  12. HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juras, R. C.; Blankenship, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    The HRIBF Tandem Accelerator Radiation Safety System was designed to permit experimenters and operations staff controlled access to beam transport and experiment areas with accelerated beam present. Neutron-Gamma detectors are mounted in each area at points of maximum dose rate and the resulting signals are integrated by redundant circuitry; beam is stopped if dose rate or integrated dose exceeds established limits. This paper will describe the system, in use for several years at the HRIBF, and discuss changes recently made to modernize the system and to make the system compliant with DOE Order 5480.25 and related ORNL updated safety rules.

  13. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  14. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Dunxiong; Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  15. The EMMA Accelerator, a Diagnostic Systems Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, A.; Berg, J.; Bliss, N. Cox, G.; Dufau, M.; Gallagher, A.; Hill, C.; Jones, J.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Muratori, B.; Oates, A.; Shepherd B.; Smith, R.; Hock, K.; Holder, D.; Ibison, M., Kirkman I.; Borrell, R.; Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M.

    2011-09-04

    The 'EMMA' Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (ns-FFAG) international project is currently being commissioned at Daresbury Laboratory, UK. This accelerator has been equipped with a number of diagnostic systems to facilitate this. These systems include a novel time-domain-multiplexing BPM system, moveable screen systems, a time-of-flight instrument, Faraday cups, and injection/extraction tomography sections to analyze the single bunch beams. An upgrade still to implement includes the installation of wall current monitors. This paper gives an overview of these systems and shows some data and results from the diagnostics that have contributed to the successful demonstration of a serpentine acceleration by this novel accelerator.

  16. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  17. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  18. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-78. Launched June 20, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin M.; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia was measured during the STS-78 mission using accelerometers from three different instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment, the Space Acceleration Measurement System and the Microgravity Measurement Assembly. The quasi-steady environment was also calculated in near real-time during the mission by the Microgravity Analysis Workstation. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment provided investigators with real-time quasi-steady acceleration measurements. The Space Acceleration Measurement System recorded higher frequency data on-board for post-mission analysis. The Microgravity Measurement Assembly provided investigators with real-time quasi-steady and higher frequency acceleration measurements. The Microgravity Analysis Workstation provided calculation of the quasi-steady environment. This calculation was presented to the science teams in real-time during the mission. The microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew and experiment operations is presented and interpreted in this report. A radiator deploy, the Flight Control System checkout, and a vernier reaction control system reboost demonstration had minimal effects on the acceleration environment, with excitation of frequencies in the 0.01 to 10 Hz range. Flash Evaporator System venting had no noticeable effect on the environment while supply and waste water dumps caused excursions of 2 x lO(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -6) g in the Y(sub b) and Z(sub b) directions. Crew sleep and ergometer exercise periods can be clearly seen in the acceleration data, as expected. Accelerations related to the two Life Science Laboratory Equipment Refrigerator/Freezers were apparent in the data as are accelerations caused by the Johnson Space Center Projects Centrifuge. As on previous microgravity missions, several signals are present in the acceleration data for which a source has not been identified. The causes of these accelerations

  19. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  20. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    John H. Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS-95 mission. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Orbital Systems Test (HOST). an STS-95 payload, was an in-flight demonstration of HST components to be installed during the next HST servicing mission. One of the components under evaluation was the cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Based on concerns about vibrations from the operation of the NICMOS cryocooler affecting the overall HST line-of-sight requirements, the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free-Flyers (SAMS-FF) was employed to measure the vibratory environment of the STS-95 mission, including any effects introduced by the NICMOS cryocooler. The STS-95 mission represents the first STS mission supported by SAMS-FF. Utilizing a Control and Data Acquisition Unit (CDU) and two triaxial sensor heads (TSH) mounted on the HOST support structure in Discovery's cargo bay, the SAMS-FF and the HOST project were able to make vibratory measurements both on-board the vibration-isolated NICMOS cryocooler and off-board the cryocooler mounting plate. By comparing the SAMS-FF measured vibrations on-board and off-board the NICMOS cryocooler, HST engineers could assess the cryocooler g-jitter effects on the HST line-of-sight requirements. The acceleration records from both SAMS-FF accelerometers were analyzed and significant features of the microgravity environment are detailed in this report.

  1. Radionuclide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Zabel, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years, Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has become established as an important method for radionuclide analysis. In the Arizona system the accelerator is operated at a thermal voltage of 1.8MV for C-14 analysis, and 1.6 to 2MV for Be-10. Samples are inserted into a cesium sputter ion source in solid form. Negative ions sputtered from the target are accelerated to about 25kV, and the injection magnet selects ions of a particular mass. Ions of the 3+ charge state, having an energy of about 9MeV are selected by an electrostatic deflector, surviving ions pass through two magnets, where only ions of the desired mass-energy product are selected. The final detector is a combination ionization chamber to measure energy loss (and hence, Z), and a silicon surface-barrier detector which measures residual energy. After counting the trace iosotope for a fixed time, the injected ions are switched to the major isotope used for normalization. These ions are deflected into a Faraday cup after the first high-energy magnet. Repeated measurements of the isotope ratio of both sample and standards results in a measurement of the concentration of the radionuclide. Recent improvements in sample preparation for C-14 make preparation of high-beam current graphite targets directly from CO2 feasible. Except for some measurements of standards and backgrounds for Be-10 measurements to date have been on C-14. Although most results have been in archaeology and quaternary geology, studies have been expanded to include cosmogenic C-14 in meteorites. The data obtained so far tend to confirm the antiquity of Antarctic meteorites from the Allan Hills site. Data on three samples of Yamato meteorites gave terrestrial ages of between about 3 and 22 thousand years.

  2. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  3. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an autoregressive moving average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. Simple harmonic motion is assumed for the acceleration computations, and the central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model is used for the computations of velocity. A cantilevered rectangular wing model is used to validate the simple approach. Quality of the computed deflection, acceleration, and velocity values are independent of the number of fibers. The central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model proposed in this study follows the target response with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, the handicap of the backward difference equation, phase shift, is successfully overcome.

  4. Time Domain Measurement of Moving Object Speed Using Acceleration Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazunori; Noro, Mitsuo; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    In this study, we proposed a time-domain measurement method of moving object speed with a commercially available acceleration sensor. The sensor of this kind is normally used to measure the acceleration of a stationary vibration object, while it is not applicable to the measurement of a transient moving object due to the frequency response of the sensor itself. An impulsive sensor response was derived from the free-drop movement of a metallic sphere. The deconvolution allows the sensor to measure the acceleration in the time domain, which was validated through the measurement of the speed of a hand-held metal piece approaching a target.

  5. Three Component Velocity and Acceleration Measurement Using FLEET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Calvert, Nathan; Dogariu, Arthur; Miles, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) method has been used to measure three components of velocity and acceleration for the first time. A jet of pure N2 issuing into atmospheric pressure air was probed by the FLEET system. The femtosecond laser was focused down to a point to create a small measurement volume in the flow. The long-lived lifetime of this fluorescence was used to measure the location of the tagged particles at different times. Simultaneous images of the flow were taken from two orthogonal views using a mirror assembly and a single intensified CCD camera, allowing two components of velocity to be measured in each view. These different velocity components were combined to determine three orthogonal velocity components. The differences between subsequent velocity components could be used to measure the acceleration. Velocity accuracy and precision were roughly estimated to be +/-4 m/s and +/-10 m/s respectively. These errors were small compared to the approx. 100 m/s velocity of the subsonic jet studied.

  6. Second-order state estimation experiments using acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    The estimation of dynamic states for feedback control of structural systems using second-order differential equations and acceleration measurements is described. The formulation of the observer model, and the design of the observer gains is discussed in detail. It is shown the second-order observer is highly stable because the stability constraints on the observer gains are model independent. The limitation of the proposed observer is the need for 'nearly' collocated actuators and accelerometers. Experimental results using a control-structure interaction testbed are presented that show the second-order observer provided more stability than a Kalman filter estimator without decreasing closed-loop performance.

  7. Gait analysis using gravitational acceleration measured by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Todoh, Masahiro; Morikawa, Manabu; Nakayasu, Minoru; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    A novel method for measuring human gait posture using wearable sensor units is proposed. The sensor units consist of a tri-axial acceleration sensor and three gyro sensors aligned on three axes. The acceleration and angular velocity during walking were measured with seven sensor units worn on the abdomen and the lower limb segments (both thighs, shanks and feet). The three-dimensional positions of each joint are calculated from each segment length and joint angle. Joint angle can be estimated mechanically from the gravitational acceleration along the anterior axis of the segment. However, the acceleration data during walking includes three major components; translational acceleration, gravitational acceleration and external noise. Therefore, an optimization analysis was represented to separate only the gravitational acceleration from the acceleration data. Because the cyclic patterns of acceleration data can be found during constant walking, a FFT analysis was applied to obtain some characteristic frequencies in it. A pattern of gravitational acceleration was assumed using some parts of these characteristic frequencies. Every joint position was calculated from the pattern under the condition of physiological motion range of each joint. An optimized pattern of the gravitational acceleration was selected as a solution of an inverse problem. Gaits of three healthy volunteers were measured by walking for 20s on a flat floor. As a result, the acceleration data of every segment was measured simultaneously. The characteristic three-dimensional walking could be shown by the expression using a stick figure model. In addition, the trajectories of the knee joint in the horizontal plane could be checked by visual imaging on a PC. Therefore, this method provides important quantitive information for gait diagnosis. PMID:19121522

  8. PARTS: (Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aherne, Michael; Davis, Phil; England, Matt; Gustavsson, Jake; Pankow, Steve; Sampaio, Chere; Savella, Phil

    2002-01-01

    The Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System (PARTS) is an unmanned cargo shuttle intended to ferry large payloads to and from Martian orbit using a highly efficient VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). The design of PARTS focuses on balancing cost and minimizing transit time for a chosen payload consisting of vehicles, satellites, and other components provided by interested parties.

  9. Acceleration by pulsar winds in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of accretion torques, a pulsar in a binary system will spin down due to electromagnetic dipole radiation and the spin-down power will drive a wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs. Winds from pulsars with short periods will prevent any subsequent accretion but may be confined by the companion star atmosphere, wind, or magnetosphere to form a standing shock. The authors investigate the possibility of particle acceleration at such a pulsar wind shock and the production of very high energy (VHE) and ultra high energy (UHE) gamma rays from interactions of accelerated protons in the companion star's wind or atmosphere. They find that in close binaries containing active pulsars, protons will be shock accelerated to a maximum energy dependent on the pulsar spin-down luminosity. If a significant fraction of the spin-down power goes into particle acceleration, these systems should be sources of VHE and possibly UHE gamma rays. The authors discuss the application of the pulsar wind model to binary sources such as Cygnus X-3, as well as the possibility of observing VHE gamma-rays from known binary radio pulsar systems.

  10. Acceleration by pulsar winds in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of accretion torques, a pulsar in a binary system will spin down due to electromagnetic dipole radiation, and the spin-down power will drive a wind of relativistic electron-position pairs. Winds from pulsars with short periods will prevent any subsequent accretion but may be confined by the companion star atmosphere, wind, or magnetosphere to form a standing shock. This paper investigates the possibility of particle acceleration at such a pulsar wind shock and the production of VHE and UHE gamma-rays from interactions of accelerated protons in the companion star's wind or atmosphere. It is found that, in close binaries containing active pulsars, protons will be shock accelerated to a maximum energy dependent on the pulsar spin-down luminosity. If a significant fraction of the spin-down power goes into particle acceleration, these systems should be sources of VHE and possibly UHE gamma-rays. The application of the pulsar wind model to binary sources such as Cygnus X-3 is discussed, as well as the possibility of observing VHE gamma-rays from known binary radio pulsar systems.

  11. Measurement and Data Distribution for Microgravity Accelerations on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    Two accelerometer systems will be available on the International Space Station to support microgravity payloads with information about the quasi-steady and vibratory acceleration environment of the research facilities. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System will record contributions to the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II will measure vibratory disturbances on-board due to vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances. Due to the dynamic nature of the microgravity environment and its potential to influence sensitive experiments, NASA's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project has initiated a plan through which the data from these instruments will be distributed to researchers in a timely and meaningful fashion. Beyond the obvious benefit of correlation between accelerations and the scientific phenomena being studied, such information is also useful for hardware developers who can gain qualitative and quantitative feedback about their facility acceleration output to station.

  12. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  13. An RFQ accelerator system for MeV ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakimoto, Akira; Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Ikuo; Nagamachi, Shinji; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Asari, Masatoshi

    1989-02-01

    A 4-vane-type Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator system for MeV ion implantation has been constructed and ion beams of boron and nitrogen have been accelerated successfully up to an energy of 1.01 and 1.22 MeV, respectively. The acceleration of phosphorus is now ongoing. The design was performed with two computer codes called SUPERFISH and PARMTEQ. The energy of the accelerated ions was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The obtained values agreed well with the designed ones. Thus we have confirmed the validity of our design and have found the possibility that the present RFQ will break through the production-use difficulty of MeV ion implantation.

  14. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  15. Induction accelerators for the phase rotator system

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, Lou; Yu, Simon; Vanecek, Dave

    2001-07-30

    The principle of magnetic induction has been applied to the acceleration of high current beams in betatrons and a variety of induction accelerators. The linear induction accelerator (LIA) consists of a simple nonresonant structure where the drive voltage is applied to an axially symmetric gap that encloses a toroidal ferromagnetic material. The change in flux in the magnetic core induces an axial electric field that provides particle acceleration. This simple nonresonant (low Q) structure acts as a single turn transformer that can accelerate from hundreds of amperes to tens of kiloamperes, basically only limited by the drive impedance. The LIA is typically a low gradient structure that can provide acceleration fields of varying shapes and time durations from tens of nanoseconds to several microseconds. The efficiency of the LIA depends on the beam current and can exceed 50% if the beam current exceeds the magnetization current required by the ferromagnetic material. The acceleration voltage available is simply given by the expression V=A dB/dt. Hence, for a given cross section of material, the beam pulse duration influences the energy gain. Furthermore, a premium is put on minimizing the diameter, which impacts the total weight or cost of the magnetic material. The diameter doubly impacts the cost of the LIA since the power (cost) to drive the cores is proportional to the volume as well. The waveform requirements during the beam pulse makes it necessary to make provisions in the pulsing system to maintain the desired dB/dt during the useful part of the acceleration cycle. This is typically done two ways, by using the final stage of the pulse forming network (PFN) and by the pulse compensation network usually in close proximity of the acceleration cell. The choice of magnetic materials will be made by testing various materials both ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic. These materials will include the nickel-iron, silicon steel amorphous and various types of ferrites not

  16. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  17. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from June to November 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hrovat, Ken; Moskowitz, Milton; McPherson, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including sounding rockets, drop towers, parabolic aircraft, and Orbiter missions. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments with acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project at the NASA Lewis Research Center supports principal investigators of microgravity experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1993, a cooperative effort was started between the United States and Russia involving science utilization of the Russian Mir space station by scientists from the United States and Russia. MSAD is currently sponsoring science experiments participating in the Shuttle-Mir Science Program in cooperation with the Russians on the Mir space station. Included in the complement of MSAD experiments and equipment is a SAMS unit In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. The initial SAMS supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment from June to November 1995. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the PCG Principal Investigator's requirements. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded to support this PCG experiment. The report contains plots of the SAMS 100 Hz sensor head data as an overview of the microgravity environment, including the STS-74 Shuttle-Mir docking.

  18. TOWARD A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE COSMIC ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2012-12-20

    We present precise H I 21 cm absorption line redshifts observed in multiple epochs to directly constrain the secular redshift drift z-dot or the cosmic acceleration, {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle}. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration likely attributable to systematic instrumental errors. However, we obtain robust constraints using primarily Green Bank Telescope digital data. Ten objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show z-dot = (-2.3 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = -5.5 {+-} 2.2 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The best constraint from a single object, 3C 286 at (z) = 0.692153275(85), is z-dot = (1.6 {+-} 4.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 2.8 {+-} 8.4 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the theoretically expected acceleration at z = 0.5, z-dot = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 0.3 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, but they demonstrate the lack of peculiar acceleration in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. A comparison of UV metal absorption lines to the 21 cm line improves constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: {Delta}({alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu})/{alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu} = (- 1.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} in the redshift range z = 0.24-2.04. The linear evolution over the last 10.4 Gyr is (- 0.2 {+-} 2.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} yr{sup -1}, consistent with no variation. The cosmic acceleration could be directly measured in {approx}125 years using current telescopes or in {approx}5 years using a Square Kilometer Array, but systematic effects will arise at the 1 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} level.

  19. Control system for the NBS microtron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. Ray; Trout, Robert E.; Wilson, Bonnie L.; Ayres, Robert L.; Yoder, Neil R.

    1986-06-01

    As various subsystems of the National Bureau of Standards/Los Alamos racetrack microtron accelerator are being brought on-line, experience has been gained with some of the innovations implemented in the control system. Foremost among these are the joystick-based operator controls, the hierarchical distribution of control system intelligence, and the independent secondary stations, permitting sectional stand-alone operation. The result of the distributed database philosophy and parallel data links has been very fast data updates, permitting joystick interaction with system elements. The software development was greatly simplified by using the hardware arbitration of several parallel processors in the Multibus system to split the software tasks into independent modules.

  20. Acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1987-01-01

    The features, design, calibration, and testing of Lewis Research Center's acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research are described. Specific circuit schematics and system specifications are included as well as representative data traces from flown trajectories. Other observations learned from developing and using this system are mentioned where appropriate. The system, now a permanent part of the Lewis Learjet zero-gravity program, provides legible, concise, and necessary guidance information enabling pilots to routinely fly accurate zero-gravity trajectories. Regular use of this system resulted in improvements of the Learjet zero-gravity flight techniques, including a technique to minimize later accelerations. Lewis Gates Learjet trajectory data show that accelerations can be reliably sustained within 0.01 g for 5 consecutive seconds, within 0.02 g for 7 consecutive seconds, and within 0.04 g for up to 20 second. Lewis followed the past practices of acceleration measurement, yet focussed on the acceleration displays. Refinements based on flight experience included evolving the ranges, resolutions, and frequency responses to fit the pilot and the Learjet responses.

  1. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  2. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Mark L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  3. Quantum accelerometer: Distinguishing inertial Bob from his accelerated twin Rob by a local measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dragan, Andrzej; Fuentes, Ivette; Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-15

    A single quantum system, such as the Unruh-DeWitt detector, can be used to determine absolute acceleration by local measurements on a quantum field. To show this, we consider two kinematically indistinguishable scenarios: an inertial observer, Bob, measuring the field of a uniformly accelerated cavity, and his noninertial twin, Rob, accelerating and making measurements in a stationary cavity. We find that these scenarios can be distinguished in the nonrelativistic regime only by measurements on highly excited massive fields, allowing one to detect the noninertialness of the reference frame.

  4. Quantum accelerometer: Distinguishing inertial Bob from his accelerated twin Rob by a local measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Andrzej; Fuentes, Ivette; Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    A single quantum system, such as the Unruh-DeWitt detector, can be used to determine absolute acceleration by local measurements on a quantum field. To show this, we consider two kinematically indistinguishable scenarios: an inertial observer, Bob, measuring the field of a uniformly accelerated cavity, and his noninertial twin, Rob, accelerating and making measurements in a stationary cavity. We find that these scenarios can be distinguished in the nonrelativistic regime only by measurements on highly excited massive fields, allowing one to detect the noninertialness of the reference frame.

  5. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  6. A study of the influence of the data acquisition system sampling rate on the accuracy of measured acceleration loads for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Julia H.

    1992-01-01

    A research effort was initiated at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC), to describe the relationship between the sampling rate and the accuracy of acceleration loads obtained from the data acquisition system of a transport aircraft. An accelerometer was sampled and digitized at a rate of 100 samples per second onboard a NASA Boeing 737 (B-737) flight research aircraft. Numerical techniques were used to reconstruct 2.5 hours of flight data into its original input waveform and then re-sample the waveform into rates of 4, 8, 16, and 32 samples per second. Peak-between-means counting technique and power spectral analysis were used to evaluate each sampling rate using the 32 samples per second data as the comparison. This paper presents the results from these methods and includes in appendix A, the peak-between-means counting results used in a general fatigue analysis for each of the sampling rates.

  7. Fermilab tevatron high level RF accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Tawzer, S.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer. A cavity consists of two quarter-wave resonators placed back to back with a coaxial drift tube separating the two accelerating gaps by ..pi.. radians. The cavities are very similar to the prototype which has been previously described/sup 3/ and is operating as Station 8 in the Tevatron. Only additional water cooling around the high current region of the drift tube supports and a double loop used to monitor the unbalance current through the Hipernom mode damping resistor have been added. Each cavity has a Q of about7100, a shunt impedance of 1.2 M..cap omega.., and is capable of running cw with a peak accelerating voltage of 360

  8. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  9. Pulsed power systems for the DARHT accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.N.; Parsons, W.M.; Earley, L.M.; Melton, J.G.; Moir, D.C.; Carlson, R.L.; Barnes, G.A.; Builta, L.A.; Eversole, S.A.; Keel, G.I.; Rader, D.C.; Romero, J.A.; Shurter, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydro Test (DARHT) Facility is being designed to produce high-resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamics experiments. Two 16- to 20-MeV linear induction accelerators (LIA), with an included angle of 90{degree}, are used to produce intense bremsstrahlung x-ray pulses of short duration (60-ns flat-top). Each accelerator has a 4-MeV electron source that injects an electron beam into a series of 250-kV induction cells. The three major pulsed-power systems are the injectors, the induction-cell pulsed-power (ICPP) units, and the ICPP trigger systems, and are discussed in this paper. 11 refs., 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Two wire wakefield measurements of the DARHT accelerator cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Vella, M.

    1998-05-01

    One of the characteristics specifying the performance of an accelerator cell as it relates to the electron beam, is the Wakefield impedance. The real part of the transverse wakefield impedance relates to offsets of the beam as it travels through the accelerator cell. To verify that the cell operates as expected, and that simulations and design predictions of the cell are within acceptable parameters (before building more cells) it is desirable to measure the wakefield impedance using the traditional two-wire technique. This technique benefits from its reproducibility and physical simplicity but is complicated by the need to fabricate a test fixture. But once the fixture is fabricated, it is simple to measure any number of accelerator cells. The following is a description of the two-wire measurement technique as performed at Lawrence Berkeley Lab (LBL) on a prototype DARHT accelerator cell.

  11. Measurements of Acceleration Due to Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Bill

    1990-01-01

    The principle means by which g has been measured are summarized. Discussed are "Kater's Reversible Pendulum," falling rules, and interferometry methods. Types of corrections and various sources of uncertainty are considered. (CW)

  12. Vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, K. C.; Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Adalgeirsdottir, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present current vertical crustal velocity and acceleration fields for Iceland as measured by 62 continuously operating GPS stations. After analyzing available CGPS data from 1995 to present and manually repairing breaks and removing transient earthquake and volcanic deformation signals, we calculate velocities and accelerations by fitting a second order polynomial model consisting of a coordinate offset term and two additional terms representing the time-averaged coordinate velocity and acceleration. Our velocity estimates agree closely with previously published velocity fields and show a broad region of rapid uplift in central Iceland, with near zero uplift observed near coastal regions. The largest vertical velocities occur near the center of the island, between the Vatnajökull and Hofsjökull ice sheets at rates exceeding 20 mm/yr. Velocity uncertainties have a mean of ~0.1mm/yr. The pattern of acceleration mimics that of the velocity field such that the velocity contrast between the interior and coastal regions is being enhanced. Largest positive accelerations of ~1.5 mm/yr2 are observed in central Iceland and acceleration uncertainties have a mean of ~0.2mm/yr2. Previous studies have modeled rapid uplift in Iceland as an isostatic response to loss of ice mass from the central Iceland ice sheets. We propose that the accelerating uplift is a result of accelerating ice mass loss, with possible implications for climate driven glacial retreat and models for ice loss and isostatic adjustment.

  13. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  14. Fermilab Tevatron high level rf accelerating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-06-01

    Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

  15. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume. PMID:23126755

  16. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  17. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Uncertainty assessment for accelerator-driven systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, P. J.; Gomes, I.; Micklich, B.; Palmiotti, G.

    1999-06-10

    The concept of a subcritical system driven by an external source of neutrons provided by an accelerator ADS (Accelerator Driver System) has been recently revived and is becoming more popular in the world technical community with active programs in Europe, Russia, Japan, and the U.S. A general consensus has been reached in adopting for the subcritical component a fast spectrum liquid metal cooled configuration. Both a lead-bismuth eutectic, sodium and gas are being considered as a coolant; each has advantages and disadvantages. The major expected advantage is that subcriticality avoids reactivity induced transients. The potentially large subcriticality margin also should allow for the introduction of very significant quantities of waste products (minor Actinides and Fission Products) which negatively impact the safety characteristics of standard cores. In the U.S. these arguments are the basis for the development of the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW), which has significant potential in reducing nuclear waste levels. Up to now, neutronic calculations have not attached uncertainties on the values of the main nuclear integral parameters that characterize the system. Many of these parameters (e.g., degree of subcriticality) are crucial to demonstrate the validity and feasibility of this concept. In this paper we will consider uncertainties related to nuclear data only. The present knowledge of the cross sections of many isotopes that are not usually utilized in existing reactors (like Bi, Pb-207, Pb-208, and also Minor Actinides and Fission Products) suggests that uncertainties in the integral parameters will be significantly larger than for conventional reactor systems, and this raises concerns on the neutronic performance of those systems.

  19. A flexible and configurable system to test accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy M. Nogiec et al.

    2001-07-20

    Fermilab's accelerator magnet R and D programs, including production of superconducting high gradient quadrupoles for the LHC insertion regions, require rigorous yet flexible magnetic measurement systems. Measurement systems must be capable of handling various types of hardware and extensible to all measurement technologies and analysis algorithms. A tailorable software system that satisfies these requirements is discussed. This single system, capable of distributed parallel signal processing, is built on top of a flexible component-based framework that allows for easy reconfiguration and run-time modification. Both core and domain-specific components can be assembled into various magnet test or analysis systems. The system configured to comprise a rotating coil harmonics measurement is presented. Technologies as Java, OODB, XML, JavaBeans, software bus and component-based architectures are used.

  20. Reliable timing systems for computer controlled accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Jürgen; Nettleton, Robert

    1986-06-01

    Over the past decade the use of computers has set new standards for control systems of accelerators with ever increasing complexity coupled with stringent reliability criteria. In fact, with very slow cycling machines or storage rings any erratic operation or timing pulse will cause the loss of precious particles and waste hours of time and effort of preparation. Thus, for the CERN linac and LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) timing system reliability becomes a crucial factor in the sense that all components must operate practically without fault for very long periods compared to the effective machine cycle. This has been achieved by careful selection of components and design well below thermal and electrical limits, using error detection and correction where possible, as well as developing "safe" decoding techniques for serial data trains. Further, consistent structuring had to be applied in order to obtain simple and flexible modular configurations with very few components on critical paths and to minimize the exchange of information to synchronize accelerators. In addition, this structuring allows the development of efficient strategies for on-line and off-line fault diagnostics. As a result, the timing system for Linac 2 has, so far, been operating without fault for three years, the one for LEAR more than one year since its final debugging.

  1. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Harold; Dance, William E.

    1999-06-01

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6×104n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics.

  2. Critical Systems Engineering Accelerator: Aerospace Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ricardo; Fernandez, Gonzalo; Regada, Raul; Basanta, Luis; Alana, Elena; Del Carmen Lomba, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the complexity and functionality of space systems is increasing more and more. Safety critical systems have to guarantee strong safety and dependability constraints. This paper presents CRYSTAL (Critical sYSTem engineering AcceLeration), a cross-domain ARTEMIS project for increasing the efficiency of the embedded software development in the industry through the definition of an integrated tool chain. CRYSTAL involves four major application domains: Aerospace, Automotive, Rail and Medical Healthcare. The impact in the Space Domain will be evaluated through a demonstrator implemented using CRYSTAL framework: the Low Level Software for an Avionics Control Unit, capable to run Application SW for autonomous navigation, image acquisition control, data compression and/or data handling. Finally, the results achieved will be evaluated taking into account the ECSS (European Committee for Space Standardization) standards and procedures.

  3. Longitudinal impedance measurement of an RK-TBA induction accelerating gap

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Induction accelerating gap designs are being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) applications. The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance to limit beam breakup, low longitudinal impedance at the beam-modulation frequency to minimize power loss. Various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques were explored to optimize the gap design. We report on the experimental effort to evaluate the rf properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. Longitudinal impedance measurements above beam-tube cut-off frequency using a single-wire measuring system are presented.

  4. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, D.; Phillips, F.M.

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes /sup 10/Be, /sup 14/C, /sup 26/Al, /sup 36/Cl, and /sup 129/I can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10/sup -12/ to 10/sup -15/ and as few as 10/sup 5/ atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archaeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of half-lives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences. 98 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Preliminary OARE absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James

    1993-01-01

    On-orbit Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on STS-50 was examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels were derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. The tri-axial OARE raw acceleration measurements (i.e., telemetered data) during the interval were filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval were analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z- axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process (using the OARE maneuver data) and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter's center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axes. Results indicate that there is a force of unknown origin being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces were reexamined, but none produce the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the Orbiter is creating the environment observed.

  7. Preliminary OARE absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James

    1993-02-01

    On-orbit Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on STS-50 was examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels were derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. The tri-axial OARE raw acceleration measurements (i.e., telemetered data) during the interval were filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval were analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z- axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process (using the OARE maneuver data) and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter's center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axes. Results indicate that there is a force of unknown origin being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces were reexamined, but none produce the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the Orbiter is creating the environment observed.

  8. Position, velocity and acceleration estimates from the noisy radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, K. V.

    1984-04-01

    A two-dimensional Kalman tracking filter is described for obtaining optimum estimates of position, velocity and acceleration of an aircraft whose acceleration is perturbed due to maneuvers and/or other random factors. In a track-while-scan operation, a two-dimensional radar sensor is assumed to measure the range and bearing of the vehicle at uniform sampling intervals of time T seconds through random noise. The steady-state gain characteristics of the filter have been analytically obtained and the computer results are presented.

  9. RHIC 28 MHZ ACCELERATING CAVITY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSE,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; KWIATKOWSKI,S.; RATTI,A.; PIRKL,W.

    2001-06-18

    The 28 MHz accelerating system consists of a quarter wave cavity driven by an inductively coupled 100kW tetrode amplifer and 1kW solid state driver amplifer. 40dB of rf feedback closed around the cavity and amplifers reduces small perturbations within the loop by a factor of 100, and reduces the time required to shift the phase at transition by a factor of 10, limited by the saturation of the drive chain. The cavity is tuned over a 200kHz range by a mechanical tuner which varies the gap capacitance. Broadband HOM damping is provided by two orthogonal loop coupled high pass filters. Design parameters and commissioning results are presented.

  10. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-73, Launched October 20, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; DeLombard, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia was measured during the STS-73 mission using accelerometers from five different instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment, the Space Acceleration Measurement System, the Three-dimensional Microgravity Accelerometer, the Microgravity Measuring Device, and Suppression of Transient Accelerations by Levitation Evaluation System. The Microgravity Analysis Workstation quasi-steady environment calculation and comparison of this calculation with Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data was used to assess how appropriate a planned attitude was expected to be for one Crystal Growth Facility experiment sample. The microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew, and experiment operations is presented and interpreted in this report. Data are examined to show the effects of vernier reaction control system jet firings for Orbiter attitude control. This is compared to examples of data when no thrusters were firing, when the primary reaction control system jets were used for attitude control, and when single vernier jets were fired for test purposes. In general, vernier jets, when used for attitude control, cause accelerations in the 3 x 10(exp -4) g to 7 x 10(exp -4) g range. Primary jets used in this manner cause accelerations in the 0.01 to 0.025 g range. Other significant disturbance sources characterized are water dump operations, with Y(sub b) axis acceleration deviations of about 1 x 10(exp -6) g; payload bay door opening motion, with Y(sub o) and Z(sub o) axis accelerations of frequency 0.4 Hz; and probable Glovebox fan operations with notable frequency components at 20, 38, 43, 48, and 53 Hz. The STS-73 microgravity environment is comparable to the environments measured on earlier microgravity science missions.

  11. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurement for STS-87: Launched November 19, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; DeLombard, Richard; Reckart, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Two accelerometer systems, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and the Space Acceleration Measurement System, were used to measure and record the microgravity environment of the Orbiter Columbia during the STS-87 mission in November-December 1997. Data from two separate Space Acceleration Measurement System units were telemetered to the ground during the mission and data plots were displayed for investigators of the Fourth United States Microgravity Payload experiments in near real-time using the World Wide Web. Plots generated using Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data (telemetered to the ground using a tape delay) were provided to the investigators using the World Wide Web approximately twelve hours after data recording. Disturbances in the microgravity environment as recorded by these instruments are grouped by source type: Orbiter systems, on-board activities, payload operations, and unknown sources. The environment related to the Ku-band antenna dither, Orbiter structural modes, attitude deadband collapses, water dump operations, crew sleep, and crew exercise was comparable to the effects of these sources on previous Orbiter missions. Disturbances related to operations of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement Systems that were not observed on previous missions are detailed. The effects of Orbiter cabin and airlock depressurization and extravehicular activities are also reported for the first time. A set of data plots representing the entire mission is included in the CD-ROM version of this report.

  12. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurement for STS-87, Launched November 19, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; DeLombard, Richard; Reckart, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Two accelerometer systems, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and the Space Acceleration Measurement System, were used to measure and record the microgravity environment of the Orbiter Columbia during the STS-87 mission in November-December 1997. Data from two separate Space Acceleration Measurement System units were telemetered to the ground during the mission and data plots were displayed for investigators of the Fourth United States Microgravity Payload experiments in near real-time using the World Wide Web. Plots generated using Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data (telemetered to the ground using a tape delay) were provided to the investigators using the World Wide Web approximately twelve hours after data recording. Disturbances in the microgravity environment as recorded by these instruments are grouped by source type: Orbiter systems, on-board activities, payload operations, and unknown sources. The environment related to the Ku-band antenna dither, Orbiter structural modes, attitude deadband collapses, water dump operations, crew sleep, and crew exercise was comparable to the effects of these sources on previous Orbiter missions. Disturbances related to operations of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement Systems that were not observed on previous missions are detailed. The effects of Orbiter cabin and airlock depressurization and extravehicular activities are also reported for the first time. A set of data plots representing the entire mission is included in the CD-ROM version of this report.

  13. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Hwang, D.W. |

    1992-06-01

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 7v{sub e} (v{sub ph} was varied 2v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 10v{sub e}), where v{sub e} is the electron thermal velocity, (kT{sub e}/m{sub e}){sup {1/2}}. As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted.

  14. Systems and methods for the magnetic insulation of accelerator electrodes in electrostatic accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R

    2013-12-17

    The present invention provides systems and methods for the magnetic insulation of accelerator electrodes in electrostatic accelerators. Advantageously, the systems and methods of the present invention improve the practically obtainable performance of these electrostatic accelerators by addressing, among other things, voltage holding problems and conditioning issues. The problems and issues are addressed by flowing electric currents along these accelerator electrodes to produce magnetic fields that envelope the accelerator electrodes and their support structures, so as to prevent very low energy electrons from leaving the surfaces of the accelerator electrodes and subsequently picking up energy from the surrounding electric field. In various applications, this magnetic insulation must only produce modest gains in voltage holding capability to represent a significant achievement.

  15. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  16. Radio frequency systems for present and future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rf systems are described for the FNAL Main Ring and Tevatron Ring, CERN SPS and LEP, and HERA proton acceleration system, CERN PS e/sup +/e/sup minus/ acceleration system, and CERN EPA monochromatic cavity. Low impedance rf systems in CERN ISR, the Brookhaven CBA, and SSC are also discussed.

  17. Measuring the acceleration due to gravity using an IR transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdElazem, Sohaib; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new technique to study the dynamics of a free-falling object in a lab setting and to measure the acceleration due to gravity g using a simple and economic setup. The precise measurement of time taken for an object to fall freely passing an infrared (IR) transceiver is utilized to deduce the acceleration due to gravity. The reflected IR intensity from a free-falling 0.19 m rod of equally spaced white stripes of 0.01 m is detected and sent to a digital oscilloscope to observe and record the falling time period of each stripe. By fitting recorded elapsed falling times to the well-known quadratic equation of motion under constant acceleration, an accurate value of the acceleration due to gravity of g = 9.8092 ± 0.0384 m s-2 is obtained. In addition to its accuracy, the proposed technique is safer and more economic than most of the other currently used setups to determine g in undergraduate teaching labs. This study may provide undergraduate lab instructors with an efficient teaching technique for a traditional classroom experiment.

  18. SEU-tolerant IQ detection algorithm for LLRF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecki, M.

    2007-08-01

    High-energy accelerators use RF field to accelerate charged particles. Measurements of effective field parameters (amplitude and phase) are tasks of great importance in these facilities. The RF signal is downconverted in frequency but keeping the information about amplitude and phase and then sampled in ADC. One of the several tasks for LLRF control system is to estimate the amplitude and phase (or I and Q components) of the RF signal. These parameters are further used in the control algorithm. The XFEL accelerator will be built using a single-tunnel concept. Therefore electronic devices (including LLRF control system) will be exposed to ionizing radiation, particularly to a neutron flux generating SEUs in digital circuits. The algorithms implemented in FPGA/DSP should therefore be SEU-tolerant. This paper presents the application of the WCC method to obtain immunity of IQ detection algorithm to SEUs. The VHDL implementation of this algorithm in Xilinx Virtex II Pro FPGA is presented, together with results of simulation proving the algorithm suitability for systems operating in the presence of SEUs.

  19. Survey of Electronic Safety Systems in Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, K.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results and analysis of a comprehensive survey of the implementation of accelerator safety interlock systems at over 20 international labs. At the present time there is not a self consistent means to evaluate both the experience and level of protection provided by electronic safety interlock systems. This research is intended to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of several different types of interlock system implementation methodologies. Research, medical, and industrial accelerators are compared. The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) was one of the first large particle accelerators to implement a safety interlock system using programmable logic controllers. Since that time all of the major new U.S. accelerator construction projects plan to use some form of programmable electronics as part of a safety interlock system in some capacity. To the author's knowledge such a compilation has not been presented before.

  20. Radiation measurements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, H.J.; Vacca, J.H.; Veluri, V.R.; White, M.

    1995-07-01

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source is a 2856-MHz, S-band, electron-positron linear accelerator (linac). It produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. Radiation measurements were made during normal electron and positron operation, as well as during several beam loss scenarios. Neutron and gamma measurements made outside the shielding walls during normal operation are within DOE guidelines. Measured radiation fields are compared to predicted levels for different conditions.

  1. Measurement of acceleration in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haessner, R.; Theobald, W.; Niedermeier, S.; Michelmann, K.; Feurer, T.; Schillinger, H.; Sauerbrey, R.

    1998-02-20

    Accelerations up to 4x10{sup 19} m/s{sup 2} are measured in femtosecond laser-produced plasmas at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) technique. A high density plasma is formed by focusing an ultrashort unchirped laser pulse on a plane carbon target and part of the reflected pulse is eventually detected by a FROG autocorrelator. Radiation pressure and thermal pressure accelerate the plasma which causes a chirp in the reflected laser pulse. The retrieved phase and amplitude information reveal that the plasma motion is dominated by the large light pressure which pushes the plasma into the target. This is supported by theoretical estimates and by the results of independently measured time integrated spectra of the reflected pulse.

  2. Measurement of the Decelerating Wake in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R. H.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R. H.; Walz, D. R.; Clayton, C. E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.

    2009-01-22

    Recent experiments at SLAC have shown that high gradient acceleration of electrons is achievable in meter scale plasmas. Results from these experiments show that the wakefield is sensitive to parameters in the electron beam which drives it. In the experiment the bunch lengths were varied systematically at constant charge. The effort to extract a measurement of the decelerating wake from the maximum energy loss of the electron beam is discussed.

  3. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  4. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-89: Launched January 22, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Support of microgravity research on the 89th flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-89) and a continued effort to characterize the acceleration environment of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Mir Space Station form the basis for this report. For the STS-89 mission, the Space Shuttle Endeavour was equipped with a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) unit, which collected more than a week's worth of data. During docked operations with Mir, a second SAMS unit collected approximately a day's worth of data yielding the only set of acceleration measurements recorded simultaneously on the two spacecraft. Based on the data acquired by these SAMS units, this report serves to characterize a number of acceleration events and quantify their impact on the local nature of the accelerations experienced at the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment location. Crew activity was shown to nearly double the median root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration level calculated below 10 Hz, while the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator/Freezer operating at about 22 Hz was a strong acceleration source in the vicinity of the MGM location. The MGM science requirement that the acceleration not exceed q I mg was violated numerous times during their experiment runs; however, no correlation with sample instability has been found to this point. Synchronization between the SAMS data from Endeavour and from Mir was shown to be close much of the time, but caution with respect to exact timing should be exercised when comparing these data. When orbiting as a separate vehicle prior to docking, Endeavour had prominent structural modes above 3 Hz, while Mir exhibited a cluster of modes around 1 Hz. When mated, a transition to common modes was apparent in the two SAMS data sets. This report is not a comprehensive analysis of the acceleration data, so those interested in further details should contact the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services team at the National Aeronautics and Space

  5. Comparing current cluster, massively parallel, and accelerated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Kevin J; Davis, Kei; Hoisie, Adolfy; Kerbyson, Darren J; Pakin, Scott; Lang, Mike; Sancho Pitarch, Jose C

    2010-01-01

    Currently there is large architectural diversity in high perfonnance computing systems. They include 'commodity' cluster systems that optimize per-node performance for small jobs, massively parallel processors (MPPs) that optimize aggregate perfonnance for large jobs, and accelerated systems that optimize both per-node and aggregate performance but only for applications custom-designed to take advantage of such systems. Because of these dissimilarities, meaningful comparisons of achievable performance are not straightforward. In this work we utilize a methodology that combines both empirical analysis and performance modeling to compare clusters (represented by a 4,352-core IB cluster), MPPs (represented by a 147,456-core BG/P), and accelerated systems (represented by the 129,600-core Roadrunner) across a workload of four applications. Strengths of our approach include the ability to compare architectures - as opposed to specific implementations of an architecture - attribute each application's performance bottlenecks to characteristics unique to each system, and to explore performance scenarios in advance of their availability for measurement. Our analysis illustrates that application performance is essentially unrelated to relative peak performance but that application performance can be both predicted and explained using modeling.

  6. High data-rate atom interferometer for measuring acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Hayden J.; Rakholia, Akash V.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate a high data-rate light-pulse atom interferometer for measuring acceleration. The device is optimized to operate at rates between 50 Hz to 330 Hz with sensitivities of 0.57{mu}g/{radical}(Hz) to 36.7{mu}g/{radical}(Hz), respectively. Our method offers a dramatic increase in data rate and demonstrates a path to applications in highly dynamic environments. The performance of the device can largely be attributed to the high recapture efficiency of atoms from one interferometer measurement cycle to another.

  7. Sonic boom measurements from accelerating supersonic tracked sleds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Supersonic sled tests on the Sandia 1524-m (5000-ft) track generate sonic booms of sufficient intensity to allow some airblast measurements at distance scales not obtained from wind tunnel or flight tests. During acceleration, an emitted curved boom wave propagates to a caustic, or focus. Detailed measurements around these caustics may help to clarify the overpressure magnification which can occur from real aircraft operations. Six fixed pressure gages have been operated to document the general noise field, and a mobile array of twelve gages.

  8. Ram accelerator direct launch system for space cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A new method of efficiently accelerating relatively large masses (up to several metric tons) to velocities of 0.6 km/sec up to 12 km/sec using chemical energy has been developed. The vehicle travels through a tube filled with a premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixture. There is no propellant on-board the vehicle. The tube acts as the outer cowling of a ram jet and the energy release process travels with the vehicle. The ballistic efficiency remains high up to extremely high velocities and the acceleration can be maintained at a nearly constant level. Five modes of ram accelerator operation have been investigated; these modes differ primarily in the method of chemical heat release and the operational velocity range, and include two subsonic combustion modes (one of which involves thermally choke a combustion behind the vehicle) and three detonation drive modes. These modes of propulsion are capable of efficient acceleration in the range of 0.6-12 km/sec, although aerodynamic heating becomes severe above about 8 km/sec. Experiments carried out to date at the University of Washington up to 2 km/sec have established proof of principle of the ram accelerator concept and have shown close agreement between predicted and measured performance. A launch system capable of delivering two metric tons into low earth orbit was selected for the purposes of the present study. The preliminary analysis indicates that the overall dimensions of a restricted acceleration (less than approx. 1000 g) launch facility would require a tube 1 m in diameter, with an overall length of approximately 4 km. As in any direct launch scheme, a small on-board rocket is required to circularize the otherwise highly elliptical orbit which intersects the Earth. Various orbital insertion scenarios have been explored for the case of a 9 km/sec ram accelerator launch. These include direct insertion through a single circularization maneuver (i.e., on rocket burn), insertion involving two burns, and a

  9. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-65, Launched 8 July 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The second flight of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) payload on board the STS-65 mission was supported by three accelerometer instruments: The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) located close to the orbiter center of mass; the Quasi-Steady Acceleration Measurement experiment, and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), both in the Spacelab module. A fourth accelerometer, the Microgravity Measuring Device recorded data in the middeck in support of exercise isolation tests.Data collected by OARE and SAMS during IML-2 are displayed in this report. The OARE data represent the microgravity environment below 1 Hz. The SAMS data represent the environment in the 0.01 Hz to 100 Hz range. Variations in the environment caused by unique activities are presented. Specific events addressed are: crew activity, crew exercise, experiment component mixing activities, experiment centrifuge operations, refrigerator/freezer operations and circulation pump operations. The analyses included in this report complement analyses presented in other mission summary reports.

  10. A fiber optic strain measurement and quench localization for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanoort, Johannes M.; Scanlan, Ronald M.; Tenkate, Herman H. J.

    1994-10-01

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system or as an absolute strain detector. Combined, one can monitor the mechanical behaviour of the magnet system over time during construction, long time storage and operation. The sensing mechanism is described, together with various tests in laboratory environments. The test results of a multichannel test matrix to be incorporated first in the dummy coils and then in the final version of a 13T Nb3Sn accelerator dipole magnet are presented. Finally, the possible use of this system as a quench localization system is proposed.

  11. Large high-vacuum systems for CERN accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strubin, P.

    2008-05-01

    CERN operated over the more than 50 years of its existence particle accelerators and storage rings ranging from a few tens of metre to 27 km, the size of its latest project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is under construction and will be started in 2008. The challenges began with the Intersection Storage Rings (ISR) in the seventies. With a beam pipe length of 2 × 1 km, this accelerator required innovative solutions like bake-out and glow discharge to achieve the required static vacuum level, fight against beam-induced pressure increases and cancel beam neutralisation by trapped electrons. The vacuum system of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) storage ring (in operation between 1989 and 2001) of a total length of 27 km had to cope with very high levels of synchrotron power. The beam vacuum system of LHC (2 × 27 km) integrates some parts at 1.9 K and others at room temperature and will also have to cope with dynamic effects. In addition to the beam vacuum system, LHC requires insulation vacuum for the superconducting magnets and the helium distribution line. Whereas the required pressure is not very low, the leak detection and localisation is significantly more demanding for the insulation vacuum than for the beam vacuum because of the large volumes and the thermal insulation. When the size of an accelerator grows, the difficulties are not only to get a clean and leak tight vacuum system, but also to be able to measure reliably pressure or gas composition over long distances. Furthermore, in the case of LHC the integration of the beam vacuum system was particularly difficult because of the complexity induced by a superconducting magnet scheme and the reduced space available for the beam pipes. Planning and logistics aspects during installation, including the usage of mobile pumping and diagnostic means, were much more difficult to manage in LHC than in previous projects.

  12. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ˜16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  13. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles. PMID:26932019

  14. Lessons from Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) System Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Brambora, Clifford; Ghuman, Parminder; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) system was developed as part of the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The reconfigurable computing technologies were investigated for Level 1 satellite telemetry data processing to achieve computing acceleration and cost reduction for the next-generation Level 1 data processing systems. The MODIS instrument calibration algorithm was implemented using reconfigurable a computer. The system development process and the lessons learned throughout the design cycle are summarized in this paper.

  15. Application of real-time digitization techniques in beam measurement for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhan, Lin-Song; Gao, Xing-Shun; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Beam measurement is very important for accelerators. In this paper, modern digital beam measurement techniques based on IQ (In-phase & Quadrature-phase) analysis are discussed. Based on this method and high-speed high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion, we have completed three beam measurement electronics systems designed for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system (ADS). Core techniques of hardware design and real-time system calibration are discussed, and performance test results of these three instruments are also presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205153, 10875119), Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2030040029),and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  16. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

  17. Three-grid accelerator system for an ion propulsion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for an ion engine comprising a three-grid accelerator system with the decelerator grid biased negative of the beam plasma. This arrangement substantially reduces the charge-exchange ion current reaching the accelerator grid at high tank pressures, which minimizes erosion of the accelerator grid due to charge exchange ion sputtering, known to be the major accelerator grid wear mechanism. An improved method for life testing ion engines is also provided using the disclosed apparatus. In addition, the invention can also be applied in materials processing.

  18. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-75, Launched February 22, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Moskowitz, Milton E.; McPherson, Kevin M.; DeLombard, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Two accelerometers provided acceleration data during the STS-75 mission in support of the third United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) experiments. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) provided a measure of the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The OARE provided investigators with quasi-steady acceleration measurements after about a six hour time lag dictated by downlink constraints. SAMS data were downlinked in near-real-time and recorded on-board for post-mission analysis. An overview of the mission is provided as are brief discussions of these two accelerometer systems. Data analysis techniques used to process SAMS and OARE data are discussed Using a combination of these techniques, the microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew, and experiment operations is presented and interpreted. The microgravity environment represented by SAMS and OARE data is comparable to the environments measured by the instruments on earlier microgravity science missions. The OARE data compared well with predictions of the quasi-steady environment. The SAMS data show the influence of thruster firings and crew motion (transient events) and of crew exercise, Orbiter systems, and experiment operations (oscillatory events). Thruster activity on this mission appears to be somewhat more frequent than on other microgravity missions with the combined firings of the F5L and F5R jets producing significant acceleration transients. The specific crew activities performed in the middeck and flight deck, the SPREE table rotations, the waste collection system compaction, and the fuel cell purge had negligible effects on the microgravity environment of the USMP-3 carriers. The Ku band antenna repositioning activity resulted in a brief interruption of the ubiquitous 17 Hz signal in the SAMS data. In addition, the auxiliary power unit operations during the Flight Control System checkout

  19. A Fine-Tooth Comb to Measure the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    worth recalling that the kind of precision required, 1 cm/s, corresponds, on the focal plane of a typical high-resolution spectrograph, to a shift of a few tenths of a nanometre, that is, the size of some molecules," explains PhD student and team member Constanza Araujo-Hauck from ESO. The new calibration technique comes from the combination of astronomy and quantum optics, in a collaboration between researchers at ESO and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. It uses ultra-short pulses of laser light to create a 'frequency comb' - light at many frequencies separated by a constant interval - to create just the kind of precise 'ruler' needed to calibrate a spectrograph. After successful tests in the MPQ laboratory in 2007, the team have successfully tested a prototype device using the laser comb at the VTT (Vacuum Tower Telescope) solar telescope in Tenerife, on 8 March 2008, measuring the spectrum of the Sun in infrared light. The results are already impressive, and the technique promises to achieve the accuracy needed to study these big astronomical questions. "In our tests in Tenerife, we have already achieved beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. Now we are going to make the system more versatile, and develop it even further," says team member Tilo Steinmetz, from Menlo Systems GmbH, a spin-off company from the Max Planck Institute, which was founded to commercialise the frequency comb technique. Having tested the technique on a solar telescope, a new version of the system is now being built for the HARPS planet-finder instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla in Chile, before being considered for future generations of instruments. One of the ambitious project to be realised with the E-ELT, called CODEX, aims to measure the recently discovered acceleration of the universe directly, by following the velocities of distant galaxies and quasars over a 20-year period. This would let astronomers test Einstein's general relativity and the nature of the recently

  20. Summary report of mission acceleration measurements for STS-60, SPACEHAB2, launched 11 February 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The STS-60 mission, which launched on 11 February 1994, carried seven accelerometer systems. This report describes the configuration of each of these systems, where they were located on the Orbiter and the name of a contact person for each system. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was one of the accelerometer systems on-board and this mission marked its eighth successful flight. Acceleration data are provided here for SAMS which flew under an agreement between the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications division and the NASA office of Advanced Concepts and Technology. Acceleration data for the other accelerometer systems are not presented here. SAMS was located in the commercial SPACEHAB laboratory, on its second flight. The SAMS system was configured with three triaxial sensor heads with filter cut-offs of 5, 10, and 50 Hz. The acceleration environment related to an experiment centrifuge, an experiment refrigerator freezer unit, a SAMS sensor head rotation, an Orbiter shudder, and payload deploy activities are discussed. In the Appendices, all of the data from SAMS Head B (10 Hz) are plotted to provide an overview of the environment during the majority of the STS-60 mission. An evaluation form is included at the end of the report to solicit users' comments about the usefulness of this series of reports.

  1. Accelerated Superposition State Molecular Dynamics for Condensed Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Michele; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2008-04-01

    An extension of superposition state molecular dynamics (SSMD) [Venkatnathan and Voth J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2005, 1, 36] is presented with the goal to accelerate timescales and enable the study of "long-time" phenomena for condensed phase systems. It does not require any a priori knowledge about final and transition state configurations, or specific topologies. The system is induced to explore new configurations by virtue of a fictitious (free-particle-like) accelerating potential. The acceleration method can be applied to all degrees of freedom in the system and can be applied to condensed phases and fluids. PMID:26620930

  2. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics.

  3. A Fine-Tooth Comb to Measure the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    worth recalling that the kind of precision required, 1 cm/s, corresponds, on the focal plane of a typical high-resolution spectrograph, to a shift of a few tenths of a nanometre, that is, the size of some molecules," explains PhD student and team member Constanza Araujo-Hauck from ESO. The new calibration technique comes from the combination of astronomy and quantum optics, in a collaboration between researchers at ESO and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. It uses ultra-short pulses of laser light to create a 'frequency comb' - light at many frequencies separated by a constant interval - to create just the kind of precise 'ruler' needed to calibrate a spectrograph. After successful tests in the MPQ laboratory in 2007, the team have successfully tested a prototype device using the laser comb at the VTT (Vacuum Tower Telescope) solar telescope in Tenerife, on 8 March 2008, measuring the spectrum of the Sun in infrared light. The results are already impressive, and the technique promises to achieve the accuracy needed to study these big astronomical questions. "In our tests in Tenerife, we have already achieved beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. Now we are going to make the system more versatile, and develop it even further," says team member Tilo Steinmetz, from Menlo Systems GmbH, a spin-off company from the Max Planck Institute, which was founded to commercialise the frequency comb technique. Having tested the technique on a solar telescope, a new version of the system is now being built for the HARPS planet-finder instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla in Chile, before being considered for future generations of instruments. One of the ambitious project to be realised with the E-ELT, called CODEX, aims to measure the recently discovered acceleration of the universe directly, by following the velocities of distant galaxies and quasars over a 20-year period. This would let astronomers test Einstein's general relativity and the nature of the recently

  4. Tracking accelerated aging of composites with ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D.J.; Durbin, P.F.; Thomas, G.H.; Groves, S.E.

    1996-10-01

    Composite materials are steadily replacing traditional materials in many industries. For many carbon composite materials, particularly in aerospace applications, durability is a critical design parameter which must be accurately characterized. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Boeing Commercial Airplane Group have established a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to assist in the high speed research program at Boeing. LLNL`s expertise in fiber composites, computer modeling, mechanical testing, chemical analysis and nondestructive evaluation (ND) will contribute to the study of advanced composite materials in commercial aerospace applications. Through thermo-mechanical experiments with periodic chemical analysis and nondestructive evaluation, the aging mechanisms in several continuous fiber polymer composites will be studied. Several measurement techniques are being studied for their correlation with aging. This paper describes through-transmission ultrasonic attenuation measurements of isothermally aged composite materials and their use as a tracking parameter for accelerated aging.

  5. A large distributed digital camera system for accelerator beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Honkavaara, K.

    2005-07-01

    Optical diagnostics, providing images of accelerated particle beams using radiation emitted by particles impinging a radiator, typically a fluorescent screen, has been extensively used, especially on electron linacs, since the 1970's. Higher intensity beams available in the last decade allow extending the use of beam imaging techniques to perform precise measurements of important beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and energy spread using optical transition radiation (OTR). OTR-based diagnostics systems are extensively used on the superconducting TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac driving the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (VUV-FEL) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron facility. Up to 30 optical diagnostic stations have been installed at various positions along the 250-m-long linac, each equipped with a high-performance digital camera. This paper describes the new approach to the design of the hardware and software setups required by the complex topology of such a distributed camera system.

  6. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x{sub F} scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed.

  7. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  8. Summary report of mission acceleration measurements for Spacehab-01, STS-57 launched 21 June 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Brian; Grodsinsky, Carlos; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The maiden voyage of the commercial Spacehab laboratory module onboard the STS-57 mission was integrated with several accelerometer packages, one of which was the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The June 21st 1993, launch was the seventh successful mission for the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Application's (OLMSA) SAMS unit. This flight was also complemented by a second accelerometer system. The Three Dimensional Microgravity Accelerometer (3-DMA), a Code C funded acceleration measurement system, offering an on-orbit residual calibration as a reference for the unit's four triaxial accelerometers. The SAMS accelerometer unit utilized three remote triaxial sensor heads mounted on the forward Spacehab module bulkhead and on one centrally located experiment locker door. These triaxial heads had filter cut-offs set to 5, 50, and 1000 Hz. The mission also included other experiment specific accelerometer packages in various locations.

  9. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  10. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  11. Automatic detection of lameness in gestating group-housed sows using positioning and acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Traulsen, I; Breitenberger, S; Auer, W; Stamer, E; Müller, K; Krieter, J

    2016-06-01

    Lameness is an important issue in group-housed sows. Automatic detection systems are a beneficial diagnostic tool to support management. The aim of the present study was to evaluate data of a positioning system including acceleration measurements to detect lameness in group-housed sows. Data were acquired at the Futterkamp research farm from May 2012 until April 2013. In the gestation unit, 212 group-housed sows were equipped with an ear sensor to sample position and acceleration per sow and second. Three activity indices were calculated per sow and day: path length walked by a sow during the day (Path), number of squares (25×25 cm) visited during the day (Square) and variance of the acceleration measurement during the day (Acc). In addition, data on lameness treatments of the sows and a weekly lameness score were used as reference systems. To determine the influence of a lameness event, all indices were analysed in a linear random regression model. Test day, parity class and day before treatment had a significant influence on all activity indices (P<0.05). In healthy sows, indices Path and Square increased with increasing parity, whereas variance slightly decreased. The indices Path and Square showed a decreasing trend in a 14-day period before a lameness treatment and to a smaller extent before a lameness score of 2 (severe lameness). For the index acceleration, there was no obvious difference between the lame and non-lame periods. In conclusion, positioning and acceleration measurements with ear sensors can be used to describe the activity pattern of sows. However, improvements in sampling rate and analysis techniques should be made for a practical application as an automatic lameness detection system. PMID:27074864

  12. The LEDA beam-position measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Stettler, M.W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the beam-position measurement system being developed for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) and the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The system consists of a beam-position monitor (BPM) probe, cabling, down-converter module, position/intensity module, on-line error-correction system, and the necessary control system interfaces. The modules are built on the VXI-interface standard and are capable of duplex data transfer with the control system. Some of the key, system parameters are: position-measurement bandwidth of at least 180 kHz, the ability to measure beam intensity, a beam-position measurement accuracy of less than 1.25 percent of the bore radius, a beam-current dynamic range of 46 dB, a total system dynamic range in excess of 75 dB, and built-in on-line digital-system-error correction.

  13. Measurement of the velocities in the transient acceleration process using all-fiber photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Chong-qing; Song, Hong-wei; Yu, Tao; Xu, Jing-jing

    2011-05-01

    Based on analysis of basic photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV), a formula to measure velocity variation in a single cycle is put forward. PDV has been improved in three aspects, namely, the laser, the detector and the data processing. A measurement system for velocity of the initial stage of a shock motion has been demonstrated. Instantaneous velocity measurements have been performed. The experimental results have a good agreement with the values obtained from the accelerometer. Compared with the traditional fringe method, the proposed method in this paper can identify instantaneous velocity variation. So it is particularly suitable for measuring the velocity in the transient acceleration process of shock waves and detonation waves.

  14. Accelerated Aging System for Prognostics of Power Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Vashchenko, Vladislav; Wysocki, Philip; Saha, Sankalita

    2010-01-01

    Prognostics is an engineering discipline that focuses on estimation of the health state of a component and the prediction of its remaining useful life (RUL) before failure. Health state estimation is based on actual conditions and it is fundamental for the prediction of RUL under anticipated future usage. Failure of electronic devices is of great concern as future aircraft will see an increase of electronics to drive and control safety-critical equipment throughout the aircraft. Therefore, development of prognostics solutions for electronics is of key importance. This paper presents an accelerated aging system for gate-controlled power transistors. This system allows for the understanding of the effects of failure mechanisms, and the identification of leading indicators of failure which are essential in the development of physics-based degradation models and RUL prediction. In particular, this system isolates electrical overstress from thermal overstress. Also, this system allows for a precise control of internal temperatures, enabling the exploration of intrinsic failure mechanisms not related to the device packaging. By controlling the temperature within safe operation levels of the device, accelerated aging is induced by electrical overstress only, avoiding the generation of thermal cycles. The temperature is controlled by active thermal-electric units. Several electrical and thermal signals are measured in-situ and recorded for further analysis in the identification of leading indicators of failures. This system, therefore, provides a unique capability in the exploration of different failure mechanisms and the identification of precursors of failure that can be used to provide a health management solution for electronic devices.

  15. Effects of changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI for follow-up in brain atrophy measurement.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kelvin K; Malone, Ian M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Fox, Nick C

    2015-02-15

    Stable MR acquisition is essential for reliable measurement of brain atrophy in longitudinal studies. One attractive recent advance in MRI is to speed up acquisition using parallel imaging (e.g. reducing volumetric T1-weighted acquisition scan times from around 9 to 5 min). In some studies, a decision to change to an accelerated acquisition may have been deliberately taken, while in others repeat scans may occasionally be accidentally acquired with an accelerated acquisition. In ADNI, non-accelerated and accelerated scans were acquired in the same scanning session on each individual. We investigated the impact on brain atrophy as measured by k-means normalized boundary shift integral (KN-BSI) and deformation-based morphometry when changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI acquisitions over a 12-month interval using scans of 422 subjects from ADNI. KN-BSIs were calculated using both a non-accelerated baseline scan and non-accelerated 12-month scans (i.e. consistent acquisition), and a non-accelerated baseline scan and an accelerated 12-month scan (i.e. changed acquisition). Fluid-based non-rigid registration was also performed on those scans to estimate the brain atrophy rate. We found that the effect on KN-BSI and fluid-based non-rigid registration depended on the scanner manufacturer. For KN-BSI, in Philips and Siemens scanners, the change had very little impact on the measured atrophy rate (increase of 0.051% in Philips and -0.035% in Siemens from consistent acquisition to changed acquisition), whereas, in GE, the change caused a mean reduction of 0.65% in the brain atrophy rate. This is likely due to the difference in tissue contrast between gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid in the non-accelerated and accelerated scans in GE, which uses IR-FSPGR instead of MP-RAGE. For fluid-based non-rigid registration, the change caused a mean increase of 0.29% in the brain atrophy rate in the changed acquisition compared with consistent acquisition in Philips

  16. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  17. Low-level 14C measurements and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, A.E.; Beukens, R.P.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E.; Gove, H.E.

    2005-09-08

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and isotope enrichment were used in 1991 to estimate that the 14C content of methane in natural gas was {<=}1.6x10-18 of the total carbon. The low content of 14C in underground hydrocarbons was verified later in the remarkable results from the Borexino test scintillation counter for solar neutrino studies. Since then studies of the 14C background problem have demonstrated that much of the background originally observed in the AMS measurements can, in principle, be eliminated. However, many difficulties and other backgrounds are to be faced as the limit for AMS is pushed still further towards possibly a ratio of < 10-21. These will be discussed.

  18. Performance Measurement Analysis System

    1989-06-01

    The PMAS4.0 (Performance Measurement Analysis System) is a user-oriented system designed to track the cost and schedule performance of Department of Energy (DOE) major projects (MPs) and major system acquisitions (MSAs) reporting under DOE Order 5700.4A, Project Management System. PMAS4.0 provides for the analysis of performance measurement data produced from management control systems complying with the Federal Government''s Cost and Schedule Control Systems Criteria.

  19. A small 1 MeV electron accelerator for measuring heavy metal concentrations in smokestack gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppond, A.; Redden, D. P.; Meitzler, C. R.; Swenson, D. A.

    1997-05-01

    A low-current electron beam may be used as a diagnostic tool to measure the concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Hg) present in the flue gas particulates produced by smelters or cement kilns. A small electron accelerator is being constructed as part of a prototype emissions monitoring system. The electron beam energy has a design energy of 1 MeV, a peak current of 5 mA, and a duty factor of 0.1 percent. In this paper, we discuss the results of a set of EGS4 calculations used to model the transport properties of a 1 MeV electron beam passing through a thin vacuum window and the flue gas. Since the accelerator will be mounted in a harsh environment, we have investigated the effects of temperature variations on the linac structure and RF power source. The present status of the accelerator construction project is presented.

  20. Accelerator control system at KEKB and the linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kurashina, Miho; Mikawa, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Satoh, Masanori; Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    KEKB has completed all of the technical milestones and has offered important insights into the flavor structure of elementary particles, especially CP violation. The accelerator control system at KEKB and the injector linac was initiated by a combination of scripting languages at the operation layer and EPICS (experimental physics and industrial control system) at the equipment layer. During the project, many features were implemented to achieve extreme performance from the machine. In particular, the online linkage to the accelerator simulation played an essential role. In order to further improve the reliability and flexibility, two major concepts were additionally introduced later in the project, namely, channel access everywhere and dual-tier controls. Based on the improved control system, a virtual accelerator concept was realized, allowing the single injector linac to serve as three separate injectors to KEKB's high-energy ring, low-energy ring, and Photon Factory, respectively. These control technologies are indispensable for future particle accelerators.

  1. Field Installation and Real-Time Data Processing of the New Integrated SeismoGeodetic System with Real-Time Acceleration and Displacement Measurements for Earthquake Characterization Based on High-Rate Seismic and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, Leonid; Jackson, Michael; Passmore, Paul; Raczka, Jared; Alvarez, Marcos; Barrientos, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    We will discuss and show the results obtained from an integrated SeismoGeodetic System, model SG160-09, installed in the Chilean National Network. The SG160-09 provides the user high rate GNSS and accelerometer data, full epoch-by-epoch measurement integrity and, using the Trimble Pivot™ SeismoGeodetic App, the ability to create combined GNSS and accelerometer high-rate (200Hz) displacement time series in real-time. The SG160-09 combines seismic recording with GNSS geodetic measurement in a single compact, ruggedized package. The system includes a low-power, 220-channel GNSS receiver powered by the latest Trimble-precise Maxwell™6 technology and supports tracking GPS, GLONASS and Galileo signals. The receiver incorporates on-board GNSS point positioning using Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technology with satellite clock and orbit corrections delivered over IP networks. The seismic recording element includes an ANSS Class A, force balance triaxial accelerometer with the latest, low power, 24-bit A/D converter, which produces high-resolution seismic data. The SG160-09 processor acquires and packetizes both seismic and geodetic data and transmits it to the central station using an advanced, error-correction protocol with back fill capability providing data integrity between the field and the processing center. The SG160-09 has been installed in the seismic station close to the area of the Iquique earthquake of April 1, 2014, in northern Chile, a seismically prone area at the current time. The hardware includes the SG160-09 system, external Zephyr Geodetic-2 GNSS antenna, and high-speed Internet communication media. Both acceleration and displacement data was transmitted in real-time to the National Seismological Center in Santiago for real-time data processing using Earthworm / Early Bird software. Command/Control of the field station and real-time GNSS position correction are provided via the Pivot software suite. Data from the SG160-09 system was

  2. In-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield in an accelerator environment: Instrumentation and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, W. H.; Asner, D. M.; Conway, J. V.; Dennett, C. A.; Greenwald, S.; Kim, J.-S.; Li, Y.; Moore, T. P.; Omanovic, V.; Palmer, M. A.; Strohman, C. R.

    2015-05-01

    The performance of a particle accelerator can be limited by the build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the vacuum chamber. Secondary electron emission from the chamber walls can contribute to EC growth. An apparatus for in-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield (SEY) in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in connection with EC studies for the CESR Test Accelerator program. The CESR in-situ system, in operation since 2010, allows for SEY measurements as a function of incident electron energy and angle on samples that are exposed to the accelerator environment, typically 5.3 GeV counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons. The system was designed for periodic measurements to observe beam conditioning of the SEY with discrimination between exposure to direct photons from synchrotron radiation versus scattered photons and cloud electrons. The samples can be exchanged without venting the CESR vacuum chamber. Measurements have been done on metal surfaces and EC-mitigation coatings. The in-situ SEY apparatus and improvements to the measurement tools and techniques are described.

  3. Plutonium measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    McAninch, J E; Hamilton, T F; Broan, T A; Jokela, T A; Knezovich, T J; Ognibene, T J; Proctor, I D; Roberts, M L; Southon, J R; Vogel, J S; Sideras-Haddad, E

    1999-10-26

    Mass spectrometric methods provide sensitive, routine, and cost-effective analyses of long-lived radionuclides. Here the authors report on the status of work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a capability for actinide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to take advantage of the high potential of AMS for rejection of interferences. This work demonstrates that the LLNL AMS spectrometer is well-suited for providing high sensitivity, robust, high throughput measurements of plutonium concentrations and isotope ratios. Present backgrounds are {approximately}2 x 10{sup 7}atoms per sample for environmental samples prepared using standard alpha spectrometry protocols. Recent measurements of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Pu activities and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu isotope ratios in IAEA reference materials agree well with IAEA reference values and with alpha spectrometry and recently published ICP-MS results. Ongoing upgrades of the AMS spectrometer are expected to reduce backgrounds below 1 x 10{sup 6} atoms per sample while allowing simplifications of the sample preparation chemistry. These simplifications will lead to lower per-sample costs, higher throughput, faster turn around and, ultimately, to larger and more robust data sets.

  4. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  5. Ion extraction capabilities of two-grid accelerator systems. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovang, D. C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the ion extraction capabilities of two-grid accelerator systems common to electrostatic ion thrusters is described. This work resulted in a large body of experimental data which facilitates the selection of the accelerator system geometries and operating parameters necessary to maximize the extracted ion current. Results suggest that the impingement-limited perveance is not dramatically affected by reductions in screen hole diameter to 0.5 mm. Impingement-limited performance is shown to depend most strongly on grid separation distance, accelerator hole diameter ratio, the discharge-to-total accelerating voltage ratio, and the net-to-total accelerating voltage ratio. Results obtained at small grid separation ratios suggest a new grid operating condition where high beam current per hole levels are achieved at a specified net accelerating voltage. It is shown that this operating condition is realized at an optimum ratio of net-to-total accelerating voltage ratio which is typically quite high. The apparatus developed for this study is also shown to be well suited measuring the electron backstreaming and electrical breakdown characteristics of two-grid accelerator systems.

  6. RFQ design for the RAON accelerator's ISOL system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bong Hyuk; Hong, In-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The heavy-ion accelerator RAON has the advantage of having both an in-flight (IF) and an isotope separator on-line (ISOL) system. Two radio frequency quadrupoles (RFQs) will be installed in the RAON: the main linear accelerator (LINAC) RFQ will be used to accelerate the two-charge state 238U for the IF system, while the post-accelerator RFQ will be used to accelerate low-current isotope beams from the ISOL system. In this paper, the post-accelerator RFQ design for the ISOL system is reported. A beam current of 1 pμA was used, and the input beam and the output beam energies were 5 keV/u and 400 keV/u, respectively. Moreover, the design was optimized by reducing the total length and power, adjusting the beam quality. To quantify the influence of thermal expansion on the frequency, we calculated the frequency difference according to deference between the vane's tip and the body's diameter.

  7. A new tool for accelerator system modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators. The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in assessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were sued to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version (1.1) of ASM is briefly described and an example of the modeling and analysis capabilities is illustrated.

  8. Repeatable electrical measurement instrumentation for use in the accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the construction, calibration, and performance of a repeatable measurement system for use in conjunction with the accelerated stress testing of a-Si:H cells. A filtered diode array is utilized to approximate the spectral response of any type of solar cell in discrete portions of the spectrum. It is noted that in order to achieve the necessary degree of overall repeatability, it is necessary to pay particular attention to methods of contacting and positioning the cells.

  9. Helium refrigeration systems for super-conducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.

    2015-12-04

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting technology which requires 4.5-K or 2-K helium refrigeration systems. These systems utilize superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and/or superconducting magnets which are packaged into vacuum vessels known as cryo-modules (CM’s). Many of the present day accelerators are optimized to operate primarily at around 2-K, requiring specialized helium refrigeration systems which are cost intensive to produce and to operate. Some of the cryogenic refrigeration system design considerations for these challenging applications are discussed.

  10. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

  11. An accelerated forth data-acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.; Rennier, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    A new data acquisition system was put into operation at Urbana in August 1984. It uses a standard Apple 2 microcomputer with 48 k RAM and a standard 5 1/4 inch floppy disk. Design criteria for the system is given. The system was implemented using fig-FORTH, a threaded interpretive language which permits easy interfacing to machine code. The throughput of this system is better by a factor of 6 than the PDP-15 minicomputer system previously used, and it has the real time display feature and provides the data in much more convenient form. The features which contribute to this improved performance is listed.

  12. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26931839

  13. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  14. FemtoMolar measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2009-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive analytical method suitable for the detection of sub-nM concentrations of labeled biological substances such as pharmaceutical drugs in body fluids. A limiting factor in extending the concentration measurements to the sub-pM range is the natural (14)C content in living tissues. This was circumvented by separating the labeled drug from the tissue matrix, using standard high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedures. As the separated total drug amount is in the few fg range, it is not possible to use a standard AMS sample preparation method, where mg sizes are required. We have utilized a sensitive carbon carrier method where a (14)C-deficient compound is added to the HPLC fractions and the composite sample is prepared and analyzed by AMS. Using 50 microL human blood plasma aliquots, we have demonstrated concentration measurements below 20 fM, containing sub-amol amounts of the labeled drug. The method has the immediate potential of operating in the sub-fM region. PMID:19177507

  15. Systemic risk measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Solange Maria; Silva, Thiago Christiano; Tabak, Benjamin Miranda; de Souza Penaloza, Rodrigo Andrés; de Castro Miranda, Rodrigo César

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present systemic risk measures based on contingent claims approach and banking sector multivariate density. We also apply network measures to analyze bank common risk exposure. The proposed measures aim to capture credit risk stress and its potential to become systemic. These indicators capture not only individual bank vulnerability, but also the stress dependency structure between them. Furthermore, these measures can be quite useful for identifying systemically important banks. The empirical results show that these indicators capture with considerable fidelity the moments of increasing systemic risk in the Brazilian banking sector in recent years.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Sudhir; Dagaonkar, S. S.; Bisht, Geetika; Dayanand, S.; Devi, Reena; Deshpande, S. S.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Kannan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a special radiotherapy technique used to irradiate intracranial lesions by 3-D arrangements of narrow photon beams eliminating the needs of invasive surgery. Three different tertiary collimators, namely BrainLab and Radionics circular cones and BrainLab micro multileaf collimator (mMLC), are used for linear accelerator-based SRS systems (X-Knife). Output factor (St), tissue maximum ratio (TMR) and off axis ratio (OAR) of these three SRS systems were measured using CC01 (Scanditronix/ Welhofer) and Pinpoint (PTW) cylindrical and Markus plane parallel ionization chambers as well as TLD and radiochromic film. Measurement results of CC01 and Pinpoint chambers were very close to each other which indicate that further reduction in volume and physical dimensions of cylindrical ionization chamber is not necessary for SRS/SRT dosimetry. Output factors of BrainLab and Radionics SRS cones were very close to each other while output factors of equivalent diameter mMLC field were different from SRS circular cones. TMR of the three SRS systems compared were very close to one another. OAR of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC were very close to each other, within 2%. However, OARs of BrainLab cone were found comparable to OARs of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC within maximum variation of 4%. In addition, user-measured similar data of other three mMLC X-Knives were compared with the mMLC X-Knife data measured in this work and found comparable. The concept of switching over to mMLC-based SRS/SRT is thus validated from dosimetric characteristics as well. PMID:21217914

  17. ACCELERATORS: Timing system of HIRFL-CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jin-Mei; Yuan, You-Jin; Qiao, Wei-Min; Jing, Lan; Zhang, Wei

    2009-05-01

    The national science project HIRFL-CSR has recently been officially accepted. As a cyclotron and synchrotron complex, it puts some particularly high demands on the control system. There are hundreds of pieces of equipment that need to be synchronized. An integrated timing control system is built to meet these demands. The output rate and the accuracy of the controller are 16 bit/μs. The accuracy of the time delay reaches 40 ns. The timing control system is based on a typical event distribution system, which adopts the new event generation and the distribution scheme. The scheme of the timing control system with innovation points, the architecture and the implemented method are presented in the paper.

  18. Small Accelerators for the Next Generation of BNCT Irradiation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Tanaka, K.; Bengua, G.; Hoshi, M.; Nakagawa, Y.

    2005-01-15

    The neutron irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using compact accelerators installed at hospitals was mainly investigated for the usage of direct neutrons from near-threshold {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, and moderated neutrons from 2.5 MeV {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reactions and other reactions. This kind of system can supply the medical doctors and patients with convenience to carry out BNCT in hospitals. The accelerator system would be regarded as the next-generation of BNCT in the near future.

  19. Emerging Standards with Application to Accelerator Safety System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, K.; Robertson, H.

    1997-05-01

    This paper addresses international standards which can be applied to the requirements for accelerator personnel safety systems. Particular emphasis is given to standards which specify requirements for safety interlock systems which employ programmable electronic subsystems. The work draws on methodologies currently under development for the medical, process control, and aerospace industries. The paper then goes on to show how these methods may be applied to accelerator safety system design. Detailed examples are drawn from the recently approved standard ``ISA-S84'' and the draft standard ``IEC1508''.

  20. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  1. Preliminary description of the ground test accelerator cryogenic cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of the Neutral Particle Beam Program supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office. The GTA is a full-sized test facility to evaluate the feasibility of using a negative ion accelerator to produce a neutral particle beam (NPB). The NPB would ultimately be used outside the earth's atmosphere as a target discriminator or as a directed energy weapon. The operation of the GTA at cryogenic temperature is advantageous for two reasons: first, the decrease of temperature caused a corresponding decrease in the rf heating of the copper in the various units of the accelerator, and second, at the lower temperature the decrease in the thermal expansion coefficient also provides greater thermal stability and consequently, better operating stability for the accelerator. This paper discusses the cryogenic cooling system needed to achieve these advantages. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. A new approach to modeling linear accelerator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-07-22

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators with specific applications to machines of interest to Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT). The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in accessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are to be modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were used to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Code (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version of ASM is described and examples of the modeling and analysis capabilities are illustrated. The results of an example study, for an accelerator concept typical of ADTT applications, is presented and sample displays from the computer interface are shown.

  3. A new approach to modeling linear accelerator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Jameson, Robert A.

    1995-09-15

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators with specific applications to machines of interest to Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT). The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in assessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are to be modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were used to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Code (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version of ASM is described and examples of the modeling and analysis capabilities are illustrated. The results of an example parameter trade study, for an accelerator concept typical of ADTT applications, is presented and sample displays from the computer interface are shown.

  4. dc power system for deuteron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Creek, K.O.; Liska, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility dc power system provides excitation current for all linac and High-Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) quadrupole and bending magnets, excitation for horizontal and vertical beam steering, and current-bypass shunts.

  5. Emerging standards with application to accelerator safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, K.L.; Robertson, H.P.

    1997-08-01

    This paper addresses international standards which can be applied to the requirements for accelerator personnel safety systems. Particular emphasis is given to standards which specify requirements for safety interlock systems which employ programmable electronic subsystems. The work draws on methodologies currently under development for the medical, process control, and nuclear industries.

  6. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements in the Acceleration Phase of Spherical Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Hu, S. X.; Hager, J. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-09-04

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of 3D broadband nonuniformities was measured using x-ray radiography in spherical plastic shells accelerated by laser light at an intensity of approx2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The 20- and 24-mum-thick spherical shells were imploded with 54 beams on the OMEGA laser system. The shells contained diagnostic openings for backlighter x rays used to image shell modulations. The measured shell trajectories and modulation RT growth were in fair agreement with 2D hydro simulations during the acceleration phase of the implosions with convergence ratios of up to approx2.2. Since the ignition designs rely on these simulations, improvements in the numerical codes will be implemented to achieve better agreement with experiments.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements in the Acceleration Phase of Spherical Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Hu, S.X.; Hager, J.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-09-10

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of 3D broadband nonuniformities was measured using x-ray radiography in spherical plastic shells accelerated by laser light at an intensity of ~2 x 10^14 W/cm^2. The 20- and 24-um-thick spherical shells were imploded with 54 beams on the OMEGA laser system. The shells contained diagnostic openings for backlighter x rays used to image shell modulations. The measured shell trajectories and modulation RT growth were in fair agreement with 2D hydro simulations during the acceleration phase of the implosions with convergence ratios of up to ~2:2. Since the ignition designs rely on these simulations, improvements in the numerical codes will be implemented to achieve better agreement with experiments.

  9. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-62, Launched 4 March 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The second mission of the United States Microgravity Payload on-board the STS-62 mission was supported with three accelerometer instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and two units of the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS). The March 4, 1994 launch was the fourth successful mission for OARE and the ninth successful mission for SAMS. The OARE instrument utilizes a sensor for very low frequency measurements below one Hertz. The accelerations in this frequency range are typically referred to as quasisteady accelerations. One of the SAMS units had two remote triaxial sensor heads mounted on the forward MPESS structure between two furnance experiments, MEPHISTO and AADSF. These triaxial heads had low-pass filter cut-off frequencies at 10 and 25 Hz. The other SAMS unit utilized three remote triaxial sensor heads. Two of the sensor heads were mounted on the aft MPESS structure between the two experiments IDGE and ZENO. These triaxial heads had low-pass filter cut-off frequencies at 10 and 25 Hz. The third sensor head was mounted on the thermostat housing inside the IDGE experiment container. This triaxial head had a low-pass filter cut-off frequency at 5 Hz. This report is prepared to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide to evaluating the acceleration environment during STS-62 and as a means of identifying areas which require further study. To achieve this purpose, various pieces of information are included, such as an overview of the STS-62 mission, a description of the accelerometer system flown on STS-62, some specific analysis of the accelerometer data in relation to the various mission activities, and an overview of the low-gravity environment during the entire mission. An evaluation form is included at the end of the report to solicit users' comments about the usefulness of this series of reports.

  10. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  11. Accelerated life ac conductivity measurements of CRT oxide cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, A. A.; Barratt, D. S.; Hassan, A. K.; Nabok, A.

    2006-07-01

    The ac conductivity measurements have been carried out for the activated Ba/SrO cathode with additional 5% Ni powder for every 100 h acceleration life time at the temperature around 1125 K. The ac conductivity was studied as a function of temperature in the range 300-1200 K after conversion and activation of the cathode at 1200 K for 1 h in two cathodes face to face closed configuration. The experimental results prove that the hopping conductivity dominate in the temperature range 625-770 K through the traps of the WO 3 associate with activation energy Ea = 0.87 eV, whereas from 500-625 K it is most likely to be through the traps of the Al 2O 3 with activation energy of Ea = 1.05 eV. The hopping conductivity at the low temperature range 300-500 K is based on Ni powder link with some Ba contaminants in the oxide layer stricture which indicates very low activation energy Ea = 0.06 eV.

  12. An Acceleration Measurement Capability on International Space Station Supporting Microgravity Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    The conditions present in low-earth-orbit have enabled various scientific investigations to be conducted. A fundamental reason that space is a useful environment for science is the presence of a decreased effect of gravity while in orbital free-fall. Science investigations are conducted to study phenomena occurring as a result of reductions in buoyancy forces and phenomena enabled as a result of the apparent lack of gravity. The science community requires knowledge of the environment in which their experiments are being conducted. A general purpose measurement system was developed in the 1980's to supply scientific investigators with data of the residual acceleration environment. The Space Acceleration Measurement System, or SAMS, has flown aboard the NASA shuttle fleet over fourteen times, successfully acquiring acceleration measurement data in support of microgravity science experiments. As NASA continues its development of the International Space Station and its associated research payloads, it once again becomes necessary to address the requirement to measure the residual acceleration in support of the planned scientific investigations. As a follow-on to the SAMS project, SAMS-2 was initiated to investigate the requirements and develop the measurement system to support the microgravity science payloads aboard the International Space Station. The characteristics of the payload complement to be supported by SAMS-2 and the different capabilities provided by the station requires a fresh look at the design implementation of a general purpose measurement system. Not only is there a requirement for measurements in support of numerous, potentially simultaneous experiments, but this support is required to be provided for at least ten years of on-orbit operation as compared to a ten to fourteen day mission on shuttle. These differences in fundamental requirements result in the design configuration of the space station-based SAMS-2 being significantly different than that

  13. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is seeking to reinvigorate the national space program and recapture the public s interest in human space exploration by developing missions to the Moon, near-earth asteroids, Lagrange points, Mars, and beyond. The would-be successor to the Space Shuttle, NASA s Constellation Program, planned to take humans back to the Moon by 2020, but due to budgetary constraints was cancelled in 2010 in search of a more "affordable, sustainable, and realistic" concept2. Following a number of studies, the much anticipated Space Launch System (SLS) was unveiled in September of 2011. The SLS core architecture consists of a cryogenic first stage with five Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and a cryogenic second stage using a new J-2X engine3. The baseline configuration employs two 5-segment solid rocket boosters to achieve a 70 metric ton payload capability, but a new, more capable booster system will be required to attain the goal of 130 metric tons to orbit. To this end, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center recently released a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) entitled "Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction." The increased emphasis on affordability is evident in the language used in the NRA, which is focused on risk reduction "leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS" and "enabling competition" to "enhance SLS affordability. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to perform an independent assessment of the elements that make up an affordable and realistic path forward for the SLS booster system, utilizing advanced design methods and technology evaluation techniques. The goal is to identify elements that will enable a more sustainable development program by exploring the trade space of heavy lift booster systems and focusing on affordability, operability, and reliability at the system and subsystem levels5. For this study

  14. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  15. Accelerator-Feasible N-Body Nonlinear Integrable System

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, V.; Nagaitsev, S.

    2014-12-23

    Nonlinear N-body integrable Hamiltonian systems, where N is an arbitrary number, attract the attention of mathematical physicists for the last several decades, following the discovery of some number of these systems. This paper presents a new integrable system, which can be realized in facilities such as particle accelerators. This feature makes it more attractive than many of the previous such systems with singular or unphysical forces.

  16. MANTRA: Measuring Neutron Capture Cross Sections in Actinides with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Collon, P.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Nusair, O.; Nair, C.; Paul, M.; Kondev, F.; Chen, J.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2013-10-01

    With rising global energy needs, there is substantial interest in nuclear energy research. To explore possibilities for advanced fuel cycles, better neutron cross section data are needed for the minor actinides. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAsmutation) project will improve these data by measuring integral (n, γ) cross sections. The cross sections will be extracted by measuring isotopic ratios in pure actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Lab, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry(AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). MANTRA presents a unique AMS challenge because of the goal to measure multiple isotopic ratios on a large number of samples. To meet these challenges, we have modified the AMS setup at ATLAS to include a laser ablation system for solid material injection into our ECR ion source. I will present work on the laser ablation system and modified source geometry, as well as preliminary measurements of unirradiated actinide samples at ATLAS. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  18. Effects of acceleration on gait measures in three horse gaits.

    PubMed

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Zarski, Lila; Aerts, Peter; Clayton, Hilary

    2015-05-01

    Animals switch gaits according to locomotor speed. In terrestrial locomotion, gaits have been defined according to footfall patterns or differences in center of mass (COM) motion, which characterizes mechanisms that are more general and more predictive than footfall patterns. This has generated different variables designed primarily to evaluate steady-speed locomotion, which is easier to standardize in laboratory conditions. However, in the ecology of an animal, steady-state conditions are rare and the ability to accelerate, decelerate and turn is essential. Currently, there are no data available that have tested whether COM variables can be used in accelerative or decelerative conditions. This study used a data set of kinematics and kinetics of horses using three gaits (walk, trot, canter) to evaluate the effects of acceleration (both positive and negative) on commonly used gait descriptors. The goal was to identify variables that distinguish between gaits both at steady state and during acceleration/deceleration. These variables will either be unaffected by acceleration or affected by it in a predictable way. Congruity, phase shift and COM velocity angle did not distinguish between gaits when the dataset included trials in unsteady conditions. Work (positive and negative) and energy recovery distinguished between gaits and showed a clear relationship with acceleration. Hodographs are interesting graphical representations to study COM mechanics, but they are descriptive rather than quantitative. Force angle, collision angle and collision fraction showed a U-shaped relationship with acceleration and seem promising tools for future research in unsteady conditions. PMID:25767145

  19. Design of a ram accelerator mass launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aarnio, Michael; Armerding, Calvin; Berschauer, Andrew; Christofferson, Erik; Clement, Paul; Gohd, Robin; Neely, Bret; Reed, David; Rodriguez, Carlos; Swanstrom, Fredrick

    1988-01-01

    The ram accelerator mass launch system has been proposed to greatly reduce the costs of placing acceleration-insensitive payloads into low earth orbit. The ram accelerator is a chemically propelled, impulsive mass launch system capable of efficiently accelerating relatively large masses from velocities of 0.7 km/sec to 10 km/sec. The principles of propulsion are based on those of a conventional supersonic air-breathing ramjet; however the device operates in a somewhat different manner. The payload carrying vehicle resembles the center-body of the ramjet and accelerates through a stationary tube which acts as the outer cowling. The tube is filled with premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixtures that burn in the vicinity of the vehicle's base, producing a thrust which accelerates the vehicle through the tube. This study examines the requirement for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500 km circular orbit with a minimum amount of on-board rocket propellant for orbital maneuvers. The goal is to achieve a 50 pct payload mass fraction. The proposed design requirements have several self-imposed constraints that define the vehicle and tube configurations. Structural considerations on the vehicle and tube wall dictate an upper acceleration limit of 1000 g's and a tube inside diameter of 1.0 m. In-tube propulsive requirements and vehicle structural constraints result in a vehicle diameter of 0.76 m, a total length of 7.5 m and a nose-cone half angle of 7 degrees. An ablating nose-cone constructed from carbon-carbon composite serves as the thermal protection mechanism for atmospheric transit.

  20. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the $600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  1. Thermal performance analysis and measurements of the prototype cryomodules of European XFEL accelerator - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Barbanotti, S.; Eschke, J.; Jensch, K.; Klos, R.; Maschmann, W.; Petersen, B.; Sawlanski, O.

    2014-11-01

    The European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), the research facility currently under construction in the Hamburg area, Germany, is based on a superconducting linear accelerator that brings electrons to almost the speed of light. The linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerating cryomodules (CMs) operating at the temperature of 2 K. The thermal performances of the accelerator CMs are a key element to determine the heat load budget, the required capacity and the cost of the XFEL refrigerating system and to guarantee its efficient operation. The measurement of the thermal performances of the CMs is also an important step in the qualification of the CMs during the series production. This paper describes the thermal performance analysis of the European XFEL prototype cryomodules. The analysis takes into account all the main contributors (multilayer insulation, current leads, power couplers, support posts, and cavities) to the static and dynamic heat loads at various cryogenic temperature levels. Existing empirical databases are reviewed and used to evaluate the heat transfer through the multilayer insulation and numerical simulations are developed to investigate the heat loads generated from the different CM components.

  2. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  3. Vacuum measurements of the K500 cyclotron accelerator chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Mallory, M.L.; Miller, P.S.; Kuchar, J.; Hudson, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the unique internal cryopumping system, the pressure in the K500 superconducting cyclotron was measured as a function of radius for various gas flow rates emanating from the internal PIG source. For the test, a nude ion gauge with vertical dimension less than 2.3 cm was built and mounted on the internal beam probe. The effect of magnetic field on the ion gauge reading was determined and a method of degaussing the cyclotron was devised. Data from the normal shielded ion gauge located approximately 6 m away from the median plane was correlated with the internal vacuum measurements.

  4. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from November 1995 to March 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including Orbiter missions and Russia's Mir space station. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) to support these science experiments by providing acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The LeRC Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project supports principal investigations of microgravity science experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1994, a SAMS unit was installed on the Mir space station. In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. Previous reports have summarized the SAMS data acquired during the period from September 1994 to November 1995. During the time period from November 1995 to March 1996, the primary SAMS-supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the requirements specified by the PCG Principal Investigator. Also included in this data are mission events of interest, such as the undocking of STS-74 from Mir (November 1995) and the docking of Atlantis (STS-76) to Mir in March 1996. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded in the interval from November 1995 to March 1996.

  5. Bioelectric Signal Measuring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama-Santana, A.; Pólo-Parada, L.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low noise measuring system based on interdigitated electrodes for sensing bioelectrical signals. The system registers differential voltage measurements in order of microvolts. The base noise during measurements was in nanovolts and thus, the sensing signals presented a very good signal to noise ratio. An excitation voltage of 1Vrms with 10 KHz frequency was applied to an interdigitated capacitive sensor without a material under test and to a mirror device simultaneously. The output signals of both devices was then subtracted in order to obtain an initial reference value near cero volts and reduce parasitic capacitances due to the electronics, wiring and system hardware as well. The response of the measuring system was characterized by monitoring temporal bioelectrical signals in real time of biological materials such as embryo chicken heart cells and bovine suprarenal gland cells.

  6. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Reynier, Yvan; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  7. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  8. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.

    1997-01-01

    A current measuring system comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device.

  9. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Olson, J.E.

    1997-09-09

    A current measuring system is disclosed comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device. 4 figs.

  10. Kaonic atoms measurements at the DAFNE accelerator: the SIDDHARTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu (Petrascu, C.; Corradi, G.; dUffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R. S.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wunschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-03-01

    Kaonic Hydrogen and Helium X-ray measurements play nowadays a fundamental role in testing the reliability of the Chiral Perturbation Theory as a realisation of the Quantum Chromodynamics at low energies. Dictated by both electromagnetic and strong interaction, X-ray transitions at lower energy levels of these complex bound systems offer indeed the unique opportunity to perform a threshold measurements of zero-energy meson-nucleon scattering. Nowadays the SIDDHARTA experiment at DAFNE collider is the only apparatus which can provide such kind of measurements with the high precision needed to disentangle different theoretical calculation scenarios. In this work we present the SIDDHARTA experiment performances and results, with a focus on the main topics of light kaonic atom physics.

  11. SYSTEMS TO ACCELERATE IN SITU STABILIZATION OF WASTE DEPOSITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ systems to accelerate the stabilization of waste deposits involve three essential elements: selection of a chemical or biological agent (reactant) which can react with and stabilize the waste, a method for delivery of the reactant to the deposit and a method for recovery ...

  12. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1993-06-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  13. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. ); Spulgis, I. )

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH[sub 2]) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH[sub 2] run tank containing an LH[sub 2]/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  14. Cryogenic cooling system for the Ground Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1994-12-31

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  15. TRIDAQ systems in HEP experiments at LHC accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagozdzińska, Agnieszka; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Zalewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes Trigger and Data Acquisition (TRIDAQ) systems of accelerator experiments for High Energy Physics. The background for physics research comprises assumptions of the Standard Model theory with basic extensions. On this basis, a structure of particle detector system is described, with emphasis on the following functional blocks: Front-End Electronics, Trigger and DAQ systems. The described solutions are used in the LHC experiments: ATLAS, ALICE, CMS and LHCb. They are also used in other accelerator experiments. Data storage and processing functionality is divided into two hardware systems: Trigger and Data Acquisition, that are dependent on each other. High input data rate impose relevant choices for the architecture and parameters of both systems. The key parameters include detailed system structure and its overall latency. Trigger structure is defined by the physics requirements and the storage capability of DAQ system. Both systems are designed to achieve the highest possible space and time resolution for particle detection. Trigger references are reviewed [1-43] as well as chosen accelerator research efforts origination in this country [44-83].

  16. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  17. Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.

  18. Digital capacitance measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The hardware phase of a digital capacitance measuring system is presented with the major emphasis placed on the electrical design and operation. Test results are included of the three units fabricated. The system's interface is applicable to existing requirements for the space shuttle vehicle.

  19. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  20. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for MSL-1: STS-83, Launched April 14, 1997; STS-94, Launched July 1, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Tschen, Peter; McPherson, Kevin; Nati, Maurizio; Reckart, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia was measured during the STS-83 and STS-94 flights of the Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) mission using four different accelerometer systems: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA), and the Quasi-Steady Acceleration Measurement (QSAM) system. All four accelerometer systems provided investigators with acceleration measurements downlinked in near-real-time. Data from each system was recorded for post-mission analysis. The OARE measured the Shuttle's acceleration with high resolution in the quasi-steady frequency regime below about 0.1 Hz. The SAMS provided investigators with higher frequency acceleration measurements up to 25 Hz. The QSAM and MMA systems provided investigators with quasi-steady and higher frequency (up to 100 Hz) acceleration measurements, respectively. The microgravity environment related to various Orbiter maneuvers, crew activities, and experiment operations as measured by the OARE and MMA is presented and interpreted in section 8 of this report.

  1. Measurement of Electro-Optic Shock and Electron Acceleration in a Strongly Cavitated Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, M. H.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D. F.; Ting, A.

    2010-09-03

    Conically emitted second harmonic radiation was observed when a relativistically intense, ultrashort laser pulse was focused into a jet of gas. This second harmonic electro-optic shock is the result of frequency mixing within the sheath of electrons surrounding a highly cavitated plasma region created by the ponderomotive force of the laser. Strong correlation between the second harmonic characteristics and electron acceleration has been observed.

  2. Measurement of electro-optic shock and electron acceleration in a strongly cavitated laser wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D; Gordon, D F; Ting, A

    2010-09-01

    Conically emitted second harmonic radiation was observed when a relativistically intense, ultrashort laser pulse was focused into a jet of gas. This second harmonic electro-optic shock is the result of frequency mixing within the sheath of electrons surrounding a highly cavitated plasma region created by the ponderomotive force of the laser. Strong correlation between the second harmonic characteristics and electron acceleration has been observed. PMID:20867524

  3. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from May 1997 to June 1998 (NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1999-01-01

    During NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7 (May 1997 to June 1998), about eight gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The data were recorded on twenty-seven optical disks which were returned to Earth on Orbiter missions STS-86, STS-89, and STS-91. During these increments, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support various microgravity experiments. This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity acceleration environment to which the experiments were exposed. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous Mir increment summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project.

  4. Stress Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center and Stress Photonics developed an infrared-based stress measurement system for use in nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures. Stress Photonics commercialized the technology in the DeltaTherm 1000 system, used to compare designs and detect cracks in structures, especially for aging aircraft and bridges. The system combines digital signal processing technology with a special infrared camera to provide instantaneous thermal images and live differential images.

  5. Measurement of Actinides in Environmental Samples at Micro-Becquerel Levels by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A; Knezovich, J P; Marchetti, A A; Hamilton, T F

    2002-09-03

    The need for ultra-sensitive actinide measurements continues to expand in the fields of environmental stewardship, nuclear isotope forensics, radiobioassay and environmental research. We have developed a heavy isotope accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS). The system was designed particularly for the measurement of actinide concentrations and isotopic ratios. A fast isotope switching capability has been incorporated in the system, allowing flexibility in isotope selection and for the quasi-continuous normalization to a reference isotope spike. Initially, our utilization of the system has concentrated on the measurement of Pu isotopes. Under current operating conditions, background levels equivalent to <10{sup 6} atoms are observed during routine {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu measurements. Measurements of samples containing 10{sup 13} {sup 238}U atoms demonstrate that the system provides a {sup 238}U rejection factor of >10{sup 7}. Recently, we have utilized the high dynamic range of the AMS system in measuring samples whose Pu contents ranged from <10{sup 6} (background) to >10{sup 11} Pu atoms. Measurements of known materials, combined with results from an externally organized intercomparison program, indicate that our {sup 239}Pu measurements are accurate and precise down to the {mu}Bq level ({approx}10{sup 6} atoms). The development of the heavy isotope system was undertaken with particular interest in the measurement of environmental samples, including soils, sediments, waters, air filters, tissue samples, and human urine. The high rejection of interferences, including molecular interferences, and low susceptibility to matrix components, provided by the AMS technique are of particular relevance for such complex samples. These two factors significantly reduce demands on sample preparation chemistry for Pu analyses, allowing relatively simple, cost-effective procedures

  6. Three dimensional finite element methods: Their role in the design of DC accelerator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2013-04-19

    High Voltage Engineering has designed, built and tested a 2 MV dual irradiation system that will be applied for radiation damage studies and ion beam material modification. The system consists of two independent accelerators which support simultaneous proton and electron irradiation (energy range 100 keV - 2 MeV) of target sizes of up to 300 Multiplication-Sign 300 mm{sup 2}. Three dimensional finite element methods were used in the design of various parts of the system. The electrostatic solver was used to quantify essential parameters of the solid-state power supply generating the DC high voltage. The magnetostatic solver and ray tracing were used to optimize the electron/ion beam transport. Close agreement between design and measurements of the accelerator characteristics as well as beam performance indicate the usefulness of three dimensional finite element methods during accelerator system design.

  7. Three dimensional finite element methods: Their role in the design of DC accelerator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2013-04-01

    High Voltage Engineering has designed, built and tested a 2 MV dual irradiation system that will be applied for radiation damage studies and ion beam material modification. The system consists of two independent accelerators which support simultaneous proton and electron irradiation (energy range 100 keV - 2 MeV) of target sizes of up to 300 × 300 mm2. Three dimensional finite element methods were used in the design of various parts of the system. The electrostatic solver was used to quantify essential parameters of the solid-state power supply generating the DC high voltage. The magnetostatic solver and ray tracing were used to optimize the electron/ion beam transport. Close agreement between design and measurements of the accelerator characteristics as well as beam performance indicate the usefulness of three dimensional finite element methods during accelerator system design.

  8. Concurrent validity of accelerations measured using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cole, Michael H; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W; Smeathers, James E; Kerr, Graham K

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s(-2)). Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: -0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s(-2)), whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: -0.16 to -0.02 vs. -0.07 to 0.07 m.s(-2)). The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments. PMID:24866262

  9. Concurrent Validity of Accelerations Measured Using a Tri-Axial Inertial Measurement Unit while Walking on Firm, Compliant and Uneven Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael H.; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K.; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W.; Smeathers, James E.; Kerr, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s−2). Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: −0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s−2), whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: −0.16 to −0.02 vs. −0.07 to 0.07 m.s−2). The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments. PMID:24866262

  10. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-95: Launched October 19, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    John H. Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS-95 mission. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) orbital Systems Test (HOST), an STS-95 payload, was an in-flight demonstration of HST components to be installed during the next HST servicing mission. One of the components under evaluation was the cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Based on concerns about vibrations from the operation of the NICMOS cryocooler affecting the overall HST line-of-sight requirements, the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free-Flyers (SAMS-FF) was employed to measure the vibratory environment of the STS-95 mission, including any effects introduced by the NICMOS cryocooler. The STS-95 mission represents the first STS mission supported by SAMS-FF. Utilizing a Control and Data Acquisition Unit (CDU) and two triaxial sensor heads (TSH) mounted on the HOST support structure in Discovery's cargo bay, the SAMS-FF and the HOST project were able to make vibratory measurements both on-board the vibration-isolated NICMOS cryocooler and off-board the cryocooler mounting plate. By comparing the SAMS-FF measured vibrations on-board and off-board the NICMOS cryocooler, HST engineers could assess the cryocooler g-jitter effects on the HST line-of-sight requirements. The acceleration records from both SAMS-FF accelerometers were analyzed and significant features of the microgravity environment are detailed in this report.

  11. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir From January to May 1997 (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine burn, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  12. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-79. Launched 16 Sep. 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Reckart, Timothy A.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) collected acceleration data in support of the Mechanics of Granular Materials experiment during the STS-79 Mir docking mission, September 1996. STS-79 was the first opportunity to record SAMS data on an Orbiter while it was docked to Mir. Crew exercise activities in the Atlantis middeck and the Mir base module are apparent in the data. The acceleration signals related to the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator Freezer had different characteristics when comparing the data recorded on Atlantis on STS-79 with the data recorded on Mir during STS-74. This is probably due, at least in part, to different transmission paths and SAMS sensor head mounting mechanisms. Data collected on Atlantis during the STS-79 docking indicate that accelerations due to vehicle and solar array structural modes from Mir transfer to Atlantis and that the structural modes of the Atlantis-Mir complex are different from those of either vehicle independently. A 0.18 Hz component of the SAMS data, present while the two vehicles were docked, was probably caused by the Mir solar arrays. Compared to Atlantis structural modes of about 3.9 and 4.9 Hz, the Atlantis-Mir complex has structural components of about 4.5 and 5.1 Hz. After docking, apparent structural modes appeared in the data at about 0.8 and 1.8 Hz. The appearance, disappearance, and change in the structural modes during the docking and undocking phases of the joint Atlantis-Mir operations indicates that the structural modes of the two spacecraft have an effect on the microgravity environment of each other. The transfer of structural and equipment related accelerations between vehicles is something that should be considered in the International Space Station era.

  13. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. Method A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. Results We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen’s overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). Conclusion A wireless accelerometer based ‘hot stroke’ monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability. PMID:23590690

  14. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  15. Vacuum Systems Consensus Guideline for Department of Energy Accelerator Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Casey,R.; Haas, E.; Hseuh, H-C.; Kane, S.; Lessard, E.; Sharma, S.; Collins, J.; Toter, W. F.; Olis, D. R.; Pushka, D. R.; Ladd, P.; Jobe, R. K.

    2008-09-09

    Vacuum vessels, including evacuated chambers and insulated jacketed dewars, can pose a potential hazard to equipment and personnel from collapse, rupture due to back-fill pressurization, or implosion due to vacuum window failure. It is therefore important to design and operate vacuum systems in accordance with applicable and sound engineering principles. 10 CFR 851 defines requirements for pressure systems that also apply to vacuum vessels subject to back-fill pressurization. Such vacuum vessels are potentially subject to the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII (hereafter referred to as the 'Code'). However, the scope of the Code excludes vessels with internal or external operating pressure that do not exceed 15 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). Therefore, the requirements of the Code do not apply to vacuum systems provided that adequate pressure relief assures that the maximum internal pressure within the vacuum vessel is limited to less than 15 psig from all credible pressure sources, including failure scenarios. Vacuum vessels that cannot be protected from pressurization exceeding 15 psig are subject to the requirements of the Code. 10 CFR 851, Appendix A, Part 4, Pressure Safety, Section C addresses vacuum system requirements for such cases as follows: (c) When national consensus codes are not applicable (because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc.), contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local code. Measures must include the following: (1) Design drawings, sketches, and calculations must be reviewed and approved by a qualified independent design professional (i.e., professional engineer). Documented organizational peer review is acceptable. (2) Qualified personnel must be used to perform examinations and

  16. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  17. Fabrication and Measurement of 12 GeV Prototype Quadrupoles at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tommy Hiatt, Mark Wiseman, Kenneth Baggett, J. Beck, Leigh Harwood, Joseph Meyers, Jeffrey Dail

    2009-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) currently has a maximum beam energy of 6 GeV. The 12 GeV Upgrade Project will double the existing energy and is currently scheduled for completion in 2014. This doubling of energy requires modifications to the beam transport system which includes the addition of several new magnet designs and modifications to many existing designs. Prototyping efforts have been concluded for two different designs of quadrupole magnets required for the upgrade. The design, fabrication and measurement will be discussed.

  18. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2014-01-15

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup −7} rad /√( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  19. A productivity measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, R.H.; Blain, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The system for measuring productivity of the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Drafting Group was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Productivity Measurement System, built on relational data base management software, provides up-to-date information on the productivity of the Drafting Group, the drafting units, and the individual Drafters. The system was developed using data collected in the Drafters Time and Activities Log and Task Baseline Agreement (TBA) that was input to the data base. Using these data, an average usage rate in hours per square foot of drawing, CAD and Manual, was established. This provided a benchmark for management reports that are depicted graphically for ease of trend analyses. In addition, the system provides each drafter an indicator as to where they stand in relation to their peers, and all of the information provided leads to more accurate drafting estimates. 11 figs.

  20. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.

  1. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  2. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  3. Compact Superconducting Radio-frequency Accelerators and Innovative RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swaapan; Milton, Stephen

    2015-04-10

    We will present several new technical and design breakthroughs that enable the creation of a new class of compact linear electron accelerators for industrial purposes. Use of Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities allow accelerators less than 1.5 M in length to create electron beams beyond 10 MeV and with average beam powers measured in 10’s of KW. These machines can have the capability to vary the output energy dynamically to produce brehmstrahlung x-rays of varying spectral coverage for applications such as rapid scanning of moving cargo for security purposes. Such compact accelerators will also be cost effective for many existing and new industrial applications. Examples include radiation crosslinking of plastics and rubbers, creation of pure materials with surface properties radically altered from the bulk, modification of bulk or surface optical properties of materials, sterilization of medical instruments animal solid or liquid waste, and destruction of organic compounds in industrial waste water effluents. Small enough to be located on a mobile platform, such accelerators will enable new remediation methods for chemical and biological spills and/or in-situ crosslinking of materials. We will describe one current design under development at Fermilab including plans for prototype and value-engineering to reduce costs. We will also describe development of new nano-structured field-emitter arrays as sources of electrons, new methods for fabricating and cooling superconducting RF cavities, and a new novel RF power source based on magnetrons with full phase and amplitude control.

  4. Energy Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neal; Auerbach, David; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decer, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon; Joshi, Chadrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-01-03

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC indicate trapping of plasma electrons. More charge came out of than went into the plasma. Most of this extra charge had energies at or below the 10 MeV level. In addition, there were trapped electron streaks that extended from a few GeV to tens of GeV, and there were mono-energetic trapped electron bunches with tens of GeV in energy.

  5. Waveband Analysis of Track Irregularities in High-Speed Railway from On-Board Acceleration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Seok; Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Young Guk; Kim, Seog Won; Park, Choonsoo

    This paper is focused on waveband analysis of the lateral and vertical track irregularities from the on-board acceleration measurement of in-service high-speed trains. The track irregularities play important roles to determine dynamic stability of vehicles and ride quality of passengers, so that their amplitude and wavelength should be monitored continuously and carefully. Measuring acceleration at the axle-box or bogie of the trains has been under consideration for low-cost implementation and robust to a harsh railway environment. To estimate the track irregularities, lateral and vertical vibration caused by the wheel/track interaction is measured by the axle-box and bogie mounted accelerometers of an in-service high-speed train. A Kalman filter is used to prevent unrealistic drifts in the estimation. By applying the waveband-pass and compensation filters to the estimated displacement, it is possible to estimate the track irregularities. A distance-wavelength representation is used to identify their waveband in an intuitive way. It is verified by comparing with a commercial track geometry measurement system. From their comparison, it confirms that the representation can produce a satisfactory result.

  6. Lessons learned on the Ground Test Accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When we initiated the control system design for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), we envisioned a system that would be flexible enough to handle the changing requirements of an experimental project. This control system would use a developers` toolkit to reduce the cost and time to develop applications for GTA, and through the use of open standards, the system would accommodate unforeseen requirements as they arose. Furthermore, we would attempt to demonstrate on GTA a level of automation far beyond that achieved by existing accelerator control systems. How well did we achieve these goals? What were the stumbling blocks to deploying the control system, and what assumptions did we make about requirements that turned out to be incorrect? In this paper we look at the process of developing a control system that evolved into what is now the ``Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System`` (EPICS). Also, we assess the impact of this system on the GTA project, as well as the impact of GTA on EPICS. The lessons learned on GTA will be valuable for future projects.

  7. Positron Injector Accelerator and RF System for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bowden, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Sheppard, J.C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-28

    Due to the extremely high energy deposition from positrons, electrons, photons and neutrons behind the positron target, and because a solenoid is required to focus the large emittance positron beam, the 1.3 GHz preaccelerator has to use normal conducting structures up to energy of 400 MeV. There are many challenges in the design of the normal-conducting portion of the ILC positron injector system such as obtaining high positron yield with required emittance, achieving adequate cooling with the high RF and particle loss heating, and sustaining high accelerator gradients during millisecond-long pulses in a strong magnetic field. Considering issues of feasibility, reliability and cost savings for the ILC, the proposed design for the positron injector contains both standing-wave (SW) and traveling-wave (TW) L-band accelerator structures. A short version of the new type of the SW section is under fabrication and testing. An updated status report is given. This paper also covers acceleration vs. deceleration for pre-accelerator sections, SW vs. TW structures, as well as longitudinal matching from target to linac and linac to damping ring.

  8. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  9. Classroom performance system use in an accelerated graduate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Corinne; Joiner Rogers, Glenda; Volker, Deborah; Ramberg, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Many students who enter accelerated nursing programs have not been exposed to the analysis, prediction, and decision-making skills needed by today's RN. To foster practice with complex concepts in the classroom and to give teachers immediate feedback about student in-class mastery of core material, use of an audience participation system within the classroom may be useful. This article reports the implementation of a classroom performance system and the results ofa program evaluation project designed to capture the system's impact on student and faculty satisfaction and student learning outcomes. Project results and implications for further work are presented. PMID:20182157

  10. Hardware-accelerated Components for Hybrid Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Gorton, Ian

    2008-10-31

    We present a study on the use of component technology for encapsulating platform-specific hardwareaccelerated algorithms on hybrid HPC systems. Our research shows that component technology can have significant benefits from a software engineering pointof- view to increase encapsulation, portability and reduce or eliminate platform dependence for hardwareaccelerated algorithms. As a demonstration of this concept, we discuss our experience in designing, implementing and integrating an FPGA-accelerated kernel for Polygraph, an application in computational proteomics.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry with a coupled tandem-linac system

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled system provides higher energies, which allows one to extend AMS to hitherto untouched mass regions. Another important argument is that the complexity, although bothersome for the operation, increases the selectivity of detecting a particular isotope. The higher-energy argument holds for any heavy-ion accelerator which is capable of delivering higher energy than a tandem. The present use of tandem-linac combinations for AMS, rather than cyclotrons, linacs or combinations of these machines, has mainly to do with the fact that this technique was almost exclusively developed around tandem accelerators. Therefore the tandem-linac combination is a natural extension to higher energies. The use of negative ions has some particular advantages in suppressing background from unwanted elements that do not form stable negative ions (e.g., N, Mg, Ar). On the other hand, this limits the detection of isotopes to elements which do form negative ions. For particular problems it may therefore be advantageous to use a positive-ion machine. What really matters most for choosing one or the other machine is to what extent the entire accelerator system can be operated in a truly quantiative way from the ion source to the detection system. 20 references, 4 figures.

  12. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Angelis, M. de; Prevedelli, M.

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  14. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  15. Microwave measurements of azimuthal asymmetries in accelerating fields of disk-loaded waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Deruyter, H.; Defa, W.

    1983-03-01

    This paper presents microwave measurements of azimuthal asymmetries in the accelerating fields of the SLAC disk-loaded waveguide. These field asymmetries lead to rf phase-dependent beam steering which can be detrimental to operation of linear accelerators in general and of the SLAC Linear Collider in particular.

  16. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  17. Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Sungchil; Kim, Sehwan; Chou, Pai H.

    2011-04-01

    Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate and the pressure change propagates through the pipeline. From the measurement of pipe vibration the rupture can be detected. In this paper, the field test results and observations are provided for implementing next generation of SCADA system for pipeline rupture detection. Two field tests were performed on real buried plastic and metal pipelines for rupture detection. The rupture was simulated by introducing sudden water pressure drop caused by water blow-off and valve control. The measured acceleration data at the pipe surfaces were analyzed in both time and frequency domain. In time domain, the sudden narrow increase of acceleration amplitude was used as an indication of rupture event. For the frequency domain analysis, correlation function and the short time Fourier Transform technique were adopted to trace the dominant frequency shift. The success of rupture detection was found to be dependent on several factors. From the frequency analysis, the dominant frequency of metal water pipe was shifted by the water pressure drop, however, it was hard to identify from the plastic pipeline. Also the influence of existing facility such as airvac on pipe vibrations was observed. Finally, several critical lessons learned in the viewpoint of field measurement are discussed in this paper.

  18. Measurement of time-dependent external moments and forces by the sum of weighted accelerations technique

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Coleman, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Force identification using a sum of weighted accelerations technique (SWAT) is developed for measurement of externally applied force and moment which dynamically excite a structural system. Mode shape coefficients, from a free-body modal characterization, are used to determine two sets of weighting factors which, when used in the SWAT, eliminate the free-body vibrational response. One set of weighting factors, having the units of mass, are used in the SWAT measurement of the resultant force vector. The second set of weighting factors, having the units of first-moment-of-mass, are calculated to measure the moment acting at the center of mass of the external force with a similar sum of weighted accelerations. The theory for determining the force and moment vectors is developed in this paper. We illustrate the technique through the analysis of a simple beam and a rectangular plate. We then demonstrate the analytical predictions with the laboratory testing of softly suspended structures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  20. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  1. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  2. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  3. Wind measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Huffaker, R. M.; Dahm, W. K.; Thomson, J. A. L.; Lawrence, T. R.; Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A system for remotely measuring vertical and horizontal winds present in discrete volumes of air at selected locations above the ground is described. A laser beam is optically focused in range by a telescope, and the output beam is conically scanned at an angle about a vertical axis. The backscatter, or reflected light, from the ambient particulates in a volume of air, the focal volume, is detected for shifts in wavelength, and from these, horizontal and vertical wind components are computed.

  4. Contour measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.; Deaton, E. T., Jr.; Campbell, R. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A measurement system for measuring the departures from a straight line of discrete track sections of a track along a coal face in a mine employing a vehicle having a pair of spaced wheel assemblies which align with the track is presented. A reference arm pivotally connects between the wheel assemblies, and there is indicating means for measuring the angle of pivot between the arm and each of the wheel assemblies. The length of the device is less than the length of a track section, and thus when one of the wheel assemblies is on one track section and one is on an adjoining track section, the sum of the indicated angles will be indicative of the angle between track sections. Thus, from the length of a track section and angle, the departure of each track section from the line may be calculated.

  5. System for Measuring Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNichol, Randal S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system has been developed for detecting the level of a liquid in a tank wherein a capacitor positioned in the tank has spaced plates which are positioned such that the dielectric between the plates will be either air or the liquid, depending on the depth of the liquid in the tank. An oscillator supplies a sine wave current to the capacitor and a coaxial cable connects the capacitor to a measuring circuit outside the tank. If the cable is very long or the capacitance to be measured is low, the capacitance inherent in the coaxial cable will prevent an accurate reading. To avoid this problem, an inductor is connected across the cable to form with the capacitance of the cable a parallel resonant circuit. The impedance of the parallel resonant circuit is infinite, so that attenuation of the measurement signal by the stray cable capacitance is avoided.

  6. Quick Look Report of Acceleration Measurements on Mir Space Station During Mir-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments with microgravity acceleration measurements. In the past, SAMS was flown exclusively on the NASA Orbiters. MSAD is currently sponsoring science experiments participating in the Shuttle-Mir Science Program in cooperation with the Russians on the Mir space station. Included in the complement of MSAD experiments and equipment is a SAMS unit installed on the Mir space station. On 25 August 1994, the SAMS unit was launched on a Russia Progress vehicle to the Mir space station. The SAMS unit will support science experiments from the U.S. and Russia in a manner similar to the Orbiter missions by measuring the microgravity environments during the experiment operations. In October 1994, the SAMS unit recorded data on Mir for over fifty-three hours in seven different time periods to survey possible locations for future experiments. This report presents a quick look at the data and the microgravity environment during the time periods in which SAMS data were acquired. The Mir acceleration data were examined to ascertain gross attributes of the data. This report does not present an exhaustive examination of all possible activities due to the short time available to prepare this quick look report and due to the absence of complete timeline information during the SAMS recording time periods. Appendices A, B and C provide plots of the SAMS data for an overview of the microgravity environment at the times that data were recorded. Appendix D describes the procedures to access SAMS data by file transfer protocol (ftp) utilizing the internet. Appendix E contains a user comment sheet.

  7. Cryogenic system for the MYRRHA superconducting linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Junquera, Tomas; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre; Romão, Luis Medeiros; Vandeplassche, Dirk

    2014-01-29

    SCK⋅CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, is designing MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor (80 MW{sub th}), conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting (SC) proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). From 17 MeV onward, the SC accelerator will consist of 48 β=0.36 spoke-loaded cavities (352 MHz), 34 β=0.47 elliptical cavities (704 MHz) and 60 β=0.65 elliptical cavities (704 MHz). We present an analysis of the thermal loads and of the optimal operating temperature of the cryogenic system. In particular, the low operating frequency of spoke cavities makes their operation in CW mode possible both at 4.2 K or at 2 K. Our analysis outlines the main factors that determine at what temperature the spoke cavities should be operated. We then present different cryogenic fluid distribution schemes, important characteristics (storage, transfer line, etc.) and the main challenges offered by MYRRHA in terms of cryogenics.

  8. Numerical simulation of reacting flow in a thermally choked ram accelerator projectile launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.

    1991-06-01

    CFD solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations are presently applied to a ram-accelerator projectile launcher's reacting and nonreacting turbulent flowfields. The gases in question are a hydrocarbon such as CH4, an oxidizer such as O2, and an inert gas such as N2. Numerical simulations are presented which highlight in-bore flowfield details and allow comparisons with measured launch tube wall pressures and projectile thrust as a function of velocity. The computation results thus obtained are used to ascertain the operational feasibility of a proposed 120-mm-bore ram accelerator system.

  9. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30-cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of two- and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation has been performed. Two-grid translation tests show that overcompensation of the 30-cm thruster SHAG (Small Hole Accelerator Grid) leads to a premature impingement limit. By better matching the SHAG grid set spacing to the 30-cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30-cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  10. Hollow cathode and ion accelerator system for current ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, G.

    1981-01-01

    A small self-heating hollow cathode has been designed and tested which uses a novel flowing plasma starting concept to eliminate the need for cathode heating elements and low work function insert materials. In a magnetic field free ion source, this cathode has reliably and repeatedly produced arc currents, using argon, of 100 ampere (the power supply limit) at arc voltages of 22 volts. The cathode operates with a high gas stagnation pressure and plasma density to produce field enhanced thermionic emission from the electron emitting surface, a 0.02mm thick rolled tungsten foil cylinder, without appreciable erosion of this surface. Possible applications of larger versions of this hollow cathode for use in neutral beam injector ion sources are discussed. An ion accelerator system has also been designed and tested which combines a unique arrangement of multiple hole and slit apertures to amplify the extracted ion current density by a factor of four during the ion acceleration process.

  11. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CORONAL ACCELERATION REGION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Saem; Hudson, H. S.; Glesener, L.; Lin, R. P.; White, S. M.; Masuda, S.; Wuelser, J.-P.

    2010-05-10

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) are used to investigate coronal hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the partially disk-occulted solar flare of 2007 December 31. The STEREO mission provides EUV images of the flare site at different viewing angles, establishing a two-ribbon flare geometry and occultation heights of the RHESSI and NoRH observations of {approx}16 Mm and {approx}25 Mm, respectively. Despite the occultation, intense hard X-ray emission up to {approx}80 keV occurs during the impulsive phase from a coronal source that is also seen in microwaves. The hard X-ray and microwave source during the impulsive phase is located {approx}6 Mm above thermal flare loops seen later at the soft X-ray peak time, similar in location to the above-the-loop-top source in the Masuda flare. A single non-thermal electron population with a power-law distribution (with spectral index of {approx}3.7 from {approx}16 keV up to the MeV range) radiating in both bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron emission can explain the observed hard X-ray and microwave spectrum, respectively. This clearly establishes the non-thermal nature of the above-the-loop-top source. The large hard X-ray intensity requires a very large number (>5 x 10{sup 35} above 16 keV for the derived upper limit of the ambient density of {approx}8 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) of suprathermal electrons to be present in this above-the-loop-top source. This is of the same order of magnitude as the number of ambient thermal electrons. We show that collisional losses of these accelerated electrons would heat all ambient electrons to superhot temperatures (tens of keV) within seconds. Hence, the standard scenario, with hard X-rays produced by a beam comprising the tail of a dominant thermal core plasma, does not work. Instead, all electrons in the above-the-loop-top source seem to be accelerated, suggesting that the above-the-loop-top source is itself the

  12. Methodology for the calibration of and data acquisition with a six-degree-of-freedom acceleration measurement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harvey; Plank, Gordon; Weinstock, Herbert; Coltman, Michael

    1989-06-01

    Described here is a methodology for calibrating and gathering data with a six-degree-of-freedom acceleration measurement device that is intended to measure head acceleration of anthropomorphic dummies and human volunteers in automotive crash testing and head impact trauma studies. Error models (system equations) were developed for systems using six accelerometers in a coplanar (3-2-1) configuration, nine accelerometers in a coplanar (3-3-3) configuration and nine accelerometers in a non-coplanar (3-2-2-2) configuration and the accuracy and stability of these systems were compared. The model was verified under various input and computational conditions. Results of parametric sensitivity analyses which included parameters such as system geometry, coordinate system location, data sample rate and accelerometer cross axis sensitivities are presented. Recommendations to optimize data collection and reduction are given. Complete source listings of all of the software developed are presented.

  13. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  14. Reliable-linac design for accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,

    2002-01-01

    Accelerator reliability corresponding to a very low frequency of beam interrupts is an important new accelerator requirement for accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems. In this paper we review typical accelerator-reliability requirements and discuss possible methods for meeting these goals with superconducting proton-linac technology.

  15. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  16. Status and Future Developments in Large Accelerator Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. White

    2006-10-31

    Over the years, accelerator control systems have evolved from small hardwired systems to complex computer controlled systems with many types of graphical user interfaces and electronic data processing. Today's control systems often include multiple software layers, hundreds of distributed processors, and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. While it is clear that the next generation of accelerators will require much bigger control systems, they will also need better systems. Advances in technology will be needed to ensure the network bandwidth and CPU power can provide reasonable update rates and support the requisite timing systems. Beyond the scaling problem, next generation systems face additional challenges due to growing cyber security threats and the likelihood that some degree of remote development and operation will be required. With a large number of components, the need for high reliability increases and commercial solutions can play a key role towards this goal. Future control systems will operate more complex machines and need to present a well integrated, interoperable set of tools with a high degree of automation. Consistency of data presentation and exception handling will contribute to efficient operations. From the development perspective, engineers will need to provide integrated data management in the beginning of the project and build adaptive software components around a central data repository. This will make the system maintainable and ensure consistency throughout the inevitable changes during the machine lifetime. Additionally, such a large project will require professional project management and disciplined use of well-defined engineering processes. Distributed project teams will make the use of standards, formal requirements and design and configuration control vital. Success in building the control system of the future may hinge on how well we integrate commercial components and learn from best practices used in other industries.

  17. Modeling of accelerator systems and experimental verification of Quarter-Wave Resonator steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, Carla

    beam pipe, which has the potential to induce steering on the beam. These additional complications make this a significant device to study in order to optimize the accelerator's overall performance. The NSCL and ReA, along with FRIB, are first introduced to provide background and motivate the central modeling objectives presented throughout this work. In the next chapter, underlying beam physics principles are then discussed, as they form the basis from which modeling methods are derived. The modeling methods presented include multi-particle tracking and beam envelope matrix transport. The following chapter investigates modeling elements in more detail, including quadrupoles, solenoids, and coaxial accelerating cavities. Assemblies of accelerator elements, or lattices, have been modeled as well, and a method for modeling multiple charge state transport using linear matrix methods is also given. Finally, an experiment studying beam steering induced by QWR resonators is presented, the first systematic experimental investigation of this effect. As mentioned earlier, characterization of this steering on beam properties is important for accurate modeling of the beam transport through the linac. The measurement technique devised at ReA investigates the effect's dependence on the beam's vertical offset within the cavity, the cavity amplitude, and the beam energy upon entrance into the cavity. The results from this experiment agree well with the analytical predictions based on geometrical parameters calculated from on-axis field profiles. The incorporation of this effect into modeling codes has the potential to speed up complex accelerator operations and tuning procedures in systems using QWRs.

  18. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  19. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  20. Phase-Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System developed and used at Langley Research Center measures phase between two signals of same frequency or between two signals, one of which is harmonic multiple of other. Simple and inexpensive device combines digital and analog components to give accurate phase measurements. One signal at frequency f fed to pulse shaper, produces negative pulse at time t4. Pulse applied to control input of sample-and-hold module 1. Second signal, at frequency nf, fed to zero-crossover amplifier, producing square wave at time t. Signal drives first one-shot producing narrow negative pulse at t1. Signal then drives second one-shot producing narrow positive pulse at time t2. This pulse used to turn on solid-state switch and reset integrator circuit to zero.

  1. High gradient dielectric wakefield device measurements at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Simpson, J.

    1997-10-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is a facility designed to investigate high gradient wakefield acceleration techniques. Wakefields are excited using a drive beam produced by a 14 MeV high current photoinjector-based linac. A second photocathode gun generates a 4 MeV witness beam which is used as a probe of the wakefields in the device under test. The delay of the witness bunch with respect to the drive bunch can be continuously varied from -100 ps to >1 ns. The drive and witness bunches propagate along collinear or parallel trajectories through the test section. A dipole spectrometer is then used to measure the energy change of the witness beam. The complete wakefield measurement system has been commissioned and wakefield experiments using dielectric structures are underway. Initial experiments have focused on collinear wakefield device geometries where the drive and witness bunches traverse the same structure. For attaining very high gradients we will construct and study step-up transformer structures in which the rf pulse generated by the drive beam is compressed transversely and longitudinally.

  2. Angular measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A system for the measurement of shaft angles is disclosed wherein a synchro resolver is sequentially pulsed, and alternately, a sine and then a cosine representative voltage output of it are sampled. Two like type, sine or cosine, succeeding outputs (V sub S1, V sub S2) are averaged and algebraically related to the opposite type output pulse (V sub c) occurring between the averaged pulses to provide a precise indication of the angle of a shaft coupled to the resolver at the instant of the occurrence of the intermediately occurring pulse (V sub c).

  3. Angular measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1986-06-01

    A system for the measurement of shaft angles is disclosed wherein a synchro resolver is sequentially pulsed, and alternately, a sine and then a cosine representative voltage output of it are sampled. Two like type, sine or cosine, succeeding outputs (V sub S1, V sub S2) are averaged and algebraically related to the opposite type output pulse (V sub c) occurring between the averaged pulses to provide a precise indication of the angle of a shaft coupled to the resolver at the instant of the occurrence of the intermediately occurring pulse (V sub c).

  4. SUMP MEASURING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; Athneal Marzolf, A; Casandra Robinson, C; James Fiscus, J; Daniel Krementz, D; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    The process sumps in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS) collect leaks from process tanks and jumpers. To prevent build-up of fissile material the sumps are frequently flushed which generates liquid waste and is prone to human error. The development of inserts filled with a neutron poison will allow a reduction in the frequency of flushing. Due to concrete deterioration and deformation of the sump liners the current dimensions of the sumps are unknown. Knowledge of these dimensions is necessary for development of the inserts. To solve this problem a remote Sump Measurement System was designed, fabricated, and tested to aid development of the sump inserts.

  5. Accelerator-Driven Systems for Nuclear Waste Transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Charles D.

    The renewed interest since 1990 in accelerator-driven subcritical systems for transmutation of commercial nuclear waste has evolved to focus on the issue of whether fast- or thermal-spectrum systems offer greater promise. This review addresses the issue by comparing the performance of the more completely developed thermal- and fast-spectrum designs. Substantial design information is included to allow an assessment of the viability of the systems compared. The performance criteria considered most important are (a) the rapidity of reduction of the current inventory of plutonium and minor actinide from commercial spent fuel, (b) the cost, and (c) the complexity. The liquid-fueled thermal spectrum appears to offer major advantages over the solid-fueled fast-spectrum system, making waste reduction possible with about half the capital requirement on a substantially shorter time scale and with smaller separations requirements.

  6. Preparing accelerator systems for the RHIC sextant commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction is progressing steadily towards completion in 1999 when beams will circulate in both collider rings. One of the major tests of the RHIC project was the commissioning of the first sextant with gold ion beams in early 1997. This is a report on preparation of the RHIC accelerator systems for the first sextant test. It includes beam position monitors, timing, injection correction through the magnetic septum and kickers, current transformers, flags and the ionization beam profile monitors, beam loss monitors, beam and quench permit link system, power supply controls, and the configuration database system. The software and hardware development and coordination of the different systems before commissioning were regularly checked during bi-weekly, and (later) weekly, progress report meetings.

  7. Preparing Accelerator Systems for the RHIC Sextant Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Clifford, T.; Connoly, R.; Fischer, W.; Harrison, M.; Mackay, W.; Olsen, B.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trahern, C.; Witkover, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction is progressing steadily towards the beginning of the 1999 when beams will first be circulated in both collider rings. One of the major tests of the RHIC project is the commissioning of the first sextant with gold ion beams. This is a report on the preparation of the RHIC accelerator systems during the first sextant test, including beam position monitors, timing, injection correction through the magnetic septum and kickers, current transformers, ``flags'' and the ionization beam profile monitors, beam loss monitors, beam and quench permit link system, power supply controls, and the CYBASE data base system. The software and hardware development and coordination of the different systems before commissioning were regularly checked during bi-weekly, and (later) weekly, progress report meetings.

  8. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  9. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safer, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power.

  10. Acceleration Measurement and Characterization in Support of the USMP-4 Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, M. J. B.; Hrovat, K.; McPherson, K.; DeLombard, R.; Reckart, T.

    1999-01-01

    One common characteristic of the USMP-4 experiments is that various effects of gravity make it difficult, if not impossible, to achieve usable results when performing the experiments on Earth's surface. Therefore, the investigators took advantage of the microgravity environment afforded by being in low-Earth orbit to perform their research. Interpretation of the experiment results both during the mission and upon post-mission analyses of data and samples required an understanding of the microgravity environment in which the experiments were conducted. To achieve that understanding, data were collected using the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and two Space Acceleration Measurement Systems (SAMS). Data from those systems, combined with an assessment of mission and experiment activities, were used to characterize the microgravity environment that existed on Columbia during the mission. The text herein gives details about some characteristics of the environment that were noted during the mission and during post-mission data analysis. The disturbances studied include the Ku-band antenna 17 Hz dither; the effect of changing the Orbiter attitude deadband limits; the effects of different bicycle ergometer configurations; and the effect of IDGE (Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment) experiment fans and SAMS computer hard drives. Additional information about the microgravity environment is provided. Supplementary data plots representing the environment throughout the majority of the mission are available at the Uniform Resource Locator (URL). Data files for both SAMS and OARE are accessible via anonymous file transfer protocol from the file server.

  11. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Xu, Fengyu; Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiangchen; Chen, Anbin; Wei, Xiaotao; Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu

    2014-11-01

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  12. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  13. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  14. A measurement of actinide neutron transmutations with accelerator mass spectrometry in order to infer neutron capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, William K.

    Improved neutron capture cross section data for transuranic and minor actinides are essential for assessing possibilities for next generation reactors and advanced fuel cycles. The Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutation (MANTRA) project aims to make a comprehensive set of energy integrated neutron capture cross section measurements for all relevant isotopes from Th to Cf. The ability to extract these cross sections relies on the use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to analyze isotopic concentrations in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The AMS measurements were performed at the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) and required a number of key technical developments to the ion source, accelerator, and detector setup. In particular, a laser ablation material injection system was developed at the electron cyclotron resonance ion source. This system provides a more effective method to produce ion beams from samples containing only 1% actinide material and offers some benefits for reducing cross talk in the source. A series of four actinide measurements are described in this dissertation. These measurements represent the most substantial AMS work attempted at ATLAS and the first results of the MANTRA project. Isotopic ratios for one and two neutron captures were measured in each sample with total uncertainties around 10%. These results can be combined with a MCNP model for the neutron fluence to infer actinide neutron capture cross sections.

  15. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  16. Optical Measurements of Dense Hypervelocity Plasmoids from Coaxial and Railgun Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Brockington, Samuel; Witherspoon, Douglas; Elton, Ray

    2009-11-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, momentum injection/rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. We present measurements taken on the plasmoids produced by a half-scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, a full scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, and a novel minirailgun accelerator. The data presented includes spectroscopic measurements of velocity and density, two point interferometric measurements of line integrated density and velocity, and fast framing camera imaging. Results from these measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight measurements taken using photodiodes, as well as total plasmoid momentum measurements taken using a ballistic pendulum technique. Plasma density is greater than 5 x10^15 cm-3, and velocities range up to 100 km/s, with a small component in some cases exceeding 120 km/s.

  17. Yeast dynamic metabolic flux measurement in nutrient-rich media by HPLC and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Benjamin J; Navid, Ali; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Bench, Graham

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic flux, the flow of metabolites through networks of enzymes, represents the dynamic productive output of cells. Improved understanding of intracellular metabolic fluxes will enable targeted manipulation of metabolic pathways of medical and industrial importance to a greater degree than is currently possible. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach to modeling metabolic fluxes, but its utility is limited by a lack of experimental measurements. Incorporation of experimentally measured fluxes as system constraints will significantly improve the overall accuracy of FBA. We applied a novel, two-tiered approach in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure nutrient consumption rates (extracellular fluxes) and a targeted intracellular flux using a (14)C-labeled precursor with HPLC separation and flux quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The use of AMS to trace the intracellular fate of (14)C-glutamine allowed the calculation of intracellular metabolic flux through this pathway, with glutathione as the metabolic end point. Measured flux values provided global constraints for the yeast FBA model which reduced model uncertainty by more than 20%, proving the importance of additional constraints in improving the accuracy of model predictions and demonstrating the use of AMS to measure intracellular metabolic fluxes. Our results highlight the need to use intracellular fluxes to constrain the models. We show that inclusion of just one such measurement alone can reduce the average variability of model predicted fluxes by 10%. PMID:21062031

  18. ACCELERATORS: A GUI tool for beta function measurement using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Ling; Tian, Shun-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Cheng; Liu, Gui-Min

    2009-04-01

    The beta function measurement is used to detect the shift in the betatron tune as the strength of an individual quadrupole magnet is varied. A GUI (graphic user interface) tool for the beta function measurement is developed using the MATLAB program language in the Linux environment, which facilitates the commissioning of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring. In this paper, we describe the design of the application and give some measuring results and discussions about the definition of the measurement. The program has been optimized to solve some restrictions of the AT tracking code. After the correction with LOCO (linear optics from closed orbits), the horizontal and the vertical root mean square values (rms values) can be reduced to 0.12 and 0.10.

  19. Rim inertial measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.; Anderson, W. W.; Phillips, W. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The invention includes an angular momentum control device (AMCD) having a rim and several magnetic bearing stations. The AMCD is in a strapped down position on a spacecraft. Each magnetic bearing station comprises means, including an axial position sensor, for controlling the position of the rim in the axial direction; and means, including a radial position sensor, for controlling the position of the rim in the radial direction. A first computer receives the signals from all the axial position sensors and computes the angular rates about first and second mutually perpendicular axes in the plane of the rim and computes the linear acceleration along a third axis perpendicular to the first and second axes. A second computer receives the signals from all the radial position sensors and computes the linear accelerations along the first and second axes.

  20. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  1. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  2. Calorimetric measurement of afterheat in target materials for the accelerator production of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Zucker, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The estimate of afterheat in a spallation target of lead (Pb) or tungsten (W), by calorimetry, is the purpose of this experiment in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). Such measurements are needed to confirm code calculations, these being the only practical way of gaining this type of information in a form suitable to aid the design of the APT machine. Knowledge of the magnitude and duration of afterheat resulting from decay of activation products produced by proton bombardment of the target is necessary to quantify APT safety assumptions, to design target cooling and safety systems, and to reduce technical risk. Direct calorimetric measurement of the afterheat for the appropriate incident proton energies is more reliable than the available alternative, which is indirect, based on data from gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. The basic concept, a direct measurement of decay afterheat which bypasses the laborious classical way of determining this quantity, has been demonstrated to work. The gamma-ray energy given off by the decay products produced in the activation of lead or tungsten with high-energy protons apparently does represent a significant fraction of the total decay energy. A calorimeter designed for measurement of isotopes decaying by alpha emission must be modified to reduce energy lost with escaping gamma rays. Replacement of the aluminum liner with a tungsten liner in the SSC measurement chamber resulted in a 270% increase in measured heat, proving that the energy loss in the earlier (1992) measurements was significant. Gamma-ray measurements are needed to confirm the gamma-ray absorption calculations for the calorimeter to determine the correction for loss of heat due to transmission of high-energy gamma rays through the calorimeter walls. The experiments at BLIP have shown that calorimetry can be a useful tool in measuring the afterheat in APT target materials.

  3. A Nuclear-Powered Laser-Accelerated Plasma Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments at the University of Michigan and other laboratories throughout the world have demonstrated that ultrafast (very short pulse length) lasers can accelerate charged particles to relativistic speeds. The terrawatt laser at the University of Michigan has generated a beam of protons containing more than 1010 particles at a mean energy of over one Mev while the petawatt laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced proton beams containing more than 1014 particles with maximum energy of 58 Mev and a mean energy of about 6 Mev. Using the latter data as a basis for a present-day LAPPS (Laser Accelerated Plasma Propulsion System) propulsion device we show that it can produce a specific impulse of several million seconds albeit at a fraction of a Newton of thrust. We show that if the thrust can be increased to a modest 25 Newtons a fly-by robotic interstellar mission to 10,000 AU can be achieved in about 26 years, while a round trip to Mars will be accomplished in about 6 months. In both instances a one MWe nuclear power system with a mass of about 5 MT will be needed to drive the laser, and the recently announced NASA's Nuclear Space Initiative should be able to address such reactors in the near future.

  4. Measurement of Gravitational Acceleration Using a Computer Microphone Port

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khairurrijal; Eko Widiatmoko; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Kurniasih, Neny

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure the swing period of a simple pendulum automatically. The pendulum position is converted into a signal frequency by employing a simple electronic circuit that detects the intensity of infrared light reflected by the pendulum. The signal produced by the electronic circuit is sent to the microphone port and…

  5. Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for fluid measurements which may be utilized to determine mass flow rates such as instantaneous mass flow of a fluid stream. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention may be utilized to compare an input mass flow to an output mass flow of a drilling fluid circulation stream. In one embodiment, a fluid flow rate is determined by utilizing a microwave detector in combination with an acoustic sensor. The acoustic signal is utilized to eliminate 2pi phase ambiguities in a reflected microwave signal. In another embodiment, a fluid flow rate may be determined by detecting a phase shift of an acoustic signal across two different predetermined transmission paths. A fluid density may be determined by detecting a calibrated phase shift of an acoustic signal through the fluid. In another embodiment, a second acoustic signal may be transmitted through the fluid to define a particular 2pi phase range which defines the phase shift. The present invention may comprise multiple transmitters/receivers operating at different frequencies to measure instantaneous fuel levels of cryogenic fuels within containers positioned in zero or near zero gravity environments. In one embodiment, a moveable flexible collar of transmitter/receivers may be utilized to determine inhomogenuities within solid rocket fuel tubes.

  6. Optics measurement and correction during acceleration with beta-squeeze in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2015-05-03

    In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has only taken place at injection and at final energy, with interpolation of corrections partially into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats that, if corrected, could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoiding the high-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. We recently demonstrated successful beam optics corrections during acceleration at RHIC. We verified conclusively the superior control of the beam realized via these corrections

  7. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  8. Numerical design and model measurements for a 1.3 GHz microtron accelerating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeven, W. J. G. M.; Theeuwen, M. E. H. J.; Knoben, M. H. M.; Moerdijk, A. J.; Botman, J. I. M.; van der Heide, J. A.; Timmermans, C. J.; Hagedoorn, H. L.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the free electron laser project TEUFEL, a 25 MeV racetrack microtron is under construction at the Eindhoven University. The accelerating cavity of this microtron is a standing wave on axis coupled structure. It consists of three accelerating cells and two coupling cells. Numerical field calculations for this cavity were done with the computer codes SUPERFISH, URMEL-T and MAFIA. Not only the accelerating modes but also the dangerous beam breakup modes were calculated with MAFIA. An aluminium, scale 1:1 model of the structure was made in order to measure various cavity properties. Field profiles were measured with the perturbation ball method. An equivalent LC-circuit simulation of the accelerating structure was made, which serves as a model for the interpretation of the results.

  9. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, J. P.; Lebrat, J. F.; Soule, R.; Martini, M.; Jacqmin, R.; Imel, G. R.; Salvatores, M.

    1999-06-10

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties.

  10. Accelerated measurement of perikymata by an optical instrument

    PubMed Central

    Elhechmi, Imen; Braga, José; Dasgupta, Gautam; Gharbi, Tijani

    2013-01-01

    The proposed device considerably reduces the measuring time of important microscopic features of tooth crown surfaces. The instrumentation is accompanied by a computer program to analyse the results. Tooth enamel is formed by ameloblasts, which demonstrate daily secretory rhythms developing tissue-specific structures known as cross striations, and longer period markings that are referred as striae of Retzius. These striae correspond to linear structures on the enamel surface. This newly developed optical measuring instrument can automatically, precisely and accurately record the number and periodicity of perikymata on the dental crown. Furthermore it can characterize the variability in periodicity of perikymata in hominids. The depth of field can be extended as desired by taking several images with different focus positions and combining them into a single composite image that contains all regions fully focused. PMID:24156069

  11. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  12. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF MUON G-2 AND ACCELERATOR RELATED ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,H.N.; BUNCE,G.; CAREY,R.M.; CUSHMAN,P.; DANBY,G.T.; DEBEVEC,P.T.; DEILE,M.; DENG,H.; DENINGER,W.; DHAWAN,S.K.; ET AL; MENG,W.

    2001-09-21

    A precision measurement of the anomalous g value, a{sub {mu}}=(g-2)/2, for the positive muon has been made using high intensity protons available at the Brookhaven AGS. The result based on the 1999 data a{sub {mu}}=11659202(14)(6) x 10{sup 10} (1.3ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the combined previous data. The current theoretical value from the standard model is a{sub {mu}} (SM)=11659159.6(6.7) x 10{sup 10} (0.57 ppm) and differ by over 2.5 standard deviation with experiment. Issues with reducing systematic errors and enhancing the injection and storage efficiencies are discussed.

  13. 148-Gd cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, R. K.; Pitcher, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Hertel, N. E.

    2002-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, 148Gdp roduction was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 pm thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 pm thin A1 activation foils, Spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy.

  14. An improved 8 GeV beam transport system for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A new 8 GeV beam transport system between the Booster and Main Ring synchrotrons at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is presented. The system was developed in an effort to improve the transverse phase space area occupied by the proton beam upon injection into the Main Ring accelerator. Problems with the original system are described and general methods of beamline design are formulated. Errors in the transverse properties of a beamline at the injection point of the second synchrotron and their effects on the region in transverse phase space occupied by a beam of particles are discussed. Results from the commissioning phase of the project are presented as well as measurements of the degree of phase space dilution generated by the transfer of 8 GeV protons from the Booster synchrotron to the Main Ring synchrotron.

  15. Summary Report of mission acceleration measurements for STS-66. Launched November 3, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Experiments flown in the middeck of Atlantis during the STS-66 mission were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). In particular, the three triaxial SAMS sensor heads collected data in support of protein crystal growth experiments. Data collected during STS-66 are reviewed in this report. The STS-66 SAMS data represent the microgravity environment in the 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz range. Variations in the environment related to differing levels of crew activity are discussed in the report. A comparison is made among times when the crew was quiet during a public affairs conference, working quietly, and exercising. These levels of activity are also compared to levels recorded by a SAMS unit in the Spacelab on Columbia during the STS-65 mission.

  16. Measurements of reduced corkscrew motion on the ETA-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Brand, H.R.; Chambers, F.W.; Chen, Y.J.; Coffield, F.E.; Deadrick, F.J.; Griffith, L.V.; Lager, D.L.; Mauer, W.J.; Nexsen, W.E.; Paul, A.C.; Sampayan, S.; Turner, W.C.

    1991-05-01

    The ETA-II linear induction accelerator is used to drive a microwave free electron laser (FEL). Corkscrew motion, which previously limited performance, has been reduced by: (1) an improved pulse distribution system which reduces energy sweep, (2) improved magnetic alignment achieved with a stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) and (3) a unique magnetic tuning algorithm. Experiments have been carried out on a 20-cell version of ETA-II operating at 1500 A and 2.7 MeV. The measured transverse beam motion is less than 0.5 mm for 40 ns of the pulse, an improvement of a factor of 2 to 3 over previous results. Details of the computerized tuning procedure, estimates of the corkscrew phase, and relevance of these results to future FEL experiments are presented. 11 refs.

  17. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  18. Telemetry system for the transmission of data from projectiles during the acceleration phase in the gun barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, V.

    1984-05-01

    A ballistic telemetry system reliable for accelerations up 100,00 g was developed. It consist of industrially produced thick layer 10 mm x 10 mm components which can be assembled to a telemetry system according to the unit box principle depending on user requirements. The electronic circuits are fixed in the gun barrel with epoxy resin. The short time phenomena and the limited space require analog data transmission. The 30 mm barrels used for interior ballistics tests and the block diagram of the measuring system are described. The results of the axial acceleration measurements show very clearly the effect of the injection resistance at the beginning of the projectile motion, and by integration provide the temporal evolution of the projectile velocity in the barrel. The measurements of the transverse acceleration clearly show the effect of the barrel curvature and the gravitational force. A wire and an optoelectronic transmission system were developed.

  19. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  20. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  1. Coupling MCNP-DSP and LAHET Monte Carlo Codes for Designing Subcriticality Monitors for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Rugama, Y. Munoz-Cobos, J.; Perez, R.

    2000-10-23

    The design of reactivity monitoring systems for accelerator-driven systems must be investigated to ensure that such systems remain subcritical during operation. The Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP-DSP were combined together to facilitate the design of reactivity monitoring systems. The coupling of LAHET and MCNP-DSP provides a tool that can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements such as the pulsed neutron, Rossi-{alpha}, or noise analysis measurements.

  2. Test-to-Failure of a Two-Grid, 30-cm-dia. Ion Accelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Pless, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the failure mechanism and erosion characteristics of an ion accelerator system due to erosion by charge-exchange ions a test was performed in which a 30-cm-diameter, 2-grid ion accelerator system was tested to failure. The erosion charcteristics observed in this test, however, imply significantly shorter accelerator grid life times than typically stated in the literature. Finally, the test suggests that structural failure is probably not the most likely first failure mechanism for the accelerator grid.

  3. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  4. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  5. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, N J; Harris, L J

    2002-11-19

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  6. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (ria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, M. A.; Moody, K. J.; Wild, J. F.; Patin, J. B.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Harris, L. J.

    2003-10-01

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  7. An Accelerated Recursive Doubling Algorithm for Block Tridiagonal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K

    2014-01-01

    Block tridiagonal systems of linear equations arise in a wide variety of scientific and engineering applications. Recursive doubling algorithm is a well-known prefix computation-based numerical algorithm that requires O(M^3(N/P + log P)) work to compute the solution of a block tridiagonal system with N block rows and block size M on P processors. In real-world applications, solutions of tridiagonal systems are most often sought with multiple, often hundreds and thousands, of different right hand sides but with the same tridiagonal matrix. Here, we show that a recursive doubling algorithm is sub-optimal when computing solutions of block tridiagonal systems with multiple right hand sides and present a novel algorithm, called the accelerated recursive doubling algorithm, that delivers O(R) improvement when solving block tridiagonal systems with R distinct right hand sides. Since R is typically about 100 1000, this improvement translates to very significant speedups in practice. Detailed complexity analyses of the new algorithm with empirical confirmation of runtime improvements are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this algorithm has not been reported before in the literature.

  8. Coordinate measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, Keith

    2003-04-08

    An apparatus and method is utilized to measure relative rigid body motion between two bodies by measuring linear motion in the principal axis and linear motion in an orthogonal axis. From such measurements it is possible to obtain displacement, departure from straightness, and angular displacement from the principal axis of a rigid body.

  9. A wireless accelerometer node for reliable and valid measurement of lumbar accelerations during treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Timothy R; Yaggie, James A; McGregor, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the reliability of a wireless accelerometer and its agreement with optical motion capture for the measurement of root mean square (RMS) acceleration during running. RMS acceleration provides a whole-body metric of movement mechanics and economy. Fifteen healthy college-age participants performed treadmill running for two 60-s trials at 2.22, 2.78, and 3.33 m/s and one trial of 150 s (five 30-s epochs) at 2.78 m/s. We assessed between-trial and within-trial reliability, and agreement in each axis between a trunk-mounted wireless accelerometer and a reflective marker on the accelerometer measured by optical motion capture. Intraclass correlations assessing between-trial repeatability were 0.89-0.97, depending on the axis, and intraclass correlations assessing within-trial repeatability were 0.99-1.00. Bland-Altman analyses assessing agreement indicated mean difference values between -0.03 and 0.03 g, depending on the axis. Anterio-posterior acceleration had the greatest limits of agreement (LOA) (±0.12 g) and vertical acceleration had the smallest LOA (±0.03 g). For measuring RMS acceleration of the trunk, this wireless accelerometer node provides repeatable and valid measurement compared with the standard laboratory method of optical motion capture. PMID:26836779

  10. Recent performance of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source accelerator system

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.; Donley, L.

    1987-03-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has now been in operation as part of a national user program for over five years. During that period steady progress has been made in both beam intensity and reliability. Almost 1.8 billion pulses totaling 4 x 10/sup 21/ protons have now been delivered to the spallation neutron target. Recent weekly average currents have reached 15 ..mu..A (3.2 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse, 30 pulses per second) and short-term peaks of almost 17 ..mu..A have been reached. In fact, the average current for the last two years is up 31% over the average for the first three years of operation.

  11. Accelerated Vascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Role of Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Al Gadban, Mohammed M.; Alwan, Mohamed M.; Smith, Kent J.; Hammad, Samar M.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition that is considered a major cause of death worldwide. Striking phenomena of atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is its high incidence in young patients. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that differentiate from hematopoietic progenitors and reside in different tissues to preserve tissue integrity. Macrophages scavenge modified lipids and play a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. When activated, macrophages secret inflammatory cytokines. This activation triggers apoptosis of cells in the vicinity of macrophages. As such, macrophages play a significant role in tissue remodeling including atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture. In spite of studies carried on identifying the role of macrophages in atherosclerosis, this role has not been studied thoroughly in SLE-associated atherosclerosis. In this review, we address factors released by macrophages as well as extrinsic factors that may control macrophage behavior and their effect on accelerated development of atherosclerosis in SLE. PMID:25638414

  12. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  13. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  14. RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1988-04-12

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in responsive to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Integrated Enterprise Accelerator Database for the SLC Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahey, T.; Rock, J.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.; Underwood, K.

    2002-08-01

    Since its inception in the early 1980's, the SLC Control System has been driven by a highly structured memory-resident real-time database. While efficient, its rigid structure and file-based sources makes it difficult to maintain and extract relevant information. The goal of transforming the sources for this database into a relational form is to enable it to be part of a Control System Enterprise Database that is an integrated central repository for SLC accelerator device and Control System data with links to other associated databases. We have taken the concepts developed for the NLC Enterprise Database and used them to create and load a relational model of the online SLC Control System database. This database contains data and structure to allow querying and reporting on beamline devices, their associations and parameters. queries tend to retrieve large numbers of rows and attribute tables can become large, adversely affecting performance. In addition, this model does not allow optimal use of database features such as constraints and joins, nor the standard set of database query and

  16. Experimental measurements of rf breakdowns and deflecting gradients in mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study of a high gradient metallic accelerating structure at sub-THz frequencies, where we investigated the physics of rf breakdowns. Wakefields in the structure were excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam. We present the first quantitative measurements of gradients and metal vacuum rf breakdowns in sub-THz accelerating cavities. When the beam travels off axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement and changes in the shape of the electron bunch. This behavior can be exploited for subfemtosecond beam diagnostics.

  17. Radionuclides in man and his environment measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Erlandsson, Bengt; Kiisk, Madis; Persson, Per; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina; Mattsson, Soeren; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Olofsson, Mikael

    1999-06-10

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive analytical method for measuring very low concentrations of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. For radioanalytical purposes, the main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than one hour). In this report some current applications of the AMS technique at the Lund Pelletron accelerator are presented, in particular studies of {sup 14}C-labeled pharmaceuticals used in clinical nuclear medicine and biomedical research.

  18. Design And Performance Of A 3 MV Tandetron Accelerator System For High-Current Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2011-06-01

    The Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India will commission in 2011 a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator system. Hi-flux neutron production, nuclear reaction cross-section measurements and time of flight experiments are among the research activities to be performed with this system. Features such as high beam currents, high beam energy stability and low beam energy spread are necessary when conducting these types of experiments. At the same time, the beam energy must be known with high accuracy. This article reports the early results obtained during the in-house testing of the system. H beam currents of 500 {mu}A have been transported through the system. The so-called ''Q-snout'' electrode lens ensures high particle transmission ({approx}70%) through the accelerator even at 7% of the rated terminal voltage (TV). At present, the negative H ion beam current output of the SO120 multicusp ion source, rated at only 2 mA, combined with the Tandetron accelerators (with terminal voltage ranging from 1 to 6 MV) provides H beam powers of up to 10 kW.

  19. Theoretical analysis of acceleration measurements in a model of an operating wind turbine.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Douglas E.; Rumsey, Mark Allen; White, Jonathan Randall

    2010-04-01

    Wind loading from turbulence and gusts can cause damage in horizontal axis wind turbines. These unsteady loads and the resulting damage initiation and propagation are difficult to predict. Unsteady loads enter at the rotor and are transmitted to the drivetrain. The current generation of wind turbine has drivetrain-mounted vibration and bearing temperature sensors, a nacelle-mounted inertial measurement unit, and a nacelle-mounted anemometer and wind vane. Some advanced wind turbines are also equipped with strain measurements at the root of the rotor. This paper analyzes additional measurements in a rotor blade to investigate the complexity of these unsteady loads. By identifying the spatial distribution, amplitude, and frequency bandwidth of these loads, design improvements could be facilitated to reduce uncertainties in reliability predictions. In addition, dynamic load estimates could be used in the future to control high-bandwidth aerodynamic actuators distributed along the rotor blade to reduce the saturation of slower pitch actuators currently used for wind turbine blades. Local acceleration measurements are made along a rotor blade to infer operational rotor states including deflection and dynamic modal contributions. Previous work has demonstrated that acceleration measurements can be experimentally acquired on an operating wind turbine. Simulations on simplified rotor blades have also been used to demonstrate that mean blade loading can be estimated based on deflection estimates. To successfully apply accelerometers in wind turbine applications for load identification, the spectral and spatial characteristics of each excitation source must be understood so that the total acceleration measurement can be decomposed into contributions from each source. To demonstrate the decomposition of acceleration measurements in conjunction with load estimation methods, a flexible body model has been created with MSC.ADAMS{copyright} The benefit of using a simulation model

  20. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  1. A first attempt to measure 92Nb/93Nb ratios with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guozhu, He; Ming, He; Zuying, Zhou; Zhenyu, Li; Kejun, Dong; Shaoyong, Wu; Shilong, Liu; Xiongjun, Chen; Qiwen, Fan; Chaoli, Li; Xianwen, He; Heng, Li; Shan, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) method for the measurement of the long-lived radionuclide 92Nb has been established at the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator of the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Niobium powder mixed with PbF2 by a ratio of 1:2 (in mass) was used as the cathode material. Atomic anions of Nb- were extracted from a Cs-beam sputter source. The terminal voltage of the tandem accelerator was 8.5 MV. Nb13+ ions were selected after terminal foil stripping. A multi-anode gas ionization chamber was used for the particle detection. The total suppression factor of the two major interfering isobars, 92Zr and 92Mo, was about 103. A detection limit of about 10-11 was achieved for 92Nb/93Nb ratio measurements on a blank sample.

  2. SOPC implementation for stereovision measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoping; Lv, Naiguang; Deng, Wenyi; Zhao, Zhe

    2010-11-01

    Image processing is necessary for three-dimensional information recovering of stereovision measurement system and it is always bottleneck for real-time applications. In order to accelerate system computational power, the design of SOPC system which can fulfills image processing tasks parallel is discussed. As a part of high-speed stereovision measurement system, the application specific SOPC is designed as an embedded PCI board card of hosts PC. This paper focuses on three aspects. Firstly, Principles of SOPC system designing and SOPC features selecting are analyzed with measuring requirements under consideration. Then the realization of SOPC system is described in detail. The embedded processor, special IPs (Intelligent Properties), several custom logic modules are included in a single FPGA. All units are seamlessly integrated into the overall system using the system builder interface. The parallel processing is illustrated by examples. In the end, simulation and debugging results of SOPC system are introduced. Elements that influence running time are analyzed and final results are given. Experiment and test results show that all the functions needed were realized with much higher efficiency and processing speed in our SOPC system than conventional software.

  3. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Bauman, M.; Lesyna, D.; Miller, D.; Nusbaum, J.; Slater, J.; Johanning, J.; Miranda, J. ); DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Siebers, J. ); Ludewigt, B. )

    1991-11-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented (R. R. Wilson, Radiology {bold 47}, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. {bold 9}, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. {bold 10}, 831 (1983)). One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less then {plus minus}5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7{times}10{sup 9} protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5{times}10{sup 10} protons/spills for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation. The distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak was observed at 27.5-cm depth with an incident proton energy of 235 MeV. The dose at the distal edge falls from 90% to 10% of peak value in 7 mm.

  4. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Bauman, M; Lesyna, D; Miller, D; Nusbaum, J; Slater, J; Johanning, J; Miranda, J; DeLuca, P M; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented [R. R. Wilson, Radiology 47, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983)]. One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less than +/- 5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7 x 10(9) protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5 x 10(10) protons/spill for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1661367

  5. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reactive Hydrocarbon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2014-02-25

    The research activities in this project consisted of four different sub-projects. Three different accelerated dynamics techniques (parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics, and temperature-accelerated dynamics) were applied to the modeling of pyrolysis of hydrocarbons. In addition, parallel replica dynamics was applied to modeling of polymerization.

  6. Measurement of acceleration while walking as an automated method for gait assessment in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Chapinal, N; de Passillé, A M; Pastell, M; Hänninen, L; Munksgaard, L; Rushen, J

    2011-06-01

    The aims were to determine whether measures of acceleration of the legs and back of dairy cows while they walk could help detect changes in gait or locomotion associated with lameness and differences in the walking surface. In 2 experiments, 12 or 24 multiparous dairy cows were fitted with five 3-dimensional accelerometers, 1 attached to each leg and 1 to the back, and acceleration data were collected while cows walked in a straight line on concrete (experiment 1) or on both concrete and rubber (experiment 2). Cows were video-recorded while walking to assess overall gait, asymmetry of the steps, and walking speed. In experiment 1, cows were selected to maximize the range of gait scores, whereas no clinically lame cows were enrolled in experiment 2. For each accelerometer location, overall acceleration was calculated as the magnitude of the 3-dimensional acceleration vector and the variance of overall acceleration, as well as the asymmetry of variance of acceleration within the front and rear pair of legs. In experiment 1, the asymmetry of variance of acceleration in the front and rear legs was positively correlated with overall gait and the visually assessed asymmetry of the steps (r ≥ 0.6). Walking speed was negatively correlated with the asymmetry of variance of the rear legs (r=-0.8) and positively correlated with the acceleration and the variance of acceleration of each leg and back (r ≥ 0.7). In experiment 2, cows had lower gait scores [2.3 vs. 2.6; standard error of the difference (SED)=0.1, measured on a 5-point scale] and lower scores for asymmetry of the steps (18.0 vs. 23.1; SED=2.2, measured on a continuous 100-unit scale) when they walked on rubber compared with concrete, and their walking speed increased (1.28 vs. 1.22 m/s; SED=0.02). The acceleration of the front (1.67 vs. 1.72 g; SED=0.02) and rear (1.62 vs. 1.67 g; SED=0.02) legs and the variance of acceleration of the rear legs (0.88 vs. 0.94 g; SED=0.03) were lower when cows walked on rubber

  7. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  8. A New Ground Motion Intensity Measure, Peak Filtered Acceleration (PFA), to Estimate Collapse Vulnerability of Buildings in Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shiyan

    In this thesis, we develop an efficient collapse prediction model, the PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) model, for buildings subjected to different types of ground motions. For the structural system, the PFA model covers modern steel and reinforced concrete moment-resisting frame buildings (potentially reinforced concrete shear wall buildings). For ground motions, the PFA model covers ramp-pulse-like ground motions, long-period ground motions, and short-period ground motions. To predict whether a building will collapse in response to a given ground motion, we first extract long-period components from the ground motion using a Butterworth low-pass filter with suggested order and cutoff frequency. The order depends on the type of ground motion, and the cutoff frequency depends on the building's natural frequency and ductility. We then compare the filtered acceleration time history with the capacity of the building. The capacity of the building is a constant for 2-dimentional buildings and a limit domain for 3-dimentional buildings. If the filtered acceleration exceeds the building's capacity, the building is predicted to collapse. Otherwise, it is expected to survive the ground motion. The parameters used in PFA model, which include fundamental period, global ductility and lateral capacity, can be obtained either from numerical analysis or interpolation based on the reference building system proposed in this thesis. The PFA collapse prediction model greatly reduces computational complexity while archiving good accuracy. It is verified by FEM simulations of 13 frame building models and 150 ground motion records. Based on the developed collapse prediction model, we propose to use PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) as a new ground motion intensity measure for collapse prediction. We compare PFA with traditional intensity measures PGA, PGV, PGD, and Sa in collapse prediction and find that PFA has the best performance among all the intensity measures. We also provide a

  9. Acceleration and Rotation in a Pendulum Ride, Measured Using an iPhone 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Rohlen, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Many modern cell phones have built-in sensors that may be used as a resource for physics education. Amusement rides offer examples of many different types of motion, where the acceleration leads to forces experienced throughout the body. A comoving 3D-accelerometer gives an electronic measurement of the varying forces acting on the rider, but a…

  10. Automated ac galvanomagnetic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Espy, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    An automated, ac galvanomagnetic measurement system is described. Hall or van der Pauw measurements in the temperature range 10-300 K can be made at a preselected magnetic field without operator attendance. Procedures to validate sample installation and correct operation of other system functions, such as magnetic field and thermometry, are included. Advantages of ac measurements are discussed.

  11. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  12. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  13. Beam-wall interaction measurements in LLNL induction accelerator bend experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Friedman, A.; Kamin, G. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Eylon, S.; Hopkins, H. S.

    1997-11-01

    Ion-induced desorption coefficients are determined from measurements of pressure rises when an ion beam strikes a surface. These measurements are made after the first bend of 9^circ by deflecting the beam onto the stainless steel beam tube, and within a pill-box where the beam strikes a stainless steel target at an angle that can be varied from 90^circ to ~10^circ. The beam consists of 2 mA of singly-charged potassium ions at 80 keV with pulse lengths of several microsec. Data near 10^circ are relevant to near-term experiments where beam halo could strike the wall at angles of a few degrees. Data near 90^circ are relevant to ions resulting from charge exchange with a reactor driver class beam which has a space potential of the order of 100 kV. These data will aid in assessing the adequacy of the existing vacuum system when the bend experiment is upgraded to a recirculator induction accelerator.

  14. Comparison between CARIBIC Aerosol Samples Analysed by Accelerator-Based Methods and Optical Particle Counter Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-08-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on a Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with the following accelerator-based methods: particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during 1 year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  15. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-04-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  16. Spray momentum measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Technique enables accurate prediction of erosion and cavitation produced by fluid spray. Method measures high velocity sprays produced by small orifices. Originally designed to determine oxidizer-injection patterns of liquid fueled rocket engines, technique is used with other liquids, or, with appropriate modification, with gases.

  17. Pollution Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Research Ventures, Inc.'s visiplume is a portable, microprocessor-controlled air pollution monitor for measuring sulfur dioxide emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants, and facilities that manufacture sulfuric acid. It observes smokestack plumes at a distance from the stack obviating the expense and difficulty of installing sample collectors in each stack and later analyzing the samples.

  18. Charged-particle acceleration through laser irradiation of thin foils at Prague Asterix Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Maria; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Musumeci, Paolo; Calcagno, Lucia; Wolowski, Jerzy; Rosinski, Marcin; Zaras-Szydlowska, Agnieszka; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Velyhan, Andreiy

    2014-05-01

    Thin foils, 0.5-50 μm in thickness, have been irradiated in vacuum at Prague Asterix Laser System in Prague using 1015-16 W cm-2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different focal positions. Produced plasmas from metals and polymers films have been monitored in the forward and backward directions. Ion and electron accelerations have been investigated by using Thomson parabola spectrometer, x-ray streak camera, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors, the latter employed in time-of-flight configuration. Ion acceleration up to about 3 MeV per charge state was measured in the forward direction. Ion and electron emissions were detected at different angles as a function of the irradiation conditions.

  19. Thrust Stand Measurements Using Alternative Propellants in the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    Storable propellants (for example water, ammonia, and hydrazine) are attractive for deep space propulsion due to their naturally high density at ambient interplanetary conditions, which obviates the need for a cryogenic/venting system. Water in particular is attractive due to its ease of handling and availability both terrestrially and extra-terrestrially. While many storable propellants are reactive and corrosive, a propulsion scheme where the propellant is insulated from vulnerable (e.g. metallic) sections of the assembly would be well-suited to process these otherwise incompatible propellants. Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters meet this criterion because they can be operated without direct propellant-electrode interaction. During operation of these devices, electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil creating a time-varying current in the coil that interacts with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, many pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta

  20. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  1. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  2. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  3. Design and RF Measurements of AN X-Band Accelerating Structure for the Sparc Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bacci, A.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The 2D profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions.

  4. Design and RF Measurements of AN X-Band Accelerating Structure for the Sparc Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bacci, A.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2007-09-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The 2D profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions.

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity in Magnetic Cusped Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Natalia; Cappelli, Mark; Hargus, William, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Cusped Field Thrusters (CFTs) are magnetized plasma accelerators that use strong cusps to shape the magnetic field and hence the electrostatic potential. The cusped magnetic field lines meter the electron transport to the anode and reduce the energetic ion flux towards the dielectric channel walls, thereby reducing the effects of erosion. This work presents time averaged laser induced fluorescence velocity measurements of the ions in the plumes of three CFT variants. These include the Cylindrical Hall Thruster (CHT), Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster (CCFT), and Diverging Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT). Results indicate that magnetic cusps form equipotential surfaces, and that the majority of ion acceleration occurs outside of the thruster channels.

  6. APS linac klystron and accelerating structure gain measurements and klystron PFN voltage regulation requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.

    1997-07-01

    This note details measurements of the APS positron linac klystron and accelerating structure gain and presents an analysis of the data using fits to simple mathematical models. The models are used to investigate the sensitivity of the energy dependence of the output positron beam to klystron parameters. The gain measurements are separated into two parts: first, the energy gains of the accelerating structures of the positron linac are measured as a function of output power of the klystron; second, the klystron output power is measured as a function of input drive power and pulse forming network (PFN) voltage. This note concentrates on the positron linac rf and its performance as it directly affects the energy stability of the positron beam injected into the positron accumulator ring (PAR). Ultimately it is important to be able to minimize beam energy variations to maximize the PAR accumulation efficiency.

  7. Vorticity, turbulence production, and turbulence induced accelerations in a rectangular jet as measured using 3-D LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 4:1 aspect ratio (50.4 x 12.7 mm) was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Measurements were performed along the major and minor axis planes and at various downstream cross-sections of the jet. The mean velocity vector and entire Reynolds stress tensor were measured and presented in a previous publication. The present work presents the vorticity vector, turbulence production, and turbulence induced acceleration vector distributions which were calculated from the previously presented data.

  8. First Direct Measurement of Acceleration in the Outflow of a Nova: U Scorpii (1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Shara, Michael M.; Livio, Mario; Zurek, David

    1999-09-01

    We report the first direct measurement of acceleration in the outflow of a nova, U Sco, observed 5 days after the start of an outburst. Spectroscopic time series of the intense Hα emission line, obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope, shows a bright emission component moving across the spectrum at a rate of +0.16+/-0.02 Å in 30 minutes. This is consistent with a clump of emitting material having a line-of-sight acceleration ar=+4.1+/-0.5 m s-2. The data suggest that this clump resides within a moderately collimated bipolar outflow. Due to projection effects, this implies an actual acceleration of the clump relative to the star of a>~+25 m s-2. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Novel learning accelerates systems consolidation of a contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Josue; Cassini, Lindsey Freitas; Diehl, Felipe; Santana, Fabiana; Fürstenau de Oliveira, Lucas; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto

    2016-07-01

    After initial encoding memories may undergo a time-dependent reorganization, becoming progressively independent from the hippocampus (HPC) and dependent on cortical regions such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Although the mechanisms underlying systems consolidation are somewhat known, the factors determining its temporal dynamics are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the influence of novel learning occurring between training and test sessions on the time-course of HPC- and ACC-dependency of contextual fear conditioning (CFC) memory expression. We found that muscimol was disruptive when infused into the HPC up to 35 days after training, while the ACC is vulnerable only after 45 days. However, when animals were subjected to a series of additional, distinct tasks to be learned within the first 3 weeks, muscimol became effective sooner. Muscimol had no effect in the HPC at 20 days after training, exactly when the ACC becomes responsive to this treatment. Thus, our data indicates that the encoding of new information generates a tight interplay between distinct memories, accelerating the reorganization of previously stored long term memories between the hippocampal and cortical areas. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26860633

  10. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  11. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  12. Microbial ecology measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity and potential rapidity of the PIA test that was demonstrated during the feasibility study warranted continuing the effort to examine the possibility of adapting this test to an automated procedure that could be used during manned missions. The effort during this program has optimized the test conditions for two important respiratory pathogens, influenza virus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, developed a laboratory model automated detection system, and investigated a group antigen concept for virus detection. Preliminary tests on the handling of oropharygeal clinical samples for PIA testing were performed using the adenovirus system. The results obtained indicated that the PIA signal is reduced in positive samples and is increased in negative samples. Treatment with cysteine appeared to reduce nonspecific agglutination in negative samples but did not maintain the signal in positive samples.

  13. Buildup region and skin-dose measurements for the Therac 6 linear accelerator for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tannous, N B; Gagnon, W F; Almond, P R

    1981-01-01

    Buildup and surface-dose measurements were taken for the 6 MV photon beam from a Therac 6 linear accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) with and without a lucite blocking tray in place. Further measurements were made with a copper filter designed to reduce secondary electrons emitted by photon interactions with the Lucite tray. The results are discussed in relation to skin-sparing for radiation therapy patients. The measurements were made with a fixed volume PTW parallel-plate ionization chamber and corrected to zero-chamber volume. The results were found to be consistent with similar measurements taken with a variable volume extrapolation chamber. PMID:6798394

  14. C-14 content of ten meteorites measured by tandem accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. M.; Andrews, H. R.; Ball, G. C.; Burn, N.; Imahori, Y.; Milton, J. C. D.; Fireman, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of C-14 in three North American and seven Antarctic meteorites show in most cases that this cosmogenic isotope, which is tightly bound, was separated from absorbed atmospheric radiocarbon by stepwise heating extractions. The present upper limit to age determination by the accelerator method varies from 50,000 to 70,000 years, depending on the mass and carbon content of the sample. The natural limit caused by cosmic ray production of C-14 in silicate rocks at 2000 m elevation is estimated to be 55,000 + or - 5000 years. An estimation is also made of the 'weathering ages' of the Antarctic meteorites from the specific activity of loosely bound CO2 which is thought to be absorbed from the terrestrial atmosphere. Accelerator measurements are found to agree with previous low level counting measurements, but are more sensitive and precise.

  15. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON THE COSMOLOGICAL DECELERATION-ACCELERATION TRANSITION REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-03-20

    We compile a list of 28 independent measurements of the Hubble parameter between redshifts 0.07 {<=} z {<=} 2.3 and use this to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. These H(z) measurements by themselves require a currently accelerating cosmological expansion at about, or better than, 3{sigma} confidence. The mean and standard deviation of the six best-fit model deceleration-acceleration transition redshifts (for the three cosmological models and two Hubble constant priors we consider) are z{sub da} = 0.74 {+-} 0.05, in good agreement with the recent Busca et al. determination of z{sub da} = 0.82 {+-} 0.08 based on 11 H(z) measurements between redshifts 0.2 {<=} z {<=} 2.3, almost entirely from baryon-acoustic-oscillation-like data.

  16. Accelerator systems and instrumentation for the NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaska, Robert Miles

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam facility began operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 2005. NuMI produces an intense, muon-neutrino beam to a number of experiments. Fore most of these experiments is MINOS---the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search---that uses two neutrino detectors in the beam, one at Fermilab and one in northern Minnesota, to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. NuMI is a conventional, horn-focused neutrino beam. It is designed to accept a 400 kW, 120 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator. The proton beam is steered onto a target, producing a secondary beam of mesons which are focused into a long evacuated volume where they decay to muons and neutrinos. Pulsed toroidal magnets (horns) focus an adjustable meson momentum range. Design of the beamline and its components is challenged by the 400 kW average proton beam power. To achieve such high proton power, the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) must store and accelerate ˜ 4x1013 protons per acceleration cycle. This requires the MI to be loaded with 6 or more batches of protons from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator. Such multiple-batch injection involves a synchronization of the two machines not previously required by the Fermilab accelerators. In this dissertation, we investigate timing errors that can arise between the two accelerators, and a feedback system which enables multiple Booster transfers into the Main Injector without significant loss of beam. Using this method of synchronous transfer, the Main Injector has delivered as many as 3x1013 protons per pulse to the NuMI beam. The instrumentation to assess the quality of the neutrino beam includes arrays of radiation-tolerant ionization chambers downstream of the decay volume. These arrays detect the remnant hadrons and tertiary muons produced with the neutrinos. This thesis discusses measurements using the arrays, including diagnostics of potential beam errors and

  17. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  18. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.J.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February, 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM/sub 130/ at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and, therefore, the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high-current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced B sub solar loops.

  19. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  20. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  1. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  2. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  3. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Eliades, J.; Litherland, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2), which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  4. Image processing and computer controls for video profile diagnostic system in the ground test accelerator (GTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Zander, M.E.; Brown, S.K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Gibson, H.E.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the application of video image processing to beam profile measurements on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). A diagnostic was needed to measure beam profiles in the intermediate matching section (IMS) between the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and the drift tube linac (DTL). Beam profiles are measured by injecting puffs of gas into the beam. The light emitted from the beam-gas interaction is captured and processed by a video image processing system, generating the beam profile data. A general purpose, modular and flexible video image processing system, imagetool, was used for the GTA image profile measurement. The development of both software and hardware for imagetool and its integration with the GTA control system (GTACS) will be discussed. The software includes specialized algorithms for analyzing data and calibrating the system. The underlying design philosophy of imagetool was tested by the experience of building and using the system, pointing the way for future improvements. The current status of the system will be illustrated by samples of experimental data.

  5. Image processing and computer controls for video profile diagnostic system in the ground test accelerator (GTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Zander, M.E.; Brown, S.K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Gibson, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of video image processing to beam profile measurements on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). A diagnostic was needed to measure beam profiles in the intermediate matching section (IMS) between the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and the drift tube linac (DTL). Beam profiles are measured by injecting puffs of gas into the beam. The light emitted from the beam-gas interaction is captured and processed by a video image processing system, generating the beam profile data. A general purpose, modular and flexible video image processing system, imagetool, was used for the GTA image profile measurement. The development of both software and hardware for imagetool and its integration with the GTA control system (GTACS) will be discussed. The software includes specialized algorithms for analyzing data and calibrating the system. The underlying design philosophy of imagetool was tested by the experience of building and using the system, pointing the way for future improvements. The current status of the system will be illustrated by samples of experimental data.

  6. Study of an External Neutron Source for an Accelerator-Driven System using the PHITS Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Takanori; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Chiba, Takashi

    2005-05-24

    A code system for the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been under development for analyzing dynamic behaviors of a subcritical core coupled with an accelerator. This code system named DSE (Dynamics calculation code system for a Subcritical system with an External neutron source) consists of an accelerator part and a reactor part. The accelerator part employs a database, which is calculated by using PHITS, for investigating the effect related to the accelerator such as the changes of beam energy, beam diameter, void generation, and target level. This analysis method using the database may introduce some errors into dynamics calculations since the neutron source data derived from the database has some errors in fitting or interpolating procedures. In this study, the effects of various events are investigated to confirm that the method based on the database is appropriate.

  7. Application of Burnable Absorbers in an Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Carlsson, Johan; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2001-01-15

    The application of burnable absorbers (BAs) to minimize power peaking, reactivity loss, and capture-to-fission probabilities in an accelerator-driven waste transmutation system has been investigated. Boron-10-enriched B{sub 4}C absorber rods were introduced into a lead-bismuth-cooled core fueled with transuranic (TRU) discharges from light water reactors to achieve the smallest possible power peakings at beginning-of-life (BOL) subcriticality level of 0.97. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations show that a radial power peaking equal to 1.2 at BOL is attainable using a four-zone differentiation in BA content. Using a newly written Monte Carlo burnup code, reactivity losses were calculated to be 640 pcm per percent TRU burnup for unrecycled TRU discharges. Comparing to corresponding values in BA-free cores, BA introduction diminishes reactivity losses in TRU-fueled subcritical cores by {approx}20%. Radial power peaking after 300 days of operation at 1200-MW thermal power was <1.75 at a subcriticality level of {approx}0.92, which appears to be acceptable, with respect to limitations in cladding and fuel temperatures. In addition, the use of BAs yields significantly higher fission-to-capture probabilities in even-neutron-number nuclides. Fission-to-absorption probability ratio for {sup 241}Am equal to 0.33 was achieved in the configuration studied. Hence, production of the strong alpha-emitter {sup 242}Cm is reduced, leading to smaller fuel-swelling rates and pin pressurization. Disadvantages following BA introduction, such as increase of void worth and decrease of Doppler feedback in conjunction with small values of {beta}{sub eff}, need to be addressed by detailed studies of subcritical core dynamics.

  8. Evolution of auroral acceleration region field-aligned current systems, plasma, and potentials observed by Cluster during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Frey, H. U.; Goldstein, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral link in the chain of events that transpire during substorms, and the currents, plasma and electric fields undergo significant changes driven by complex dynamical processes deep in the magnetotail. The acceleration processes that occur therein accelerate and heat the plasma that ultimately leads to some of the most intense global substorm auroral displays. Though this region has garnered considerable attention, the temporal evolution of field-aligned current systems, associated acceleration processes, and resultant changes in the plasma constituents that occur during key stages of substorm development remain unclear. In this study we present a survey of Cluster traversals within and just above the auroral acceleration region (≤3 Re altitude) during substorms. Particular emphasis is on the spatial morphology and developmental sequence of auroral acceleration current systems, potentials and plasma constituents, with the aim of identifying controlling factors, and assessing auroral emmission consequences. Exploiting multi-point measurements from Cluster in combination with auroral imaging, we reveal the injection powered, Alfvenic nature of both the substorm onset and expansion of auroral particle acceleration. We show evidence that indicates substorm onsets are characterized by the gross-intensification and filamentation/striation of pre-existing large-scale current systems to smaller/dispersive scale Alfven waves. Such an evolutionary sequence has been suggested in theoretical models or single spacecraft data, but has not been demonstrated or characterized in multispacecraft observations until now. It is also shown how the Alfvenic variations over time may dissipate to form large-scale inverted-V structures characteristic of the quasi-static aurora. These findings suggest that, in addition to playing active roles in driving substorm aurora, inverted-V and Alfvenic acceleration processes are causally linked. Key

  9. Development of a low-energy beam transport system at KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Sato, Yoichi; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute has developed a heavy ion accelerator for fast neutron radiography [1]. To meet the requirements for fast neutron generation, we have developed an accelerator system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS), low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), medium-energy beam transport system, and drift tube linac. In this paper, we present the development of the LEBT system as a part of the heavy ion accelerator system, which operates from the ECR-IS to the RFQ entrance.

  10. The actual measurements at the tide gauges do not support strongly accelerating twentieth-century sea-level rise reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A.

    2016-03-01

    Contrary to what is claimed by reconstructions of the Global Mean Sea Level (GMSL) indicating accelerating sea level rates of rise over the twentieth-century, the actual measurements at the tide gauges show the sea levels have not risen nor accelerated that much. The most recent estimation by Hay et al [1] of the twentieth-century global mean sea level (GMSL) rise is the last attempt to give exact reconstructions without having enough information of the state of the world oceans over a century where unfortunately the good measurements were not that many. The information on relative rates of rise at the tide gauges and land subsidence of global positioning system (GPS) domes suggest the relative rate of rise is about 0.25mm/year, without any detectable acceleration. [The naïve average of all the world tide gauges of sufficient quality and length of the Permanent Service to Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) data base], Both the relative rates of rise at the tide gauges and the land vertical velocity of GPS domes of the Système d'Observation du Niveau des Eaux Littorales (SONEL) data base are strongly variable in space and time to make a nonsense the GMSL estimation.

  11. The actual measurements at the tide gauges do not support strongly accelerating twentieth-century sea-level rise reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A.

    2016-03-01

    Contrary to what is claimed by reconstructions of the Global Mean Sea Level (GMSL) indicating accelerating sea level rates of rise over the twentieth-century, the actual measurements at the tide gauges show the sea levels have not risen nor accelerated that much. The most recent estimation by Hay et al of the twentieth-century global mean sea level (GMSL) rise is the last attempt to give exact reconstructions without having enough information of the state of the world oceans over a century where unfortunately the good measurements were not that many. The information on relative rates of rise at the tide gauges and land subsidence of global positioning system (GPS) domes suggest the relative rate of rise is about 0.25mm/year, without any detectable acceleration. [The naïve average of all the world tide gauges of sufficient quality and length of the Permanent Service to Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) data base], Both the relative rates of rise at the tide gauges and the land vertical velocity of GPS domes of the Système d'Observation du Niveau des Eaux Littorales (SONEL) data base are strongly variable in space and time to make a nonsense the GMSL estimation.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  13. Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.

    1998-11-06

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  14. Proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the intense pulsed neutron source rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx.3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at: (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science; (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation; and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, we are now proposing a third cavity for the RF systems which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  15. Mid-infrared Laser System Development for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott

    Laser-driven particle accelerators based on dielectric laser acceleration are under development and exhibit unique and challenging pump requirements. Operation in the mid-infrared (5 μm) range with short pulses (<1 ps FWHM), high pulse energy (>500 μJ) and good beam quality is required. We present our progress on the design and development of a novel two- stage source of mid-infrared pulses for this application, which is based on optical parametric amplification. Beta barium borate and zinc germanium phosphide crystals are used, and are pumped by a Ti:sapphire ultrashort laser and seeded by self-phase modulation and parametric generation-based sources.

  16. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Laser damage threshold measurements of optical materials for direct laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    The laser-damage threshold is a fundamental limit for any dielectric laser-driven accelerator and is set by the material of the structure. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the laser damage mechanism, in comparison with experimental data on the damage threshold of silicon. Additionally, we present damage threshold measurement data of various optical materials, most of which have not been previously characterized in the picosecond-regime.

  18. Measurement and Characterization of the Acceleration Environment on Board the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, Charles R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop provides a comprehensive overview of the work and status of each of these areas to provide a basis for establishing a systematic approach to the challenge of avoiding these difficulties during the Space Station era of materials experimentation. The discussions were arranged in the order of: the scientific understanding of the requirements for a micro-gravity environment, a history of acceleration measurements on spacecraft, the state of accelerometer technology, and the current understanding of the predicted Space Station environment.

  19. Calculating Nozzle Side Loads using Acceleration Measurements of Test-Based Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joe

    2007-01-01

    As part of a NASA/MSFC research program to evaluate the effect of different nozzle contours on the well-known but poorly characterized "side load" phenomena, we attempt to back out the net force on a sub-scale nozzle during cold-flow testing using acceleration measurements. Because modeling the test facility dynamics is problematic, new techniques for creating a "pseudo-model" of the facility and nozzle directly from modal test results are applied. Extensive verification procedures were undertaken, resulting in a loading scale factor necessary for agreement between test and model based frequency response functions. Side loads are then obtained by applying a wide-band random load onto the system model, obtaining nozzle response PSD's, and iterating both the amplitude and frequency of the input until a good comparison of the response with the measured response PSD for a specific time point is obtained. The final calculated loading can be used to compare different nozzle profiles for assessment during rocket engine nozzle development and as a basis for accurate design of the nozzle and engine structure to withstand these loads. The techniques applied within this procedure have extensive applicability to timely and accurate characterization of all test fixtures used for modal test.A viewgraph presentation on a model-test based pseudo-model used to calculate side loads on rocket engine nozzles is included. The topics include: 1) Side Loads in Rocket Nozzles; 2) Present Side Loads Research at NASA/MSFC; 3) Structural Dynamic Model Generation; 4) Pseudo-Model Generation; 5) Implementation; 6) Calibration of Pseudo-Model Response; 7) Pseudo-Model Response Verification; 8) Inverse Force Determination; 9) Results; and 10) Recent Work.

  20. Radiation resistance of the insulating materials used in the magnetic systems of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. V.; Pupkov, Yu. A.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation resistance of glass-cloth laminate, impregnating epoxy and silicone compounds, lavsan, and other materials used in particle accelerators is measured. Irradiation is performed on an ILU-6 electron accelerator to a dose of 30-100 MGy. Recommendations on the application of the insulating materials are made.

  1. Ambient dose and dose rate measurements in the vicinity of Elekta Precise accelerators for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zutz, H; Hupe, O

    2014-12-01

    In radiation therapy, commercially available medical linear accelerators (LINACs) are used. At high primary beam energies in the 10-MeV range, the leakage dose of the accelerator head and the backscatter from the room walls, the air and the patient become more important. Therefore, radiation protection measurements of photon dose rates in the treatment room and in the maze are performed to quantify the radiation field. Since the radiation of the LINACs is usually pulsed with short radiation pulse durations in the microsecond range, there are problems with electronic dose (rate) meters commonly used in radiation protection. In this paper measurements with ionisation chambers are presented and electronic dosemeters are used for testing at selected positions. The measured time-averaged dose rate ranges from a few microsieverts per hour in the maze to some millisieverts per hour in the vicinity of the accelerator head and up to some sieverts per hour in the blanked primary beam and several hundred sieverts per hour in the direct primary beam. PMID:24379437

  2. RADIATION PROTECTION SYSTEM INSTALLATION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM/LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR PROJECT (APT/LEDA)

    SciTech Connect

    J. WILMARTH; M. SMITH; T. TOMEI

    1999-07-01

    The APT/LEDA personnel radiation protection system installation was accomplished using a flexible, modular proven system which satisfied regulatory orders, project design criteria, operational modes, and facility requirements. The goal of providing exclusion and safe access of personnel to areas where prompt radiation in the LEDA facility is produced was achieved with the installation of a DOE-approved Personnel Access Control System (PACS). To satisfy the facility configuration design, the PACS, a major component of the overall radiation safety system, conveniently provided five independent areas of personnel access control. Because of its flexibility and adaptability the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) designed Radiation Security System (RSS) was efficiently configured to provide the desired operational modes and satisfy the APT/LEDA project design criteria. The Backbone Beam Enable (BBE) system based on the LANSCE RSS provided the accelerator beam control functions with redundant, hardwired, tamper-resistant hardware. The installation was accomplished using modular components.

  3. An intracavitary cone system for electron beam therapy using a Therac 20 linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D L; Sharma, S C; Jose, B

    1986-06-01

    The Therac 20 is an AECL medical linear accelerator that produces electron and photon beams. Electron fields are produced by a scanned beam; collimation is provided by two sets of primary collimators and further collimated by external electron trimmers located 11 cm above the plane of isocenter (100 cm). These collimators are not suitable for intracavitary treatment. To overcome this limitation, we have designed an intracavitary cone system that attaches to the electron trimmers. Since the trimmers do not have to be removed while this system is in use, there is no need to bypass the associated interlock system. The apparatus consists of a platform which slides onto the lower set of trimmers, onto which a lead insert is attached. Dosimetry measurements for 9, 13, and 17 MeV electron beams are reported for three different treatment cones. PMID:3721928

  4. Comparison of measured Varian Clinac 21EX and TrueBeam accelerator electron field characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Samantha A M; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Gagne, Isabelle M

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric comparisons of radiation fields produced by Varian's newest linear accelerator, the TrueBeam, with those produced by older Varian accelerators are of interest from both practical and research standpoints. While photon fields have been compared in the literature, similar comparisons of electron fields have not yet been reported. In this work, electron fields produced by the TrueBeam are compared with those produced by Varian's Clinac 21EX accelerator. Diode measurements were taken of fields shaped with electron applicators and delivered at 100 cm SSD, as well as those shaped with photon MLCs without applicators and delivered at 70 cm SSD for field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 to 25 × 25 cm² at energies between 6 and 20 MeV. Additionally, EBT2 and EBT3 radio-chromic film measurements were taken of an MLC-shaped aperture with closed leaf pairs delivered at 70 cm SSD using 6 and 20 MeV electrons. The 6 MeV fields produced by the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX were found to be almost indistinguishable. At higher energies, TrueBeam fields shaped by electron applicators were generally flatter and had less photon contamination compared to the Clinac 21EX. Differences in PDDs and profiles fell within 3% and 3 mm for the majority of measurements. The most notable differences for open fields occurred in the profile shoulders for the largest applicator field sizes. In these cases, the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX data differed by as much as 8%. Our data indicate that an accurate electron beam model of the Clinac 21EX could be used as a starting point to simulate electron fields that are dosimetrically equivalent to those produced by the TrueBeam. Given that the Clinac 21EX shares head geometry with Varian's iX, Trilogy, and Novalis TX accelerators, our findings should also be applicable to these machines. PMID:26219015

  5. Measurements of the Influence of Acceleration and Temperature of Bodies on their Weight

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Alexander L.

    2008-01-21

    A brief review of experimental research of the influence of acceleration and temperatures of test mass upon gravitation force, executed between the 1990s and the beginning of 2000 at the St.-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics in cooperation with D. I. Mendeleev's Institute of Metrology is provided. According to a phenomenological notion, the acceleration of a test mass caused by external action, for example electromagnetic forces, results in changes of the gravitational properties of this mass. Consequences are a dependence upon gravity on the size and sign of test mass acceleration, and also on its absolute temperature. Results of weighing a rotor of a mechanical gyroscope with a horizontal axis, an anisotropic crystal with the big difference of the speed of longitudinal acoustic waves, measurements of temperature dependence of weight of metal bars of nonmagnetic materials, and also measurement of restitution coefficients at quasi-elastic impact of a steel ball about a massive plate are given. In particular, a reduction of apparent mass of a horizontal rotor with relative size 3.10{sup -6} at a speed of rotation of 18.6 thousand rev/min was observed. A negative temperature dependence of the weight of a brass core with relative size near 5.10{sup -4} K{sup -1} at room temperature was measured; this temperature factor was found to be a maximum for light and elastic metals. All observably experimental effects, have probably a general physical reason connected with the weight change dependent upon acceleration of a body or at thermal movement of its microparticles. The reduction of mass at high temperatures is of particular interest for propulsion applications.

  6. Measurements of the Influence of Acceleration and Temperature of Bodies on their Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    A brief review of experimental research of the influence of acceleration and temperatures of test mass upon gravitation force, executed between the 1990s and the beginning of 2000 at the St.-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics in cooperation with D. I. Mendeleev's Institute of Metrology is provided. According to a phenomenological notion, the acceleration of a test mass caused by external action, for example electromagnetic forces, results in changes of the gravitational properties of this mass. Consequences are a dependence upon gravity on the size and sign of test mass acceleration, and also on its absolute temperature. Results of weighing a rotor of a mechanical gyroscope with a horizontal axis, an anisotropic crystal with the big difference of the speed of longitudinal acoustic waves, measurements of temperature dependence of weight of metal bars of nonmagnetic materials, and also measurement of restitution coefficients at quasi-elastic impact of a steel ball about a massive plate are given. In particular, a reduction of apparent mass of a horizontal rotor with relative size 3.10-6 at a speed of rotation of 18.6 thousand rev/min was observed. A negative temperature dependence of the weight of a brass core with relative size near 5.10-4 K-1 at room temperature was measured; this temperature factor was found to be a maximum for light and elastic metals. All observably experimental effects, have probably a general physical reason connected with the weight change dependent upon acceleration of a body or at thermal movement of its microparticles. The reduction of mass at high temperatures is of particular interest for propulsion applications.

  7. Inertial measurement with trapped particles: A microdynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Post, E. Rehmi; Popescu, George A.; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2010-04-05

    We describe an inertial measurement device based on an electrodynamically trapped proof mass. Mechanical constraints are replaced by guiding fields, permitting the trap stiffness to be tuned dynamically. Optical readout of the proof mass motion provides a measurement of acceleration and rotation, resulting in an integrated six degree of freedom inertial measurement device. We demonstrate such a device - constructed without microfabrication - with sensitivity comparable to that of commercial microelectromechanical systems technology and show how trapping parameters may be adjusted to increase dynamic range.

  8. Computer aided coordinate measuring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastri, J. W.

    Sikorsky's computer-aided inspection system and equipment utilized to assure that manufactured parts meet drawing tolerance specifications are discussed. An overview of the system is given, and the software is described, including the monitor console routine and commands and the language commands. The system's three coordinate measuring machines are discussed, and the part inspection methods are described in stepwise fashion. System benefits and time savings items are detailed, including quick and accurate measurement of parts difficult to inspect by conventional methods, significant reduction in inspection time, a consistent baseline that highlights variances, and the use of personnel with lower skill levels to effectively inspect critical parts.

  9. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  10. Diffusive Shock Acceleration Simulations: Comparison with Particle Methods and Bow Shock Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    1995-07-01

    Direct comparisons of diffusive particle acceleration numerical simulations have been made against Monte Carlo and hybrid plasma simulations by Ellison et al. (1993) and against observations at the Earth's bow shock presented by Ellison et al. (1990). Toward this end we have introduced a new numerical scheme for injection of cosmic-ray particles out of the thermal plasma, modeled by way of the diffusive scattering process itself; that is, the diffusion and acceleration across the shock front of particles out of the suprathermal tail of the Maxwellian distribution. Our simulations take two forms. First, we have solved numerically the timedependent diffusion-advection equation for the high-energy (cosmic-ray) protons in one-dimensional quasiparallel shocks. Dynamical feedback between the particles and thermal plasma is included. The proton fluxes on both sides of the shock derived from our method are consistent with those calculated by Ellison et al. (1993). A similar test has compared our methods to published measurements at the Earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was almost parallel to the solar wind velocity (Ellison et al. 1990). Again our results are in good agreement. Second, the same shock conditions have been simulated with the two-fluid version of diffusive shock acceleration theory by adopting injection rates and the closure parameters inferred from the diffusion-advection equation calculations. The acceleration efficiency and the shock structure calculated with the two-fluid method are in good agreement with those computed with the diffusion-advection method. Thus, we find that all of these computational methods (diffusion-advection, two-fluid, Monte Carlo, and hybrid) are in substantial agreement on the issues they can simultaneously address, so that the essential physics of diffusive particle acceleration is adequately contained within each. This is despite the fact that each makes what appear to be very different assumptions or

  11. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  12. Acceleration and rotation in a pendulum ride, measured using an iPhone 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Rohlén, Johan

    2011-11-01

    Many modern cell phones have built-in sensors that may be used as a resource for physics education. Amusement rides offer examples of many different types of motion, where the acceleration leads to forces experienced throughout the body. A comoving 3D-accelerometer gives an electronic measurement of the varying forces acting on the rider, but a complete description of a motion also requires measurement of the rotation around the three axes, as provided, for example, by the iPhone 4. Here we present and interpret accelerometer and gyroscope data that were collected on a rotary pendulum ride.

  13. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  14. Nuclear Effects of Supernova-Accelerated Cosmic Rays on Early Solar System Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-03-01

    The solar system apparently formed in the neighborhood of massive stars. Supernova explosions of these stars accelerate cosmic rays to 100s of TeVs. These cosmic rays could accelerate the beta decay of certain radioactive species in meteorite parent bodies.

  15. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-17

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  16. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  17. Design of the fiber optic support system and fiber bundle accelerated life test for VIRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ian M.; Beno, Joseph H.; Hayes, Richard J.; Heisler, James T.; Mock, Jason R.; Mollison, Nicholas T.; Good, John M.; Hill, Gary J.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Anderson, Seth C.; Bauer, Svend M.; Kelz, Andreas; Roth, Martin M.; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2010-07-01

    The quantity and length of optical fibers required for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope* Dark Energy eXperiment (HETDEX) create unique fiber handling challenges. For HETDEX‡, at least 33,600 fibers will transmit light from the focal surface of the telescope to an array of spectrographs making up the Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS). Up to 96 Integral Field Unit (IFU) bundles, each containing 448 fibers, hang suspended from the telescope's moving tracker located more than 15 meters above the VIRUS instruments. A specialized mechanical system is being developed to support fiber optic assemblies onboard the telescope. The discrete behavior of 448 fibers within a conduit is also of primary concern. A life cycle test must be conducted to study fiber behavior and measure Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) as a function of time. This paper focuses on the technical requirements and design of the HETDEX fiber optic support system, the electro-mechanical test apparatus for accelerated life testing of optical fiber assemblies. Results generated from the test will be of great interest to designers of robotic fiber handling systems for major telescopes. There is concern that friction, localized contact, entanglement, and excessive tension will be present within each IFU conduit and contribute to FRD. The test apparatus design utilizes six linear actuators to replicate the movement of the telescope over 65,000 accelerated cycles, simulating five years of actual operation.

  18. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  19. Measurements of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator's low charge, 4 MeV RF photocathode witness beam.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.

    1998-04-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator's (AWA) witness RF photocathode gun produced its first electron beam in April of 1996. We have characterized the charge, energy, emittance and bunch length of the witness beam over the last several months. The emittance Was measured by both a quad scan that fitted for space charge using an in house developed Mathematica routine and a pepper pot technique. The bunch length was measured by imaging Cherenkov light from a quartz plate to a Hamamatsu streak camera with 2 psec resolution. A beam energy of 3.9 Mev was measured with a 6 inch round pole spectrometer while a beam charge was measured with both an ICT and a Faraday Cup. Although the gun will normally be run at 100 pC it has produced charges from 10 pC to 4 nc. All results of the measurements to date are presented here.

  20. Neutron field measurements for alara purposes around a Van de Graaff accelerator building.

    PubMed

    Kockerols, P; Lebacq, A L; Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Janssens, H; Lövestam, G; Vanhavere, F

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements operates a 7.0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator to generate monoenergetic neutron radiation for experimental applications. Owing to increased intensities of generated neutron fields and the more stringent regulation related to the maximum dose for the public, a concrete shielding wall surrounding the experimental building was constructed. This paper presents a study aiming at evaluating the effect of the shielding on the neutron field outside the wall. For this purpose, the following measurements were carried out around the building: (1) cartography of the neutron field for different experimental conditions; (2) measurement of neutron spectra using multiple Bonner spheres; (3) activation measurements using gold discs followed by low-level gamma spectrometry. From the measurements, it can be concluded that the wall fulfils its purpose to reduce the neutron dose rate to the surrounding area to an acceptable level. PMID:15353736

  1. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  2. Development of backsheet tests and measurements to improve correlation of accelerated exposures to fielded modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Thomas C.; Gambogi, William J.; Kopchick, James G.; Amspacher, Lucas; Peacock, R. Scott; Foltz, Benjamin; Stika, Katherine M.; Bradley, Alexander Z.; Hamzavy, Babak; Yu, Bao-Ling; Garreau-iles, Lucie; Fu, Oakland; Hu, Hongjie; Trout, T. John

    2015-09-01

    Matching accelerated test results to field observations is an important objective in the photovoltaic industry. We continue to develop test methods to strengthen correlations. We have previously reported good correlation of FTIR spectra between accelerated tests and field measurements. The availability of portable FTIR spectrometers has made measurement in the field convenient and reliable. Recently, nano-indentation has shown promise to correlate changes in backsheet mechanical properties. A precisely shaped stylus is pressed into a sample, load vs displacement recorded and mechanical properties of interest calculated in a nondestructive test. This test can be done on full size modules, allowing area variations in mechanical properties to be recorded. Finally, we will discuss optical profilometry. In this technique a white light interferogram of a surface is Fourier transformed to produce a three-dimensional image. Height differences from 1 nm to 5 mm can be detected over an area of a few cm. This technique can be used on minimodules, and is useful to determine crack and defect dimensions. Results will be presented correlating accelerated tests with fielded modules covering spectroscopic, mechanical, and morphological changes.

  3. Cantilever-based FBG sensor for temperature-independent acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Yongxing; Zhao, Chun-Liu

    2009-11-01

    A novel accelerometer based on a strain-chirped optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed. The FBG is glued in a slanted direction onto the lateral side of a right-angled triangle cantilever beam with a mass bonded on its free end. Vertical acceleration applied to the cantilever beam leads to a uniform bending along the beam length. As a result, the FBG is chirped and its reflection bandwidth changes linearly with the applied acceleration. A high sensitivity of 0.679 nm/g has been achieved in the experiment. The experimental results of the sensor are compared with the results of a conventional accelerometer for the dynamic measurements. This sensor is temperature insensitive, owning to the temperature-independence nature of reflection bandwidth of the FBG.

  4. Influence of tungsten fiber's slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Zhan, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jun-Fei; Milyukov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  5. Influence of tungsten fiber's slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Zhan, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jun-Fei; Milyukov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm. PMID:27587137

  6. Voltage measurements at the vacuum post-hole convolute of the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waisman, E. M.; McBride, R. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Wenger, D. F.; Fowler, W. E.; Johnson, W. A.; Basilio, L. I.; Coats, R. S.; Jennings, C. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lemke, R. W.; Martin, M. R.; Schrafel, P. C.; Lewis, S. A.; Moore, J. K.; Savage, M. E.; Stygar, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Presented are voltage measurements taken near the load region on the Z pulsed-power accelerator using an inductive voltage monitor (IVM). Specifically, the IVM was connected to, and thus monitored the voltage at, the bottom level of the accelerator's vacuum double post-hole convolute. Additional voltage and current measurements were taken at the accelerator's vacuum-insulator stack (at a radius of 1.6 m) by using standard D -dot and B -dot probes, respectively. During postprocessing, the measurements taken at the stack were translated to the location of the IVM measurements by using a lossless propagation model of the Z accelerator's magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) and a lumped inductor model of the vacuum post-hole convolute. Across a wide variety of experiments conducted on the Z accelerator, the voltage histories obtained from the IVM and the lossless propagation technique agree well in overall shape and magnitude. However, large-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations are more pronounced in the IVM records. It is unclear whether these larger oscillations represent true voltage oscillations at the convolute or if they are due to noise pickup and/or transit-time effects and other resonant modes in the IVM. Results using a transit-time-correction technique and Fourier analysis support the latter. Regardless of which interpretation is correct, both true voltage oscillations and the excitement of resonant modes could be the result of transient electrical breakdowns in the post-hole convolute, though more information is required to determine definitively if such breakdowns occurred. Despite the larger oscillations in the IVM records, the general agreement found between the lossless propagation results and the results of the IVM shows that large voltages are transmitted efficiently through the MITLs on Z . These results are complementary to previous studies [R. D. McBride et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 13, 120401 (2010)] that showed efficient

  7. Design and test results of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Bradley, J. III; Cummings, K.; Lynch, M.; Regan, A.; Rohlev, T.; Roybal, W.; Wang, Y.M.

    1998-12-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The APT accelerator requires over 200 RF systems each with a continuous wave output power of 1 MW. The reliability and availability of these RF systems is critical to the successful operation of the APT plant and prototypes of these systems are being developed and demonstrated on LEDA. The RF system design for LEDA includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz continuous wave (CW), RF systems driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and one, 1.0 MW, CW, RF system driving a coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL). This paper presents the design and test results for these RF systems including the klystrons, cathode power supply, circulators, RF vacuum windows, accelerator field and resonance control system, and RF transmission components. The three RF systems driving the RFQ use the accelerating structure as a power combiner, and this places some unique requirements on the RF system. These requirements and corresponding operational implications will be discussed.

  8. A procedure for combining rotating-coil measurements of large-aperture accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Oliver; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    The rotating search coil is a precise and widely used tool for measuring the magnetic field harmonics of accelerator magnets. This paper deals with combining several such multipole measurements, in order to cover magnet apertures largely exceeding the diameter of the available search coil. The method relies on the scaling laws for multipole coefficients and on the method of analytic continuation along zero-homotopic paths. By acquiring several measurements of the integrated magnetic flux density at different transverse positions within the bore of the accelerator magnet, the uncertainty on the field harmonics can be reduced at the expense of tight tolerances on the positioning. These positioning tolerances can be kept under control by mounting the rotating coil and its motor-drive unit on precision alignment stages. Therefore, the proposed technique is able to yield even more precise results for the higher-order field components than a dedicated rotating search coil of larger diameter. Moreover, the versatility of the measurement bench is enhanced by avoiding the construction of rotating search coils of different measurement radii.

  9. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Exploitation of photogrammetry measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Hai; Liang, Jin; Guo, Cheng; Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Chen, Zhi-Xin

    2010-03-01

    A digital photogrammetry measurement system (XJTUDP) is developed in this work, based on close range industry. Studies are carried out on key technologies of a photogrammetry measurement system, such as the high accuracy measurement method of a marker point center based on a fitting subpixel edge, coded point design and coded point autodetection, calibration of a digital camera, and automatic image point matching algorithms. The 3-D coordinates of object points are reconstructed using colinear equations, image orientation based on coplanarity equations, direct linear transformation solution, outer polar-line constraints, 3-D reconstruction, and a bundle adjustment solution. Through the use of circular coded points, the newly developed measurement system first locates the positions of the camera automatically. Matching and reconstruction of the uncoded points are resolved using the outer polar-line geometry of multiple positions of the camera. The normal vector of the marker points is used to eliminate the error caused by the thickness of the marker points. XJTUDP and TRITOP systems are tested on the basis of VDI/VDE2634 guidelines, respectively. Results show that their precision is less than 0.1 mm/m. The measurement results of a large-scale waterwheel blade by XJTUDP show that this photogrammetry system can be applied to industrial measurements.

  12. Airborne Atmospheric Aerosol Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K.; Park, Y.; Eun, H.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the atmospheric aerosols compositions and size distributions since they greatly affect the environment and human health. Particles in the convection layer have been a great concern in global climate changes. To understand these characteristics satellite, aircraft, and radio sonde measurement methods have usually been used. An aircraft aerosol sampling using a filter and/or impactor was the method commonly used (Jay, 2003). However, the flight speed particle sampling had some technical limitations (Hermann, 2001). Moreover, the flight legal limit, altitude, prohibited airspace, flight time, and cost was another demerit. To overcome some of these restrictions, Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and Recoverable Sonde System(R.S.S.) were developed with a very light optical particle counter (OPC), impactor, and condensation particle counter (CPC). Not only does it collect and measure atmospheric aerosols depending on altitudes, but it also monitors the atmospheric conditions, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, pressure, GPS data, during the measurement (Eun, 2013). In this research, atmospheric aerosol measurement using T.B.P.S. in Ansan area is performed and the measurement results will be presented. The system can also be mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and create an aerial particle concentration map. Finally, we will present measurement data using Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and R.S.S (Recoverable Sonde System).

  13. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  14. Characterization of ion accelerating systems on NASA LeRC's ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding ion-accelerating systems for two NASA thrusters to study the limits of ion-extraction capability or perveance. A total of nine two-grid ion-accelerating systems are tested with the 30- and 50-cm-diam ring-cusp inert-gas ion thrusters emphasizing the extension of ion-extraction. The vacuum-tank testing is described using xenon, krypton, and argon propellants, and thruster performance is computed with attention given to theoretical design considerations. Reductions in perveance are noted with decreasing accelerator-hole-to-screen-hole diameter ratios. Perveance values vary indirectly with the ratio of discharge voltage to total accelerating voltage, and screen/accelerator electrode hole-pair alignment is also found to contribute to perveance values.

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Linear Electron Acceleration by Inertial Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, J. W. R.

    2015-11-01

    Alfvén waves occur in conjunction with a significant fraction of auroral electron acceleration. Inertial mode Alfvén waves (vA >vte) in the auroral magnetosphere (2 - 4RE) with perpendicular scales on the order of the electron skin depth (c /ωpe) have a parallel electric field that, according to theory, is capable of nonlinearly accelerating suprathermal electrons to auroral energies. Unfortunately, due to space-time ambiguities of rocket and satellite measurements, it has not yet been possible to fully verify how Alfvén waves contribute to the production of accelerated electrons. To overcome the limitations of in situ spacecraft data, laboratory experiments have been carried out using the Large Plasma Device (LaPD), an NSF/DOE user facility at UCLA. An Electron Cyclotron Absorption (ECA) diagnostic has been developed to record the suprathermal parallel electron distribution function with 0.1% precision. The diagnostic records the electron distribution while inertial Alfvén waves simultaneously propagate through the plasma. Recent measurements have isolated oscillations of suprathermal electrons at the Alfvén wave frequency. Despite complications from boundary effects and the finite size of the experiment, a linear kinetic model has been produced that describes the experimental results. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative agreement between the measured and modeled linear response of suprathermal electrons to an inertial Alfvén wave. This verification of the linear physics is a necessary step before the nonlinear acceleration process can be isolated in future experiments. Presently, nonlinear effects cannot be detected because of limited Alfvén wave amplitudes. Ongoing work is focused on designing a higher-power antenna capable of efficiently launching larger-amplitude Alfvén waves with tunable perpendicular wavenumber and developing a theoretical understanding of the nonlinear acceleration process in LaPD plasma conditions. This material is

  16. On the effect of accelerated winds on the wave growth through detailed laboratory measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Hernández, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    The possible influence of accelerated winds on air-water momentum fluxes is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide information corresponding to rather short non-dimensional fetch not previously reported. Wave evolution along the tank is determined through a series of wave gauges, and the wind-induced surface drift is obtained at one of the first measuring stations at the beginning of the tank. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Data from the constant high winds provided us with reference equilibrium conditions for at least 3 different wind speed. We, nevertheless, focus in the recordings while wind was being constantly accelerated expecting some contribution to the understanding of gustiness, the implied wind wave growth and the onset of surface drift. Wind-wave growth is observed to lag behind the wind stress signal, and furthermore, a two regime wind stress is noticed, apparently well correlated with a) the incipient growth and appearance of the first waves and b) the arrival of waves from the up-wind section of the tank. Results of non-dimensional wave energy as a function of non-dimensional fetch represent an extension of at least 2 decades shorter non-dimensional fetch to the wave growth curves typically found in the literature. The linear tendency of wave growth compares very well only when wind is reaching its maximum, while during the accelerated wind

  17. Fuel retention measurements in Alcator C-Mod using accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Lanza, Richard C.; Lipschultz, Bruce; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first in situ time- and space-resolved measurements of deuterium (D) fuel retention in plasma-facing component (PFC) surfaces using Accelerator-based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. AIMS is a novel in situ materials diagnostic technique based on the spectroscopic analysis of nuclear reaction products induced in PFC surfaces using an ∼MeV beam of deuterons from a compact linear accelerator in between plasma shots. AIMS measurements of D retention on inner wall PFCs were acquired during diverted and limited plasma operations and during wall conditioning experiments. Intershot measurements demonstrate the local erosion and codeposition of boron films on PFC surfaces with a constant D / B ratio. This is consistent with previous results suggesting that D codeposition with boron is insufficient to account for the net retention observed in Alcator C-Mod. Changes in deuterium concentration during boronization, electron cyclotron and glow cleanings were also measured.

  18. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  19. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  20. Mobile-accelerator neutron-radiography system. Final report, February 1978-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Dance, W.E.; Carollo, S.F.; Bumgardner, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    The use of neutron radiography for the inspection and maintenance of large structures such as aircraft has been delayed by the absence of a mobile system particularly suited to the requirements of field use. This report describes the production, extensive field testing, evaluation and disposition of the first mobile neutron radiography system to satisfy the majority of requirements for field use. The system is based upon the concept of a mobile on-off neutron radiography system based on a sealed-tube ion accelerator as neutron source demonstrated earlier by the Vought Corporation. Primary features of the system are its self-propelled mobility, versatile positioning capability scaled to Army helicopter dimensions, an on-off beam capability, exposure capability measured in minutes, and suitability for AMMRC laboratory and field use. Included in the report are a description of all components of the system, an evaluation of the operation of the system, an evaluation of its radiographic capabilities, a description of installation elements for the AMMRC site, and recommendations for next-generation systems.

  1. Advantages and safety features using foundation fieldbus-H1 based instrumentation & control for cryo system in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S.; Haneef, K. K. M.; Jayaram, M. N.; Lalsare, D. K.

    2008-05-01

    Large accelerator programme instrumentation and control for monitoring of large no. of parameters for cryogenic/cooling system. The parameters are Cryo Temperature, Vacuum, He Level and He flow etc. The circumference of the accelerator may vary up to several kilometers. Large size accelerators require huge cabling and hardware. The use of foundation fieldbus based Transmitters for measurement and Control valves field positioners for cryo system shall reduce the cabling, hardware, maintenance and enhance data processing and interoperability. Safety is an important requirement for efficient, trouble free and safe operation of any process industry such as cryo used in accelerators. Instrumentation and Control systems can be developed using Foundation Field Bus. The safety features in foundation field bus system can be achieved by use of intrinsic safe devices, fail safe configuration, minimize the hazard by distribution of control function blocks, short circuit preventers. Apart from above features, the significant cable reduction in the fieldbus system reduces the hazard due to electrical cable fire, which is considered one of the major risk in industry. Further the reliability in fieldbus can be improved by hot stand-by redundant power supply, hot stand-by redundant CPU, hot stand-by redundant network capability and use of link active scheduler.

  2. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Acceleration Signals Measured from a Wave Buoy

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals. PMID:23966188

  3. Measurement of performance using acceleration control and pulse control in simulated spacecraft docking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Nine commercial airline pilots served as test subjects in a study to compare acceleration control with pulse control in simulated spacecraft maneuvers. Simulated remote dockings of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station were initiated from 50, 100, and 150 meters along the station's -V-bar (minus velocity vector). All unsuccessful missions were reflown. Five way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) with one between factor, first mode, and four within factors (mode, bloch, range, and trial) were performed on the data. Recorded performance measures included mission duration and fuel consumption along each of the three coordinate axes. Mission duration was lower with pulse mode, while delta V (fuel consumption) was lower with acceleration mode. Subjects used more fuel to travel faster with pulse mode than with acceleration mode. Mission duration, delta V, X delta V, Y delta V., and Z delta V all increased with range. Subjects commanded the OMV to 'fly' at faster rates from further distances. These higher average velocities were paid for with increased fuel consumption. Asymmetrical transfer was found in that the mode transitions could not be predicted solely from the mission duration main effect. More testing is advised to understand the manual control aspects of spaceflight maneuvers better.

  4. Small scale particle acceleration processes in the auroral region: Remote sensing and "in situ" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, R.; Berthomier, M.; Pickett, J.

    2012-04-01

    Among the many problems in auroral physics that are barely understood the microphysical problems occupy a majority position. Thanks to high sampling and telemetry rates implemented on spacecraft devoted to the study of the auroral regions such as POLAR, FAST, CLUSTER 2…, it has become possible to determine the role of transient nonlinear structures in the basic microscopic processes regulating the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere interactions. Great progress has been achieved in probing the nonlinear turbulent plasma processes which accelerate energetic particles and generate radiation such as the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) in the auroral upward current region. Narrow-in-altitude acceleration layers (double layers) can be identified by using both particles and waves measurements. Double layers once immersed in the plasma necessarily accelerate particles along the magnetic field, thereby generating locally strong turbulent processes leading to the formation of phase-space holes. As predicted by numerical simulations, we will emphasize the asymmetric character of the turbulence generated in the regions located upstream (low-potential side) or downstream (high-potential side) of a double layer. We will also point out that monitoring the time variation of the frequency drift of the elementary AKR radiators allows to qualitatively infer about the dynamics and the spatial extension of the field-aligned potential drops.

  5. Continuous wavelet transform analysis of acceleration signals measured from a wave buoy.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals. PMID:23966188

  6. Results of Measurements of Accelerations of Technological Devices onboard the FotonSpacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, I. V.; Volkov, M. V.; Egorov, A. V.; Reut, E. F.; Senchenkov, A. S.

    2001-07-01

    This paper generalizes the results of measuring the residual accelerations arising when investigations in space materials science are carried out onboard the unmanned Fotonspacecraft. The levels of vibroaccelerations are analyzed in the frequency band of 1 500 Hz for the technological devices UZ01, UZ04, and POLIZON, developed by the Federal Unitary State Enterprise “Barmin Design Bureau of General Machine Building” (V.P. Barmin KBOM). The levels of accelerations are estimated in the frequency band of 0 1 Hz in the zone of technological operations of these facilities. The basic sources of vibroaccelerations acting upon the frames of devices are determined in the capsule zone, where technological processes of producing new materials take place. In the frequency band of 1 500 Hz the vibroaccelerations are shown to be generated by the operation of Fotonspacecraft units and a drive of capsule translation during the technological process. On the capsule frame they reach the values of (1 3) × 10 3 g. The level of linear accelerations in the infralow-frequency band is determined by rotational motions of the Fotonspacecraft. It depends on the device location with respect to the spacecraft center of mass and does not exceed (1 7) × 10 6 gin the steady-state regime in the zone of technological activity.

  7. TRI-SERVICE SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS PENETROMETER SYSTEM (SCAPS) ACCELERATED SENSOR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1994, the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funded a Tri-Service effort to accelerate the development and fielding of environmental sensing technologies to extend the capabilities of the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCA...

  8. Development of repetitive railgun pellet accelerator and steady-state pellet supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Azuma, K.; Kasai, S.; Hasegawa, K.

    1995-12-31

    A railgun system for repetitive high-speed pellet acceleration and steady-state pellet supply system has been developed and investigated. Using a 2m-long railgun system, the hydrogen pellet was accelerated to 2.6km/sec by the supplied energy of 1.7kJ. It is expected that the hydrogen pellet can be accelerated to 3km/sec using the present pneumatic pellet accelerator and a 2m-long augment railgun. Screw-driven hydrogen-isotope filament extruding system has been fabricated and will be tested to examine its applicability to the steady-state extrusion of the solid hydrogen-isotope filament.

  9. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E.; Garza, K.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D. O.; Dandouras, I. S.; Fornacon, K.; Lucek, E. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modelling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  10. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E. J.; Garza, K. J.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D.; Dandouras, I.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; Lucek, E.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2012-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modeling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  11. Optimization of accelerator system performance at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1994-10-01

    There is an active program of accelerator development at the NSLS aimed at improving reliability, stability and brightness. Work is primarily focused on providing improved performance for the NSLS user community, however, important elements of our work have a generic character and should be of value to other synchrotron radiation facilities. In particular, we have successfully operated a small gap undulator with a full vertical beam aperture of only 3.8 mm, with no degradation of beam lifetime. This provides strong support for the belief that small gap, short period devices will play an important role in the future.

  12. The Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research Underground - CASPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2014-03-01

    An accelerator laboratory (CASPAR) to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is being constructed by a collaboration lead by South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The study of alpha induced reactions of astrophysical interest in a quasi-background free environment is the goal of the laboratory. Specifically, neutron producing reactions for the s-process will be investigated. This process is responsible for the nucleosynthesis of half of the the elements heavier than iron. An outline of CASPAR, its timeline and scientific goals will be presented.

  13. Fast Neutron Radiography at an RFQ Accelerator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, G. C.; Franklyn, C. B.; Dangendorf, V.; Buffler, A.; Bromberger, B.

    This work introduces the Necsa Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator facility and its work concerning fast neutron radiography (FNR). Necsa operates a 4-5 MeV, up to 50 mA deuteron RFQ. The previous deuterium gas target station has been modified to enable producing a white neutron beam employing a solid B4C target. Furthermore, the high energy beam transport (HEBT) section is under adjustment to achieve a longer flight-path and a better focus. This work presents an overview of the facility, the modifications made, and introduces past and ongoing neutron radiography investigations.

  14. [The first linear electron accelerator, the Therac 15 Saturne, in clinical service. I. Technical data and measurements in photon radiation].

    PubMed

    Strauch, B

    1983-09-01

    A report is given about the linear electron accelerator operating at the Alfried Krupp Krankenhaus in Essen. This is the first accelerator of the type Therac Saturne supplied for 15 MeV. Besides a description of the most important technical data and the service instructions, dosimetric data for 12 MV photon radiation are presented. The authors communicate the clinical experiences gained hitherto with the accelerator and the patient-orientated verification and recording system which has still to be improved, especially as far as the recording part is concerned. The accelerator meets the requirements of radiologic oncology. PMID:6636211

  15. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  16. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  17. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  18. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired. PMID:19054679

  19. Measurement of Asymmetric Optical Pumping of Ions Accelerating in a Magnetic-field Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan Sun; Earl Scime; Mahmood Miah; Samuel Cohen; Frederick Skiff

    2004-10-28

    We report observations of asymmetric optical pumping of argon ions accelerating in a magnetic field gradient. The signature is a difference in the laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) emission amplitude from a pair of Zeeman-split states. A model that reproduces the dependence of the asymmetry on magnetic-field and ion-velocity gradients is described. With the model, the fluorescence intensity ratio provides a new method of measuring ion collisionality. This phenomenon has implications for interpreting stellar plasma spectroscopy data which often exhibit unequal Zeeman state intensities.

  20. Proposed method for high-speed plasma density measurement in proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkeshian, R.; Reimann, O.; Muggli, P.

    2012-12-21

    Recently a proton-bunch-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the CERN-SPS beam was proposed. Different types of plasma cells are under study, especially laser ionization, plasma discharge, and helicon sources. One of the key parameters is the spatial uniformity of the plasma density profile along the cell that has to be within < 1% of the nominal density (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}). Here a setup based on a photomixing concept is proposed to measure the plasma cut-off frequency and determine the plasma density.