Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator based experiments

  1. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Facilitating an accelerated experience-based co-design project.

    PubMed

    Tollyfield, Ruth

    This article describes an accelerated experience-based co-design (AEBCD) quality improvement project that was undertaken in an adult critical care setting and the facilitation of that process. In doing so the aim is to encourage other clinical settings to engage with their patients, carers and staff alike and undertake their own quality improvement project. Patient, carer and staff experience and its place in the quality sphere is outlined and the importance of capturing patient, carer and staff feedback established. Experience-based co-design (EBCD) is described along with the recently tested accelerated version of the process. An overview of the project and outline of the organisational tasks and activities undertaken by the facilitator are given. The facilitation of the process and key outcomes are discussed and reflected on. Recommendations for future undertakings of the accelerated process are given and conclusions drawn. PMID:24526020

  3. Accelerator-based Experiments For Introductory-level Undergraduates

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Justin M.

    2009-03-10

    Although accelerator based experiments for undergraduates are often considered only for junior or senior physics majors, introductory students can also benefit from them. Rutherford backscattering and a {sup 12}C(p,p){sup 12}C elastic scattering resonance can be presented in ways that are well-suited for students who have taken only an introductory physics course.

  4. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  5. Operational experience from a large EPICS-based accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarlette, D.J.; Gerig, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation x-ray light source which uses the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) to operate its linear accelerator, positron accumulator ring, booster synchrotron, and storage ring equipment. EPICS has been used at the APS since the beginning of installation and commissioning. Currently, EPICS controls approximately 100 VME crates containing over 100,000 process variables. With this complexity, the APS has had to review some of the methods originally employed and make changes as necessary. In addition, due to commissioning and operational needs, higher-level operator software needed to be created. EPICS has been flexible enough to allow this.

  6. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  7. Laser-based acceleration for nuclear physics experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesileanu, O.; Asavei, Th.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Negoita, F.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the Extreme Light pan-European research infrastructure, Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Romania will focus on topics in Nuclear Physics, fundamental Physics and applications, based on very intense photon beams. Laser-based acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy ions is a prerequisite for a multitude of laser-driven nuclear physics experiments already proposed by the international research community. A total of six outputs of the dual-amplification chain laser system, two of 100TW, two of 1PW and two of 10PW will be employed in 5 experimental areas, with the possibility to use long and short focal lengths, gas and solid targets, reaching the whole range of laser acceleration processes. We describe the main techniques and expectations regarding the acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy nuclei at ELI-NP, and some physics cases for which these techniques play an important role in the experiments.

  8. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  9. Sprint Accelerations to First Base Among Major League Baseball Players With Different Years of Career Experience.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A Eugene; Amonette, William E

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare times to first base in Major League Baseball games to determine whether running velocity decreases to the foul line and first base among players with differing years of playing experience. From 1998 to 2012, 1,185 sprint times to first base were analyzed: 469 outfielders, 601 infielders, and 115 catchers. The players were divided into differing experience categories depending on their years of service in Major League Baseball: 1-5, 6-10, 11-15, and 16-20+ years. Velocity at the foul line and first base was compared and interval accelerations were reported. Comparisons were completed by playing position, and within left- and right-handed batters. Left-handed outfielders exhibited reduced velocities at 6-10 (p = 0.04), 11-15 (p = 0.004), and 16-20 years (p < 0.001) compared with 1-5 years; there were no statistical differences in velocity at the foul line. Right-handed outfielders exhibited significantly reduced velocities at first base in 6-10 (p = 0.002) and 11-15 years (p = 0.001); they also had a reduced velocities at the foul line in 6-10 (p = 0.004) and 11-15 years (p = 0.009). Right-handed infielders had reduced velocities at first base in 11-15 years (p < 0.001). No other differences were observed within infielders at first base or the foul line. There were no differences within the compared variables for catchers. Decreases in running velocity to first base with experience are seen in outfielders but are less prominent in infielders and catchers. Although physical capabilities for sprinting may decline with age, it is possible that through repetition more experienced players perfect the skill-related component of running to first base, thus preserving speed. PMID:25353082

  10. 3D Simulations for a Micron-Scale, Dielectric-Based Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.; Xu Jin; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental program to demonstrate a dielectric, slab-symmetric accelerator structure has been underway for the past two years. These resonant devices are driven by a side-coupled 800-nm laser and can be configured to maintain the field profile necessary for synchronous acceleration and focusing of relativistic or nonrelativistic particles. We present 3D simulations of various versions of the structure geometry, including a metal-walled structure relevant to ongoing cold tests on resonant properties, and an all-dielectric structure to be constructed for a proof-of-principle acceleration experiment.

  11. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  12. Experiment specific processing of residual acceleration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    To date, most Spacelab residual acceleration data collection projects have resulted in data bases that are overwhelming to the investigator of low-gravity experiments. This paper introduces a simple passive accelerometer system to measure low-frequency accelerations. Model responses for experiments using actual acceleration data are produced and correlations are made between experiment response and the accelerometer time history in order to test the idea that recorded acceleration data and experimental responses can be usefully correlated. Spacelab 3 accelerometer data are used as input to a variety of experiment models, and sensitivity limits are obtained for particular experiment classes. The modeling results are being used to create experiment-specific residual acceleration data processing schemes for interested investigators.

  13. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  14. Physico-Mechanical Characteristics of Freeze-Thaw Weathered Gneiss based on Accelerated Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study of physical weathering was performed on fresh and slightly weathered gneiss samples from the Wonju area of South Korea. The study investigated changes in the physico-mechanical properties of these samples during accelerated laboratory-based weathering, including analyses of microfracture formation. The deteriorated samples used in the study were subjected to 100-150 freeze-thaw cycles, with index properties and microfracture geometries measured between each cycle. Each complete freeze-thaw cycle lasted 24 hours, and consisted of 2 hours of saturation in a vacuum chamber, 8 hours of freezing at -21°C ±1°C, and 14 hours of thawing at room temperature. Specific gravity and seismic velocity values were negatively correlated with the number of freeze-thaw cycles, whereas absorption values tended to increase. The amount of deterioration of the rock samples was dependent on the degree of weathering of the rock prior to the start of the analysis. Absorption, specific gravity, and seismic velocity values can be used to infer the amount of physical weathering experienced by a gneiss in the study area. The sizes and density of microfracture in the rock specimens varied with the number of freeze-thaw cycles. It was found that box fractal dimensions can be used to quantify the formation and propagation of microfracture in the samples. In addition, these box fractal dimensions can be used as a weathering index for the mid- and long-term prediction of rock weathering. The present results indicate that accelerated-weathering analysis can provide a detailed overview of the weathering characteristics of deteriorated rocks.

  15. FXR accelerator cavity impedance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Avalle, C.A.

    1998-01-05

    One of the goals of the present Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator upgrade effort [1][2] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to reduce the cavity transverse impedance, since it has been shown that beam stability is significantly affected by this parameter [3]. Recently, we have evaluated various techniques and cell modifications to accomplish that, both through lab measurements and computer models. A spare cell, identical in every way to cells in the accelerator, was specially modified for the experiments. The impedance measurements were done without the beam, by applying twin-wire techniques. This report describes the results of these experiments and suggests possible cell modifications to improve their performance. The techniques and modifications which are suggested might also be applicable to AHF and DARHT-2 long-pulse accelerator development.

  16. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; Philip, Bobby; Sankaran, Ramanan; Tharrington, Arnold N.; Turner, John A.

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this paper we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.

  17. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; et al

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this papermore » we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.« less

  18. Accelerator physics experiments at Aladdin

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Cornacchia, M.; Jackson, A.; Zisman, M.S.

    1985-07-01

    The Aladdin accelerator is a 1 GeV synchrotron light source located at the University of Wisconsin. The results of experimental studies of the Aladdin accelerator are described. The primary purpose of the experiments reported was to investigate reported anomalies in the behavior of the linear lattice, particularly in the vertical plane. A second goal was to estimate the ring broadband impedance. Experimental observations and interpretation of the linear properties of the Aladdin ring are described, including the beta function and dispersion measurements. Two experiments are described to measure the ring impedance, the first a measurement of the parasitic mode loss, and the second a measurement of the beam transfer function. Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse emittance at 100 and 200 MeV are described and compared with predictions. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs. (LEW)

  19. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-06-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  20. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  1. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  2. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Tatsuzo

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) mission, is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the earth's ionosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator (EBA), plasma contactor, and associated instruments the purpose of which is to perform diagnostic, monitoring, and general data taking functions. Four major classes of investigations are to be performed by SEPAC. They are: beam plasma physics, beam-atmosphere interactions, the use of modulated electron beams as transmitting antennas, and the use of electron beams for remote sensing of electric and magnetic fields. The first class consists mainly of onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effects of phenomena in the vicinity of the shuttle. The last three are concerned with remote effects and are supported by other ATLAS 1 investigations as well as by ground-based observations.

  3. Space experiments with particle accelerators. [Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is to carry out active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for an overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are an electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma dynamic arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The accelerators are installed on the pallet, with monitoring and diagnostic observations being made by the gas plume release, beam-monitor TV, and particle-wave measuring instruments also mounted on the pallet. Command and display systems are installed in the module. Three major classes of investigations to be performed are vehicle charge neutralization, beam plasma physics, and beam atmosphere interactions. The first two are mainly onboard plasma physics experiments to measure the effect of phenomena in the vicinity of Spacelab. The last one is concerned with atmospheric modification and is supported by other Spacelab 1 investigations as well as by ground-based, remote sensing observations.

  4. Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment: Calibration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.; Larman, Kevin T.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), which has flown on STS-40, STS-50, and STS-58, contains a three-axis accelerometer with a single, nonpendulous, electrostatically suspended proofmass, which can resolve accelerations to the 10(sub -9) g level. The experiment also contains a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale-factor calibration. This on-orbit calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty of ground-based calibrations encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the Orbiter, and thus provides absolute acceleration measurement accuracy heretofore unachievable. This is the first time accelerometer scale-factor measurements have been performed on orbit. A detailed analysis of the calibration process is given, along with results of the calibration factors from the on-orbit OARE flight measurements on STS-58. In addition, the analysis of OARE flight-maneuver data used to validate the scale-factor measurements in the sensor's most sensitive range are also presented. Estimates on calibration uncertainties are discussed. These uncertainty estimates provides bounds on the STS-58 absolute acceleration measurements for future applications.

  5. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  6. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Sihver, L; Iwase, H; Nakashima, H; Niita, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4 degrees. PMID:15934196

  7. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sihver, L.; Iwase, H.; Nakashima, H.; Niita, K.

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4°.

  8. Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration experiment at ATF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fernow, R.; Kusche, K. P.; Liu, Y.; Kimura, W. D.; Kim, G. H.; Romea, R. D.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration was demonstrated using an axicon optical system at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF S-band linac and a high power 10.6 MICROMETERSCO2 laser were used for the experiment. Experimental arrangement and the laser and the electron beams synchronization are discussed. The electrons were accelerated more than 0.7 MeV for a 34 MW CO2 laser power. More than 3.7 MeV acceleration was measured with 0.7 GW CO2 laser power, which is more than 20 times of the previous ICA experiment. The experimental results are compared with computer program TRANSPORT simulations.

  9. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical problems, e.g. the role of shock compression in star formation. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory, to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. Experiments with flyer-generated shock waves have been performed on the Z machine in Sandia. The Zebra accelerator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) allows for complementary experiments with high repetition rate. First experiments on Zebra demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (around 2 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  10. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, S.; Ford, J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.

    2009-08-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena involve the interaction of a shock wave with an inhomogeneous background medium. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. First experiments on Zebra at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) have demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (up to 5 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  11. RF-Based Accelerators for HEDP Research

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John W.; Sessler, Andrew; Keller, Roderich; Ostroumov,Petr; Chou, Weiren

    2005-05-09

    Accelerator-driven High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments require typically 1 nanosecond, 1 microcoulomb pulses of mass 20 ions accelerated to several MeV to produce eV-level excitations in thin targets, the warm dense matter regime. Traditionally the province of induction linacs, RF-based acceleration may be a viable alternative with recent breakthroughs in accelerating structures and high-field compact superconducting solenoids. A reference design for an RF-based accelerator for HEDP research is presented using 15 T solenoids and multiple-gap RF structures configured with multiple parallel beams combined at the target. The beam is ballistically compressed with an induction linac core providing the necessary energy sweep and injected into a plasma-neutralized drift compression channel resulting in a 1 mm radius beam spot 1 nanosecond long at a thin foil or low-density target.

  12. Laboratory Reconnection Experiments - heating and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yasushi

    Recent laboratory merging/ reconnection experiments have solved a number of key physics of magnetic reconnection: 1) reconnection heating/ acceleration, 2) fast reconnection mechanisms, 3) plasmoid reconnection, 4) non-steady reconnection and 5) non-thermal particle acceleration using new kinetic interpretations. Especially, significant ion temperatures 1.2keV were documented in the world-largest tokamak merging experiment: MAST after detailed 2D elucidation of ion and electron heating characteristics in TS-3 and 4 merging experiments. The measured 2D contours of ion and electron temperatures in TS-3, 4 and MAST reveal ion heating in the downstream by reconnection outflow and electron heating around the X-point by ohmic heating of current sheet. Their detailed heating mechanisms were further investigated by comparing those results with particle simulations developed by NIFS. The ion acceleration mechanism is mostly parallel acceleration by reconnection electric field and partly perpendicular acceleration by electrostatic potential. The fast shock and ion viscosity are the major dumping (heating) mechanisms for the accelerated ions. We successfully applied the reconnection heating - typically 10-50MW to the high-beta spherical tokamak formation and heating. This paper will review major progresses in those international and interdisciplinary merging tokamak experiments.

  13. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Appel, J.A.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Escobar, C.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2010. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2010 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINER?A experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  14. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Bernardi, G.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hahn, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.

    2011-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2011. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2011 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  15. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

  16. Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration experiment at ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fernow, R.; Kusche, K.P.; Liu, Y.; Kimura, W.D.; Kim, G.H.; Romea, R.D.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1994-09-01

    Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration was demonstrated using an axicon optical system at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF S-band linac and a high power 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser were used for the experiment. Experimental arrangement and the laser and the electron beams synchronization are discussed. The electrons were accelerated more than 0.7 MeV for a 34 MW CO{sub 2} laser power. More than 3.7 MeV acceleration was measured with 0.7 GW CO{sub 2} laser power, which is more than 20 times of the previous ICA experiment. The experimental results are compared with computer program TRANSPORT simulations.

  17. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The SEPAC instruments consist of an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, a neutral gas (N2) release device, particle and field diagnostic instruments, and a low light level television system. These instruments are used to accomplish multiple experiments: to study beam-particle interactions and other plasma processes; as probes to investigate magnetospheric processes; and as perturbation devices to study energy coupling mechanisms in the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.

  18. Thinking and practice of accelerating transformation of traditional Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyan; Zhang, Yanhong; Hu, Jingqing; He, Liyun; Zhou, Xuezhong

    2011-06-01

    The gradual development of Chinese medicine is based on constant accumulation and summary of experience in clinical practice, but without the benefit of undergoing the experimental medicine stage. Although Chinese medicine has formed a systematic and unique theory system through thousands of years, with the development of evidence-based medicine, the bondage of the research methods of experience medicine to Chinese medicine is appearing. The rapid transition and transformation from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine have become important content in the development of Chinese medicine. According to the features of Chinese medicine, we propose the research idea of "taking two ways simultaneously," which is the study both in the ideal condition and in the real world. Analyzing and constructing the theoretical basis and methodology of clinical research in the real world, and building the stage for research technique is key to the effective clinical research of Chinese medicine. Only by gradually maturing and completing the clinical research methods of the real world could we realize "taking two ways simultaneously" and complementing each other, continuously produce scientific and reliable evidence of Chinese medicine, as well as transform and develop Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine. PMID:21695621

  19. The FRC Acceleration Space Thruster (FAST) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard; Houts, Mike; Slough, John; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the FRC (Field Reversed Configuration) Acceleration Space Thruster (FAST) Experiment is to investigate the use of a repetitive FRC source as a thruster, specifically for an NEP (nuclear electric propulsion) system. The Field Reversed Configuration is a plasmoid with a closed poloidal field line structure, and has been extensively studied as a fusion reactor core. An FRC thruster works by repetitively producing FRCs and accelerating them to high velocity. An FRC thruster should be capable of I(sub sp)'s in the range of 5,000 - 25,000 seconds and efficiencies in the range of 60 - 80 %. In addition, they can have thrust densities as high as 10(exp 6) N/m2, and as they are inductively formed, they do not suffer from electrode erosion. The jet-power should be scalable from the low to the high power regime. The FAST experiment consists of a theta-pinch formation chamber, followed by an acceleration stage. Initially, we will produce and accelerate single FRCs. The initial focus of the experiment will be on the ionization, formation and acceleration of a single plasmoid, so as to determine the likely efficiency and I(sub sp). Subsequently, we will modify the device for repetitive burst-mode operation (5-10 shots). A variety of diagnostics are or will be available for this work, including a HeNe interferometer, high-speed cameras, and a Thomson-scattering system. The status of the experiment will be described.

  20. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, S.; Buchanan, N.; Coleman, R.; Convery, M.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.; Nakaya, T.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2007. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2007 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  1. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, Stephen J.; Buehler, M.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Grinstein, S.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Hylen, J.; Kissel, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2008. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2008 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  2. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.N; Appel, J.A.; Brice, S.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, d.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2009. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2009 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  3. TeV/m Nano-Accelerator: Current Status of CNT-Channeling Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young Min; Lumpkin, Alex H.; Thangaraj, Jayakar Charles; Thurman-Keup, Randy Michael; Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2014-09-17

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in the accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider. The major challenge of channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require a high power driver in the hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV). This x-ray energy exceeds those for x-rays as of today, although x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon-based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper presents a beam- driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discusses feasible experiments with the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) in Fermilab.

  4. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  5. Dosimetric experience with 2 commercially available multilumen balloon-based brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Weihua Kim, Jong Oh; Chen, Alex S.J.; Mehta, Kiran; Pucci, Pietro; Huq, M. Saiful

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to report dosimetric experience with 2 kinds of multilumen balloon (MLB), 5-lumen Contura MLB (C-MLB) and 4-lumen MammoSite MLB (MS-MLB), to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation, and compare the ability to achieve target coverage and control skin and rib doses between 2 groups of patients treated with C-MLB and MS-MLB brachytherapy. C-MLB has 5 lumens, the 4 equal-spaced peripheral lumens are 5 mm away from the central lumen. MS-MLB has 4 lumens, the 3 equal-spaced peripheral lumens are 3 mm away from the central lumen. In total, 43 patients were treated, 23 with C-MLB, and 20 with MS-MLB. For C-MLB group, 8 patients were treated with a skin spacing < 7 mm and 12 patients with rib spacing < 7 mm. For MS-MLB group, 2 patients were treated with a skin spacing < 7 mm and 5 patients with rib spacing < 7 mm. The dosimetric goals were (1) ≥ 95% of the prescription dose (PD) covering ≥ 95% of the target volume (V{sub 95%} ≥ 95%), (2) maximum skin dose ≤ 125% of the PD, (3) maximum rib dose ≤ 145% of the PD (if possible), and (4) the V{sub 150%} ≤ 50 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 200%} ≤ 10 cm{sup 3}. All dosimetric criteria were met concurrently in 82.6% of C-MLB patients, in 80.0% of MS-MLB patients, and in 81.4% of all 43 patients. For each dosimetric parameter, t-test of these 2 groups showed p > 0.05. Although the geometric design of C-MLB is different from that of MS-MLB, both applicators have the ability to shape the dose distribution and to provide good target coverage, while limiting the dose to skin and rib. No significant difference was observed between the 2 patient groups in terms of target dose coverage and dose to organs at risk.

  6. Estimates of effects of residual acceleration on USML-1 experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study effort was to develop analytical models to describe the effects of residual accelerations on the experiments to be carried on the first U.S. Microgravity Lab mission (USML-1) and to test the accuracy of these models by comparing the pre-flight predicted effects with the post-flight measured effects. After surveying the experiments to be performed on USML-1, it became evident that the anticipated residual accelerations during the USML-1 mission were well below the threshold for most of the primary experiments and all of the secondary (Glovebox) experiments and that the only set of experiments that could provide quantifiable effects, and thus provide a definitive test of the analytical models, were the three melt growth experiments using the Bridgman-Stockbarger type Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF). This class of experiments is by far the most sensitive to low level quasi-steady accelerations that are unavoidable on space craft operating in low earth orbit. Because of this, they have been the drivers for the acceleration requirements imposed on the Space Station. Therefore, it is appropriate that the models on which these requirements are based are tested experimentally. Also, since solidification proceeds directionally over a long period of time, the solidified ingot provides a more or less continuous record of the effects from acceleration disturbances.

  7. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Czarapata, P.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  8. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Kawashima, N.; Marshall, J. A.; Moses, S. L.; Neubert, T.; Mende, S. B.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), which flew on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 mission, used new techniques to study natural phenomena in the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere by introducing energetic perturbations into the system from a high power electron beam with known characteristics. Properties of auroras were studied by directing the electron beam into the upper atmosphere while making measurements of optical emissions. Studies were also performed of the critical ionization velocity phenomenon.

  9. Accelerating reproductive and child health programme impact with community-based services: the Navrongo experiment in Ghana.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James F.; Bawah, Ayaga A.; Binka, Fred N.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the demographic and health impact of deploying health service nurses and volunteers to village locations with a view to scaling up results. METHODS: A four-celled plausibility trial was used for testing the impact of aligning community health services with the traditional social institutions that organize village life. Data from the Navrongo Demographic Surveillance System that tracks fertility and mortality events over time were used to estimate impact on fertility and mortality. RESULTS: Assigning nurses to community locations reduced childhood mortality rates by over half in 3 years and accelerated the time taken for attainment of the child survival Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in the study areas to 8 years. Fertility was also reduced by 15%, representing a decline of one birth in the total fertility rate. Programme costs added 1.92 US Dollar per capita to the 6.80 US Dollar per capita primary health care budget. CONCLUSION: Assigning nurses to community locations where they provide basic curative and preventive care substantially reduces childhood mortality and accelerates progress towards attainment of the child survival MDG. Approaches using community volunteers, however, have no impact on mortality. The results also demonstrate that increasing access to contraceptive supplies alone fails to address the social costs of fertility regulation. Effective deployment of volunteers and community mobilization strategies offsets the social constraints on the adoption of contraception. The research in Navrongo thus demonstrates that affordable and sustainable means of combining nurse services with volunteer action can accelerate attainment of both the International Conference on Population and Development agenda and the MDGs. PMID:17242830

  10. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  11. The LHCf experiment at the LHC accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bonechi, L.; Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; D'Alessandro, R.; Papini, P.; Castellini, G.; Faus, A.; Velasco, J.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Menjo, H.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kasahara, K.

    2006-10-27

    The claimed discovery of atmospheric shower induced by cosmic-ray with energy beyond the GZK cutoff by the AGASA experiment in 1994-1995, although not confirmed by other important experiments like Fly's Eye and Hi-Res, together with the poor knowledge of the composition of cosmic rays around and beyond the Knee region, have highlighted the necessity of new experiments that should increase our present knowledge of HECR and UHECR. For this reason big efforts have been addressed to the development of new experiments, like Auger, TA and EUSO, for a systematic study of the UHE atmospheric showers with increased capabilities with respect to the previous experiments. Moreover complementary experiments should allow a precise calibration of the methods used for the reconstruction of cosmic-ray showers in atmosphere. Their aim is the measurement of quantities that are used in these procedures and that are not yet precisely known. Under this perspective the LHCf experiment is a compact experiment which has been proposed for the study of neutral pion and gamma production at high energy in proton-proton interaction in the very forward region of the LHC accelerator. It will help calibrating the algorithms that are used to reconstruct the atmospheric shower events for energy beyond the Knee. The LHCf apparatus and the results of the first beam test, held in 2004, are shortly discussed in this work.

  12. Ferroelectric Based Technologies for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Nenasheva, E.; Kazakov, S.; Tagantsev, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2009-01-22

    Ferroelectrics have unique intrinsic properties that make them extremely attractive for high-energy accelerator applications. Low loss ferroelectric materials can be used as key elements in RF tuning and phase shifting components to provide fast, electronic control. These devices are under development for different accelerator applications for the X, Ka and L-frequency bands. The exact design of these devices depends on the electrical parameters of the particular ferroelectric material to be used--its dielectric constant, loss tangent and tunability. BST based ferroelectric-oxide compounds have been found to be suitable materials for a fast electrically-controlled tuners. We present recent results on the development of BST based ferroelectric compositions synthesized for use in high power technology components. The BST(M) ferroelectrics have been tested using both transverse and parallel dc bias fields to control the permittivity. Fast switching of a newly developed material has been shown and the feasibility of using of ferroelectric-based accelerator components in vacuum and in air has been demonstrated.

  13. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life. PMID:25190337

  14. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, Ian T.; Evans, James A.

    2015-11-24

    Scientists perform a tiny subset of all possible experiments. What characterizes the experiments they choose? What are the consequences of those choices for the pace of scientific discovery? We model scientific knowledge as a network and science as a sequence of experiments designed to gradually uncover it. By analyzing millions of biomedical articles published over 30 y, we find that biomedical scientists pursue conservative research strategies exploring the local neighborhood of central, important molecules. Although such strategies probably serve scientific careers, we show that they slow scientific advance, especially in mature fields, where more risk and less redundant experimentation would accelerate discovery of the network. Lastly, we also consider institutional arrangements that could help science pursue these more efficient strategies.

  15. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, Ian T.; Evans, James A.

    2015-11-24

    Scientists perform a tiny subset of all possible experiments. What characterizes the experiments they choose? What are the consequences of those choices for the pace of scientific discovery? We model scientific knowledge as a network and science as a sequence of experiments designed to gradually uncover it. By analyzing millions of biomedical articles published over 30 y, we find that biomedical scientists pursue conservative research strategies exploring the local neighborhood of central, important molecules. Although such strategies probably serve scientific careers, we show that they slow scientific advance, especially in mature fields, where more risk and less redundant experimentation wouldmore » accelerate discovery of the network. Lastly, we also consider institutional arrangements that could help science pursue these more efficient strategies.« less

  16. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Ushirokawa, A.; Kudo, I.; Ejiri, M.; Roberts, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Plans for SEPAC, an instrument array to be used on Spacelab 1 to study vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interaction in space, beam-atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and the electromagnetic-field configuration of the magnetosphere, are presented. The hardware, consisting of electron beam accelerator, magnetoplasma arcjet, neutral-gas plume generator, power supply, diagnostic package (photometer, plasma probes, particle analyzers, and plasma-wave package), TV monitor, and control and data-management unit, is described. The individual SEPAC experiments, the typical operational sequence, and the general outline of the SEPAC follow-on mission are discussed. Some of the experiments are to be joint ventures with AEPI (INS 003) and will be monitored by low-light-level TV.

  17. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; McGuinness, C. M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Siemann, R. H.; Spencer, J. E.; Walz, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Sears, C. M. S.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50 pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. We will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  18. Experiment to Detect Accelerating Modes in a Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.J.; Colby, E.R.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.M.; Noble, R.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.S.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2011-11-21

    An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. They will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.

  19. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  20. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific emphasis of this contract has been on the physics of beam ionosphere interactions, in particular, what are the plasma wave levels stimulated by the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) electron beam as it is ejected from the Electron Beam Accelerator (EBA) and passes into and through the ionosphere. There were two different phenomena expected. The first was generation of plasma waves by the interaction of the DC component of the beam with the plasma of the ionosphere, by wave particle interactions. The second was the generation of waves at the pulsing frequency of the beam (AC component). This is referred to as using the beam as a virtual antenna, because the beam of electrons is a coherent electrical current confined to move along the earth's magnetic field. As in a physical antenna, a conductor at a radio or TV station, the beam virtual antenna radiates electromagnetic waves at the frequency of the current variations. These two phenomena were investigated during the period of this contract.

  1. Results of the SINGAP Neutral Beam Accelerator Experiment at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Esch, H. P. L.; Svensson, L.; Inoue, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M.; Fubiani, G.

    2009-03-01

    IRFM (CEA Cadarache) and JAEA Naka have entered into a collaboration in order to test a SINGAP [1] accelerator at the JAEA Megavolt Test Facility (MTF) at Naka, Japan. Whereas at the CEA testbed the acceleration current was limited to 0.1 A, at JAEA 0.5 A is available. This allows the acceleration of 15 H- beamlets in SINGAP to be tested and a direct comparison between SINGAP and MAMuG [2] to be made. High-voltage conditioning in the SINGAP configuration has been quite slow, with 581 kV in vacuum achieved after 140 hours of conditioning. With 0.1 Pa of H2 gas present in the accelerator 787 kV could be achieved. The conditioning curve for MAMuG is 200 kV higher. SINGAP beam optics appears in agreement with calculation results. A beamlet divergence better than 5 mrad was obtained. SINGAP accelerates electrons to a higher energy than MAMuG. Measurements of the power intercepted on one of the electron dumps have been compared with EAMCC code [3] calculations. Based on the experiments described here, electron production by a SINGAP accelerator scaled up to ITER size was estimated to be too high for comfort

  2. Disk Acceleration Experiment Utilizing Minimal Material (DAXUMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew; Lorenz, Thomas; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2015-06-01

    A venture between the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently underway in an effort to characterize novel energetic material performance properties using a single, high-precision, gram-range charge. A nearly all-inclusive characterization experiment is proposed by combing LLNL's disk acceleration experiment (DAX) with the ARL explosive evaluation utilizing minimal material (AXEUMM) experiment. Spherical-cap charges fitted with a flat circular metal disk are centrally initiated using an exploding bridgewire detonator while photonic doppler velocimetry is used to probe the metal disk surface velocity and measure its temporal history. The metal disk's jump-off-velocity measurement is combined with conservation equations, material Hugoniots, and select empirical relationships to determine performance properties of the detonation wave (i.e., velocity, pressure, particle velocity, and density). Using the temporal velocity history with the numerical hydrocode CTH, a determination of the energetic material's equation of state and material expansion energy is possible. Initial experimental and computational results for the plastic-bonded energetic formulation PBXN-5 are presented.

  3. Isentropic Compression Experiments on the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay, James

    1999-06-01

    Shock compression techniques are the only viable technique for making accurate EOS measurements in the multi-Mbar pressure regime. These experiments provide specific states of pressure, volume and internal energy on the Hugoniot. In many applications, it is necessary to know the off-Hugoniot isentropic loading response of materials to ultra-high pressures. Techniques for measuring isentropic response are challenging. At low pressures, ramp wave generators are used, while at high megabar pressures, graded density impactors are employed. In these latter experiments is a small amplitude shock results in the compression isentrope centered at some initial state. A new technique that is being developed shows promise for performing isentropic experiments with smooth loading to very high pressure. This approach uses the high current densities produced with fast pulsed power accelerators to create continuous magnetic loading to a few hundred kilobars over time intervals of 100-200 ns. The resulting ramp wave propagates through a planar specimen and are measured using time-resolved VISARS. Application of the differential equations of motion over the risetime of the waves determines pressure-volume states continuously. Experiments on copper and iron, have allowed determination of the isentropic compression curve in copper and the evaluation of the kinetic properties of the alpha-epsilon phase transition in iron. In this presentation, I will review previous studies of isentropic compression, discuss the new technique using Z and the results obtained on iron and copper. A perspective on the opportunities for isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures, will be given. * Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  4. Theoretical Investigations of Plasma-Based Accelerators and Other Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Shuets, G.

    2004-05-21

    Theoretical investigations of plasma-based accelerators and other advanced accelerator concepts. The focus of the work was on the development of plasma based and structure based accelerating concepts, including laser-plasma, plasma channel, and microwave driven plasma accelerators.

  5. Comparison of integrated numerical experiments with accelerator and FEL experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.; Elliott, J.C.; Gitomer, S.J.; Goldstein, J.C.; Jones, M.E.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Takeda, H.; Tokar, R.L.; Wang, T.S.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Even at the conceptual level the strong coupling between the laser subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control, greatly complicates the understanding and design of an FEL. Given the requirements for a high-performance FEL, the coupling between the laser subsystems must be included in the design approach. To address the subsystem coupling the concept of an integrated numerical experiment (INEX) has been implemented. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostic. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. A complete INEX model has been applied to the 10{mu}m high-extraction-efficiency experiment at Los Alamos and the 0.6-{mu}m Burst Mode experiment at Boeing Aerospace. In addition, various subsets of the INEX model have been compared with a number of other experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. With the INEX approach, it now appears possible to design high-performance FELS for numerous applications. The first full-scale test of the INEX approach is the Los Alamos HIBAF experiment. The INEX concept, implementation, and validation with experiments are discussed. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  7. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  8. BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Aleynik, V; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Kanygin, V; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Sorokin, I; Taskaev, S

    2011-12-01

    Innovative facility for neutron capture therapy has been built at BINP. This facility is based on compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915-2.5 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. In the article, diagnostic techniques for proton beam and neutrons developed are described, results of experiments on proton beam transport and neutron generation are shown, discussed, and plans are presented. PMID:21439836

  9. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-02-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s-1. Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  10. Argonne plasma wake-field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cole, B.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Norem, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1989-03-14

    Four years after the initial proposal of the Plasma Wake-field Accelerator (PWFA), it continues to be the object of much investigation, due to the promise of the ultra-high accelerating gradients that can exist in relativistic plasma waves driven in the wake of charged particle beams. These wake-fields are of interest both in the laboratory, for acceleration and focusing of electrons and positrons in future linear colliders, and in nature as a possible cosmic ray acceleration mechanism. The purpose of the present work is to review the recent experimental advances made in PWFA research at Argonne National Laboratory. Some of the topics discussed are: the Argonne Advanced Accelerator Test Facility; linear plasma wake-field theory; measurement of linear plasma wake-fields; review of nonlinear plasma wave theory; and experimental measurement of nonlinear plasma wake-fields. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.

    2006-11-27

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}z = 20 {mu}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {mu}m / OD = 325 {mu}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  12. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.

    2006-11-01

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., σz = 20 μm at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 μm / OD = 325 μm). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  13. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /LLNL, Livermore /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U. /UC, Santa Barbara /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2007-03-27

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  14. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Hogan, M; Ischebeck, R; Kirby, N; Siemann, R; Walz, D; Muggli, P; Scott, A; Yoder, R

    2006-08-04

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  15. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments at the SABER Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Thompson, M.C.; Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A.M.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    Electron bunches with the unparalleled combination of high charge, low emittances, and short time duration, as first produced at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), are foreseen to be produced at the SABER facility. These types of bunches have enabled wakefield driven accelerating schemes of multi-GV/m in plasmas. In the context of the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators (DWA) such beams, having rms bunch length as short as 20 um, have been used to drive 100 um and 200 um ID hollow tubes above 20 GV/m surface fields. These FFTB tests enabled the measurement of a breakdown threshold in fused silica (with full data analysis still ongoing) [1]. With the construction and commissioning of the SABER facility at SLAC, new experiments would be made possible to test further aspects of DWAs including materials, tube geometrical variations, direct measurements of the Cerenkov fields, and proof of acceleration in tubes >10 cm in length. This collaboration will investigate breakdown thresholds and accelerating fields in new materials including CVD diamond. Here we describe the experimental plans, beam parameters, simulations, and progress to date as well as future prospects for machines based of DWA structures.

  16. Efficient accelerator afterburner design based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengkun; Blumenfeld, I.; Clayton, C. E.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M. J.; Iverson, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Kirby, N.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Muggli, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Tzoufras, M.

    2008-11-01

    Recent plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) experiment using short (˜100fs), high peak current (>10KA) electron beam as wakefield driver has demonstrated sustained acceleration gradient of ˜50GeV/m over 85 cm. The rapid progress of PWFA experiments has attracted interests regarding the possibility of making an ``afterburner'' for a linear collider. In the ``afterburner'' concept, electron acceleration is achieved by placing a trailing electron beam into the wakefield (either by beam splitting or external injection) to extract energy deposited in the plasma wave wake. Several important aspects of the ``afterburner'' design in the blow-out regime, such as wakefield generation, efficient beam loading and hosing instability have been investigated theoretically. These relevant physics will have great impact on the beam quality of a possible ``afterburner'' design. A multi-stage ``afterburner'' design with 25GeV energy gain in each stage is explored numerically with a 3D quasi-static code QuickPIC. Parameters are suggested for a 0.5 TeV PWFA afterburner with this design and simulation result will be presented.

  17. Simulations of an Accelerator-based Shielding Shielding Experiment Using theParticle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sihver, L.; Iwase, H.; Nakashima, H.; Niita, K.

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the GEM (Generalized Evaporation Model) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, the SHEN model for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for dE/dx calculations. The development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections and dE/dx distributions, and adding routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, dose and track average LET distributions. As part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from < 1 cm to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through slabs of polyethylene, PMMA, Al, and Pb, with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 30 g/cm2 at an acceptance angle of 0°± 3°. The simulated survival fraction of the primary Fe-ions, fragment spectrum for 23 g/cm2, and dose behind the shield per incident Fe-ion on the shield has been compared with measurements.

  18. Plasma-based Accelerator with Magnetic Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Paul F. Schmit and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-06-28

    Electron dephasing is a major gain-inhibiting effect in plasma-based accelerators. A novel method is proposed to overcome dephasing, in which the modulation of a modest (#24; O(10 kG)), axial, uniform magnetic field in the acceleration channel leads to densification of the plasma through magnetic compression, enabling direct, time-resolved control of the plasma wave properties. The methodology is broadly applicable and can be optimized to improve the leading acceleration approaches, including plasma beat-wave, plasma wakefield, and laser wakefield acceleration. The advantages of magnetic compression compared to other proposed schemes to overcome dephasing are identified.

  19. Plasma-based accelerator with magnetic compression.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Fisch, N J

    2012-12-21

    Electron dephasing is a major gain-inhibiting effect in plasma-based accelerators. A novel method is proposed to overcome dephasing, in which the modulation of a modest [~O(10 kG)], axial, uniform magnetic field in the acceleration channel leads to densification of the plasma through magnetic compression, enabling direct, time-resolved control of the plasma wave properties. The methodology is broadly applicable and can be optimized to improve the leading acceleration approaches, including plasma beat wave, plasma wakefield, and laser wakefield acceleration. The advantages of magnetic compression are compared to other proposed techniques to overcome dephasing. PMID:23368475

  20. Plasma-Based Accelerator with Magnetic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron dephasing is a major gain-inhibiting effect in plasma-based accelerators. A novel method is proposed to overcome dephasing, in which the modulation of a modest [˜O(10kG)], axial, uniform magnetic field in the acceleration channel leads to densification of the plasma through magnetic compression, enabling direct, time-resolved control of the plasma wave properties. The methodology is broadly applicable and can be optimized to improve the leading acceleration approaches, including plasma beat wave, plasma wakefield, and laser wakefield acceleration. The advantages of magnetic compression are compared to other proposed techniques to overcome dephasing.

  1. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  2. High Temperature μSR Experiments for Accelerator Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Koda, Akihiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Shimomura, Koichiro; Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eiji; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Nomura, Masahiro; Shimada, Taihei; Takata, Koji; Tamura, Fumihiko; Toda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    High temperature μSR is a powerful technique to study magnetic materials. In J-PARC accelerator synchrotrons, the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) and Main Ring (MR), a unique magnetic alloy-loaded cavity is used for the beam acceleration and much higher field gradient has been achieved. Such high field gradient cavities made a compact RCS possible by reducing the length for beam acceleration. Now, further upgrades of the J-PARC, RF cavities with higher RF voltage and less power loss in the magnetic core are needed for the MR. For the improvements of the magnetic property of magnetic alloy core, the high temperature μSR (muon Spin Rotation/Relaxation) was used to investigate the crystallization process of the material. Based on the measurement results, the test production of the large ring cores of a magnetic alloy, FT3L, was tried. The FT3L is the magnetic alloy which has two times better performance than the present one, FT3M. For the FT3L production, the magnetic annealing is needed to control the easy-magnetized axis of the crystalline. After the success of the test production, a mass production was started in the industry to replace all existing cavities in the MR. The first 5-cell FT3L cavity is assembled for the bench test before the installation in the accelerator tunnel. By the new cavities, the total RF voltage of J-PARC MR will be doubled to increase the beam power for neutrino experiment. In future, the cavities will be also used for the RCS to increase the beam power beyond 1 MW.

  3. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepitone, K.; Doebert, S.; Burt, G.; Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G.; Mete, O.; Verzilov, V.; Apsimon, R.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  4. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments Using HERCULES Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Horovitz, Y.

    2009-07-25

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing laser power and plasma electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 6.1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 80 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using F/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. We also studied the influence of laser focusing conditions by changing the f-number of the optics to F/15 and found an increase in density threshold for electron production compared to the F/10 configuration. The analysis of different phenomena such as betatron motion of electrons, side scattering of the laser pulse for different focusing conditions, the influence of plasma density down ramp on LWFA are shown.

  5. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  6. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose Ramon; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions. Electrolytic capacitors have higher failure rates than other components in electronic systems like power drives, power converters etc. Our current work focuses on developing first-principles-based degradation models for electrolytic capacitors under varying electrical and thermal stress conditions. Prognostics and health management for electronic systems aims to predict the onset of faults, study causes for system degradation, and accurately compute remaining useful life. Accelerated life test methods are often used in prognostics research as a way to model multiple causes and assess the effects of the degradation process through time. It also allows for the identification and study of different failure mechanisms and their relationships under different operating conditions. Experiments are designed for aging of the capacitors such that the degradation pattern induced by the aging can be monitored and analyzed. Experimental setups and data collection methods are presented to demonstrate this approach.

  7. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery

    PubMed Central

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    A scientist’s choice of research problem affects his or her personal career trajectory. Scientists’ combined choices affect the direction and efficiency of scientific discovery as a whole. In this paper, we infer preferences that shape problem selection from patterns of published findings and then quantify their efficiency. We represent research problems as links between scientific entities in a knowledge network. We then build a generative model of discovery informed by qualitative research on scientific problem selection. We map salient features from this literature to key network properties: an entity’s importance corresponds to its degree centrality, and a problem’s difficulty corresponds to the network distance it spans. Drawing on millions of papers and patents published over 30 years, we use this model to infer the typical research strategy used to explore chemical relationships in biomedicine. This strategy generates conservative research choices focused on building up knowledge around important molecules. These choices become more conservative over time. The observed strategy is efficient for initial exploration of the network and supports scientific careers that require steady output, but is inefficient for science as a whole. Through supercomputer experiments on a sample of the network, we study thousands of alternatives and identify strategies much more efficient at exploring mature knowledge networks. We find that increased risk-taking and the publication of experimental failures would substantially improve the speed of discovery. We consider institutional shifts in grant making, evaluation, and publication that would help realize these efficiencies. PMID:26554009

  8. Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC): Description of instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Baker, B. B.; Burch, J. L.; Gibson, W. C.; Black, R. K.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Bounds, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    SEPAC (Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators) flew on Spacelab 1 (SL 1) in November and December 1983. SEPAC is a joint U.S.-Japan investigation of the interaction of electron, plasma, and neutral beams with the ionosphere, atmosphere and magnetosphere. It is scheduled to fly again on Atlas 1 in August 1990. On SL 1, SEPAC used an electron accelerator, a plasma accelerator, and neutral gas source as active elements and an array of diagnostics to investigate the interactions. For Atlas 1, the plasma accelerator will be replaced by a plasma contactor and charge collection devices to improve vehicle charging meutralization. This paper describes the SEPAC instrumentation in detail for the SL 1 and Atlas 1 flights and includes a bibliography of SEPAC papers.

  9. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  10. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  11. Micro-Bubble Experiments at the Van de Graaff Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wardle, Kent E.; Quigley, K. J.; Gromov, Roman; Youker, A. J.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Bailey, James; Stepinski, D. C.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    In order to test and verify the experimental designs at the linear accelerator (LINAC), several micro-scale bubble ("micro-bubble") experiments were conducted with the 3-MeV Van de Graaff (VDG) electron accelerator. The experimental setups included a square quartz tube, sodium bisulfate solution with different concentrations, cooling coils, gas chromatography (GC) system, raster magnets, and two high-resolution cameras that were controlled by a LabVIEW program. Different beam currents were applied in the VDG irradiation. Bubble generation (radiolysis), thermal expansion, thermal convection, and radiation damage were observed in the experiments. Photographs, videos, and gas formation (O2 + H2) data were collected. The micro-bubble experiments at VDG indicate that the design of the full-scale bubble experiments at the LINAC is reasonable.

  12. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  13. The Student Course Experience among Online, Accelerated, and Traditional Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielitz, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The demand by the public for a wider variety of course formats has led to complexity in determining a course's optimal delivery format as many faculty members still believe that online and accelerated courses do not offer students an equivalent experience to traditional face to face instruction. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study…

  14. Constant Acceleration: Experiments with a Fan-Driven Dynamics Cart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the rebuilding of a Project Physics fan cart on a PASCO dynamics cart chassis for achieving greatly reduced frictional forces. Suggests four experiments for the rebuilt cart: (1) acceleration on a level track, (2) initial negative velocity, (3) different masses and different forces, and (4) inclines. (MVL)

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-11-16

    Project Title: Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications PI: Michael R. Brown, Swarthmore College The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas.

  16. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  17. The laser driven particle accelerator project: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L. Smith, T.I.; Siemann, R.H. Huang, Y.C.

    1999-07-01

    A proof of principle experiment for laser driven electron acceleration from crossed laser beams in a dielectric loaded vacuum is being carried out at Stanford University. We seek to measure a maximum energy gain of about 250 keV for a 30{endash}35 MeV electron beam in one accelerator cell. We use laser pulses of a few picoseconds of duration from a regenerative Ti:sapphire laser amplifier at a wavelength of 800 nm in a laser-electron interaction distance of {approximately}1 mm. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. The SPARC linear accelerator based terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Chiadroni, E.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Rossi, A. R.; Vaccarezza, C.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; and others

    2013-03-04

    Ultra-short electron beams, produced through the velocity bunching compression technique, are used to drive the SPARC linear accelerator based source, which relies on the emission of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range. This paper reports on the main features of this radiation, as terahertz source, with spectral coverage up to 5 THz and pulse duration down to 200 fs, with an energy per pulse of the order of several micro-joule, and as electron beam longitudinal diagnostics.

  19. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  20. Results from T2K and accelerator oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, C.

    2012-08-01

    Various experiments use secondary neutrino beams produced by accelerators to study neutrino oscillations. In this article, we will review oscillation results from a number of those experiments (MINOS, OPERA), and focus more on results from T2K. This long baseline off-axis experiment uses a beam of muon neutrinos produced in J-PARC in Japan to study muon neutrino disappearance in order to measure atmospheric parameters, as well as studying electron neutrino appearance to measure the 13 mixing angle. We will present in particular very recent results of those measurements obtained by MINOS and T2K.

  1. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl

    2012-12-21

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  2. Summary report: Working Group 2 on 'Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts'

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W. P.; Esarey, E.

    1999-07-12

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beatwave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module.

  3. First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Burdakov, A; Chudaev, V; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Mekler, K; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture therapy was built at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. This facility is based on a compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. The results of the first experiments on neutron generation are reported and discussed. PMID:19375928

  4. Absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50 from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.

    1994-01-01

    Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on Space Transportation System (STS)-50 have been examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels have been derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. During the interval, the tri-axial OARE raw telemetered acceleration measurements have been filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval have been analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z-axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process using orbiter maneuvers and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axis. Results indicate that there is a force being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces have been reexamined, but none produces the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the orbiter is creating the environment observed. At least part of this force is thought to be due to the Flash Evaporator System.

  5. The Awful Truth About Zero-Gravity: Space Acceleration Measurement System; Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Earth's gravity holds the Shuttle in orbit, as it does satellites and the Moon. The apparent weightlessness experienced by astronauts and experiments on the Shuttle is a balancing act, the result of free-fall, or continuously falling around Earth. An easy way to visualize what is happening is with a thought experiment that Sir Isaac Newton did in 1686. Newton envisioned a mountain extending above Earth's atmosphere so that friction with the air would be eliminated. He imagined a cannon atop the mountain and aimed parallel to the ground. Firing the cannon propels the cannonball forward. At the same time, Earth's gravity pulls the cannonball down to the surface and eventual impact. Newton visualized using enough powder to just balance gravity so the cannonball would circle the Earth. Like the cannonball, objects orbiting Earth are in continuous free-fall, and it appears that gravity has been eliminated. Yet, that appearance is deceiving. Activities aboard the Shuttle generate a range of accelerations that have effects similar to those of gravity. The crew works and exercises. The main data relay antenna quivers 17 times per second to prevent 'stiction,' where parts stick then release with a jerk. Cooling pumps, air fans, and other systems add vibration. And traces of Earth's atmosphere, even 200 miles up, drag on the Shuttle. While imperceptible to us, these vibrations can have a profound impact on the commercial research and scientific experiments aboard the Shuttle. Measuring these forces is necessary so that researchers and scientists can see what may have affected their experiments when analyzing data. On STS-107 this service is provided by the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers (SAMS-FF) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE). Precision data from these two instruments will help scientists analyze data from their experiments and eliminate outside influences from the phenomena they are studying during the mission.

  6. TRIDAQ systems in HEP experiments at LHC accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagozdzińska, Agnieszka; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Zalewski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes Trigger and Data Acquisition (TRIDAQ) systems of accelerator experiments for High Energy Physics. The background for physics research comprises assumptions of the Standard Model theory with basic extensions. On this basis, a structure of particle detector system is described, with emphasis on the following functional blocks: Front-End Electronics, Trigger and DAQ systems. The described solutions are used in the LHC experiments: ATLAS, ALICE, CMS and LHCb. They are also used in other accelerator experiments. Data storage and processing functionality is divided into two hardware systems: Trigger and Data Acquisition, that are dependent on each other. High input data rate impose relevant choices for the architecture and parameters of both systems. The key parameters include detailed system structure and its overall latency. Trigger structure is defined by the physics requirements and the storage capability of DAQ system. Both systems are designed to achieve the highest possible space and time resolution for particle detection. Trigger references are reviewed [1-43] as well as chosen accelerator research efforts origination in this country [44-83].

  7. Accelerated Compressed Sensing Based CT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Beheshti, Soosan; Gill, Patrick R.; Paul, Narinder S.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) an important objective is to reduce the radiation dose without significantly degrading the image quality. Compressed sensing (CS) enables the radiation dose to be reduced by producing diagnostic images from a limited number of projections. However, conventional CS-based algorithms are computationally intensive and time-consuming. We propose a new algorithm that accelerates the CS-based reconstruction by using a fast pseudopolar Fourier based Radon transform and rebinning the diverging fan beams to parallel beams. The reconstruction process is analyzed using a maximum-a-posterior approach, which is transformed into a weighted CS problem. The weights involved in the proposed model are calculated based on the statistical characteristics of the reconstruction process, which is formulated in terms of the measurement noise and rebinning interpolation error. Therefore, the proposed method not only accelerates the reconstruction, but also removes the rebinning and interpolation errors. Simulation results are shown for phantoms and a patient. For example, a 512 × 512 Shepp-Logan phantom when reconstructed from 128 rebinned projections using a conventional CS method had 10% error, whereas with the proposed method the reconstruction error was less than 1%. Moreover, computation times of less than 30 sec were obtained using a standard desktop computer without numerical optimization. PMID:26167200

  8. Cryogenic supply for accelerators and experiments at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschke, M.; Xiang, Y.; Schroeder, C. H.; Streicher, B.; Kollmus, H.

    2014-01-29

    In the coming years the new international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, will be built at GSI. In the final construction FAIR consists of synchrotrons and storage rings with up to 1,100 meters in circumference, two linear accelerators and about 3.5 kilometers beam transfer lines. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Partly the new machines will consist of superconducting magnets and therefore require a reliable supply with liquid helium. As the requirements for the magnets is depending on the machine and have a high variety, the cooling system is different for each machine; two phase cooling, forced flow cooling and bath cooling respectively. In addition the cold mass of the individual magnets varies between less than 1t up to 80t and some magnets will cause a dynamic heat load due to ramping that is higher than the static loads. The full cryogenic system will be operated above atmospheric pressure. The refrigeration and liquefaction power will be provided by two main cryogenic plants of 8 and 25 kW at 4K and two smaller plants next to the experiments.

  9. Inverse Cerenkov laser accelerator experiment annual report. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-29

    During the past year further progress was made on preparations for the Spectra Technology, Inc. (STI) inverse Cerenkov acceleration (ICA) experiment to be performed on the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Major progress was made in the design and fabrication of the experimental apparatus. This includes the gas cell, where the ICA process occurs, and the optical system that converts the CO{sub 2} laser beam into a radially polarized beam. In terms of progress on theoretical work, the authors finished optimizing the ATF ICA design parameters using their Monte Carlo computer simulation. The optimized design predicts for the ATF conditions that over 50% energy gain should be observed. They published a paper on an improved method of performing ICA by operating near the resonance of a gas. They also began analysis of a method of accelerating particles in a vacuum using a radially polarized beam and axicon focusing. Although this new method can no longer be considered ICA, it has the potential of high acceleration gradients without the drawbacks of gas scattering and gas breakdown. Three papers were published and two conference papers were presented during 1990.

  10. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  11. Thermal effects in plasma-based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2007-05-15

    Finite plasma temperature can modify the structure of the wake field, reduce the wave-breaking field, and lead to self-trapped electrons, which can degrade the electron bunch quality in a plasma-based accelerator. A relativistic warm fluid theory is used to describe the plasma temperature evolution and alterations to the structure of a nonlinear periodic wave exited in a warm plasma. The trapping threshold for a plasma electron and the fraction of electrons trapped from a thermal distribution are examined using a single-particle model. Numerical artifacts in particle-in-cell models that can mimic the physics associated with finite momentum spread are discussed.

  12. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  13. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: (99m) Tc, (111)In and (131)I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational

  14. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  15. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jyan-Min

    1997-06-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser have been carried out at Brookhaven`s Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % ({Delta}E/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator.

  16. An investigation into the effectiveness of smartphone experiments on students’ conceptual knowledge about acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzella, Alessandra; Testa, Italo

    2016-09-01

    This study is a first attempt to investigate effectiveness of smartphone-based activities on students’ conceptual understanding of acceleration. 143 secondary school students (15–16 years old) were involved in two types of activities: smartphone- and non-smartphone activities. The latter consisted in data logging and ‘cookbook’ activities. For the sake of comparison, all activities featured the same phenomena, i.e., the motion on an inclined plane and pendulum oscillations. A pre-post design was adopted, using open questionnaires as probes. Results show only weak statistical differences between the smartphone and non-smartphone groups. Students who followed smartphone activities were more able to design an experiment to measure acceleration and to correctly describe acceleration in a free fall motion. However, students of both groups had many difficulties in drawing acceleration vector along the trajectory of the studied motion. Results suggest that smartphone-based activities may be effective substitutes of traditional experimental settings and represent a valuable aid for teachers who want to implement laboratory activities at secondary school level. However, to achieve a deeper conceptual understanding of acceleration, some issues need to be addressed: what is the reference system of the built-in smartphone sensor; relationships between smartphone acceleration graphs and experimental setup; vector representation of the measured acceleration.

  17. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

  18. Hypervelocity macroparticle accelerator experiments at CEM-UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, D. A.; Weldon, W. F.; Zowarka, R. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Railgun experiments designed to accelerate projectile masses of 2 to 5 g to velocities greater than 6 km/s were performed. Two parallel rail-type accelerators with 12.7-mm square bores were used for the experiments. One gun is 2 m long and has Mo rails and Al2O3 insulators. The other is 1 m long and has Mo rails and granite insulators. The greatest velocity achieved was 5.1 km/s. The following ideas to enhance performance were tested: stiff-gun structures to reduce plasma leakage and rail movement, refractory bore materials to reduce ablation and frictional losses, and prefilling the gun bore with gases to eliminate precursor arcs. After three experiments with the 2-m-long launcher at peak currents 660-780 kA, a gun barrel with 96 percent Al2O3 insulators and 99.9 percent Mo rails (hydraulically contained and preloaded) has survived with minimal damage and no degradation of seals. This launcher configuration is capable of maintaining 0.4 torr rough vacuum for over 1 h after disconnecting the roughing pump used to evacuate the gun.

  19. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lin, C.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 {mu}m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 {mu}m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  20. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filledcapillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  1. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  2. Hyper-velocity impact experiments with electrostatic dust accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, Anna; Aust, Thomas; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hillier, Jonathan; Hornung, Klaus; Li, Yan-Wei; Strack, Heiko; Ralf, Srama

    2015-06-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVI) of micrometer-sized particles play an important role in a variety of fields such as the investigation of matter at extreme pressures and temperatures, shock waves in solid bodies, planetology and cosmic dust. The physical phenomena occurring upon impact are fragmentation and cratering, shock waves, the production of neutral and ionized gas, and light flashes. Advanced analysis techniques promise new insights into short time-scale high-pressure states of matter, requiring the production of high speed projectiles. Electrostatic accelerators act as a source of micrometer and sub-micrometer particles as projectiles for HVI experiments. This paper describes an HVI facility, capable of accelerating particles to over 100 km/s, currently located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, together with planned improvements. The facility is about to be relocated to the University of Stuttgart. This is an opportunity to enhance the facility to meet the requirements of future experimental campaigns, necessary to better understand the micrometeoroid hypervelocity impact process and develop new in situ dust experiments. We will present the design of the new facility and the planned enhancements, including new diagnostic apparatus.

  3. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  4. Advocating for Grade-Based Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbault, Keri M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents often struggle with the decision to accelerate their child and may worry about social and emotional issues, although research indicates positive effects on the social and emotional adjustment of carefully selected accelerants. As children's advocates, parents can work effectively with a school system to secure an appropriate academic…

  5. Microcomputer-based Acceleration Sensor Device for Swimming Stroke Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgi, Yuji; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Chikara

    The purpose of this study was to develop a microcomputer-based acceleration logger device for the swimming stroke monitoring. The authors measured the swimmer's tri-axial wrist acceleration and applied this device for the fatigue evaluation of the swimmers. The experimental protocol led the swimmers exhausted after the crawl stroke interval training. Every single stroke was determined by the impact acceleration peak, which appeared on the x and z-axis acceleration. The change of the underwater stroke phases was identified by the characteristics of the acceleration peaks. In their exhaustion, the y-axis acceleration, which was longitudinal forearm acceleration decreased at the beginning of the upsweep phase. At that time, the swimmer could not extend his elbow joint. Since the developed acceleration data logger could provide us the information about the underwater stroke phases and it would be a helpful tool in the swimming training.

  6. Wakefield Simulations for the Laser Acceleration Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny

    2012-04-18

    Laser-driven acceleration in dielectric photonic band gap structures can provide gradients on the order of GeV/m. The small transverse dimension of the structure, on the order of the laser wavelength, presents interesting wakefield-related issues. Higher order modes can seriously degrade beam quality, and a detailed understanding is needed to mitigate such effects. On the other hand, wakefields also provide a direct way to probe the interaction of a relativistic bunch with the synchronous modes supported by the structure. Simulation studies have been carried out as part of the effort to understand the impact on beam dynamics, and to compare with data from beam experiments designed to characterize candidate structures. In this paper, we present simulation results of wakefields excited by a sub-wavelength bunch in optical photonic band gap structures.

  7. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Sethna, Zachary; Manley, Gregory; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt; Loria, J. Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a `QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  8. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth A.; Sethna, Zachary M.; Manley, Gregory A.; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt W.; Loria, J. Patrick; Barrett, Sean E.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a ‘QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  9. From the Discovery of Radioactivity to the First Accelerator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael

    The chapter reviews the historical phases of cosmic ray research from the very beginning around 1900 until the 1940s when first particle accelerators replaced cosmic particles as source for elementary particle interactions. In opposite to the discovery of X-rays or the ionising α-, β- and γ-rays, it was an arduous path to the definite acceptance of the new radiation. The starting point was the explanation that air becomes conductive by the ionising radiation of radioactive elements in the surroundings. In the following years the penetration power of the radiation was studied with the result, that there seems be a component harder than the known γ-rays. Victor F. Hess did in 1912 the key experiment with a hydrogen balloon. He measured with three detectors an increase of ionisation up to altitudes of 5 300 m and discovered the extraterrestrial penetrating radiation. The next phase is characterised by W. Kolhörster's confirmation in 1914, doubts by R.A. Millikan and others as well as the spectacular re-discovery of cosmic rays by Millikan in 1926. With the invention of new detectors as the cloud chamber and the Geiger-Müller counter and of the coincidence method the properties of cosmic rays could be investigated. One of the striking results was the discovery that cosmic rays are of corpuscular nature. The broad research activities starting end of the 1920s were the begin of a scientific success story, which nobody of the early protagonists might have imagined. In 1932 C.D. Anderson discovered the antiparticle of the electron. It was the birth of elementary particle physics. Four years later the muon was discovered which was for many years wrongly assumed to be the carrier of the short range nuclear force predicted by H. Yukawa. One of the last high-lights before the particle accelerators took over this field of fundamental research was the discovery of the Yukawa particle. In photographic emulsions exposed by cosmic particles the pion was found in 1947. This

  10. Developments in Laser and Plasma-Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, Michael

    2001-04-01

    The explosive growth of multiterawatt laser technology combined with the increasing size and cost of conventional RF particle accelerators has driven intense research into more compact laser-driven and/or plasma based acceleration concepts. Although schemes for direct laser acceleration without plasmas or, conversely, plasma acceleration without lasers have been studied, the greatest recent progress has been made with concepts that combine lasers and plasmas [1]. Tajima and Dawson [2] proposed in 1979 that a sufficiently intense single laser pulse of duration t ω_p-1, or a pair of laser pulses with Δω ω_p, could be efficiently drive a longitudinal electron plasma wave with phase velocity approaching c via the ponderomotive force. Charged particles that "surf" such waves experience accelerating gradients (E 10^9 V/cm) as much as a thousand times greater than conventional RF accelerators. Numerous experiments have now demonstrated acceleration of up to 10^9 electrons per laser pulse to energies exceeding 100 MeV, with wide energy spread, but competitive beam emittance. Such sources have proven useful for nuclear activation analysis in their current form. However for such accelerators to be useful to a wider community, including high energy physics, key challenges must be addressed. These include: 1) Guiding terawatt laser pulses. Achieving useful laser intensities requires focusing, thus limiting interaction length to < 1 mm, whereas interaction lengths of several cm are needed to use laser energy efficiently and reach GeV acceleration in a single stage. Several groups are now developing high-throughput plasma "fibers" that have supported peak powers near a terawatt over > 1 cm without distortion [3]. 2) Phased injection. Since plasma waves with useful gradients have wavelengths of micron dimensions, charged particles must be injected with unprecedented spatial and temporal precision to achieve a monochromatic output beam. Several groups are developing new laser-based

  11. Development of Dielectric-Based High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.; Kanareykin, A.; Kazakov, S.

    2006-11-27

    High gradient accelerating structures using dielectric-lined circular waveguides have been developed for a number of years at Argonne National Laboratory. In this article, we first report the experimental results of high power rf testing on the quartz based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure carried out on Feb. 2006 at the Naval Research Laboratory. The motivation for this experiment is to test the multipactor effect on different materials under high power and high vacuum condition. Up to 12 MW pulsed rf went through the tube without breakdown. Multipactor appeared during the experiment but with different features compared to other materials like alumina. Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) measurements were introduced into the experiment for the first time to observe the light emission time and intensity. In the second part of this paper, ways to achieve higher gradient for DLA structures are proposed: 1) smaller ID and longitudinal gap free DLA structures to reduce multipactor and obtain higher gradient; 2) new coaxial type coupler to avoid dielectric gap and improve impedance matching; 3) double layered DLA structure to reduce rf loss and enhance shunt impedance as well.

  12. Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-09-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented.

  13. Investigations of the plasma and structure based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady

    2012-08-30

    The objective of our research during the reported period was three-fold: (a) theoretical investigation of novel mechanisms of injection into laser wake field accelerators; (b) theoretical investigation of single-shot frequency domain diagnostics of relativistic plasma wakes, specifically in the context of spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma bubble;(c) experimental and theoretical investigation of laser-driven accelerating structure, specifically in the context of the Surface Wave Accelerator Based on SiC (SWABSIC).

  14. Proof-of-principle experiments of laser Wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H.

    1994-04-01

    Recently there has been a great interest in laser-plasma accelerators as possible next-generation particle accelerators because of their potential for ultra high accelerating gradients and compact size compared with conventional accelerators. It is known that the laser pulse is capable of exciting a plasma wave propagating at a phase velocity close to the velocity of light by means of beating two-frequency lasers or an ultra short laser pulse. These schemes came to be known as the Beat Wave Accelerator (BWA) for beating lasers or as the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) for a short pulse laser. In this paper, the principle of laser wakefield particle acceleration has been tested by the Nd:glass laser system providing a short pulse with a power of 10 TW and a duration of 1 ps. Electrons accelerated up to 18 MeV/c have been observed by injecting 1 MeV/c electrons emitted from a solid target by an intense laser impact. The accelerating field gradient of 30 GeV/m is inferred.

  15. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  16. Isentropic compression experiments on the Sandia Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.

    2000-02-21

    A long-standing goal of the equation of state (EOS) community has been the development of a loading capability for direct measurement of material properties along an isentrope. Previous efforts on smooth bore launchers have been somewhat successful, but quite difficult to accurately reproduce, had pressure limitations, or tended to be a series of small shocks as opposed to a smoothly increasing pressure load. A technique has recently been developed on the Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator which makes use of the high current densities and magnetic fields available to produce nearly isentropic compression of samples that are approximately 1 mm in thickness over approximately 120 ns. Velocity interferometry is used to measure the rear surface motion of these samples. The resulting time resolved velocity profiles from multiple sample thicknesses provide information about mechanical response under isentropic loading conditions and phase transition kinetics. Feasibility experiments have been performed to pressures of approximately 130 kbar in copper and 300 kbar in iron with effects of the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase change kinetics in iron clearly observed. Work is in progress to achieve 1--2% accuracy in P-v space along an isentrope, provide uniaxial strain, and to eliminate magnetic field and current diffusion within the sample of interest.

  17. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  18. Recursive least square vehicle mass estimation based on acceleration partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Xiong, Lu; Yu, Zhuoping; Qu, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Vehicle mass is an important parameter in vehicle dynamics control systems. Although many algorithms have been developed for the estimation of mass, none of them have yet taken into account the different types of resistance that occur under different conditions. This paper proposes a vehicle mass estimator. The estimator incorporates road gradient information in the longitudinal accelerometer signal, and it removes the road grade from the longitudinal dynamics of the vehicle. Then, two different recursive least square method (RLSM) schemes are proposed to estimate the driving resistance and the mass independently based on the acceleration partition under different conditions. A 6 DOF dynamic model of four In-wheel Motor Vehicle is built to assist in the design of the algorithm and in the setting of the parameters. The acceleration limits are determined to not only reduce the estimated error but also ensure enough data for the resistance estimation and mass estimation in some critical situations. The modification of the algorithm is also discussed to improve the result of the mass estimation. Experiment data on a sphalt road, plastic runway, and gravel road and on sloping roads are used to validate the estimation algorithm. The adaptability of the algorithm is improved by using data collected under several critical operating conditions. The experimental results show the error of the estimation process to be within 2.6%, which indicates that the algorithm can estimate mass with great accuracy regardless of the road surface and gradient changes and that it may be valuable in engineering applications. This paper proposes a recursive least square vehicle mass estimation method based on acceleration partition.

  19. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W.

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  20. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  1. Intense coherent terahertz generation from accelerator-based sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mafuyu; Kawai, Masayuki; Hinode, Fujio; Nanbu, Kenichi; Miyahara, Fusashi

    2011-05-01

    The development of terahertz (THz) technology and science relevant to accelerator-based sources has been rapid, based on laser and semiconductor physics. To assure further progress of this scientific field, extremely intense radiation, involving gigawatt-class peak power, is needed. In addition to discussing the prospects for typical accelerator-based THz sources, such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and free electron lasers (FELs), novel, advanced THz sources employing isochronous-ring and bunched-FEL approaches are proposed.

  2. Space Station Based Microacceleration Experiment Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Katy; Economopoulos, Tony; Evenson, Erik; Gonzalez, Raul; Henson, Steve; Parada, Enrique; Robinson, Rick; Scott, Mike; Spotz, Bill

    1990-01-01

    Normal Space Station Freedom activities, such as docking, astronauts' movement, equipment vibrations, and space station reboosts, exert forces on the structure, resulting in static or transient accelerations greater than many microgravity experiments can tolerate. A solution to this problem is to isolate experiments on a separate platform free from such disturbances. The Space Station Based Microacceleration Experiment Platform, a proposed solution to the Space Station microgravity experiment problem is described. It is modular in design and can be telerobotically assembled and operated. The Microacceleration Experiment Platform (MEP) consists of a minimum configuration platform to which power, propulsion, propellant, and experiment modules are added. The platform's layout is designed to take maximum advantage of the microgravity field structure in orbit.

  3. Imaging system QA of a medical accelerator, Novalis Tx, for IGRT per TG 142: our 1 year experience.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Bowsher, James; Cai, Jing; Yoo, Sua; Wang, Zhiheng; Adamson, Justus; Ren, Lei; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2012-01-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group (TG) 142 has recently published a report to update recommendations of the AAPM TG 40 report and add new recommendations concerning medical accelerators in the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The recommendations of AAPM TG 142 on IGRT are timely. In our institute, we established a comprehensive imaging QA program on a medical accelerator based on AAPM TG 142 and implemented it successfully. In this paper, we share our one-year experience and performance evaluation of an OBI capable linear accelerator, Novalis Tx, per TG 142 guidelines. PMID:22766946

  4. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  5. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  6. Neural network-based sensor signal accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    2000-10-16

    A strategy has been developed to computationally accelerate the response time of a generic electronic sensor. The strategy can be deployed as an algorithm in a control system or as a physical interface (on an embedded microcontroller) between a slower responding external sensor and a higher-speed control system. Optional code implementations are available to adjust algorithm performance when computational capability is limited. In one option, the actual sensor signal can be sampled at the slower rate with adaptive linear neural networks predicting the sensor's future output and interpolating intermediate synthetic output values. In another option, a synchronized collection of predictors sequentially controls the corresponding synthetic output voltage. Error is adaptively corrected in both options. The core strategy has been demonstrated with automotive oxygen sensor data. A prototype interface device is under construction. The response speed increase afforded by this strategy could greatly offset the cost of developing a replacement sensor with a faster physical response time.

  7. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Harold; Dance, William E.

    1999-06-01

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6×104n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics.

  8. GPU acceleration experience with RRTMG long wave radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Erik; Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, HungLung A.; Lee, Tsengdar

    2013-10-01

    An Atmospheric radiative transfer model calculates radiative transfer of electromagnetic radiation through a planetary atmosphere. Both shortwave radiance and longwave radiance parameterizations in an atmospheric model calculate radiation fluxes and heating rates in the earth-atmospheric system. One radiative transfer model is the rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM), which calculates of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. Longwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM. The RRTMG is a validated, correlated k-distribution band model for the calculation of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. The focus of this paper is on the RRTMG long wave (RRTMG_LW) model. In order to improve computational efficiency, RRTMG_LW incorporates several modifications compared to RRTM. In RRTM_LW there are 16 g points in each of the spectral bands for a total of 256 g points. In RRTMG_LW, the number of g points in each spectral band varies from 2 to 16 depending on the absorption in each band. RRTMG_LW employs a computationally efficient correlated-k method for radiative transfer calculations. It contains 16 spectral bands with various number of quadrature points (g points) in each of the bands. In total, there are 140 g points. The radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases are included in RRTMG_LW. Active gas absorbers include H2O, O3, CO2, CH4, N2O, O2 and four types of halocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-22, and CCL4. RRTMG_LW also treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. For cloudysky radiative transfer, a maximum-random cloud overlapping scheme is used. Small scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds can be represented using a statistical technique in RRTMG_LW. Due to its accuracy, RRTMG_LW has been implemented operationally

  9. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  10. A co-design method for parallel image processing accelerator based on DSP and FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Weng, Kaijian; Cheng, Zhao; Yan, Luxin; Guan, Jing

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we present a co-design method for parallel image processing accelerator based on DSP and FPGA. DSP is used as application and operation subsystem to execute the complex operations, and in which the algorithms are resolving into commands. FPGA is used as co-processing subsystem for regular data-parallel processing, and operation commands and image data are transmitted to FPGA for processing acceleration. A series of experiments have been carried out, and up to a half or three quarter time is saved which supports that the proposed accelerator will consume less time and get better performance than the traditional systems.

  11. NIOS II processor-based acceleration of motion compensation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego; Botella, Guillermo; Mookherjee, Soumak; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on the hardware acceleration of motion compensation techniques suitable for the MPEG video compression. A plethora of representative motion estimation search algorithms and the new perspectives are introduced. The methods and designs described here are qualified for medical imaging area where are involved larger images. The structure of the processing systems considered has a good fit for reconfigurable acceleration. The system is based in a platform like FPGA working with the Nios II Microprocessor platform applying C2H acceleration. The paper shows the results in terms of performance and resources needed.

  12. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  13. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  14. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  15. Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

  16. Trapping and dark current in plasma-based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-06-01

    The trapping of thermal electrons in a nonlinear plasma wave of arbitrary phase velocity is investigated. The threshold plasma wave amplitude for trapping plasma electrons is calculated, thereby determining the fraction trapped and the expected dark current in a plasma-based accelerator. It is shown that the presence of a laser field (e.g., trapping in the self-modulated regime of the laser wakefield accelerator) increases the trapping threshold. Implications for experimental and numerical laser-plasma studies are discussed.

  17. Real-Time Data from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) is to measure, with high accuracy, the low-frequency, low-magnitude acceleration levels onboard the space shuttle. The shuttle experiences acceleration from atmospheric drag, gravity gradient forces, shuttle rotations, crew activities, water/waste dumps, and shuttle attitude thrusters. The OARE instrument has successfully flown on five past shuttle missions and is scheduled for five upcoming microgravity science missions. The data collected by OARE will be utilized by microgravity scientists to better predict and analyze the influence and effects of the shuttle's on-orbit microgravity environment on experiments in materials, combustion, and fluids research.

  18. Electromagnetic Safety of Spacecraft During Active Experiments with the Use of Plasma Accelerators and Ion Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plokhikh, Andrey; Popov, Garri; Shishkin, Gennady; Antropov, Nikolay; Vazhenin, Nikolay; Soganova, Galina

    Works under the development and application of stationary and pulsed plasma accelerators of charged particles conducted at the Moscow Aviation Institute and Research Institute of Applied Mechanics and Electrodynamics during over 40 years, active experiments on board meteorological rockets, artificial Earth satellites and "Mir" orbital station including [1], allowed to obtain data on the influence of pulsed and continuous plasma injection with the given parameters on the drop of energetic particles out of the radiation belts, efficiency of artificial excitation and propagation of electromagnetic waves in ELF and VLF ranges, and evolution of artificial plasma formations in different regions of ionosphere. Variation of the near-spacecraft electromagnetic environment related to the operation of plasma injectors was registered during active experiments along with the global electrodynamic processes. The measured electromagnetic fields are of rather high intensity and occupy frequency spectrum from some Hz to tens of GHz that may be of definite danger for the operation of spacecraft and its onboard systems. Analysis for the known test data is presented in the paper and methods are discussed for the diagnostics and modeling under laboratory conditions of radiative processes proceeding at the operation of plasma accelerators and ion injectors used while making active space experiments. Great attention is paid to the methodological and metrological bases for making radio measurements in vacuum chambers, design concept and hardware configuration of ground special-purpose instrumentation scientific complexes [2]. Basic requirements are formulated for the measurements and analysis of electromagnetic fields originating during the operation of plasma accelerators, including the radiative induced and conductive components inside the spacecraft, as well as the wave emission and excitation outside the spacecraft, in the ionosphere including. Measurement results for the intrinsic

  19. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Alessia; Moeckli, Raphael; Balmer, Aubin; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine; Do, Huu-Phuoc; Weber, Damien C.; Munier, Francis L.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  20. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators: SEPAC - SEPAC program for First Spacelab Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, T.

    The Space Shuttle/Spacelab Mission Space Experiment with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) will carry out interactive experiments on, and in, the earth ionosphere and magnetosphere, and comprises an electron beam accelerator, MPD arcjet, and associated diagnostic equipment. The mission Payload Specialist will be responsible for (1) manual control of scientific instruments, (2) monitoring of experiment displays, (3) restructuring of experiment sequence by means of display system keyboard, (4) safety and emergency operations, and (5) voice communications. Attention is given to the configurational and sequential organization of the SEPAC experiments.

  1. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  2. Experience in using FlexCtrl SCADA for accelerator automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A.; Aleinikov, V.; Sychev, A.; Borina, I.; Rukavishnikov, A.

    2012-07-01

    The programmed component of the automatic control of accelerators on the basis of licensed software packages (FlexCtrl SCADA, Photon Application Builder, and Cogent DataHub) and an additionally developed library of classes (related to visual programming with regard to functional capabilities and which all together represent an integrated media for producing the automation system) is described in the article. The number of features of the media components and the number of the components themselves can be increased since the developed media is characterized as open.

  3. Second-order state estimation experiments using acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    The estimation of dynamic states for feedback control of structural systems using second-order differential equations and acceleration measurements is described. The formulation of the observer model, and the design of the observer gains is discussed in detail. It is shown the second-order observer is highly stable because the stability constraints on the observer gains are model independent. The limitation of the proposed observer is the need for 'nearly' collocated actuators and accelerometers. Experimental results using a control-structure interaction testbed are presented that show the second-order observer provided more stability than a Kalman filter estimator without decreasing closed-loop performance.

  4. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  5. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Acceleration Disturbances on Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2000-01-01

    Normal vibrational modes on large spacecraft are excited by crew activity, operating machinery, and other mechanical disturbances. Periodic engine burns for maintaining vehicle attitude and random impulse type disturbances also contribute to the acceleration environment of a Spacecraft. Accelerations from these vibrations (often referred to as g-jitter) are several orders of magnitude larger than the residual accelerations from atmospheric drag and gravity gradient effects. Naturally, the effects of such accelerations have been a concern to prospective experimenters wishing to take advantage of the microgravity environment offered by spacecraft operating in low Earth orbit and the topic has been studied extensively, both numerically and analytically. However, these studies have not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter could use to assess how his/her experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling thereby providing comparative theoretical and experimental data. The modeling, it is hoped will provide a predictive tool that can be used for assessing experiment response to Spacecraft vibrations.

  7. Laser wakefield acceleration experiments at the University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Reed, S.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Levin, M.; Zigler, A.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing the laser power and electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 8x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 100 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using f/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of the laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. Betatron motion of electrons was also observed depending on laser power and electron density.

  8. Do US Black Women Experience Stress-Related Accelerated Biological Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Margaret T.; Pearson, Jay A.; Seashols, Sarah J.; Brown, Kelly L.; Cruz, Tracey Dawson

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that black women experience accelerated biological aging in response to repeated or prolonged adaptation to subjective and objective stressors. Drawing on stress physiology and ethnographic, social science, and public health literature, we lay out the rationale for this hypothesis. We also perform a first population-based test of its plausibility, focusing on telomere length, a biomeasure of aging that may be shortened by stressors. Analyzing data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), we estimate that at ages 49–55, black women are 7.5 years biologically “older” than white women. Indicators of perceived stress and poverty account for 27% of this difference. Data limitations preclude assessing objective stressors and also result in imprecise estimates, limiting our ability to draw firm inferences. Further investigation of black-white differences in telomere length using large-population-based samples of broad age range and with detailed measures of environmental stressors is merited. PMID:20436780

  9. A call for virtual experiments: accelerating the scientific process.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan; Vik, Jon Olav; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation is fundamental to the scientific method, whether for exploration, description or explanation. We argue that promoting the reuse of virtual experiments (the in silico analogues of wet-lab or field experiments) would vastly improve the usefulness and relevance of computational models, encouraging critical scrutiny of models and serving as a common language between modellers and experimentalists. We review the benefits of reusable virtual experiments: in specifying, assaying, and comparing the behavioural repertoires of models; as prerequisites for reproducible research; to guide model reuse and composition; and for quality assurance in the translational application of models. A key step towards achieving this is that models and experimental protocols should be represented separately, but annotated so as to facilitate the linking of models to experiments and data. Lastly, we outline how the rigorous, streamlined confrontation between experimental datasets and candidate models would enable a "continuous integration" of biological knowledge, transforming our approach to systems biology. PMID:25433232

  10. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E. Wes

    2013-07-05

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  11. Feature-based analysis of plasma-based particle acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G R; Chen, Min; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Bethel, E Wes

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam, and to investigate transverse particle loss. PMID:24356363

  12. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  13. Physics study of the TRADE : TRIGA accelerator driven experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Naberejnev, D.; Imel, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2004-01-13

    This report deals with the validation of an ADS dynamic behavior through the TRADE program. We first describe the motivations behind the TRADE project. This includes the types of ADS experiments to be performed and their necessity, beam trips issues, representativity of the experiment, and steps to be taken in the validation procedure. Then we perform the characterization of the TRADE core using deterministic methods. The general core description is given. A number of results related to the core criticality and modeling with different geometries are presented. Finally we report the experimental results of the recent critical measurements including the control rod calibration, determination of the critical configurations and fluxes in the core.

  14. Subjective Acceleration of Time Experience in Everyday Life across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Dennis; Lang, Frieder R.

    2015-01-01

    Most people believe that time seems to pass more quickly as they age. Building on assumptions of socioemotional selectivity theory, we investigated whether awareness that one's future lifetime is limited is associated with one's experience of time during everyday activities across adulthood in 3 studies. In the first 2 studies (Study 1: N = 608;…

  15. Kaonic atoms measurements at the DAFNE accelerator: the SIDDHARTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu (Petrascu, C.; Corradi, G.; dUffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R. S.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wunschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-03-01

    Kaonic Hydrogen and Helium X-ray measurements play nowadays a fundamental role in testing the reliability of the Chiral Perturbation Theory as a realisation of the Quantum Chromodynamics at low energies. Dictated by both electromagnetic and strong interaction, X-ray transitions at lower energy levels of these complex bound systems offer indeed the unique opportunity to perform a threshold measurements of zero-energy meson-nucleon scattering. Nowadays the SIDDHARTA experiment at DAFNE collider is the only apparatus which can provide such kind of measurements with the high precision needed to disentangle different theoretical calculation scenarios. In this work we present the SIDDHARTA experiment performances and results, with a focus on the main topics of light kaonic atom physics.

  16. Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), status review, 23 September 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The development responsibilities of SEPAC include: accelerator systems, diagnostic systems, power systems, dedicated experiment processor, interface unit, control panel, and all flight software. The operations of SEPAC, including automated experiments under DEP command control and SEPAC manual operations, are outlined. A diagram of the system configuration is presented.

  17. Space radiation accelerator experiments - The role of neutrons and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-10-01

    The importance of neutrons and light ions is considered when astronauts spend considerable time in thickly shielded regions of a spacecraft. This may be relevant for space missions both in and beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). In addition to heavy ion experiments at accelerators, it is suggested that an increased emphasis on experiments with lighter ions may be useful in reducing biological uncertainties.

  18. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  19. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-21

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a= 30 over 10{sup 8} protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least10{sup 7} protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  20. Laser-Based Transient Surface Acceleration of Thermoelastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CETINKAYA, CETIN; WU, CUNLI; LI, CHEN

    2000-03-01

    The removal of particles from elastic substrates has been an important practical problem in the electronics industry especially as the sizes of electronic units shrink. In recent years, there has been an interest in removingsubmicron level particles from surfaces. The use of traditional surface cleaning methods, such as ultrasonically induced fluid flow, vibrational methods, centrifugal techniques, is limited to particles that require surface acceleration lower than 107m/s2. For the effective removal of submicron particles, a higher level surface acceleration is needed since the adhesion forces (mainly van der Waals force for dry surfaces) are related to the particle size and increase approximately linearly as the characteristic radius of small particles that are to be removed decreases. In current work, based on the generalized dynamic theory of thermoelasticity reported, a transfer matrix formulation including the second sound effect is developed for a thermoelastic layer. The transfer matrix for axisymmetric wave propagation in a thermoelastic layer is obtained by adopting a double integral transform approach. The second sound effect is included to eliminate the thermal wave travelling with infinite velocity as predicted by the diffusion heat transfer model, and, consequently, the immediate arrival of waves. Using the current formulation and the periodic systems framework, a transfer function formulation for calculating the accelerations is developed for transient analysis. A double integral transform inversion method is used for transient response calculations. Acceleration levels, sufficient for submicron particle removal, are reported. Various processes such as thermoelastic stresses, surface evaporation, and optical breakdown may be responsible for surface acceleration components and particle removal. In current work, only the surface acceleration due to transient thermoelastic wave propagation is under investigation.

  1. Physical conditions for conducting radiobiological experiments in beams of accelerated particles with high linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, Y. I.; Marennyy, A. M.; Popov, V. I.; Aykhorn, K.; Ertsgreber, G.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of an accelerator to conduct radiobiological experiments is reported that uses aluminum filters to control the accelerated ion beam while preserving its stability, and a vacuum chamber to conduct the ion beam with the help of a collector through a lavsan exit port to the target. Depth distribution of the absorbed dose from a monodirectional ion beam is practically completely represented by the change in the energy spectrum of the biological object.

  2. Synergy Between Experiments and Simulations in Laser and Beam-Driven Plasma Acceleration and Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren B.

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations have been an integral part of plasma physics research since the early 1960s. Initially, they provided the ability to confirm and test linear and nonlinear theories in one-dimension. As simulation capabilities and computational power improved, then simulations were also used to test new ideas and applications of plasmas in multi-dimensions. As progress continued, simulations were also used to model experiments. Today computer simulations of plasmas are ubiquitously used to test new theories, understand complicated nonlinear phenomenon, model the full temporal and spatial scale of experiments, simulate parameters beyond the reach of current experiments, and test the performance of new devices before large capital expenditures are made to build them. In this talk I review the progress in simulations in a particular area of plasma physics: plasma based acceleration (PBA). In PBA a short laser pulse or particle beam propagates through long regions of plasma creating plasma wave wakefields on which electrons or positrons surf to high energies. In some cases the wakefields are highly nonlinear, involve three-dimensional effects, and the trajectories of plasma particles cross making it essential that fully kinetic and three-dimensional models are used. I will show how particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were initially used to propose the basic idea of PBA in one dimension. I will review some of the dramatic progress in the experimental demonstration of PBA and show how this progress was dramatically helped by a synergy between experiments and full-scale multi-dimensional PIC simulations. This will include a review of how the capability of PIC simulation tools has improved. I will also touch on some recent progress on improvements to PIC simulations of PBA and discuss how these improvements may push the synergy further towards real time steering of experiments and start to end modeling of key components of a future linear collider or XFEL based on PBA

  3. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  4. A self-injection acceleration test experiment for the FLAME laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labate, L.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benedetti, C.; Benocci, R.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ciricosta, O.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Gallo, S.; Fioravanti, S.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Köster, P.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Valente, P.; Vicario, C.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    A 250-TW laser system (FLAME - Frascati laser for acceleration and multidisciplinary experiments) is now in its commissioning phase in a new laboratory at LNF-INFN in the framework of the PLASMONX (Plasma acceleration and monochromatic X-ray generation) project. The laser will deliver<25 fs duration pulses with an energy up to 6 J, at a 10 Hz repetition rate. An ad hoc target area has also been designed and is currently being set up, allowing the first test experiments of electron laser wakefield acceleration to be carried out over the next few months in a safe, radiation-protected environment. An overview of the main features of the laser system and target area is given, along with a survey of the design and set-up of the self-injection test experiment, which is expected to reach the production of sub-GeV electron bunches.

  5. Shielding Benchmark Experiments Through Concrete and Iron with High-Energy Proton and Heavy Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakao, N.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Iwase, H.; Uwamino, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ito, S.; Fukumura, A.; Perry, D. R.; Wright, P.

    The deep penetration of neutrons through thick shield has become a very serious problem in the shielding design of high-energy, high-intensity accelerator facility. In the design calculation, the Monte Carlo transport calculation through thick shields has large statistical errors and the basic nuclear data and model used in the existing Monte Carlo codes are not well evaluated because of very few experimental data. It is therefore strongly needed to do the deep penetration experiment as shielding benchmark for investigating the calculation accuracy. Under this circumference, we performed the following two shielding experiments through concrete and iron, one with a 800 MeV proton accelerator of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), England and the other with a high energy heavy iron accelerator of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Here these two shielding benchmark experiments are outlined.

  6. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Kierstead, J.; Takai, H.; Rescia, S.; Hu, X.; Xu, H.; Mead, J.; Lanni, F.; Minelli, M.

    2015-08-17

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detectormore » front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on radiation effects tests conducted on 17 commercially available analog to digital converters and extensive single event effect measurements on specific twelve and fourteen bit ADCs that presented high tolerance to ionizing dose. We discuss mitigation strategies for single event effects (SEE) for their use in the large hadron collider environment.« less

  7. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Kierstead, J.; Takai, H.; Rescia, S.; Hu, X.; Xu, H.; Mead, J.; Lanni, F.; Minelli, M.

    2015-08-17

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detector front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on radiation effects tests conducted on 17 commercially available analog to digital converters and extensive single event effect measurements on specific twelve and fourteen bit ADCs that presented high tolerance to ionizing dose. We discuss mitigation strategies for single event effects (SEE) for their use in the large hadron collider environment.

  8. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Kierstead, J.; Takai, H.; Rescia, S.; Hu, X.; Xu, H.; Mead, J.; Lanni, F.; Minelli, M.

    2015-08-01

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detector front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on the development of a technique for testing analog to digital converters for radiation effects, in particular for single event effects. A total of seventeen commercial ADCs were evaluated for ionizing dose tolerance and extensive SEU measurements performed on a twelve and fourteen bit ADCs. Mitigation strategies for single event effects (SEE) are discussed for their use in the large hadron collider environment.

  9. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  10. {sup 163}Ho based experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, Loredana

    2015-07-15

    The analysis of the endpoint region of the calorimetrically measured {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum is a very promising way to determine the mass of the electron neutrino. The achievable sensitivity of {sup 163}Ho-based experiments and the experimental challenges will be presented. Three large collaborations aim at developing large scale experiments able to reach sub-eV sensitivity. Presently pilot experiments are performed to demonstrate the possibility to calorimetrically measure high precision and high statistics {sup 163}Ho spectra. The different approaches as well as the state of the art of the experimental efforts for the three collaborations will be discussed.

  11. Modeling laser wakefield accelerator experiments with ultrafast particle-in-cell simulations in boosted frames

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S. F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-05-15

    The development of new laser systems at the 10 Petawatt range will push laser wakefield accelerators to novel regimes, for which theoretical scalings predict the possibility to accelerate electron bunches up to tens of GeVs in meter-scale plasmas. Numerical simulations will play a crucial role in testing, probing, and optimizing the physical parameters and the setup of future experiments. Fully kinetic simulations are computationally very demanding, pushing the limits of today's supercomputers. In this paper, the recent developments in the OSIRIS framework [R. A. Fonseca et al., Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. 2331, 342 (2002)] are described, in particular the boosted frame scheme, which leads to a dramatic change in the computational resources required to model laser wakefield accelerators. Results from one-to-one modeling of the next generation of laser systems are discussed, including the confirmation of electron bunch acceleration to the energy frontier.

  12. Summary report: working group 2 on 'Plasma Based AccelerationConcepts'

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, Wim

    1998-09-01

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beatwave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module.

  13. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  14. Support Vector Machine Based on Adaptive Acceleration Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  15. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  16. Support vector machine based on adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  17. Accelerated UV weathering device based on integrating sphere technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Joannie; Byrd, Eric; Embree, Ned; Garver, Jason; Dickens, Brian; Finn, Tom; Martin, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) weathering device based on integrating sphere technology has been designed, fabricated, and implemented for studying the accelerated weathering of polymers. This device has the capability of irradiating multiple test specimens with uniform, high intensity UV radiation while simultaneously subjecting them to a wide range of precisely and independently controlled temperature and relative humidity environments. This article describes the integrating sphere-based weathering system, its ability to precisely control temperature and relative humidity, and its ability to produce a highly uniform UV irradiance.

  18. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  19. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  20. Broadband Single-Shot Electron Spectrometer for GeV-Class Laser Plasma Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Wan, W.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Laser-plasma-based accelerators can provide electrons over a broad energy range and/or with large momentum spread. The electron beam energy distribution can be controlled via accurate control of laser and plasma properties, and beams with energies ranging from'0.5 to 1000 MeV have been observed. Measuring these energy distributions in a single shot requires the use of a diagnostic with large momentum acceptance and, ideally, sufficient resolution to accurately measure energy spread in the case of narrow energy spread. Such a broadband single-shot electron magnetic spectrometer for GeV-class laser-plasma-based accelerators has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A detailed description of the hardware and the design concept is presented, as well as a performance evaluation of the spectrometer. The spectrometer covered electron beam energies raging from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, and enabled the simultaneous measurement of the laser properties at the exit of the accelerator through the use of a sufficiently large pole gap. Based on measured field maps and 3rd-order transport analysis, a few percent-level resolution and determination of the absolute energy were achieved over the entire energy range. Laser-plasma-based accelerator experiments demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic and its suitability for such a broadband electron source.

  1. Ensemble Manifold Rank Preserving for Acceleration-Based Human Activity Recognition.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dapeng; Jin, Lianwen; Yuan, Yuan; Xue, Yang

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of mobile devices and pervasive computing technologies, acceleration-based human activity recognition, a difficult yet essential problem in mobile apps, has received intensive attention recently. Different acceleration signals for representing different activities or even a same activity have different attributes, which causes troubles in normalizing the signals. We thus cannot directly compare these signals with each other, because they are embedded in a nonmetric space. Therefore, we present a nonmetric scheme that retains discriminative and robust frequency domain information by developing a novel ensemble manifold rank preserving (EMRP) algorithm. EMRP simultaneously considers three aspects: 1) it encodes the local geometry using the ranking order information of intraclass samples distributed on local patches; 2) it keeps the discriminative information by maximizing the margin between samples of different classes; and 3) it finds the optimal linear combination of the alignment matrices to approximate the intrinsic manifold lied in the data. Experiments are conducted on the South China University of Technology naturalistic 3-D acceleration-based activity dataset and the naturalistic mobile-devices based human activity dataset to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the new nonmetric scheme for acceleration-based human activity recognition. PMID:25265635

  2. Grating-based deflecting, focusing, and diagnostic dielectric laser accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    Recent technological advances has made possible the realization of the first laser-driven particle accelerator structure to be fabricated lithographically. However, a complete particle accelerator requires more than just accelerating elements. In this paper, we present a grating-based design for three other quintessential accelerator elements: the focusing structure, the deflecting structure, and the diagnostic structure.

  3. Examining Nontraditional Graduate Students' Academic Writing Experiences in an Accelerated Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crite, Charles E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The academic writing competencies of nontraditional graduate students enrolled in accelerated graduate programs have become a growing concern for many higher learning educators in those programs. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to examine the writing experiences that impacted nontraditional graduate students enrolled in…

  4. School Counselors' Perceptions and Experience with Acceleration as a Program Option for Gifted and Talented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Susannah; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Colangelo, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national survey of 149 practicing school counselors who are members of the American School Counselor Association. The survey gathered information on school counselors' perceptions of and experiences with acceleration as a program option for gifted students. Results indicate that, although school counselors'…

  5. The Gift of Time: Today's Academic Acceleration Case Study Voices of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheibel, Susan Riley

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine today's academic acceleration from the lived experience and perspectives of two young adults whose education was shortened, thereby allowing them the gift of time. Through personal interviews, parent interviews, and physical artifacts, the researcher gained a complex, holistic understanding…

  6. Recent results from polarization experiments at the LHEP-JINR Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygin, V. P.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Krasnov, V. A.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kiselev, A. S.; Kizka, V. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Livanov, A. N.; Ladygina, N. B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Piyadin, S. M.; Reznikov, S. G.; Shikhalev, M. A.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Uesaka, T.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.

    2008-10-13

    The review of recent results from polarization experiments performed at LHEP-JINR Accelerator Complex in a GeV range is given. The current status of the spin program at Nuclotron as well as its further continuation with new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source is discussed.

  7. Starting Where the Student Is: An Experiment in Accelerated Graduate Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eades, Joe C.

    1976-01-01

    A description and interim evaluation of an experimental accelerated master's degree program is presented. The program is designed for students whose undergraduate preparation, work experience, and performance on a qualifying examination suggest that they can benefit from a curriculum that builds directly upon their previous educational and work…

  8. Using a mobile phone acceleration sensor in physics experiments on free and damped harmonic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Castro-Palacio, Juan; Velázquez-Abad, Luisberis; Giménez, Marcos H.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2013-06-01

    We have used a mobile phone acceleration sensor, and the Accelerometer Monitor application for Android, to collect data in physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant, and damping constant agree very well with measurements obtained by other methods. These widely available sensors are likely to find increased use in instructional laboratories.

  9. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  10. Accelerated 4D Quantitative Single Point EPR Imaging Using Model-based Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyungseok; Matsumoto, Shingo; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Zhuo, Jiachen; Krishna, Murali C.; McMillan, Alan B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose EPRI has surfaced as a promising non-invasive imaging modality that is capable of imaging tissue oxygenation. Due to extremely short spin-spin relaxation time, EPRI benefits from single point imaging and inherently suffers from limited spatial and temporal resolution, preventing localization of small hypoxic tissues and differentiation of hypoxia dynamics, making accelerated imaging a crucial issue. Method In this study, methods for accelerated single point imaging were developed by combining a bilateral k-space extrapolation technique with model-based reconstruction that benefits from dense sampling in the parameter domain (measurement of the T2* decay of an FID). In bilateral k-space extrapolation, more k-space samples are obtained in a sparsely sampled region by bilaterally extrapolating data from temporally neighboring k-spaces. To improve the accuracy of T2* estimation, a principal component analysis (PCA)-based method was implemented. Result In a computer simulation and a phantom experiment, the proposed methods showed its capability for reliable T2* estimation with high acceleration (8-fold, 15-fold, and 30-fold accelerations for 61×61×61, 95×95×95, and 127×127×127 matrix, respectively). Conclusion By applying bilateral k-space extrapolation and model-based reconstruction, improved scan times with higher spatial resolution can be achieved in the current SP-EPRI modality. PMID:24803382

  11. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

  12. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We simulated the slip of a fault-patch during a large earthquake by rapidly loading an experimental, ring-shaped fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The flywheel abruptly delivers a finite amount of energy by spinning the fault-patch that spontaneously dissipates the energy without operator intervention. We conducted 42 experiments on Sierra White granite (SWG) samples, and 24 experiments on Kasota dolomite (KD) samples. Each experiment starts by spinning a 225 kg disk-shaped flywheel to a prescribed angular velocity. We refer to this experiment as an "earthquake-like slip-event" (ELSE). The strength-evolution in ELSE experiments is similar to the strength-evolution proposed for earthquake models and observed in stick-slip experiments. Further, we found that ELSE experiments are similar to earthquakes in at least three ways: (1) slip driven by the release of a finite amount of stored energy; (2) pattern of fault strength evolution; and (3) seismically observed values, such as average slip, peak-velocity and rise-time. By assuming that the measured slip, D, in ELSE experiments is equivalent to the average slip during an earthquake, we found that ELSE experiments (D = 0.003-4.6 m) correspond to earthquakes in moment-magnitude range of Mw = 4-8. In ELSE experiments, the critical-slip-distance, dc, has mean values of 2.7 cm and 1.2 cm for SWG and KD, that are much shorter than the 1-10 m in steady-state classical experiments in rotary shear systems. We attribute these dc values, to ELSE loading in which the fault-patch is abruptly loaded by impact with a spinning flywheel. Under this loading, the friction-velocity relations are strikingly different from those under steady-state loading on the same rock samples with the same shear system (Reches and Lockner, Nature, 2010). We further note that the slip acceleration in ELSE evolves systematically with fault strength and wear-rate, and that the dynamic weakening is restricted to the period of intense

  13. Recent Advances and Some Results in Plasma-Based Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    Simulation, using particle-in-cell (PIC) methods, has played a critical role in the evolution of the field of plasma-based acceleration. Early on, simulations allowed the testing of new ideas using so-called cartoon parameters. These simulations were done in either one or two-dimensions using single processor supercomputers. Through the development of new algorithms and parallel computing, today, we can now use PIC simulations to model the full-scale of ongoing experiments in three-dimensions. These experiments are attempting to accelerate electrons to ˜1 GeV. In this article, I will present recent results in which simulation results are compared to experiment and I will discuss the future challenges in advanced accelerator modeling. Principally, these are 1.) to be able to model a 100+ on 100+ GeV collider in three-dimensions and, 2.) to develop more efficient, yet still accurate, algorithms so that simulation can be used for real-time feedback with experiment.

  14. Experiments in sensing transient rotational acceleration cues on a flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for two transient motion sensing experiments which were motivated by the identification of an anomalous roll cue (a 'jerk' attributed to an acceleration spike) in a prior investigation of realistic fighter motion simulation. The experimental results suggest the consideration of several issues for motion washout and challenge current sensory system modeling efforts. Although no sensory modeling effort is made it is argued that such models must incorporate the ability to handle transient inputs of short duration (some of which are less than the accepted latency times for sensing), and must represent separate channels for rotational acceleration and velocity sensing.

  15. Comparison of accelerator-based with reactor-based waste transmutation schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.; Beard, C.A.; Venneri, F.; Davidson, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    Accelerator-based transmutation of waste (ATW) systems for the destruction of commercial LWR spent fuel are compared with systems based on thermal reactors accomplish the same objectives. When the same technology is assumed for the actinide-burning aspect of the two systems, it is seen that the size of the accelerator is determined only by the choice of how many of the long-lived fission products to burn. if none are transmuted, then the accelerator is not necessary. This result is independent of the choice of fluid carrier, and whether the actinides are destroyed in an ATW system or in a separate reactor.

  16. Vibration isolation technology: Sensitivity of selected classes of experiments to residual accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1990-01-01

    The solution was sought of a 2-D axisymmetric moving boundary problem for the sensitivity of isothermal and nonisothermal liquid columns and the sensitivity of thermo-capillary flows to buoyancy driven convection caused by residual accelerations. The sensitivity of a variety of space experiments to residual accelerations are examined. In all the cases discussed, the sensitivity is related to the dynamic response of a fluid. In some cases the sensitivity can be defined by the magnitude of the response of the velocity field. This response may involve motion of the fluid associated with internal density gradients, or the motion of a free liquid surface. For fluids with internal density gradients, the type of acceleration to which the experiment is sensitive will depend on whether buoyancy driven convection must be small in comparison to other types of fluid motion (such as thermocapillary flow), or fluid motion must be suppressed or eliminated (such as in diffusion studies, or directional solidification experiments). The effect of the velocity on the composition and temperature field must be considered, particularly in the vicinity of the melt crystal interface. As far as the response to transient disturbances is concerned the sensitivity is determined by both the magnitude and frequency the acceleration and the characteristic momentum and solute diffusion times.

  17. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.A.; Venneri, F.; Bowman, C.D.; Arthur, E.D.; Heighway, E.A.; Beard, C.A.; Bracht, R.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Chavez, W.; DeVolder, B.G.

    1994-10-01

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MW{sub t}.

  18. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities was flown aboard Shuttle on STS-40. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarefied flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument detects aerodynamic behavior of the Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-h orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low-frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight liner corrections for drift.

  20. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  1. The ANL experiment for a wake field accelerator using an rf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1986-08-27

    Experiments are planned at ANL to study a new accelerating concept that has been developed during the last few years named the WAKEATRON. This requires a very special, simple configuration of the beams and of the rf structure involved. The basic concepts are explained. Like most proposed experimental work, this too was initiated by a considerable amount of computational work, both analytical and numerical, on which we would like to report. We will then describe details of the planned experiments we will carry out at ANL to check some of our predictions for this concept. These experiments concentrate on beam and cavity geometry applicable to the Wakeatron.

  2. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; LaPointe, M. A.

    2006-11-27

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field ({approx}5.2 T, length {approx}1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to {approx}75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6{mu}m laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 {mu}m waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow ({approx}1%) energy-spread.

  3. Helicon Plasma Injector and Ion Cyclotron Acceleration Development in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang, Franklin R.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) radio frequency (rf) waves both produce the plasma and then accelerate the ions. The plasma production is done by action of helicon waves. These waves are circular polarized waves in the direction of the electron gyromotion. The ion acceleration is performed by ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) acceleration. The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is actively developing efficient helicon plasma production and ICRF acceleration. The VASIMR experimental device at the ASPL is called VX-10. It is configured to demonstrate the plasma production and acceleration at the 10kW level to support a space flight demonstration design. The VX-10 consists of three electromagnets integrated into a vacuum chamber that produce magnetic fields up to 0.5 Tesla. Magnetic field shaping is achieved by independent magnet current control and placement of the magnets. We have generated both helium and hydrogen high density (>10(exp 18) cu m) discharges with the helicon source. ICRF experiments are underway. This paper describes the VX-10 device, presents recent results and discusses future plans.

  4. Motivation for proposed experimentation in the realm of accelerated E. M. systems: A preliminary design for an experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, E. J.

    1970-01-01

    An experiment, designed to determine the difference between fields-magnetic and electric-surrounding a uniformly moving charge as contrasted with the fields surrounding an accelerated charge, is presented. A thought experiment is presented to illustrate the process.

  5. Invited article: advanced drag-free concepts for future space-based interferometers: acceleration noise performance.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, D; Allen, G; Conklin, J W; Sun, K-X; DeBra, D; Buchman, S; Gath, P; Fichter, W; Byer, R L; Johann, U

    2014-01-01

    Future drag-free missions for space-based experiments in gravitational physics require a Gravitational Reference Sensor with extremely demanding sensing and disturbance reduction requirements. A configuration with two cubical sensors is the current baseline for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and has reached a high level of maturity. Nevertheless, several promising concepts have been proposed with potential applications beyond LISA and are currently investigated at HEPL, Stanford, and EADS Astrium, Germany. The general motivation is to exploit the possibility of achieving improved disturbance reduction, and ultimately understand how low acceleration noise can be pushed with a realistic design for future mission. In this paper, we discuss disturbance reduction requirements for LISA and beyond, describe four different payload concepts, compare expected strain sensitivities in the "low-frequency" region of the frequency spectrum, dominated by acceleration noise, and ultimately discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of those concepts in achieving disturbance reduction for space-based detectors beyond LISA. PMID:24517738

  6. Shock experiments and numerical simulations on low energy portable electrically exploding foil accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, A. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2010-03-01

    Two low energy (1.6 and 8 kJ) portable electrically exploding foil accelerators are developed for moderately high pressure shock studies at small laboratory scale. Projectile velocities up to 4.0 km/s have been measured on Kapton flyers of thickness 125 μm and diameter 8 mm, using an in-house developed Fabry-Pérot velocimeter. An asymmetric tilt of typically few milliradians has been measured in flyers using fiber optic technique. High pressure impact experiments have been carried out on tantalum, and aluminum targets up to pressures of 27 and 18 GPa, respectively. Peak particle velocities at the target-glass interface as measured by Fabry-Pérot velocimeter have been found in good agreement with the reported equation of state data. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on realistic models of equation of state and electrical resistivity has been developed to numerically simulate the flyer velocity profiles. The developed numerical scheme is validated against experimental and simulation data reported in literature on such systems. Numerically computed flyer velocity profiles and final flyer velocities have been found in close agreement with the previously reported experimental results with a significant improvement over reported magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Numerical modeling of low energy systems reported here predicts flyer velocity profiles higher than experimental values, indicating possibility of further improvement to achieve higher shock pressures.

  7. Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C. C.; Geslot, B.

    2006-07-01

    The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

  8. Ice Target and Gas Target Experiments in the IMPACT Dust Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsat, T. L.; Collette, A.; Dee, R.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; James, D.; Janches, D.; Kempf, S.; Plane, J. M. C.; Shu, A. J.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The dust accelerator facility at the SSERVI Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) is presently implementing two major target upgrades: a cryogenic ice target and a high-pressure gas target. The ice target consists of a LN2 cryogenic system connected to both a water-ice deposition system as well as a movable freezer/holder for a pre-mixed liquid cartridge. Planned experiments include the bombardment of a variety of frozen targets and simulated ice/regolith mixtures, and the assessment of all impact products (solid ejecta, gas, plasma) as well as spectroscopy of both the impact-produced light flashes and the reflected spectra (UV, visible, IR). Such measurements are highly relevant to both physical and chemical surface modification of airless bodies due to micrometeoroid impacts. The gas target consists of a differentially pumped chamber kept at moderate background pressures, such that high-velocity (~10 km/s) micrometeoroids are completely ablated within 10's of cm (i.e. within the measurement chamber). The chamber is configured with segmented electrodes to perform a spatially-resolved measurement of charge production during ablation, and localized light-collection optics enable an assessment of the light production (luminous efficiency). Such studies are critical to the understanding of past and future ground-based measurements of meteor ablation in Earth's atmosphere, which in turn can potentially provide the best estimates of the interplanetary dust particle flux.

  9. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  10. Turbulence Hazard Metric Based on Peak Accelerations for Jetliner Passengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations are made of the approximate hazard due to peak normal accelerations of an airplane flying through a simulated vertical wind field associated with a convective frontal system. The calculations are based on a hazard metric developed from a systematic application of a generic math model to 1-cosine discrete gusts of various amplitudes and gust lengths. The math model simulates the three degree-of- freedom longitudinal rigid body motion to vertical gusts and includes (1) fuselage flexibility, (2) the lag in the downwash from the wing to the tail, (3) gradual lift effects, (4) a simplified autopilot, and (5) motion of an unrestrained passenger in the rear cabin. Airplane and passenger response contours are calculated for a matrix of gust amplitudes and gust lengths. The airplane response contours are used to develop an approximate hazard metric of peak normal accelerations as a function of gust amplitude and gust length. The hazard metric is then applied to a two-dimensional simulated vertical wind field of a convective frontal system. The variations of the hazard metric with gust length and airplane heading are demonstrated.

  11. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-01-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  12. Recent Developments on ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Y M; Buckley, R K; Buckley, S R; Clarke, J A; Corlett, P A; Dunning, D J; Goulden, A R; Hill, S F; Jackson, F; Jamison, S P; Jones, J K; Jones, L B; Leonard, S; McIntosh, P A; McKenzie, J W; Middleman, K J; Militsyn, B L; Moss, A J; Muratori, B D; Orrett, J F; Pattalwar, S M; Phillips, P J; Scott, D J; Seddon, E A; Shepherd, B.J.A.; Smith, S L; Thompson, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Williams, P H; Harrison, P; Holder, D J; Holder, G M; Schofield, A L; Weightman, P; Williams, R L; Laundry, D; Powers, T; Priebe, G; Surman, M

    2010-05-01

    Progress made in ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) commissioning and a summary of the latest experimental results are presented in this paper. After an extensive work on beam loading effects in SC RF linac (booster) and linac cavities conditioning, ALICE can now operate in full energy recovery mode at the bunch charge of 40pC, the beam energy of 30MeV and train lengths of up to 100us. This improved operation of the machine resulted in generation of coherently enhanced broadband THz radiation with the energy of several tens of uJ per pulse and in successful demonstration of the Compton Backscattering x-ray source experiment. The next steps in the ALICE scientific programme are commissioning of the IR FEL and start of the research on the first non-scaling FFAG accelerator EMMA. Results from both projects will be also reported.

  13. Rapid Acceleration Leads to Rapid Weakening in Earthquake-Like Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-10-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  14. Parameterizations for shielding electron accelerators based on Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtyarenko; G. Stapleton

    1996-10-01

    Numerous recipes for designing lateral slab neutron shielding for electron accelerators are available and each generally produces rather similar results for shield thicknesses of about 2 m of concrete and for electron beams with energy in the 1 to 10 GeV region. For thinner or much thicker shielding the results tend to diverge and the standard recipes require modification. Likewise for geometries other than lateral to the beam direction further corrections are required so that calculated results are less reliable and hence additional and costly conservatism is needed. With the adoption of Monte Carlo (MC) methods of transporting particles a much more powerful way of calculating radiation dose rates outside shielding becomes available. This method is not constrained by geometry, although deep penetration problems need special statistical treatment, and is an excellent approach to solving any radiation transport problem providing the method has been properly checked against measurements and is free from the well known errors common to such computer methods. This present paper utilizes the results of MC calculations based on a nuclear fragmentation model named DINREG using the MC transport code GEANT and models them with the normal two parameter shielding expressions. Because the parameters can change with electron beam energy, angle to the electron beam direction and target material, the parameters are expressed as functions of some of these variables to provide a universal equations for shielding electron beams which can used rather simply for deep penetration problems in simple geometry without the time consuming computations needed in the original MC programs. A particular problem with using simple parameterizations based on the uncollided flux is that approximations based on spherical geometry might not apply to the more common cylindrical cases used for accelerator shielding. This source of error has been discussed at length by Stevenson and others. To study

  15. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  16. Preliminary Results from the UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient CerenkovWakefield Accelerator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2008-02-06

    The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. This experiment takes advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam has been successfully focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam was varied in the range 20 {micro}m < {sigma}{sub z} < 100 {micro}m which produced a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain more information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

  17. Applied-B ion diode experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreike, P. L.; Burns, E. J. T.; Slutz, S. A.; Crow, J. T.; Johnson, D. J.; Johnson, P. R.; Leeper, R. J.; Miller, P. A.; Mix, L. P.; Seidel, D. B.; Wenger, D. F.

    1986-08-01

    A series of experiments was performed with an Applied-B ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I, with peak voltage, current, and power of approximately 1.8 MV, 6 MA, and 6 TW, respectively. The purpose of these experiments was to explore issues of scaling of Applied-B diode operation from the sub-TW level on single module accelerators to the multi-TW level on a low impedance, self-magnetically insulated, multimodule accelerator. This is an essential step in the development of the 100-TW level light ion beam driver required for inertial confinement fusion. The accelerator and the diode are viewed as a whole because the power pulse delivered by the 36 imperfectly synchronized magnetically insulated transmission lines to the single diode affects module addition, diode operation, and ion beam focusability. We studied electrical coupling between the accelerator and the diode, power flow symmetry, the ionic composition of the beam, and the focusability of the proton component of the beam. Scaling of the diode impedance behavior and beam quality with electrical drive power is obtained from comparison with lower-power experiments. The diode impedance lifetime was about 10 ns, several times shorter than for lower-power experiments. Azimuthal and top-to-bottom variations of the diode and ion currents were found to be approximately ±10%, compared with an estimated requirement of 5%-7% uniformity to avoid focal blurring by self-magnetic field effects. The ion production efficiency was 80%-90%. However, only 50%±10% of the ion current was carried by protons; the balance was carried by multiply charged carbon and oxygen ions. Activation measurements showed a proton beam energy of approximately 50 kJ. A gas cell filled with 5 Torr of argon was used for beam transport. The macroscopic divergence was 15±10 mrad and the microscopic divergence was 20±15 mrad, values that are similar to those from lower-power experiments. A model of beam focusing is formulated that

  18. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  19. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  20. Accelerating the connection between experiments and models: The FACE-MDS experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Medlyn, B. E.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Zaehle, S.; Walker, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mandate is clear for improving communication between models and experiments to better evaluate terrestrial responses to atmospheric and climatic change. Unfortunately, progress in linking experimental and modeling approaches has been slow and sometimes frustrating. Recent successes in linking results from the Duke and Oak Ridge free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments with ecosystem and land surface models - the FACE Model-Data Synthesis (FACE-MDS) project - came only after a period of slow progress, but the experience points the way to future model-experiment interactions. As the FACE experiments were approaching their termination, the FACE research community made an explicit attempt to work together with the modeling community to synthesize and deliver experimental data to benchmark models and to use models to supply appropriate context for the experimental results. Initial problems that impeded progress were: measurement protocols were not consistent across different experiments; data were not well organized for model input; and parameterizing and spinning up models that were not designed for simulating a specific site was difficult. Once these problems were worked out, the FACE-MDS project has been very successful in using data from the Duke and ORNL FACE experiment to test critical assumptions in the models. The project showed, for example, that the stomatal conductance model most widely used in models was supported by experimental data, but models did not capture important responses such as increased leaf mass per unit area in elevated CO2, and did not appropriately represent foliar nitrogen allocation. We now have an opportunity to learn from this experience. New FACE experiments that have recently been initiated, or are about to be initiated, include a eucalyptus forest in Australia; the AmazonFACE experiment in a primary, tropical forest in Brazil; and a mature oak woodland in England. Cross-site science questions are being developed that will have a

  1. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  2. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    PubMed

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team. PMID:27123599

  3. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, Gene

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  4. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Muggli, P.; Niknejadi, P.; Travish, G.; Williams, O.; Xuan, K.; Yakimenko, V.

    2010-11-01

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation (CCR) production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of the FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in ˜33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are performing measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive ˜50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains, and observe resonantly driven CCR as well as deflection modes. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for high efficiency operation with pulse trains, and explore transverse modes for the first time.

  5. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Gene

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with significant flexibility in mind, but without compromising cost efficiency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of different variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of-flight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  6. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Niknejadi, P.; Travish, G.; Williams, O.; Xuan, K.; Muggli, P.; Yakimenko, V.

    2010-11-04

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation (CCR) production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of the FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are performing measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains, and observe resonantly driven CCR as well as deflection modes. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for high efficiency operation with pulse trains, and explore transverse modes for the first time.

  7. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Hogan, Mark; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  8. Cantilever-based FBG sensor for temperature-independent acceleration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Yongxing; Zhao, Chun-Liu

    2009-11-01

    A novel accelerometer based on a strain-chirped optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed. The FBG is glued in a slanted direction onto the lateral side of a right-angled triangle cantilever beam with a mass bonded on its free end. Vertical acceleration applied to the cantilever beam leads to a uniform bending along the beam length. As a result, the FBG is chirped and its reflection bandwidth changes linearly with the applied acceleration. A high sensitivity of 0.679 nm/g has been achieved in the experiment. The experimental results of the sensor are compared with the results of a conventional accelerometer for the dynamic measurements. This sensor is temperature insensitive, owning to the temperature-independence nature of reflection bandwidth of the FBG.

  9. Accelerating PS model-based dynamic cardiac MRI using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Xie, Guoxi; Shi, Caiyun; Su, Shi; Zhang, Yongqin; Liu, Xin; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-02-01

    High spatiotemporal resolution MRI is a challenging topic in dynamic MRI field. Partial separability (PS) model has been successfully applied to dynamic cardiac MRI by exploiting data redundancy. However, the model requires substantial preprocessing data to accurately estimate the model parameters before image reconstruction. Since compressed sensing (CS) is a potential technique to accelerate MRI by reducing the number of acquired data, the combination of PS and CS, named as Stepped-SparsePS, was introduced to accelerate the preprocessing data acquisition of PS in this work. The proposed Stepped-SparsePS method sequentially reconstructs a set of aliased dynamic images in each channel based on PS model and then the final dynamic images from the aliased images using CS. The results from numerical simulations and in vivo experiments demonstrate that Stepped-SparsePS could significantly reduce data acquisition time while preserving high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:26552006

  10. The latest results from ELM-simulation experiments in plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Arkhipov, N. I.; Klimov, N. S.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Safronov, V. M.; Landman, I.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2009-12-01

    Recent results of ELM-simulation experiments with quasi-stationary plasma accelerators (QSPAs) Kh-50 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and QSPA-T (Troitsk, Russia) as well as experiments in the pulsed plasma gun MK-200UG (Troitsk, Russia) are discussed. Primary attention in Troitsk experiments has been focused on investigating the carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten erosion mechanisms, their onset conditions and the contribution of various erosion mechanisms (including droplet splashing) to the resultant surface damage at varying plasma heat flux. The obtained results are used for validating the numerical codes PEGASUS and MEMOS developed in FZK. Crack patterns and residual stresses in tungsten targets under repetitive edge localized mode (ELM)-like plasma pulses are studied in simulation experiments with QSPA Kh-50. Statistical processing of the experimental results on crack patterns after different numbers of QSPA Kh-50 exposures as well as those on the dependence of cracking on the heat load and surface temperature is performed.

  11. FHAST: FPGA-Based Acceleration of Bowtie in Hardware.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Edward B; Villarreal, Jason; Lonardi, Stefano; Najjar, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    While the sequencing capability of modern instruments continues to increase exponentially, the computational problem of mapping short sequenced reads to a reference genome still constitutes a bottleneck in the analysis pipeline. A variety of mapping tools (e.g., Bowtie, BWA) is available for general-purpose computer architectures. These tools can take many hours or even days to deliver mapping results, depending on the number of input reads, the size of the reference genome and the number of allowed mismatches or insertion/deletions, making the mapping problem an ideal candidate for hardware acceleration. In this paper, we present FHAST (FPGA hardware accelerated sequence-matching tool), a drop-in replacement for Bowtie that uses a hardware design based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Our architecture masks memory latency by executing multiple concurrent hardware threads accessing memory simultaneously. FHAST is composed by multiple parallel engines to exploit the parallelism available to us on an FPGA. We have implemented and tested FHAST on the Convey HC-1 and later ported on the Convey HC-2ex, taking advantage of the large memory bandwidth available to these systems and the shared memory image between hardware and software. A preliminary version of FHAST running on the Convey HC-1 achieved up to 70x speedup compared to Bowtie (single-threaded). An improved version of FHAST running on the Convey HC-2ex FPGAs achieved up to 12x fold speed gain compared to Bowtie running eight threads on an eight-core conventional architecture, while maintaining almost identical mapping accuracy. FHAST is a drop-in replacement for Bowtie, so it can be incorporated in any analysis pipeline that uses Bowtie (e.g., TopHat). PMID:26451812

  12. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Ritter, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities, was flown for the first time aboard the Space Shuttle on STS-40. This is also the first time an accelerometer package with nano-g sensitivity and a calibration facility has flown aboard the Space Shuttle. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Space Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarified flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument defects aerodynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-hour orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. During the flight, a 'trimmed-mean' filter was used to produce high quality, low frequency data which was successfully stored aboard the Space Shuttle in the OARE data storage system. Initial review of the data indicated that, although the expected precision was achieved, some equipment problems occurred resulting in uncertain accuracy. An acceleration model which includes aerodynamic, gravity-gradient, and rotational effects was constructed and compared with flight data. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight linear corrections for drift. The other axis does not exhibit these difficulties and gives good agreement with the acceleration model.

  13. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Greenly, J. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Ryutov, D. D.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Blue, B. E.; Tomlinson, K.; Schroen, D.; Stamm, R. M.; Smith, G. E.; Moore, J. K.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; Lopez, M. R.; Porter, J. L.; Matzen, M. K.

    2013-05-01

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless ("quasi-isentropic") liner compression. Third, we present "micro-Ḃ" measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density "precursor" plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  14. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  15. Design and fabrication of plasma accelerator for space micro-debris simulation and preliminary experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Zhang, Z.; Huang, J.; Li, X.; Chen, Z.; Quan, R.

    A simulation facility for hypervelocity impact of space micro-debris is designed and fabricated Just after the assembly of the facility some preliminary debugging experiments have conducted A plasma accelerator is the core component of the facility which composed of a coaxial discharge electrode an electromagnetic compressing coil and a nozzle The coaxial electrode is discharged synchronously by pulse injected gas from a delicate fabricated electromagnetic valve and pulse voltage from a capacitance bank The time periods for the pulse gas valve to turn on and to feed gas are 400 and 900 microseconds respectively As to the capacitance bank the maximum capacity is 512 mu F and can be charged as high as 30kV Therefore the maximum energy storage for the capacitance and discharge is 230KJ A custom designed control circuit ignites the pulse valve and discharge switch in turn Then a block of plasma is produced and accelerated into the electromagnetic coil where the plasma is compressed denser Eventually a plasma flow with high pressure and temperature is sprayed out the nozzle which pushes a cluster of micro-particles attached closely to the nozzle exit to hypervelocity During the preliminary debugging experiment 128 mu F capacitance is charged to 15kV and 400kA discharge current is generated then glass spheres with 100 mu m diameter is accelerated to 4 3km s Now the debug for the facility is still in progress in the near future it can accelerate micro-particles to higher velocity

  16. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    2011-07-24

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  17. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  18. Design of MEMS accelerometer based acceleration measurement system for automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, K. Arun; Mathivanan, N.

    2012-10-01

    Design of an acceleration measurement system using a MEMS accelerometer to measure acceleration of automobiles in all the three axes is presented. Electronic stability control and anti-lock breaking systems in automobiles use the acceleration measurements to offer safety in driving. The system uses an ARM microcontroller to quantize the outputs of accelerometer and save the measurement data on a microSD card. A LabVIEW program has been developed to analyze the longitudinal acceleration measurement data and test the measurement system. Random noises generated and added with measurement data during measurement are filtered by a Kalman filter implemented in LabVIEW. Longitudinal velocity of the vehicle is computed from the measurement data and displayed on a graphical chart. Typical measurement of velocity of a vehicle at different accelerations and decelerations is presented.

  19. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  20. Conceptual design of a 1013 -W pulsed-power accelerator for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Ao, T.; Benage, J. F.; Breden, E. W.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Davis, J.-P.; Ennis, J. B.; Gard, P. D.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Haill, T. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jones, P. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Lucero, D. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Root, S.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Wisher, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual design of a next-generation pulsed-power accelerator that is optimized for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments. Sufficient electrical energy is delivered by the accelerator to a physics load to achieve—within centimeter-scale samples—material pressures as high as 1 TPa. The accelerator design is based on an architecture that is founded on three concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression, impedance matching, and transit-time-isolated drive circuits. The prime power source of the accelerator consists of 600 independent impedance-matched Marx generators. Each Marx comprises eight 5.8-GW bricks connected electrically in series, and generates a 100-ns 46-GW electrical-power pulse. A 450-ns-long water-insulated coaxial-transmission-line impedance transformer transports the power generated by each Marx to a system of twelve 2.5-m-radius water-insulated conical transmission lines. The conical lines are connected electrically in parallel at a 66-cm radius by a water-insulated 45-post sextuple-post-hole convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the conical lines, and delivers the combined current to a single solid-dielectric-insulated radial transmission line. The radial line in turn transmits the combined current to the load. Since much of the accelerator is water insulated, we refer to it as Neptune. Neptune is 40 m in diameter, stores 4.8 MJ of electrical energy in its Marx capacitors, and generates 28 TW of peak electrical power. Since the Marxes are transit-time isolated from each other for 900 ns, they can be triggered at different times to construct-over an interval as long as 1 μ s -the specific load-current time history required for a given experiment. Neptune delivers 1 MJ and 20 MA in a 380-ns current pulse to an 18 -m Ω load; hence Neptune is a megajoule-class 20-MA arbitrary waveform generator. Neptune will allow the international scientific community to conduct dynamic

  1. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. An Ultra-High Gradient Cherenkov Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at SLAC FFTB

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Hoover, S.; Hogan, M.J.; Muggli, P.; Thompson, M.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R.; /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U.

    2005-08-02

    The creation of ultra-high current, ultra-short pulse beams Q=3 nC, {sigma}{sub z} = 20{micro}m at the SLAC FFTB has opened the way for very high gradient plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. We study here the use of these beams in a proposed Cherenkov wakefield experiment, where one may excite electromagnetic wakes in a simple dielectric tube with inner diameter of few 100 microns that exceed the GV/m level. We discuss the scaling of the fields with design geometric design parameters, and choice of dielectric. We also examine measurable aspects of the experiment, such as the total coherent Cerenkov radiation energy one may collect, and the expected aspects of dielectric breakdown at high fields.

  3. Summary report: Working Group 2 on {open_quotes}Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; Esarey, E.

    1999-07-01

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beatwave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Ridge-based bias potentials to accelerate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Penghao; Duncan, Juliana; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-12-28

    An effective way to accelerate rare events in molecular dynamics simulations is to apply a bias potential which destabilizes minima without biasing the transitions between stable states. This approach, called hyperdynamics, is limited by our ability to construct general bias potentials without having to understand the reaction mechanisms available to the system, a priori. Current bias potentials are typically constructed in terms of a metric which quantifies the distance that a trajectory deviates from the reactant state minimum. Such metrics include detection of negative curvatures of the potential, an energy increase, or deviations in bond lengths from the minimum. When one of these properties exceeds a critical value, the bias potentials are constructed to approach zero. A problem common to each of these schemes is that their effectiveness decreases rapidly with system size. We attribute this problem to a diminishing volume defined by the metrics around a reactant minimum as compared to the total volume of the reactant state basin. In this work, we mitigate the dimensionality scaling problem by constructing bias potentials that are based upon the distance to the boundary of the reactant basin. This distance is quantified in two ways: (i) by following the minimum mode direction to the reactant boundary and (ii) by training a machine learning algorithm to give an analytic expression for the boundary to which the distance can be calculated. Both of these ridge-based bias potentials are demonstrated to scale qualitatively better with dimensionality than the existing methods. We attribute this improvement to a greater filling fraction of the reactant state using the ridge-based bias potentials as compared to the standard potentials. PMID:26723648

  5. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  6. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator's water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator's physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations

  7. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, A. O. Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T.

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  8. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Acceleration Processes: Theory SSX Experiments and Connections to Space and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    W Matthaeus; M Brown

    2006-07-15

    This is the final technical report for a funded program to provide theoretical support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. We examined mhd relaxation, reconnecton between two spheromaks, particle acceleration by these processes, and collisonless effects, e.g., Hall effect near the reconnection zone,. Throughout the project, applications to space plasma physics and astrophysics were included. Towards the end ofthe project we were examining a more fully turbulent relaxation associated with unconstrained dynamics in SSX. We employed experimental, spacecraft observations, analytical and numerical methods.

  9. Vibration isolation technology: Sensitivity of selected classes of space experiments to residual accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Adebiyi, Adebimpe

    1989-01-01

    Progress performed on each task is described. Order of magnitude analyses related to liquid zone sensitivity and thermo-capillary flow sensitivity are covered. Progress with numerical models of the sensitivity of isothermal liquid zones is described. Progress towards a numerical model of coupled buoyancy-driven and thermo-capillary convection experiments is also described. Interaction with NASA personnel is covered. Results to date are summarized and they are discussed in terms of the predicted space station acceleration environment. Work planned for the second year is also discussed.

  10. The UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient Cerenkov Wakefield Accelerator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebec, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2006-01-25

    An experiment is planned to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range. This new UCLA/SLAC/USC collaboration will take advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {delta}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The electron beam will be focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam will be varied in order to alter the accelerating gradient and probe the breakdown threshold of the dielectric structures. In addition to breakdown studies, we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

  11. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  12. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  13. Pedestrian movement analysis in transfer station corridor: Velocity-based and acceleration-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Yongkai; Ran, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, pedestrians are classified into aggressive and conservative ones by their temper. Aggressive pedestrians' walking through crowd in transfer station corridor is analyzed. Treating pedestrians as particles, this paper uses the modified social force model (MSFM) as the building block, where forces involve self-driving force, repulsive force and friction force. The proposed model in this paper is a discrete model combining the MSFM and cellular automata (CA) model, where the updating rules of the CA are redefined with MSFM. Due to the continuity of values generated by the MSFM, we use the fuzzy logic to discretize the continuous values into cells pedestrians can move in one step. With the observation that stimulus around pedestrians influences their acceleration directly, an acceleration-based movement model is presented, compared to the generally reviewed velocity-based movement model. In the acceleration-based model, a discretized version of kinematic equation is presented based on the acceleration discretized with fuzzy logic. In real life, some pedestrians would rather keep their desired speed and this is also mimicked in this paper, which is called inertia. Compared to the simple triangular membership function, a trapezoidal membership function and a piecewise linear membership function are used to capture pedestrians' inertia. With the trapezoidal and the piecewise linear membership function, many overlapping scenarios should be carefully handled and Dubois and Prade's four-index method is used to completely describe the relative relationship of fuzzy quantities. Finally, a simulation is constructed to demonstrate the effect of our model.

  14. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J ×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH2 with 2.8% H2 served as the discharge medium. H2 was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the Hβ emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 1016 cm-3 . Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  15. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-15

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH{sub 2} with 2.8% H{sub 2} served as the discharge medium. H{sub 2} was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the H{sub β} emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  16. Effects of Experiment Location and Orbiter Attitude on the Residual Acceleration On-Board STS-73 (USML-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; McPherson, Kevin M.; Matisak, Brian P.; Wagar, William O.

    1997-01-01

    A knowledge of the quasi-steady acceleration environment on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter is of particular importance for materials processing experiments which are limited by slow diffusive processes. The quasi-steady (less than 1 HZ) acceleration environment on STS-73 (USML-2) was measured using the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) accelerometer. One of the facilities flown on USML-2 was the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF), which was used by several Principal Investigators (PIS) to grow crystals. In this paper the OARE data mapped to the sample melt location within this furnace is presented. The ratio of the axial to radial components of the quasi-steady acceleration at the melt site is presented. Effects of Orbiter attitude on the acceleration data is discussed.

  17. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Marseille, CPPM /Indiana U. /American Astron. Society /Caltech /Case Western Reserve U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-15

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  18. Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  19. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  20. Dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Sudhir; Dagaonkar, S. S.; Bisht, Geetika; Dayanand, S.; Devi, Reena; Deshpande, S. S.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Kannan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a special radiotherapy technique used to irradiate intracranial lesions by 3-D arrangements of narrow photon beams eliminating the needs of invasive surgery. Three different tertiary collimators, namely BrainLab and Radionics circular cones and BrainLab micro multileaf collimator (mMLC), are used for linear accelerator-based SRS systems (X-Knife). Output factor (St), tissue maximum ratio (TMR) and off axis ratio (OAR) of these three SRS systems were measured using CC01 (Scanditronix/ Welhofer) and Pinpoint (PTW) cylindrical and Markus plane parallel ionization chambers as well as TLD and radiochromic film. Measurement results of CC01 and Pinpoint chambers were very close to each other which indicate that further reduction in volume and physical dimensions of cylindrical ionization chamber is not necessary for SRS/SRT dosimetry. Output factors of BrainLab and Radionics SRS cones were very close to each other while output factors of equivalent diameter mMLC field were different from SRS circular cones. TMR of the three SRS systems compared were very close to one another. OAR of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC were very close to each other, within 2%. However, OARs of BrainLab cone were found comparable to OARs of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC within maximum variation of 4%. In addition, user-measured similar data of other three mMLC X-Knives were compared with the mMLC X-Knife data measured in this work and found comparable. The concept of switching over to mMLC-based SRS/SRT is thus validated from dosimetric characteristics as well. PMID:21217914

  1. The 7-gap-resonator-accelerator for the REX-ISOLDE-experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlech, H.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R.; Papureanu, S.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.

    1998-04-01

    The Radioactive Beam Experiment at ISOLDE (REX-ISOLDE-Experiment) which presently is being developed and under construction at CERN serves to investigate exotic, very neutron rich, radioactive nuclei [1](Radioactive beam EXperiment at ISOLDE: Coloumb Excitation and Neutron Transfer Reactions of Exotic Nuclei, Proposal to the ISOLDE commitee, CERNSIC94-25). A linear accelerator delivers radioactive ions which are produced by the isotope separator ISOLDE with energies between 0.85 and 2.2 MeV/u. The Linac will consist of a RFQ-accelerator, an interdigital H-Structure (IH) and three 7-gap-resonators with variable energy. While the LMU Munich is responsible for the frontpart of the accelerator, the backpart is being built by the MPI [2](H. Podlech, Master Thesis, MPI-H-V21-1997, Heidelburg, 1997). After estimation of the voltage of one resonator to 1.75 MV at 90 kW, the design velocities were fixed to 5.4%, 6.0% and 6.6% of the velocity of light. Three downscaled models (1:2.5) were built in order to optimize the shuntimpedance and the field-distribution at the operation frequency of the amplifiers of 101.28 MHz. The optimization of all low power resonators is now successfully finished. Extensive beam dynamic calculations were made in order to optimize the transmission of the beam up to the target. It turned out that final energies between 0.85 and 2.2 MeV/u with nearly 100% transmission can be achieved. The acceptance in the x-plane is 1.2π mm mrad (norm.) and in the y-plane 3.0π mm mrad (norm.). The bunchlength of the fully accelerated beam (2.2 MeV/u) is 2.4 ns at the target. The development of the resonators was accompanied by extensive MAFIA calculations. It could be demonstrated that spiral-resonators like 7-gap-resonators can be calculated with MAFIA with an accuracy of 1% in comparison with experimental results. Presently, the tanks and the half shells of the power type resonators are manufactured in the workshops of the MPI.

  2. Test particle acceleration in a numerical MHD experiment of an anemone jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, K. J.; Galsgaard, K.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: To use a 3D numerical MHD experiment representing magnetic flux emerging into an open field region as a background field for tracing charged particles. The interaction between the two flux systems generates a localised current sheet where MHD reconnection takes place. We investigate how efficiently the reconnection region accelerates charged particles and what kind of energy distribution they acquire. Methods: The particle tracing is done numerically using the Guiding Center Approximation on individual data sets from the numerical MHD experiment. Results: We derive particle and implied photon distribution functions having power law forms, and look at the impact patterns of particles hitting the photosphere. We find that particles reach energies far in excess of those seen in observations of solar flares. However the structure of the impact region in the photosphere gives a good representation of the topological structure of the magnetic field. Three movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Recent accelerator experiments updates in Shielding INtegral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodeli, I.; Sartori, E.; Kirk, B.

    2006-06-01

    SINBAD is an internationally established set of radiation shielding and dosimetry data relative to experiments relevant in reactor shielding, fusion blanket neutronics and accelerator shielding. In addition to the characterization of the radiation source, it describes shielding materials and instrumentation and the relevant detectors. The experimental results, be it dose, reaction rates or unfolded spectra are presented in tabular ASCII form that can easily be exported to different computer environments for further use. Most sets in SINBAD also contain the computer model used for the interpretation of the experiment and, where available, results from uncertainty analysis. The set of primary documents used for the benchmark compilation and evaluation are provided in computer readable form. SINBAD is available free of charge from RSICC and from the NEA Data Bank.

  4. Application of an electromagnetic accelerator to ultra-high-speed plastic deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, A.; Kiritani, M.

    2002-01-01

    An electromagnetic accelerator (railgun) is briefly introduced, and several examples of experimental results obtained from test runs of this facility are shown and merits of the application of the railgun to high-speed deformation experiments are emphasized. On applying this facility to high-speed deformation experiments, several specific adapters should be designed, such as a jig for applying a designed amount of deformation to a specimen, A specimen cooling system is also important, as a measure against severe temperature rise occurring during extraordinarily rapid deformation. Although application of the railgun involves many difficulties, the railgun is expected to be a very attractive tool for ultra-high-speed deformation research. The railgun can realize the ultra-high-speed deformation via the collision of a projectile and a target material at a speed comparable to the sonic wave velocity Such high speeds cannot be obtainable by other methods.

  5. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  6. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M. S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Robinson, K. E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Weingartner, R.; Gruener, F.

    2010-11-04

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  7. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  8. From experiment to design -- Fault characterization and detection in parallel computer systems using computational accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Keun Soo

    This dissertation summarizes experimental validation and co-design studies conducted to optimize the fault detection capabilities and overheads in hybrid computer systems (e.g., using CPUs and Graphics Processing Units, or GPUs), and consequently to improve the scalability of parallel computer systems using computational accelerators. The experimental validation studies were conducted to help us understand the failure characteristics of CPU-GPU hybrid computer systems under various types of hardware faults. The main characterization targets were faults that are difficult to detect and/or recover from, e.g., faults that cause long latency failures (Ch. 3), faults in dynamically allocated resources (Ch. 4), faults in GPUs (Ch. 5), faults in MPI programs (Ch. 6), and microarchitecture-level faults with specific timing features (Ch. 7). The co-design studies were based on the characterization results. One of the co-designed systems has a set of source-to-source translators that customize and strategically place error detectors in the source code of target GPU programs (Ch. 5). Another co-designed system uses an extension card to learn the normal behavioral and semantic execution patterns of message-passing processes executing on CPUs, and to detect abnormal behaviors of those parallel processes (Ch. 6). The third co-designed system is a co-processor that has a set of new instructions in order to support software-implemented fault detection techniques (Ch. 7). The work described in this dissertation gains more importance because heterogeneous processors have become an essential component of state-of-the-art supercomputers. GPUs were used in three of the five fastest supercomputers that were operating in 2011. Our work included comprehensive fault characterization studies in CPU-GPU hybrid computers. In CPUs, we monitored the target systems for a long period of time after injecting faults (a temporally comprehensive experiment), and injected faults into various types of

  9. Surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide: theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S.; Korobkin, D.; Neuner, B.; Shvets, G.

    2009-01-22

    Compact near-field solid-state accelerating structure powered by a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is considered. The accelerating luminous transverse magnetic mode is excited in a few-micron wide evacuated planar channel between two silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on silicon (Si) wafers. Laser coupling to this mode is accomplished through the properly designed Si gratings. Operating wavelength is dictated by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of SiC and the channel width. The geometric loss factor {kappa} of the accelerating mode is computed. It is found that the unwanted excitation of the guided modes in Si wafers reduces the laser coupling efficiency and increases the fields inside the Si wafer.

  10. A Novel Angular Acceleration Sensor Based on the Electromagnetic Induction Principle and Investigation of Its Calibration Tests

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An angular acceleration sensor can be used for the dynamic analysis of human and joint motions. In this paper, an angular acceleration sensor with novel structure based on the principle of electromagnetic induction is designed. The method involves the construction of a constant magnetic field by the excitation windings of sensor, and the cup-shaped rotor that cut the magnetic field. The output windings of the sensor generate an electromotive force, which is directly proportional to the angular acceleration through the electromagnetic coupling when the rotor has rotational angular acceleration. The mechanical structure and the magnetic working circuit of the sensor are described. The output properties and the mathematical model including the transfer function and state-space model of the sensor are established. The asymptotical stability of the sensor when it is working is verified by the Lyapunov Theorem. An angular acceleration calibration device based on the torsional pendulum principle is designed. The method involves the coaxial connection of the angular acceleration sensor, torsion pendulum and a high-precision angle sensor, and then an initial external force is applied to the torsion pendulum to produce a periodic damping angle oscillation. The angular acceleration sensor and the angle sensor will generate two corresponding electrical signals. The sensitivity coefficient of the angular acceleration sensor can be obtained after processing these two-channel signals. The experiment results show that the sensitivity coefficient of the sensor is about 17.29 mv/Krad·s2. Finally, the errors existing in the practical applications of the sensor are discussed and the corresponding improvement measures are proposed to provide effective technical support for the practical promotion of the novel sensor. PMID:23941911

  11. A novel angular acceleration sensor based on the electromagnetic induction principle and investigation of its calibration tests.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An angular acceleration sensor can be used for the dynamic analysis of human and joint motions. In this paper, an angular acceleration sensor with novel structure based on the principle of electromagnetic induction is designed. The method involves the construction of a constant magnetic field by the excitation windings of sensor, and the cup-shaped rotor that cut the magnetic field. The output windings of the sensor generate an electromotive force, which is directly proportional to the angular acceleration through the electromagnetic coupling when the rotor has rotational angular acceleration. The mechanical structure and the magnetic working circuit of the sensor are described. The output properties and the mathematical model including the transfer function and state-space model of the sensor are established. The asymptotical stability of the sensor when it is working is verified by the Lyapunov Theorem. An angular acceleration calibration device based on the torsional pendulum principle is designed. The method involves the coaxial connection of the angular acceleration sensor, torsion pendulum and a high-precision angle sensor, and then an initial external force is applied to the torsion pendulum to produce a periodic damping angle oscillation. The angular acceleration sensor and the angle sensor will generate two corresponding electrical signals. The sensitivity coefficient of the angular acceleration sensor can be obtained after processing these two-channel signals. The experiment results show that the sensitivity coefficient of the sensor is about 17.29 mv/Krad·s2. Finally, the errors existing in the practical applications of the sensor are discussed and the corresponding improvement measures are proposed to provide effective technical support for the practical promotion of the novel sensor. PMID:23941911

  12. Shifting to an Inquiry-Based Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Gregory; Slykhuis, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Teaching science with an inquiry-based approach can seem like an impossible challenge. However, it is achievable. One way to begin is by converting a cookbook-style lab (from the internet or a textbook) into an inquiry-based science experience. To convert a cookbook lab into an inquiry-based science experience, the authors propose the following…

  13. PROPOSAL FOR A PRE-BUNCHED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION EXPERIMENT AT THE BNL DUV FEL FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.SHEEHY,B.WU,Z.GAI,W.TING,A.

    2003-05-12

    We propose a pre-bunched Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) experiment in a plasma channel at the BNL DUV-FEL Facility. BNL DUV-FEL facility is uniquely qualified to carry out the proposed experiment because of the high-brightness' electron beam and RF synchronized TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. The DUV-FEL is a 200 MeV linac facility equipped with a photocathode RF gun injector, a 100 fs Ti:Sapphire laser system and a magnetic bunch compressor. The proposed LWFA will inject a 150 MeV, 10 fs electron bunch into a centimeters long plasma channel. Simulation and preliminary experiment showed that, high-brightness 10 fs electron bunch with 20 pC charge could be produced using the technique of longitudinal emittance compensation. The initial experiment will be performed using the existing Ti:Sapphire laser system (50mJ, 100 fs) with 30 {micro}m spot and 4 cm channel, the maximum energy gain will be about 15 MeV. We propose to upgrade the existing SDL laser output to 500 mJ with a shorter pulse length (50 fs). For an electron beam spot size of 20 um, the expected energy gain is about 100 MeV for a 5 TW, 50 fs laser pulse.

  14. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  15. Prospects of Hybrid Plasma- and Radiofrequency-Based Electron Acceleration at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Gruener, Florian; Elsen, Eckhard; Floettmann, Klaus; Foster, Brian; Brinkmann, Reinhard; Schmidt, Bernhard; Schlarb, Holger; Stephan, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The field of particle acceleration in plasma wakes has seen remarkable progress in recent years. Accelerating gradients of more than 10 GV/m can now be readily achieved using either ultra-short intense laser pulses or particle beams as wake drivers. The demonstration of the first GeV electron beams and a general trend towards improved reproducibility, beam quality and control over the involved plasma processes has led to plasma-acceleration techniques beginning to draw considerable interest in the traditional accelerator community. As a consequence, DESY, Germany's leading accelerator center, has established a research program for plasma-based novel acceleration techniques with the goal of exploiting the synergetic combination of conventional and new accelerator technology. Such a concept offers an attractive pathway to study many mechanisms occurring in plasma-based accelerators, for example electron-beam-emittance evolution, extreme bunch compression, the controlled emission of betatron radiation, and staging of accelerating units. In addition, it is assumed that bypassing the difficult-to-master process of particle self-injection, which is utilized in all current laser-plasma acceleration schemes, will greatly enhance the reliability of such machines compared to the state-of-the-art.

  16. Ground-Based Experiments on Vibrational Thermal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Rogers, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on g-jitter effects in fluid flow provide insight that complements both theoretical studies and space-based experiments on this problem. We report preliminary results for experiments on Rayleigh-Benard convection subjected to time-dependent accelerations on a shaker table. For sinusoidal modulation, two qualitatively different pattern forming mechanisms come into play: geometry induced wavenumber selection (as in the standard "no-shake" Rayleigh-Benard problem) and dispersion induced wavenumber selection due to parametric instability (as in the Faraday surface-wave problem). We discuss preliminary results on the competition and co-existence of patterns due to these different instability mechanisms. We also discuss the implications of this work on the general question of pattern formation in the presence of noise.

  17. Participation in the definition, conduct, and analysis of particle accelerator experiments for the first Spacelab Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) is a joint endeavor between NASA and the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Sciences (ISAS) in Japan. Its objectives are to use energetic electron beams to investigate beam-atmosphere interactions and beam-plasma interactions in the earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere using the shuttle Spacelab. Two flights of SEPAC have occurred to date (Spacelab 1 on STS-9 in Nov.-Dec. 1983 and ATLAS 1 on STS-45 in Mar.-Apr. 1992). The SEPAC instrumentation is available for future missions, and the scientific results of the first two missions justify further investigations; however, at present there are no identifiable future flight opportunities. As specified in the contract, the primary purpose of this report is to review the scientific accomplishments of the ATLAS 1 SEPAC experiments, which have been documented in the published literature, with only a brief review of the earlier Spacelab 1 results. One of the main results of the Spacelab 1 SEPAC experiments was that the ejection of plasma from the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjet was effective in maintaining vehicle charge neutralization during electron beam firings, but only for a brief period of 10 ms or so. Therefore, a xenon plasma contactor, which can provide continuous vehicle charge neutralization, was developed for the ATLAS 1 SEPAC experiments. Because of the successful operation of the plasma contactor on ATLAS 1, it was possible to perform experiments on beam-plasma interactions and beam-atmosphere interactions at the highest beam power levels of SEPAC. In addition, the ability of the plasma contactor to eject neutral xenon led to a successful experiment on the critical ionization velocity (CIV) phenomena on ATLAS 1.

  18. Experiments on 1,000 km/s flyer acceleration and collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Kehne, D. M.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2012-10-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities achieved using the ultra-uniform deep-uv drive of the Nike KrF laser [Karasik et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317 (2010)], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce ˜1 Gbar shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Such velocities may indicate a path to lower minimum energy required for central ignition. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. New results give velocity of >1,100 km/s achieved through improvements in pulseshaping. Variation of second foil parameters results in significant change in fusion neutron production on impact. In-flight target density is inferred from target heating upon collision via DD neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Availability of pressures generated by collisions of such highly accelerated flyers may provide an experimental platform for study of matter at extreme conditions. Work is supported by US DOE (NNSA).

  19. Laboratory Experiments with the Concordia College High-Speed Dust Particle Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    During the Apollo Era, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center built a 2MeV high-speed, dust particle accelerator. This facility was used to test and calibrate the LEAM instrument which was flown to the lunar surface by Apollo 17. As the Apollo project wound down, NASA no longer had need of the dust particle accelerator, and in 1975, it was move to Concordia College in Moorhead, MN. Through the years, it has been maintained and some modifications and improvements have been made to it. In the past decade, the facility has been revived and used by several collaborating institutions to study dust detector instrumentation as well as the effects of dust impacts on various materials. We have tested a prototype, space-flight dust particle detector. Also, piezoelectric pins which can be used as dust detectors were studied to learn the pin's response to single particle impacts of different energies and momenta, and then those measured responses were compared with theoretical models. The effects of high speed impacts on ultra-high temperature ceramics, aerogel, and several different thin films have also been studied at our facility. The results of these experiments will be presented.

  20. Electron Acceleration and Ionization Production in High-Power Heating Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Pedersen, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60-80 km. Artificial ionization production is indicated by significant 427.8 nm emissions from the 1st negative band of N2+ and the appearance of transmitter-induced bottomside traces in ionosonde data during the periods of most intense optical emissions. However, the exact mechanisms producing the artificial plasmas remain to be determined. Yet the only existing theoretical models explain the development of artificial plasma as an ionizing wavefront moving downward due to ionization by electrons accelerated by HF-excited strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) generated near the plasma resonance, where the pump frequency matches the plasma frequency. However, the observations suggest also the significance of interactions with upper hybrid and electron Bernstein waves near multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We describe recent observations and discuss suitable acceleration mechanisms.

  1. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-26

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense ({approx} 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion ({approx}100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient ({approx} 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3x10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  2. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  3. Fuel retention measurements in Alcator C-Mod using accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Lanza, Richard C.; Lipschultz, Bruce; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first in situ time- and space-resolved measurements of deuterium (D) fuel retention in plasma-facing component (PFC) surfaces using Accelerator-based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. AIMS is a novel in situ materials diagnostic technique based on the spectroscopic analysis of nuclear reaction products induced in PFC surfaces using an ∼MeV beam of deuterons from a compact linear accelerator in between plasma shots. AIMS measurements of D retention on inner wall PFCs were acquired during diverted and limited plasma operations and during wall conditioning experiments. Intershot measurements demonstrate the local erosion and codeposition of boron films on PFC surfaces with a constant D / B ratio. This is consistent with previous results suggesting that D codeposition with boron is insufficient to account for the net retention observed in Alcator C-Mod. Changes in deuterium concentration during boronization, electron cyclotron and glow cleanings were also measured.

  4. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  5. Accelerating Content-Based Image Retrieval via GPU-Adaptive Index Structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A tremendous amount of work has been conducted in content-based image retrieval (CBIR) on designing effective index structure to accelerate the retrieval process. Most of them improve the retrieval efficiency via complex index structures, and few take into account the parallel implementation of them on underlying hardware, making the existing index structures suffer from low-degree of parallelism. In this paper, a novel graphics processing unit (GPU) adaptive index structure, termed as plane semantic ball (PSB), is proposed to simultaneously reduce the work of retrieval process and exploit the parallel acceleration of underlying hardware. In PSB, semantics are embedded into the generation of representative pivots and multiple balls are selected to cover more informative reference features. With PSB, the online retrieval of CBIR is factorized into independent components that are implemented on GPU efficiently. Comparative experiments with GPU-based brute force approach demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve high speedup with little information loss. Furthermore, PSB is compared with the state-of-the-art approach, random ball cover (RBC), on two standard image datasets, Corel 10 K and GIST 1 M. Experimental results show that our approach achieves higher speedup than RBC on the same accuracy level. PMID:24782668

  6. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  7. Optimization of accelerator target and detector for portal imaging using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, S.; Evans, P. M.; Verhaegen, F.; Nahum, A. E.; Spezi, E.; Partridge, M.

    2002-09-01

    Megavoltage portal images suffer from poor quality compared to those produced with kilovoltage x-rays. Several authors have shown that the image quality can be improved by modifying the linear accelerator to generate more low-energy photons. This work addresses the problem of using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment to optimize the beam and detector combination to maximize image quality for a given patient thickness. A simple model of the whole imaging chain was developed for investigation of the effect of the target parameters on the quality of the image. The optimum targets (6 mm thick aluminium and 1.6 mm copper) were installed in an Elekta SL25 accelerator. The first beam will be referred to as Al6 and the second as Cu1.6. A tissue-equivalent contrast phantom was imaged with the 6 MV standard photon beam and the experimental beams with standard radiotherapy and mammography film/screen systems. The arrangement with a thin Al target/mammography system improved the contrast from 1.4 cm bone in 5 cm water to 19% compared with 2% for the standard arrangement of a thick, high-Z target/radiotherapy verification system. The linac/phantom/detector system was simulated with the BEAM/EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Contrast calculated from the predicted images was in good agreement with the experiment (to within 2.5%). The use of MC techniques to predict images accurately, taking into account the whole imaging system, is a powerful new method for portal imaging system design optimization.

  8. Systematic Study of Spin Effects at SPASCHARM Experiment at 70-GeV Accelerator in Protvino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, V. V.; Abramov, V. V.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Borisov, N. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Evdokimova, A. S.; Meshchanin, A. P.; Minaev, N. G.; Morozov, D. A.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ryzhikov, S. V.; Semenov, P. A.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Rykov, V. L.; Usov, Y. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    A new experiment SPASCHARM for systematic study of polarization phenomena in the inclusive and exclusive hadronic reactions in the energy range of IHEP accelerator U-70 (12-50GeV) is currently under development. The universal experimental setup will detect dozens of various resonances and stable particles produced in collisions of unpolarized beams with the polarized target, and at the next stage, using polarized proton and antiproton beams. At the beginning, the final states consisting of light quarks (u, d, s) will be reconstructed, and later on the charmonium states will be studied. Measurements are planned for a variety of beams: π±,K±,p, antiprotons. Hyperon polarization and spin density matrix elements of the vector mesons will be measured along with the single-spin asymmetry (SSA). The 2π-acceptance in azimuth, which is extremely useful for reduction of systematic errors in measurements of spin observables, will be implemented in the experiment. The solid angle acceptance of the setup, Δθ ≈ 250 mrad vertically and 350 mrad horizontally in the beam fragmentation region, covers a wide range of kinematic variables pT and xF. This provides the opportunity for separating dependences on these two variables which is usually not possible in the setups with a small solid angle acceptance. Unlike some previous polarization experiments, the SPASCHARM will be able to simultaneously accumulate and record data on the both, charged and neutral particle production.

  9. ATTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAMS GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION EXPERIMENT AT THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZOLOTOREV, M.; ZHOLENTS, A.; WANG, X.J.; BABZIEN, M.; SKARITKA, J.; RAKOWSKY, G.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2002-02-01

    We are proposing an Atto-second electron beam generation and diagnostics experiment at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) using 1 {micro}m Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). The proposed experiment will be carried out by an BNL/LBNL collaboration, and it will be installed at the ATF beam line II. The proposed experiment will employ a one-meter long undulator with 1.8 cm period (VISA undulator). The electron beam energy will be 63 MeV with emittance less than 2 mm-mrad and energy spread less than 0.05%. The ATF photocathode injector driving laser will be used for energy modulation by Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). With 10 MW laser peak power, about 2% total energy modulation is expected. The energy modulated electron beam will be further bunched through either a drift space or a three magnet chicane into atto-second electron bunches. The attosecond electron beam bunches will be analyzed using the coherent transition radiation (CTR).

  10. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  11. Reply to ``Comment on `Beamstrahlung considerations in laser-plasma-accelerator-based linear colliders' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-10-01

    We reply to Lebedev and Nagaitsev’s foregoing Comment [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 16, 108001 (2013)PRABFM1098-4402]. We disagree with the conclusion of the Comment that scattering imposes a fundamental limitation on plasma-based accelerator technology. Laser-plasma accelerators are compatible with high-luminosity collider concepts.

  12. Minimum time acceleration of aircraft turbofan engines by using an algorithm based on nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum time accelerations of aircraft turbofan engines are presented. The calculation of these accelerations was made by using a piecewise linear engine model, and an algorithm based on nonlinear programming. Use of this model and algorithm allows such trajectories to be readily calculated on a digital computer with a minimal expenditure of computer time.

  13. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  14. Neural Network Based Representation of UH-60A Pilot and Hub Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2000-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, experimental hub accelerations and the corresponding pilot floor vertical vibration are studied. The present physics-based, quantitative effort represents an initial systematic study on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database was used. A 'maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)', derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, was used. Three neural network based representation-cases were considered. The pilot floor vertical vibration was considered in the first case and the hub accelerations were separately considered in the second case. The third case considered both the hub accelerations and the pilot floor vertical vibration. Neither the advance ratio nor the gross weight alone could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration over the entire flight envelope. The hub accelerations data were modeled and found to be of very acceptable quality. The hub accelerations alone could not be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. Thus, the hub accelerations alone do not drive the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the hub accelerations, along with either the advance ratio or the gross weight or both, could be used to satisfactorily predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot floor vertical vibration.

  15. Self-mode-transition from laser wakefield accelerator to plasma wakefield accelerator of laser-driven plasma-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pae, K. H.; Choi, I. W.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-15

    Via three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the self-mode-transition of a laser-driven electron acceleration from laser wakefield to plasma-wakefield acceleration is studied. In laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) mode, an intense laser pulse creates a large amplitude wakefield resulting in high-energy electrons. Along with the laser pulse depletion, the electron bunch accelerated in the LWFA mode drives a plasma wakefield. Then, after the plasma wakefield accelerator mode is established, electrons are trapped and accelerated in the plasma wakefield. The mode transition process and the characteristics of the accelerated electron beam are presented.

  16. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  17. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; et al

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated bymore » the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  18. Beam-wall interaction measurements in LLNL induction accelerator bend experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Friedman, A.; Kamin, G. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Eylon, S.; Hopkins, H. S.

    1997-11-01

    Ion-induced desorption coefficients are determined from measurements of pressure rises when an ion beam strikes a surface. These measurements are made after the first bend of 9^circ by deflecting the beam onto the stainless steel beam tube, and within a pill-box where the beam strikes a stainless steel target at an angle that can be varied from 90^circ to ~10^circ. The beam consists of 2 mA of singly-charged potassium ions at 80 keV with pulse lengths of several microsec. Data near 10^circ are relevant to near-term experiments where beam halo could strike the wall at angles of a few degrees. Data near 90^circ are relevant to ions resulting from charge exchange with a reactor driver class beam which has a space potential of the order of 100 kV. These data will aid in assessing the adequacy of the existing vacuum system when the bend experiment is upgraded to a recirculator induction accelerator.

  19. Real-time orthorectification by FPGA-based hardware acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, David; Gordon, Don

    2010-10-01

    Orthorectification that corrects the perspective distortion of remote sensing imagery, providing accurate geolocation and ease of correlation to other images is a valuable first-step in image processing for information extraction. However, the large amount of metadata and the floating-point matrix transformations required to operate on each pixel make this a computation and I/O (Input/Output) intensive process. As result much imagery is either left unprocessed or loses timesensitive value in the long processing cycle. However, the computation on each pixel can be reduced substantially by using computational results of the neighboring pixels and accelerated by special pipelined hardware architecture in one to two orders of magnitude. A specialized coprocessor that is implemented inside an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip and surrounded by vendorsupported hardware IP (Intellectual Property) shares the computation workload with CPU through PCI-Express interface. The ultimate speed of one pixel per clock (125 MHz) is achieved by the pipelined systolic array architecture. The optimal partition between software and hardware, the timing profile among image I/O and computation, and the highly automated GUI (Graphical User Interface) that fully exploits this speed increase to maximize overall image production throughput will also be discussed. The software that runs on a workstation with the acceleration hardware orthorectifies 16 Megapixels per second, which is 16 times faster than without the hardware. It turns the production time from months to days. A real-life successful story of an imaging satellite company that adopted such workstations for their orthorectified imagery production will be presented. The potential candidacy of the image processing computation that can be accelerated more efficiently by the same approach will also be analyzed.

  20. Proof-Of-Principle Experiment for Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.; Sears, C.M.S.; Spencer, J.E.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-01

    We recently achieved the first experimental observation of laser-driven particle acceleration of relativistic electrons from a single Gaussian near-infrared laser beam in a semi-infinite vacuum. This article presents an in-depth account of key aspects of the experiment. An analysis of the transverse and longitudinal forces acting on the electron beam is included. A comparison of the observed data to the acceleration viewed as an inverse transition radiation process is presented. This is followed by a detailed description of the components of the experiment and a discussion of future measurements.

  1. Hybrid photoneutron source optimization for electron accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, F.; Shahriari, M.

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is being studied as a possible radiotherapic treatment for some cancer types. Neutron energy for penetrating into tissue should be in the epithermal range. Different methods are used for neutron production. Electron accelerators are an alternative way for producing neutrons in electron-photon-neutron processes. Optimization of electron/photon and photoneutron targets calculations with respect to electron energy, dimension (radius and thickness) and neutron yield were done by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. According to the results, a hybrid photoneutron source including BeD 2 and Tungsten has been introduced.

  2. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  3. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  4. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, J. P.; Lebrat, J. F.; Soule, R.; Martini, M.; Jacqmin, R.; Imel, G. R.; Salvatores, M.

    1999-06-10

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties.

  5. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  6. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  7. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  8. A Photon Collider Experiment based on SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2003-11-01

    Technology for a photon collider experiment at a future TeV-scale linear collider has been under development for many years. The laser and optics technology has reached the point where a GeV-scale photon collider experiment is now feasible. We report on the photon-photon luminosities that would be achievable at a photon collider experiment based on a refurbished Stanford Linear Collider.

  9. Model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration due to an incoherent wakefield induced by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takeda, K.; Tampo, M.; Takabe, H.; Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2011-01-15

    The first report on a model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration by using intense laser pulses is presented. Large amplitude light waves are considered to be excited in the upstream regions of relativistic astrophysical shocks and the wakefield acceleration of cosmic rays can take place. By substituting an intense laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, such shock environments were modeled in a laboratory plasma. A plasma tube, which is created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, was irradiated by an intense laser pulse. Nonthermal electrons were generated by the wakefield acceleration and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of {approx}2. The maximum attainable energy of the electrons in the experiment is discussed by a simple analytic model. In the incoherent wakefield the maximum energy can be much larger than one in the coherent field due to the momentum space diffusion or the energy diffusion of electrons.

  10. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented.

  11. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  12. Development of accelerator mass spectrometer based on a compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-W.; Kim, D.-G.

    2011-07-01

    A small cyclotron has been designed for accelerator mass spectrometry, and the injection beam line is constructed as part of prototyping. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is estimated to be around 4000. The design of the cyclotron was performed with orbit-tracking computations using 3D magnetic and electric fields, and beam optics of the injection line was calculated using the codes such as IGUN and TRANSPORT. The radial injection scheme is chosen to place a beam on equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection line includes an ion source, Einzel lens, rf buncher, 90° dipole magnet, and quadrupole triplet magnet. A carbon beam was extracted from the front part of the injection line. An rf cavity system for the cyclotron was built and tested. A multi channel plates (MCP) detector to measure low-current ion beams was also tested. Design considerations are given to analyzing a few different radioisotopes in form of positive ions as well as negative ions.

  13. Binomial distribution based τ-leap accelerated stochastic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Gillespie introduced the τ-leap approximate, accelerated stochastic Monte Carlo method for well-mixed reacting systems [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 1716 (2001)]. In each time increment of that method, one executes a number of reaction events, selected randomly from a Poisson distribution, to enable simulation of long times. Here we introduce a binomial distribution τ-leap algorithm (abbreviated as BD-τ method). This method combines the bounded nature of the binomial distribution variable with the limiting reactant and constrained firing concepts to avoid negative populations encountered in the original τ-leap method of Gillespie for large time increments, and thus conserve mass. Simulations using prototype reaction networks show that the BD-τ method is more accurate than the original method for comparable coarse-graining in time.

  14. An active target for the accelerator-based transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Grebyonkin, K. F.

    1995-09-15

    Consideration is given to the possibility of radical reduction in power requirements to the proton accelerator of the electronuclear reactor due to neutron multiplication both in the blanket and the target of an active material. The target is supposed to have the fast-neutron spectrum, and the blanket--the thermal one. The blanket and the target are separated by the thermal neutrons absorber, which is responsible for the neutron decoupling of the active target and blanket. Also made are preliminary estimations which illustrate that the realization of the idea under consideration can lead to significant reduction in power requirements to the proton beam and, hence considerably improve economic characteristics of the electronuclear reactor.

  15. A Model-based Prognostics Methodology for Electrolytic Capacitors Based on Electrical Overstress Accelerated Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Kulkarni, Chetan; Biswas, Gautam; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A remaining useful life prediction methodology for electrolytic capacitors is presented. This methodology is based on the Kalman filter framework and an empirical degradation model. Electrolytic capacitors are used in several applications ranging from power supplies on critical avionics equipment to power drivers for electro-mechanical actuators. These devices are known for their comparatively low reliability and given their criticality in electronics subsystems they are a good candidate for component level prognostics and health management. Prognostics provides a way to assess remaining useful life of a capacitor based on its current state of health and its anticipated future usage and operational conditions. We present here also, experimental results of an accelerated aging test under electrical stresses. The data obtained in this test form the basis for a remaining life prediction algorithm where a model of the degradation process is suggested. This preliminary remaining life prediction algorithm serves as a demonstration of how prognostics methodologies could be used for electrolytic capacitors. In addition, the use degradation progression data from accelerated aging, provides an avenue for validation of applications of the Kalman filter based prognostics methods typically used for remaining useful life predictions in other applications.

  16. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  17. Model-Based Acceleration of Look-Locker T1 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Wech, Tobias; Bley, Thorsten; Köstler, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time T1 has widespread applications in clinical MRI as it promises a quantitative comparison of tissue properties across subjects and scanners. Due to the long scan times of conventional methods, however, the use of quantitative MRI in clinical routine is still very limited. In this work, an acceleration of Inversion-Recovery Look-Locker (IR-LL) T1 mapping is presented. A model-based algorithm is used to iteratively enforce an exponential relaxation model to a highly undersampled radially acquired IR-LL dataset obtained after the application of a single global inversion pulse. Using the proposed technique, a T1 map of a single slice with 1.6mm in-plane resolution and 4mm slice thickness can be reconstructed from data acquired in only 6s. A time-consuming segmented IR experiment was used as gold standard for T1 mapping in this work. In the subsequent validation study, the model-based reconstruction of a single-inversion IR-LL dataset exhibited a T1 difference of less than 2.6% compared to the segmented IR-LL reference in a phantom consisting of vials with T1 values between 200ms and 3000ms. In vivo, the T1 difference was smaller than 5.5% in WM and GM of seven healthy volunteers. Additionally, the T1 values are comparable to standard literature values. Despite the high acceleration, all model-based reconstructions were of a visual quality comparable to fully sampled references. Finally, the reproducibility of the T1 mapping method was demonstrated in repeated acquisitions. In conclusion, the presented approach represents a promising way for fast and accurate T1 mapping using radial IR-LL acquisitions without the need of any segmentation. PMID:25860381

  18. Two Channel Dielectric-Lined Rectangular High Transformer Ratio Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G.; Gai, Wei; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Mihalcea, D.

    2010-11-04

    Current status of a two-channel cm-scale rectangular dielectric lined wakefield accelerator structure is described. This structure is installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility (AWA), and is presently being evaluated. The device has a transformer ratio of {approx}12.5:1. When driven by a {approx}50 nC single drive bunch it is expected to obtain {approx}6 MV/m acceleration gradient. Related issues are discussed.

  19. Risk-based Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostolakis, G.; Catton, I.; Issacci, F.; Paulos, T.; Jones, S.; Paxton, K.; Paul, M.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on risk-based spacecraft fire safety experiments are presented. Spacecraft fire risk can never be reduced to a zero probability. Probabilistic risk assessment is a tool to reduce risk to an acceptable level.

  20. Operational experience for coupled operation of the Holifield tandem electrostatic accelerator and isochronous cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.A.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.S.; Ludemann, C.A.; Meigs, M.J.; Milner, W.T.

    1986-10-01

    Coupled operation of the 25 MV tandem accelerator and the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility began in January 1981. Since that time the use of the cyclotron in this mode has become routine. Thirty-six different ion species in the range from /sup 9/Be to /sup 150/Nd have been accelerated; 106 separate beam setups have been provided. Since the beginning of coupled operation, significant improvement of cyclotron systems, and setup and operating techniques, have been made. The graphite electrostatic deflector septum formerly used for high-current light ion beams has been replaced by a thin molybdenum septum. Extraction system positioning mechanisms have been refined and recalibrated and more precise and reliable position readouts have been provided. The computer-based control system has been improved. The frequency range of the rf system has been increased to eliminate an energy dead-band. Cyclotron setup calculations have been improved and standardized methods have been developed to consistently achieve well-centered orbits, correct beam extraction system positions, and electrostatic and magnetic strengths. A totally new beam bunching system has been installed. The improvements in the phase-lock system of the beam buncher have been especially effective. A large number of obsolete and unreliable power supplies have been replaced. Beam extraction efficiency has been increased from approx.50% to approx.70%. Accuracy of obtaining the desired energy without fine tuning is now approx.1% compared to 2 to 3% in early coupled operation. Beam setup time (tuning) has been reduced by approx.20%. Unscheduled maintenance has been reduced by a factor of two.

  1. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-10-15

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  2. Nike Experiments on Acceleration of Planar Targets Stabilized with a Short Spike Pulse^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Metzler, N.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Oh, J.; Mostovych, A. N.; Gardner, J. H.

    2005-10-01

    Theoretical work has shown that a low energy spike pulse in front of the drive laser pulse can help mitigate the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in targets for inertial confinement fusion.[1]^ While other experiments [2] used higher spike pulse energies, this study reports the influence of a lower energy spike and longer spike-main pulse delay on the acceleration of planar CH targets. Time evolution of preimposed sinusoidal ripples on the target surface was observed using a monochromatic x-ray imaging system. Delayed onset and/or suppression of mode growth was found for the spike prepulse shots compared to those with a low intensity foot, in good agreement with predictions from FAST2D simulations. The propagation velocity of the decaying shock wave from the spike pulse was measured with VISAR and was also in good agreement with an analytical prediction.[3] [1] Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3283 (1999); 9, 5050 (2002); 10, 1897 (2003);Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003) ;Betti et al., Phys Plamas 12, 042703 (2005) ;[2]Knauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056306 (2005) ; [3]Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003). ^1Work supported by U. S. Department of Energy

  3. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  4. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  5. Accelerating phylogenetics computing on the desktop: experiments with executing UPGMA in programmable logic.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Akella, S; Waddell, P H

    2004-01-01

    Having greater computational power on the desktop for processing taxa data sets has been a dream of biologists/statisticians involved in phylogenetics data analysis. Many existing algorithms have been highly optimized-one example being Felsenstein's PHYLIP code, written in C, for UPGMA and neighbor joining algorithms. However, the ability to process more than a few tens of taxa in a reasonable amount of time using conventional computers has not yielded a satisfactory speedup in data processing, making it difficult for phylogenetics practitioners to quickly explore data sets-such as might be done from a laptop computer. We discuss the application of custom computing techniques to phylogenetics. In particular, we apply this technology to speed up UPGMA algorithm execution by a factor of a hundred, against that of PHYLIP code running on the same PC. We report on these experiments and discuss how custom computing techniques can be used to not only accelerate phylogenetics algorithm performance on the desktop, but also on larger, high-performance computing engines, thus enabling the high-speed processing of data sets involving thousands of taxa. PMID:17270875

  6. The Boeing photocathode accelerator magnetic pulse compression and energy recovery experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    An 18 MeV, photocathode accelerator operating at 433 MHz is being commissioned for FEL applications. The accelerator consists of a two-cell RF photocathode imjector followed by four new multicell cavities. The two cell injector has previously been operated at a micropulse repetition frequency of 27 MHz, a micropulse charge of 5 nC and 25% duty factor.

  7. Students' Perceptions of Their Experiences from within Acceleration Programs in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a research project examining participant students' points of view on accelerated programs in mathematics from four state secondary schools in New Zealand. The four participant schools in this research offered a variety of different acceleration designs and philosophies and were different in size location,…

  8. "DIANA" - A New, Deep-Underground Accelerator Facility for Astrophysics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Leitner, D.; Lemut, A.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

    2009-05-28

    The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility 1.4 km below ground. DIANA is part of the US proposal DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) to establish a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory in the former gold mine of Homestake in South Dakota, USA. DIANA would consist of two high-current accelerators, a 30 to 400 kV variable, high-voltage platform, and a second, dynamitron accelerator with a voltage range of 350 kV to 3 MV. As a unique feature, both accelerators are planned to be equipped with either high-current microwave ion sources or multi-charged ECR ion sources producing ions from protons to oxygen. Electrostatic quadrupole transport elements will be incorporated in the dynamitron high voltage column. Compared to current astrophysics facilities, DIANA could increase the available beam densities on target by magnitudes: up to 100 mA on the low energy accelerator and several mA on the high energy accelerator. An integral part of the DIANA project is the development of a high-density super-sonic gas-jet target which can handle these anticipated beam powers. The paper will explain the main components of the DIANA accelerators and their beam transport lines and will discuss related technical challenges.

  9. Studies of industrial emissions by accelerator-based techniques: A review of applications at CEDAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.

    2012-04-01

    Different research activities are in progress at the Centre for Dating and Diagnostics (CEDAD), University of Salento, in the field of environmental monitoring by exploiting the potentialities given by the different experimental beam lines implemented on the 3 MV Tande-tron accelerator and dedicated to AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrome-try) radiocarbon dating and IB A (Ion Beam Analysis). An overview of these activities is presented by showing how accelerator-based analytical techniques can be a powerful tool for monitoring the anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources and for the assessment of the biogenic content in SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) burned in WTE (Waste to Energy) plants.

  10. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-19

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  11. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  12. Accelerating and democratizing science through cloud-based services.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.

    2011-05-01

    Many businesses today save time and money, and increase their agility, by outsourcing mundane IT tasks to cloud providers. The author argues that similar methods can be used to overcome the complexities inherent in increasingly data-intensive, computational, and collaborative scientific research. He describes Globus Online, a system that he and his colleagues are developing to realize this vision. he scientific community today has unprecedented opportunities to effect transformational change in how individuals and teams engage in discovery. The driving force is a set of interrelated new capabilities that, when harnessed, can enable dramatic acceleration in the discovery process: greater availability of massive data, exponentially faster computers, ultra-high-speed networks, and deep interdisciplinary collaboration. The opportunity - and challenge - is to make these capabilities accessible not just to a few 'big science' projects but to every researcher at every level. Here, I argue that the key to seizing this opportunity is embracing software delivery methods that haven't been widely adopted in research, notably software as a service (SaaS) - a technology that forms an important part of what people refer to as the cloud. I also describe projects in the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory that aim to realize this vision, focusing initially on data movement and management.

  13. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  14. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  15. About the scheme of the infrared FEL system for the accelerator based on HF wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kabanov, V.S.; Dzergach, A.I.

    1995-12-31

    Accelerators, based on localization of plasmoids in the HF wells (RF traps) of the axially-symmetric electromagnetic field E {sub omn} in an oversized (m,n>>1) resonant system, can give accelerating gradients {approximately}100 kV/{lambda}, e.g. 10 GV/m if {lambda}=10 {mu}m. One of possible variants of HF feeding for these accelerators is based on using the powerful infrared FEL System with 2 frequencies. The corresponding FEL`s may be similar to the Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL ({lambda}{sub 1,2}{approximately}10 pm, e-beam energy {approximately}15 MeV, e-beam current {approximately}100 A). Their power is defined mainly by the HF losses in the resonant system of the supposed accelerator.

  16. Extending PowerPack for Profiling and Analysis of High Performance Accelerator-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Chang, Hung-Ching; Song, Shuaiwen; Su, Chun-Yi; Meyer, Timmy; Mooring, John; Cameron, Kirk

    2014-12-01

    Accelerators offer a substantial increase in efficiency for high-performance systems offering speedups for computational applications that leverage hardware support for highly-parallel codes. However, the power use of some accelerators exceeds 200 watts at idle which means use at exascale comes at a significant increase in power at a time when we face a power ceiling of about 20 megawatts. Despite the growing domination of accelerator-based systems in the Top500 and Green500 lists of fastest and most efficient supercomputers, there are few detailed studies comparing the power and energy use of common accelerators. In this work, we conduct detailed experimental studies of the power usage and distribution of Xeon-Phi-based systems in comparison to the NVIDIA Tesla and at SandyBridge.

  17. Accelerating the Next Generation Long Read Mapping with the FPGA-Based System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Wang, Chao; Li, Xi; Zhou, Xuehai

    2014-01-01

    To compare the newly determined sequences against the subject sequences stored in the databases is a critical job in the bioinformatics. Fortunately, recent survey reports that the state-of-the-art aligners are already fast enough to handle the ultra amount of short sequence reads in the reasonable time. However, for aligning the long sequence reads (>400 bp) generated by the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, it is still quite inefficient with present aligners. Furthermore, the challenge becomes more and more serious as the lengths and the amounts of the sequence reads are both keeping increasing with the improvement of the sequencing technology. Thus, it is extremely urgent for the researchers to enhance the performance of the long read alignment. In this paper, we propose a novel FPGA-based system to improve the efficiency of the long read mapping. Compared to the state-of-the-art long read aligner BWA-SW, our accelerating platform could achieve a high performance with almost the same sensitivity. Experiments demonstrate that, for reads with lengths ranging from 512 up to 4,096 base pairs, the described system obtains a 10x -48x speedup for the bottleneck of the software. As to the whole mapping procedure, the FPGA-based platform could achieve a 1.8x -3:3x speedup versus the BWA-SW aligner, reducing the alignment cycles from weeks to days. PMID:26356857

  18. Experiments of interest to nuclear astrophysics using 17F, 18F and 56NI beams from the ATLAS accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    First experiments with radioactive beams of 17F, 18F and 56Ni have been performed at the superconducting accelerator ATLAS at Argonne National laboratory. The experiments address several questions related to the hot CNO cycle and the breakout into the rp process, in particular the production of 19Ne via the 18F(p,gamma) and of 17F via the 14O(4He,p) reactions. The beams were produced by using either the two-accelerator method (18F, 56Ni) or (for 17F) by bombarding a hydrogen (deuterium) target with 17O or 16O, respectively. Special high-efficiency detection techniques were developed to perform experiments with low beam intensities and sometimes considerable isobar impurities. Planned measurements with other radioactive ion beams will be discussed.

  19. Novel pulsed particle accelerator for energy dependent positron re-emission experiments.

    PubMed

    Grill, Niklas; Piochacz, Christian; Zimnik, Samantha; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel device for particle acceleration based on elevation of the potential energy of beam pulses. This so-called energy elevator is particularly beneficial if both the particle source and the sample have to be near ground potential due to experimental constraints. We applied this new technique to enable depth dependent measurements of re-emitted positrons using the surface spectrometer at the NEPOMUC positron beam facility. First, a two-stage bunching system is used to generate positron pulses with a repetition rate of 5 MHz and a duration of 1.663(5) ns before their energy is raised to several keV. The whole system was shown to work with an exceptional efficiency of 88%. We demonstrated the usability of our setup by investigating the positron re-emission spectra of Ni and Pd as function of positron implantation energy. For Ni the positron work function could be determined to be ΦNi (+)=-1.4(2)eV. In addition, as predicted by theory, our experimental findings imply a positive positron work function for Pd. PMID:27250411

  20. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Piot, Philippe; Zhu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  1. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion FacilityUpgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-07-07

    The BASE Light Ion Facility upgrades have been completed. All proton beams are now delivered to Cave 4A. New control software, a larger diameter beam window, and improved quality assurance measures have been added.

  2. A note on breast cancer trials with pCR-based accelerated approval.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi; Cui, Lu; Yang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), under the agency's Fast Track review designation, allows early approval of drugs to treat serious diseases and fill an unmet medical need based on a surrogate endpoint. In May 2012, FDA issued a draft Guidance for Industry on the accelerated approval of breast cancer drugs based on the surrogate endpoint "pathologic complete response" (pCR). The research reported in this article investigates potential issues in designing clinical studies for pCR-based accelerated approval. The correlation between pCR and long-term survival was investigated. Two sample comparisons based on a conditional survival model under different assumptions were performed and are discussed along with simulation results. The findings from this research may shed some light on the implementation of the FDA draft guidance. PMID:24926729

  3. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments) was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigator (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes thE MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  4. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  5. Vector Extrapolation-Based Acceleration of Regularized Richardson Lucy Image Deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmele, Steffen; Hesser, Jürgen

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy has become an important tool in biological and medical sciences for imaging thin specimen, even living ones. Due to out-of-focus blurring and noise the acquired images are degraded and thus it is necessary to restore them. One of the most popular methods is an iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm with total variation regularization. This algorithm while improving the image quality is converging slowly whereas with a constantly increasing amount of image data fast methods are required. In this paper, we present an accelerated version of the algorithm and investigate the achieved speed up. The acceleration method is based on a vector extrapolation technique and avoids a computational intensive evaluation of the underlying cost function. To evaluate the acceleration two synthetic test images are used. The accelerated algorithm reaches an acceptable result within 30% to 40% less computational time.

  6. Temperature-Insensitive Fibre-Optic Acceleration Sensor Based on Intensity-Referenced Fibre Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Qun; Dong, Bo; Wang, Yong-Xin; Evan, LALLY; Wang, An-Bo

    2008-10-01

    A temperature-insensitive acceleration sensor using two fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs), based on reflection spectrum intensity modulation and optical power detection, is proposed and demonstrated. A cantilever beam is used to generate acceleration-induced axial strain along two sensing gratings, which are glued on the two opposite surfaces of the beam. Because the two gratings operate within the linear spectral range of a light source, formed by a thermally-tunable extrinsic Fabry-Perot optical filter, the intensity difference of the two reflections from the gratings is proportional to the acceleration applied. This eliminates the need for sophisticated wavelength interrogation of the gratings, and it also endows the sensor with immunity to temperature variation. Compared with a commercial micromachined accelerometer, the sensor is proven to be capable of accurately detecting acceleration.

  7. Early operating experience with the Brookhaven National Laboratory radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.; Clifford, T.; Giordano, S.; Khiari, F.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Puglisi, M.; Warner, P.

    1984-05-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory polarized H/sup -/ injection program for the AGS utilizes a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration between the polarized H/sup -/ source and the Alvarez Linac. The RFQ accelerator is now in operation with low beam currents. The results of low and high power rf testing will be reported together with initial results of operation in the polarized H/sup -/ beam line.

  8. JAERI R and D on accelerator-based transmutation under OMEGA program

    SciTech Connect

    Takizuka, T.; Nishida, T.; Mizumoto, M.; Yoshida, H.

    1995-09-15

    The overview of the Japanese long-term research and development program on nuclide partitioning and transmutation, called ''OMEGA,'' is presented. Under this national program, major R and D activities are being carried out at JAERI, PNC, and CRIEPI. Accelerator-based transmutation study at JAERI is focused on a dedicated transmutor with a subcritical actinide-fueled subcritical core coupled with a spallation target driven by a high intensity proton accelerator. Two types of system concept, solid system and molten-salt system, are discussed. The solid system consists of sodium-cooled tungsten target and metallic actinide fuel. The molten-salt system is fueled with molten actinide chloride that acts also as a target material. The proposed plant transmutes about 250 kg of minor actinide per year, and generates enough electricity to power its own accelerator. JAERI is proposing the development of an intense proton linear accelerator ETA with 1.5 GeV-10 mA beam for engineering tests of accelerator-based transmutation. Recent achievements in the accelerator development are described.

  9. Acceleration ground test program to verify GAS payload No. 559 structure/support avionics and experiment structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassanto, John M.; Cassanto, Valerie A.

    1988-01-01

    Acceleration ground tests were conducted on the Get Away Special (GAS) payload 559 to verify the structural integrity of the structure/support avionics and two of the planned three flight experiments. The ITA (Integrated Test Area) Standardized Experiment Module (ISEM) structure was modified to accommodate the experiments for payload 559. The ISEM avionics consisted of a heavy duty sliver zinc power supply, three orthogonal-mounted low range microgravity accelerometers, a tri-axis high range accelerometer, a solid state recorder/programmer sequencer, and pressure and temperature sensors. The tests were conducted using the Gravitational Plant Physiology Laboratory Centrifuge of the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, PA. The launch-powered flight steady state acceleration profile of the shuttle was simulated from lift-off through jettison of the External Tank (3.0 g's). Additional tests were conducted at twice the nominal powered flight acceleration levels (6 g's) and an over-test condition of four times the powered flight loads to 12.6 g's. The present test program has demonstrated the value of conducting ground tests to verify GAS payload experiment integrity and operation before flying on the shuttle.

  10. Accelerating Multiple Compound Comparison Using LINGO-Based Load-Balancing Strategies on Multi-GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Chung-Hung; Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yu-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Compound comparison is an important task for the computational chemistry. By the comparison results, potential inhibitors can be found and then used for the pharmacy experiments. The time complexity of a pairwise compound comparison is O(n2), where n is the maximal length of compounds. In general, the length of compounds is tens to hundreds, and the computation time is small. However, more and more compounds have been synthesized and extracted now, even more than tens of millions. Therefore, it still will be time-consuming when comparing with a large amount of compounds (seen as a multiple compound comparison problem, abbreviated to MCC). The intrinsic time complexity of MCC problem is O(k2n2) with k compounds of maximal length n. In this paper, we propose a GPU-based algorithm for MCC problem, called CUDA-MCC, on single- and multi-GPUs. Four LINGO-based load-balancing strategies are considered in CUDA-MCC in order to accelerate the computation speed among thread blocks on GPUs. CUDA-MCC was implemented by C+OpenMP+CUDA. CUDA-MCC achieved 45 times and 391 times faster than its CPU version on a single NVIDIA Tesla K20m GPU card and a dual-NVIDIA Tesla K20m GPU card, respectively, under the experimental results. PMID:26491652

  11. Accelerating Multiple Compound Comparison Using LINGO-Based Load-Balancing Strategies on Multi-GPUs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Chung-Hung; Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yu-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Compound comparison is an important task for the computational chemistry. By the comparison results, potential inhibitors can be found and then used for the pharmacy experiments. The time complexity of a pairwise compound comparison is O(n (2)), where n is the maximal length of compounds. In general, the length of compounds is tens to hundreds, and the computation time is small. However, more and more compounds have been synthesized and extracted now, even more than tens of millions. Therefore, it still will be time-consuming when comparing with a large amount of compounds (seen as a multiple compound comparison problem, abbreviated to MCC). The intrinsic time complexity of MCC problem is O(k (2) n (2)) with k compounds of maximal length n. In this paper, we propose a GPU-based algorithm for MCC problem, called CUDA-MCC, on single- and multi-GPUs. Four LINGO-based load-balancing strategies are considered in CUDA-MCC in order to accelerate the computation speed among thread blocks on GPUs. CUDA-MCC was implemented by C+OpenMP+CUDA. CUDA-MCC achieved 45 times and 391 times faster than its CPU version on a single NVIDIA Tesla K20m GPU card and a dual-NVIDIA Tesla K20m GPU card, respectively, under the experimental results. PMID:26491652

  12. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  13. Calcium-Based Nanoparticles Accelerate Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ishise, Hisako; Carre, Antoine Lyonel; Nishimoto, Soh; Longaker, Michael; Lorenz, H. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nanoparticles (NPs) are small entities that consist of a hydroxyapatite core, which can bind ions, proteins, and other organic molecules from the surrounding environment. These small conglomerations can influence environmental calcium levels and have the potential to modulate calcium homeostasis in vivo. Nanoparticles have been associated with various calcium-mediated disease processes, such as atherosclerosis and kidney stone formation. We hypothesized that nanoparticles could have an effect on other calcium-regulated processes, such as wound healing. In the present study, we synthesized pH-sensitive calcium-based nanoparticles and investigated their ability to enhance cutaneous wound repair. Methods Different populations of nanoparticles were synthesized on collagen-coated plates under various growth conditions. Bilateral dorsal cutaneous wounds were made on 8-week-old female Balb/c mice. Nanoparticles were then either administered intravenously or applied topically to the wound bed. The rate of wound closure was quantified. Intravenously injected nanoparticles were tracked using a FLAG detection system. The effect of nanoparticles on fibroblast contraction and proliferation was assessed. Results A population of pH-sensitive calcium-based nanoparticles was identified. When intravenously administered, these nanoparticles acutely increased the rate of wound healing. Intravenously administered nanoparticles were localized to the wound site, as evidenced by FLAG staining. Nanoparticles increased fibroblast calcium uptake in vitro and caused contracture of a fibroblast populated collagen lattice in a dose-dependent manner. Nanoparticles also increased the rate of fibroblast proliferation. Conclusion Intravenously administered, calcium-based nanoparticles can acutely decrease open wound size via contracture. We hypothesize that their contraction effect is mediated by the release of ionized calcium into the wound bed, which occurs when the p

  14. Computer Based Simulation of Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edward, Norrie S.

    1997-01-01

    Examines computer based simulations of practical laboratory experiments in engineering. Discusses the aims and achievements of lab work (cognitive, process, psychomotor, and affective); types of simulations (model building and behavioral); and the strengths and weaknesses of simulations. Describes the development of a centrifugal pump simulation,…

  15. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  16. Generation and propagation of an electromagnetic pulse in the Trigger experiment and its possible role in electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Kintner, P. M.; Kudeki, E.; Holmgren, G.; Bostrom, R.; Fahleson, U. V.

    1980-01-01

    Instruments onboard the Trigger payload detected a large-amplitude, low-frequency, electric field pulse which was observed with a time delay consistent only with an electromagnetic wave. A model for this perturbation is constructed, and the associated field-aligned current is calculated as a function of altitude. This experiment may simulate the acceleration mechanism which results in the formation of auroral arcs, and possibly even other events in cosmic plasmas.

  17. Cell inactivation, repair and mutation induction in bacteria after heavy ion exposure: results from experiments at accelerators and in space.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G; Schafer, M; Baltschukat, K; Weisbrod, U; Micke, U; Facius, R; Bucker, H

    1989-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of accelerated heavy ions on biological matter, the responses of spores of B. subtilis to this structured high LET radiation was investigated applying two different approaches. 1) By the use of the Biostack concept, the inactivation probability as a function of radial distance to single particles' trajectory (i.e. impact parameter) was determined in space experiments as well as at accelerators using low fluences of heavy ions. It was found that spores can survive even a central hit and that the effective range of inactivation extends far beyond impact parameters where inactivation by delta-ray dose would be effective. Concerning the space experiment, the inactivation cross section exceeds those from comparable accelerator experiments by roughly a factor of 20. 2) From fluence effect curves, cross sections for inactivation and mutation induction, and the efficiency of repair processes were determined. They are influenced by the ions characteristics in a complex manner. According to dependence on LET, at least 3 LET ranges can be differentiated: A low LET range (app. < 200 keV/micrometers), where cross sections for inactivation and mutation induction follow a common curve for different ions and where repair processes are effective; an intermediate LET range of the so-called saturation cross section with negligible mutagenic and repair efficiency; and a high LET range (>1000 keV/micrometers) where the biological endpoints are majorly dependent on atomic mass and energy of the ion under consideration. PMID:11537282

  18. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Peters, C.; Power, M.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  19. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, Ben; Mihalcea, Daniel; Panuganti, Harsha; Piot, Philippe; Brau, Charles; Choi, Bo; Gabella, William; Ivanov, Borislav; Mendenhall, Marcus; Lynn, Christopher; Sen, Tanaji; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  20. Construction, commissioning and operational experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.; Arnold, N.; Berg, W.

    1996-10-01

    The Advanced Photon Source linear accelerator system consists of a 200 MeV, 2856 MHz S-Band electron linac and a 2-radiation-thick tungsten target followed by a 450 MeV positron linac. The linac system has operated 24 hours per day for the past year to support accelerator commissioning and beam studies and to provide beam for the user experimental program. It achieves the design goal for positron current of 8 mA and produces electron energies up to 650 MeV without the target in place. The linac is described and its operation and performance are discussed.

  1. Acceleration techniques for reduced-order models based on proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cizmas, P.; Richardson, B.; Brenner, T.; O'Brien, T.; Breault, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents several acceleration techniques for reduced-order models based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method. The techniques proposed herein are: (i) an algorithm for splitting the database of snapshots generated by the full-order model; (ii) a method for solving quasi-symmetrical matrices; (iii) a strategy for reducing the frequency of the projection. The acceleration techniques were applied to a POD-based reduced-order model of the twophase flows in fluidized beds. This reduced-order model was developed using numerical results from a full-order computational fluid dynamics model of a two-dimensional fluidized bed. Using these acceleration techniques the computational time of the POD model was two orders of magnitude shorter than the full-order model.

  2. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loulergue, A.; Labat, M.; Evain, C.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Malka, V.; Couprie, M. E.

    2015-02-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) are a unique source of light, particularly in the x-ray domain. After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). However, the present LWFA electron bunch properties do not permit use directly for a significant FEL amplification. It is known that longitudinal decompression of electron beams delivered by state-of-the-art LWFA eases the FEL process. We propose here a second order transverse beam manipulation turning the large inherent transverse chromatic emittances of LWFA beams into direct FEL gain advantage. Numerical simulations are presented showing that this beam manipulation can further enhance by orders of magnitude the peak power of the radiation.

  3. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Le Jeannic, H; Ruaudel, J; Morin, O; Laurat, J

    2014-12-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments. PMID:25554277

  4. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J.

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  5. A novel method to generate a self-accelerating Bessel-like beam based on graded index multimode optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaxun; Liu, Chunlan; Yu, Zhang; Liu, Zhihai; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a transverse self-accelerating Bessel-like beam generator based on a graded index multimode optical fiber(GIF). The single-mode fiber and the graded-index multimode fiber are spliced with a defined offset. The offset Δx and the GIF length L affect the final properties of the Bessel-like beam, here we choose the offset Δx=20μm and the GIF length L=430μm to be optimal. The beam accelerates along the designed parabolic path up to 250μm in z direction and 40μm in x direction, the curvature of bending is 16% (40μm/250μm, x/z). This transverse self-accelerating Bessel-like beam generator based on the graded index multimode optical fiber constitutes a new development for high-precision micro particles experiments and manipulations because of its simple structure, high integration and small size.

  6. Experimental dosimetry and beam evaluation in a phantom for near lithium threshold accelerator based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudchadker, R. J.; Lee, C. L.; Harker, Y. D.; Harmon, F.

    1999-06-01

    Current accelerator-based neutron source concepts for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are centered on the lithium (p,n) reaction. The near lithium threshold source concept uses proton energies ≲100 keV above the reaction threshold energy (1.88 MeV). For deeply seated brain tumors, epithermal (1 eV to 10 keV) neutrons are needed to penetrate the skull cap and subsequently thermalize at the tumor location. All BNCT neutron sources inherently have thermal, fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. In order to quantify the thermal neutron component, a cylindrical acrylic head phantom has been constructed to simulate the patient's head and neck. BF3 proportional counters have been used to determine the thermal neutron flux (boron dose). The thermal neutron flux component has been compared with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code calculations. Our results indicate a good comparison between the MCNP code calculations and the benchmark experiments performed. The results also indicate that the near threshold neutron concept is competitive with other BNCT neutron sources.

  7. Experimental dosimetry and beam evaluation in a phantom for near lithium threshold accelerator based BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, R. J.; Harmon, F.; Lee, C. L.; Harker, Y. D.

    1999-06-10

    Current accelerator-based neutron source concepts for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are centered on the lithium (p,n) reaction. The near lithium threshold source concept uses proton energies < or approx. 100 keV above the reaction threshold energy (1.88 MeV). For deeply seated brain tumors, epithermal (1 eV to 10 keV) neutrons are needed to penetrate the skull cap and subsequently thermalize at the tumor location. All BNCT neutron sources inherently have thermal, fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. In order to quantify the thermal neutron component, a cylindrical acrylic head phantom has been constructed to simulate the patient's head and neck. BF{sub 3} proportional counters have been used to determine the thermal neutron flux (boron dose). The thermal neutron flux component has been compared with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code calculations. Our results indicate a good comparison between the MCNP code calculations and the benchmark experiments performed. The results also indicate that the near threshold neutron concept is competitive with other BNCT neutron sources.

  8. Wide-bandwidth Tm-based amplifier for laser acceleration driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Drew A.; Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.

    2016-03-01

    We report on an investigation of novel 2 μm thulium (Tm)-based laser accelerator driver (LAD) offering efficient generation of high-energy pulses with high-peak power at high pulse repetition rate (PRF), high efficiency, and with near-diffraction-limited beam quality (BQ). Laser acceleration of electrons by ultrashortpulse laser-generated plasmas offers accelerators of much reduced size and cost compared to conventional accelerators of the same energy, thus replacing the traditional mammoth-size and costly accelerator research facilities with room-size systems1. A LAD operating at 2 μm wavelength offers ponderomotive forces four times that of 1 μm wavelength and six times that of a traditional 0.8 μm wavelength LAD. In addition, the Tm bandwidth of nearly 400 nm offers > 15% tunability and generation of ultrashort pulses down to <30 fs. The "2-for- 1" pump quantum efficiency of the Tm ion enables > 20% wall-plug efficiency. This work presents a preliminary analysis of Tm-based LAD configurations.

  9. Simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration with external electron-bunch injection for REGAE experiments at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyuk, Julia; Mehrling, Timon; Tsung, Frank S.; Floettman, Klaus; Osterhoff, Jens

    2012-12-21

    We present particle-in-cell simulations for future laser-plasma wakefield experiments with external bunch injection at the REGAE accelerator facility at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. Two effects have been studied in detail: emittance evolution of electron bunches externally injected into a wake, and longitudinal bunch compression inside the wakefield. Results show significant transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This might introduce the necessity to include beam-matching sections upstream of each plasma-accelerator section with fundamental implications on the design of staged laser wakefield accelerators. When externally injected at the zero-field crossing of the laser-driven wake, the electron bunch may undergo significant compression in longitudinal direction and be accelerated simultaneously due to the gradient in the acting force. The mechanism would allow for production of single high-energy, ultra-short (on the order of one femtosecond) bunches at REGAE. The optimal conditions for maximal bunch compression are discussed in the presented studies.

  10. Accelerating Opportunity: A Portrait of Students and Their Program Experiences from the 2014 Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Shayne; Martin-Caughey, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of students enrolled in Accelerating Opportunity (AO) career pathways in spring 2014. AO provides grants to help community colleges create career pathway programs to enroll students with low basic skills into for-credit career and technical education courses to improve educational and employment…

  11. Designing a successful HMD-based experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, J. S.; Pausch, R.; Sturgill, C. B.; Christiansen, K. D.; Kaiser, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    For entertainment applications, a successful virtual experience based on a head-mounted display (HMD) needs to overcome some or all of the following problems: entering a virtual world is a jarring experience, people do not naturally turn their heads or talk to each other while wearing an HMD, putting on the equipment is hard, and people do not realize when the experience is over. In the Electric Garden at SIGGRAPH 97, we presented the Mad Hatter's Tea Party, a shared virtual environment experienced by more than 1,500 SIGGRAPH attendees. We addressed these HMD-related problems with a combination of back story, see-through HMDs, virtual characters, continuity of real and virtual objects, and the layout of the physical and virtual environments.

  12. Highly accelerated cardiac MRI using iterative SENSE reconstruction: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bradley D; Carr, Maria; Botelho, Marcos P F; Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Markl, Michael; Zenge, Michael O; Schmidt, Michaela; Nadar, Mariappan S; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative performance of an accelerated cardiovascular MRI (CMR) protocol that features iterative SENSE reconstruction and spatio-temporal L1-regularization (IS SENSE). Twenty consecutively recruited patients and 9 healthy volunteers were included. 2D steady state free precession cine images including 3-chamber, 4-chamber, and short axis slices were acquired using standard parallel imaging (GRAPPA, acceleration factor = 2), spatio-temporal undersampled TSENSE (acceleration factor = 4), and IS SENSE techniques (acceleration factor = 4). Acquisition times, quantitative cardiac functional parameters, wall motion abnormalities (WMA), and qualitative performance (scale: 1-poor to 5-excellent for overall image quality, noise, and artifact) were compared. Breath-hold times for IS SENSE (3.0 ± 0.6 s) and TSENSE (3.3 ± 0.6) were both reduced relative to GRAPPA (8.4 ± 1.7 s, p < 0.001). No difference in quantitative cardiac function was present between the three techniques (p = 0.89 for ejection fraction). GRAPPA and IS SENSE had similar image quality (4.7 ± 0.4 vs. 4.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.09) while, both techniques were superior to TSENSE (quality: 4.1 ± 0.7, p < 0.001). GRAPPA WMA agreement with IS SENSE was good (κ > 0.60, p < 0.001), while agreement with TSENSE was poor (κ < 0.40, p < 0.001). IS SENSE is a viable clinical CMR acceleration approach to reduce acquisition times while maintaining satisfactory qualitative and quantitative performance. PMID:26894256

  13. Experiments with Orbit-Spin Coupling Accelerations in a Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischna, M. A.; Shirley, J. H.; Newman, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the hypothesis that year-to-year differences in the orbital angular momentum of Mars [Shirley, this meeting] can contribute to the interannual variability of the Mars climate. For much of the year, the seasonal cycle of the atmospheric circulation is highly repeatable, being driven by global insolation patterns; however, during southern summer (the 'dust storm season'), the atmosphere is more highly variable from year-to-year. The processes underlying this variability are not yet clear. As a means of addressing this uncertainty, we explore the possibility that the root cause may be extrinsic to the atmospheric system itself. Recent work has uncovered a mechanism for a coupling of Mars' orbital and rotational motions that yields heretofore-unsuspected accelerations on the martian atmosphere. These accelerations, while instantaneously small (on the order of 10-5 ms-2), may cumulatively yield wind velocity changes of several 10s of ms-1 on seasonal timescales. Here, we use the MarsWRF general circulation model to examine the effect of these newly identified coupling term accelerations (CTAs) on Mars' atmospheric circulation. The accelerations vary significantly with time, and exhibit variable phasing with respect to Mars' annual cycle. We have run MarsWRF with the inclusion of the additional accelerations for a range of years from MY -16 (1924) to MY 34 (2018). We find that interannual variability in the model output derives largely from differences in the sign and magnitude of the CTAs, confirming one of the predictions of the physical hypothesis. During certain seasons the overall circulation is strengthened by the CTAs, while at other times the CTAs disappear. Resultant surface wind stresses, which are a function of the near-surface winds, are enhanced during periods when the CTAs attain maximum values. We have begun to explore the relationship between the CTAs and the martian dust cycle through its influence on these surface stresses.

  14. Multi-processor developments in the United States for future high energy physics experiments and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, I.

    1988-03-01

    The use of multi-processors for analysis and high-level triggering in High Energy Physics experiments, pioneered by the early emulator systems, has reached maturity, in particular with the multiple microprocessor systems in use at Fermilab. It is widely acknowledged that such systems will fulfill the major portion of the computing needs of future large experiments. Recent developments at Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program will make such systems even more powerful, cost-effective, and easier to use than they are at present. The next generation of microprocessors, already available, will provide CPU power of about one VAX 780 equivalent/$300, while supporting most VMS FORTRAN extensions and large (>8MB) amounts of memory. Low cost high density mass storage devices (based on video tape cartridge technology) will allow parallel I/O to remove potential I/O bottlenecks in systems of over 1000 VAX equipment processors. New interconnection schemes and system software will allow more flexible topologies and extremely high data bandwidth, especially for on-line systems. This talk will summarize the work at the Advanced Computer Program and the rest of the US in this field. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Magnetic flux compression experiments on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Bliss, D. E.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; Martin, M. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Greenly, J. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for diagnosing magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz (t) =Bz (0) × [ R (0) / R (t) ]2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes, (2) streaked visible Zeeman spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We will also briefly highlight some recent developments using neutron diagnostics (ratio of secondary DT to primary DD neutrons and secondary DT neutron energy spectra) to assess the degree of magnetization in fully integrated magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Navigating Uncharted Waters: An Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Kelly; Thomas, Michelle; Schuemann, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Miami Dade College received a $1.9 million Title V grant from the US Department of Education to develop an Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes (EAP) track called Project ACE for ESL students. The ACE curriculum is anchored by the principles of flexibility, contextualization, and faculty buy-in--critical matters given…

  17. Investigation of Microopto-eletromechanical Angular Velocity and Acceleration Transducers based on Optical Tunneling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busurin, V. I.; Lwin, Naing Htoo; Tuan, Pham Anh

    In this paper the possibility of microopto-electromechanical (MOEM) angular velocity and acceleration transducers based on optical tunneling effect (OTE) is considered. The generalized model of MOEM transducers with various types of sensing elements (SE) is developed, transfer functions are investigated, and the errors with various design parameters of transducers are estimated.

  18. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  19. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT. PMID:26300076

  20. Panorama of new generation of accelerator based short wavelength coherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The newly developed intense short wavelength light sources (from Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) to X-rays) have open the path to the exploration of matter for revealing structures and electronic processes and for following their evolution in time. After drawing the panorama of existing accelerator based short wavelength light sources, the new trends of evolution of short wavelengths FEL are described, with some illustrations with the example of the LUNEX5 (free electron Laser a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) demonstrator project of advanced compact Free Electron Laser.

  1. A modified acceleration-based monthly gravity field solution from GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiujie; Shen, Yunzhong; Chen, Wu; Zhang, Xingfu; Hsu, Houze; Ju, Xiaolei

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes an alternative acceleration approach for determining GRACE monthly gravity field models. The main differences compared to the traditional acceleration approach can be summarized as: (1) The position errors of GRACE orbits in the functional model are taken into account; (2) The range ambiguity is eliminated via the difference of the range measurements and (3) The mean acceleration equation is formed based on Cowell integration. Using this developed approach, a new time-series of GRACE monthly solution spanning the period January 2003 to December 2010, called Tongji_Acc RL01, has been derived. The annual signals from the Tongji_Acc RL01 time-series agree well with those from the GLDAS model. The performance of Tongji_Acc RL01 shows that this new model is comparable with the RL05 models released by CSR and JPL as well as with the RL05a model released by GFZ.

  2. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  3. Accelerator-based Neutron Fluence Standard of the National Metrology Institute of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Jun; Uritani, Akira; Kudo, Katsuhisa

    2009-03-01

    We report the present status of the national standard on accelerator-based fast neutron fluences in Japan. Monoenergetic neutron fluence standards have been established at 144 keV, 565 keV, 5.0 MeV and 8.0 MeV by using a Van de Graaff accelerator and at 2.5 MeV and 14.8 MeV by using a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. These standards are prepared to measure the detection efficiency and the energy response of neutron sensitive devices, such as personal dosimeters and survey meters. Neutron production and absolute fluence measurement for these energies are described. We are developing a new standard in the energy region of a few tens of keV, which is also introduced here as well as our future plans.

  4. The STIRAP-based unitary decelerating and accelerating processes of a single free atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xijia

    2008-05-01

    The STIRAP-based unitary decelerating and accelerating processes have been constructed for the physical system of a single free atom. The present theoretical work is focused on investigating analytically how the momentum distribution of a momentum superposition state of a quantum system such as a momentum Gaussian wave-packet state of a single freely moving atom affects the STIRAP state transfer in these decelerating and accelerating processes. The complete STIRAP state transfer and the unitarity of these processes are stressed highly in the investigation. It has been shown that the momentum distribution has an important influence upon the STIRAP state-transfer efficiency. In the ideal adiabatic condition these unitary decelerating and accelerating processes are studied in detail for a freely moving atom. A general adiabatic condition for the basic STIRAP unitary decelerating and accelerating processes is also derived analytically. The unitary decelerating and accelerating processes may be used to manipulate and control in time and space a Gaussian wave-packet motional state of a free atom. The detail work see: Xijia Miao, http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0707.0063.

  5. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  6. Mechanical Component Lifetime Estimation Based on Accelerated Life Testing with Singularity Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Chuckpaiwong, I.; Liang, S. Y.; Seth, B. B.

    2002-07-01

    Life testing under nominal operating conditions of mechanical parts with high mean lifetime between failure (MTBF) often consumes a significant amount of time and resources, rendering such procedures expensive and impractical. As a result, the technology of accelerated life testing (ALT) has been developed for testing at high stress levels (e.g. temperature, voltage, pressure, corrosive media, load, vibration amplitude, etc.) so that it can be extrapolated—through a physically reasonable statistical model—to obtain estimations of life at lower, normal stress levels or even limit stress levels. However, the issue of prediction accuracy associated with extrapolating data outside the range of testing, or even to a singularity level (no stress), has not yet been fully addressed. In this research, an accelerator factor is introduced into an inverse power law model to estimate the life distribution in terms of time and stresses. Also, a generalized Eyring model is set up for singularity extrapolation in handling limit stress level conditions. The procedure to calibrate the associated shape factors based on the maximum likelihood principle is also formulated. The methodology implementation, based on a one-main-step, multiple-step-stress test scheme, is experimentally illustrated with tapered roller bearing under the stress of environmental corrosion as a case study. The experimental results show that the developed accelerated life test model can effectively evaluate the life probability of a bearing based on accelerated testing data when extrapolating to the stress levels within or outside the range of testing.

  7. Random and bias errors in simple regression-based calculations of sea-level acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howd, P.; Doran, K. J.; Sallenger, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the random and bias errors associated with three simple regression-based methods used to calculate the acceleration of sea-level elevation (SL). These methods are: (1) using ordinary least-squares regression (OLSR) to fit a single second-order (in time) equation to an entire elevation time series; (2) using a sliding regression window with OLRS 2nd order fits to provide time and window length dependent estimates; and (3) using a sliding regression window with OLSR 1st order fits to provide time and window length dependent estimates of sea level rate differences (SLRD). A Monte Carlo analysis using synthetic elevation time series with 9 different noise formulations (red, AR(1), and white noise at 3 variance levels) is used to examine the error structure associated with the three analysis methods. We show that, as expected, the single-fit method (1), while providing statistically unbiased estimates of the mean acceleration over an interval, by statistical design does not provide estimates of time-varying acceleration. This technique cannot be expected to detect recent changes in SL acceleration, such as those predicted by some climate models. The two sliding window techniques show similar qualitative results for the test time series, but differ dramatically in their statistical significance. Estimates of acceleration based on the 2nd order fits (2) are numerically smaller than the rate differences (3), and in the presence of near-equal residual noise, are more difficult to detect with statistical significance. We show, using the SLRD estimates from tide gauge data, how statistically significant changes in sea level accelerations can be detected at different temporal and spatial scales.

  8. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  9. Neutron dosimetry in linear electron accelerator during radiotherapy treatment: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio; Nastasi, U.; Ongaro, C.; Stasi, E.; Zanini, Alessandro

    1995-03-01

    In the electron linear accelerators used for radiotherapy by high energy electrons or gamma rays, there is a non negligible production of neutrons by photodisintegration or electrodisintegration reactions on the high Z components of the head machine (target, flattening filter, collimators). At the Experimental Physics Department of Torino University, Torino, Italy an experimental and theoretical evaluation has been performed on the undesired neutron production in the MD Class Mevatron Siemens accelerator used at the Radiotherapy Department of S. Giovanni Battista A.S. Hospital for cancer therapy by a 15 MV gamma ray beam. A simulation of the total process has been carried out, using EGS4 MonteCarlo computer code for the evaluation of photoneutron spectra and MCNP code for the neutron transport in the patient's body. The geometrical description both of the accelerator head in EGS4 and of the anthropomorphous phantom in MCNP have been highly optimized. Experimental measurements have been carried out by bubble detectors BD 100R appropriately allocated inside a new phantom in polyetylene and plexiglass, especially designed for this purpose.

  10. Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18 mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300 μm). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices. PMID:25618819

  11. Laser red shifting based characterization of wakefield excitation in a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S.; Benedetti, C.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-15

    Optical spectra of a drive laser exiting a channel guided laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) are analyzed through experiments and simulations to infer the magnitude of the excited wakefields. The experiments are performed at sufficiently low intensity levels and plasma densities to avoid electron beam generation via self-trapping. Spectral redshifting of the laser light is studied as an indicator of the efficiency of laser energy transfer into the plasma through the generation of coherent plasma wakefields. Influences of input laser energy, plasma density, temporal and spatial laser profiles, and laser focal location in a plasma channel are analyzed. Energy transfer is found to be sensitive to details of laser pulse shape and focal location. The experimental conditions for these critical parameters are modeled and included in particle-in-cell simulations. Simulations reproduce the redshift of the laser within uncertainties of the experiments and produce an estimate of the wake amplitudes in the experiments as a function of amount of redshift. The results support the practical use of laser redshifting to quantify the longitudinally averaged accelerating field that a particle would experience in an LPA powered below the self-trapping limit.

  12. BASE - The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δg/g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.

  13. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  14. Fluorescence-based video profile beam diagnostics: Theory and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.P.; Garcia, R.C.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Shinas, M.A.; Wright, R.; Yuan, V.; Zander, M.E. )

    1994-10-10

    Inelastic collisions between accelerated particles and residual gas in the accelerator vessel can cause the residual gas to fluoresce. The gas fluorescence intensity is proportional to the current density of the particle beam. This process provides the foundation for a video diagnostics system to measure the profile and position of accelerated particle beams. This, in fact, has proven to be a useful diagnostic at several installations. This paper describes the light production process resulting from beam-residual gas interactions and gives formulas for estimating the beam radiance for various conditions. Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) radiance calculations will be used as an example. In addition, measurement experiences with the GTA video diagnostics system will be discussed.

  15. Fluorescence-based video profile beam diagnostics: Theory and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.; Gilpatrick, D.; Shinas, M.; Garcia, R.; Yuan, V.; Zander, M.

    1994-05-01

    Inelastic collisions between accelerated particles and residual gas in the accelerator vessel can cause the residual gas to fluoresce. The gas fluorescence intensity is proportional to the current density of the particle beam. This process provides the foundation for a video diagnostic system to measure the profile and position of accelerated particle beams. This, in fact, has proven to be a useful diagnostic at several installations. This paper describes the light production process resulting from beam -- residual gas interactions and gives formulas for estimating the beam radiance for various conditions. Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) radiance calculations will be used as an example. In addition, measurement experiences with the GTA video diagnostics system will be discussed.

  16. Accelerating patch-based directional wavelets with multicore parallel computing in compressed sensing MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyue; Qu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yunsong; Guo, Di; Lai, Zongying; Ye, Jing; Chen, Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Compressed sensing MRI (CS-MRI) is a promising technology to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. Both improving the image quality and reducing the computation time are important for this technology. Recently, a patch-based directional wavelet (PBDW) has been applied in CS-MRI to improve edge reconstruction. However, this method is time consuming since it involves extensive computations, including geometric direction estimation and numerous iterations of wavelet transform. To accelerate computations of PBDW, we propose a general parallelization of patch-based processing by taking the advantage of multicore processors. Additionally, two pertinent optimizations, excluding smooth patches and pre-arranged insertion sort, that make use of sparsity in MR images are also proposed. Simulation results demonstrate that the acceleration factor with the parallel architecture of PBDW approaches the number of central processing unit cores, and that pertinent optimizations are also effective to make further accelerations. The proposed approaches allow compressed sensing MRI reconstruction to be accomplished within several seconds. PMID:25620521

  17. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George; Glotzer, Sharon; McCurdy, Bill; Roberto, Jim

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of abating, has

  18. A polarization-based frequency scanning interferometer and the signal processing acceleration method based on parallel processing architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Min Young

    FSI system, one of the most promising optical surface measurement techniques, generally results in superior optical performance comparing with other 3-dimensional measuring methods as its hardware structure is fixed in operation and only the light frequency is scanned in a specific spectral band without vertical scanning of the target surface or the objective lens. FSI system collects a set of images of interference fringe by changing the frequency of light source. After that, it transforms intensity data of acquired image into frequency information, and calculates the height profile of target objects with the help of frequency analysis based on FFT. However, it still suffers from optical noise from target surface and relatively long processing time due to the number of images acquired in frequency scanning phase. First, a polarization-based frequency scanning interferometry (PFSI) is proposed for optical noise robustness. It consists of tunable laser for light source, λ/4 plate in front of reference mirror, λ/4 plate in front of target object, polarizing beam splitter, polarizer in front of image sensor, polarizer in front of the fiber coupled light source, λ/2 plate between PBS and polarizer of the light source. Using the proposed system, we can solve the problem low contrast of acquired fringe image by using polarization technique. Also, we can control light distribution of object beam and reference beam. Second, the signal processing acceleration method is proposed for PFSI, based on parallel processing architecture, which consists of parallel processing hardware and software such as GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) and CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). As a result, the processing time reaches into tact time level of real-time processing. Finally, the proposed system is evaluated in terms of accuracy and processing speed through a series of experiment and the obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed system and method.

  19. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  20. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  1. The High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC: Physics and Technology Challenges for the Accelerator and the Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    In the second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500/fb over 10 years of operation to the general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented pp luminosity, the experiments will need to address the aging of the present detectors and to improve the ability to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. The lectures gave an overview of the physics motivation and described the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades of the four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques and a brief overview of the accelerator upgrade. Only some key points of the upgrade program of the four major experiments are discussed in this report; more information can be found in the references given at the end.

  2. POLAR 5 - An electron accelerator experiment within an aurora. III - Evidence for significant spacecraft charging by an electron accelerator at ionospheric altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, T. A.; Maynard, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    The POLAR 5 rocket experiment carried an electron accelerator on a 'daughter' payload which injected a 0.1 A beam of 10 keV electrons in a pulsed mode every 410 ms. With spin and precession, injections were made over a wide range of pitch angles. Measurements from a double probe electric field instrument and from particle detectors on the 'mother' payload and from a crude RPA on the 'daughter' payload are interpreted to indicate that the 'daughter' charges to a potential between several hundred volts and 1 kV. The neutralizing return current to the 'daughter' is shown to be asymmetrically distributed with the majority being collected from the direction of the beam. The additional electrons necessary to neutralize the daughter are thought to be produced and heated through beam-plasma interactions postulated by Maehlum et al. (1980) and Grandal et al. (1980) to explain the particle and optical measurements. Significant electric fields emanating from the charged 'daughter' and the beam are seen at distances exceeding 100 m at the 'mother' payload.

  3. Polar 5 - An electron accelerator experiment within an aurora. I - Instrumentation and geophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehlum, B. N.; Grandal, B.; Jacobsen, T. A.; Maseide, K.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Soraas, F.; Aarsnes, K.; Stadsnes, J.; Maynard, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    A mother-daughter rocket was launched over two auroral structures, which included a 10 keV electron accelerator and a series of diagnostic instruments for monitoring optical and wave effects generated through beam-atmospheric interactions and production of secondary electrons. The instrumentation, the ground and rocket background measurements obtained, and some of the beam effects on various geophysical parameters are presented. Attention is given to the rocket geometry, capacitance probe, particle counters, photometers, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray detector. Observations on the plasma environment, auroral particle precipitation, d.c. electric field, optical emissions, and auroral background HF and VLF emissions are also discussed.

  4. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Qi, Jianmin; Chu, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The linear-transformer-driver (LTD) is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z -pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z -pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%-90%) can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32 cm /μ s when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%-30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  5. Accelerated Helium and Hydrogen Production in Fe-54 Doped Alloys - Measurements and Calculations for the FIST Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Oliver, Brian M.; Ohnuki, S.; Shiba, K.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Robertson, J. P.; Meadows, J. W.; Gelles, David S.

    2000-09-01

    Helium and hydrogen measurements for F-82H alloys enriched up to 96% in 54Fe demonstrate accelerated gas production due to differences in the isotopic cross sections. The samples were irradiated in the JP-17 and JP-22 experiments in HFIR. Results are compared to calculations using isotopic helium production cross sections from ENDF/B-VI or the computer code, GNASH, for the radioactive isotope 55Fe. Helium measurements demonstrated an accelerated helium (appm)/dpa ratio of 2.3 after a 1.25-year irradiation, an increase of a factor of 4.3 over natural iron, due to higher helium production cross sections for 54Fe and 55Fe. Alloys doped with 55Fe could achieve helium/dpa ratios up to about 20, well above the fusion reactor ratio of 10. Calculations predict that hydrogen production is accelerated by about a factor of 13 over natural iron. However, measurements show that most of this hydrogen is not retained in the samples.

  6. Accelerators for critical experiments involving single-particle upset in solid-state microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle interactions in microelectronic circuit chips (integrated circuits) present a particularly insidious problem for solid-state electronic systems due to the generation of soft errors or single-particle event upset (SEU) by either cosmic rays or other radiation sources. Particle accelerators are used to provide both light and heavy ions in order to assess the propensity of integrated circuit chips for SEU. Critical aspects of this assessment involve the ability to analytically model SEU for the prediction of error rates in known radiation environments. In order to accurately model SEU, the measurement and prediction of energy deposition in the form of an electron-hole plasma generated along an ion track is of paramount importance. This requires the use of accelerators which allow for ease in both energy control (change of energy) and change of ion species. This and other aspects of ion-beam control and diagnostics (e.g., uniformity and flux) are of critical concern for the experimental verification of theoretical SEU models.

  7. Experiences in fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Verdonk, Marcel L; Rees, David C

    2012-05-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become established in both industry and academia as an alternative approach to high-throughput screening for the generation of chemical leads for drug targets. In FBDD, specialised detection methods are used to identify small chemical compounds (fragments) that bind to the drug target, and structural biology is usually employed to establish their binding mode and to facilitate their optimisation. In this article, we present three recent and successful case histories in FBDD. We then re-examine the key concepts and challenges of FBDD with particular emphasis on recent literature and our own experience from a substantial number of FBDD applications. Our opinion is that careful application of FBDD is living up to its promise of delivering high quality leads with good physical properties and that in future many drug molecules will be derived from fragment-based approaches. PMID:22459076

  8. Laser-plasma accelerators-based high energy radiation femtochemistry and spatio-temporal radiation biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauduel, Y. A.; Lundh, O.; Martin, M. T.; Malka, V.

    2012-06-01

    The innovating advent of powerful TW laser sources (~1019 W cm-z) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultra-short relativistic particle beams (electron, proton) in the MeV domain open exciting opportunities for the simultaneous development of high energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF) and ultrafast radiation biomedicine. Femtolysis experiments (Femtosecond radiolysis) of aqueous targets performed with relativistic electron bunches of 2.5-15 MeV give new insights on transient physicochemical events that take place in the prethermal regime of confined ionization tracks. Femtolysis studies emphasize the pre-eminence of ultra-fast quantum effects in the temporal range 10-14 - 10-11 s. The most promising advances of HERF concern the quantification of ultrafast sub-nanometric biomolecular damages (bond weakening and bond breaking) in the radial direction of a relativistic particle beam. Combining ultra-short relativistic particle beams and near-infrared spectroscopic configurations, laser-plasma accelerators based high energy radiation femtochemistry foreshadows the development of real-time radiation chemistry in the prethermal regime of nascent ionisation clusters. These physico-chemical advances would be very useful for future developments in biochemically relevant environments (DNA, proteins) and in more complex biological systems such as living cells. The first investigation of single and multiple irradiation shots performed at high energy level (90 MeV) and very high dose rate, typically 1013 Gy s-1, demonstrates that measurable assessments of immediate and reversible DNA damage can be explored at single cell level. Ultrafast in vivo irradiations would permit the development of bio-nanodosimetry on the time scale of molecular motions, i.e. angstrom or sub-angstrom displacements and open new perspectives in the emerging domain of ultrafast radiation biomedicine such as pulsed radiotherapy.

  9. Summary of recent experiments on focusing of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam with a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Alexander, N.; Barnard, J. J.; Lund, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a summary of recent experiments on focusing of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated (TNSA) proton beam with a stack of thin conducting foils. The experiments were performed using the Phelix laser (GSI-Darmstadt) and the Titan laser, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of TNSA protons were experimentally observed for the first time at the Phelix laser user facility, in a specially engineered structure ('lens') consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. Follow up experiments using the Titan laser obtained results consistent with the collimation/focusing observed in the initial experiments using the Phelix. The Titan experiments employed improved, 25 μm- and 50 μm-gap targets and the new fine mesh diagnostic. All the experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields were applied, and no neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. A plausible interpretation of the observed phenomena is that the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the conducting foils inhibits radial expansion of the beam.

  10. Risk-Based Decision Process for Accelerated Closure of a Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Norland, R. L.; DiSalvo, R.; Anderson, M.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Site) resulted in contamination of soil and underground systems and structures with hazardous substances, including plutonium, uranium and hazardous waste constituents. The Site was placed on the National Priority List in 1989. There are more than 370 Individual Hazardous Substance Sites (IHSSs) at RFETS. Accelerated cleanup and closure of RFETS is being achieved through implementation and refinement of a regulatory framework that fosters programmatic and technical innovations: (1) extensive use of ''accelerated actions'' to remediate IHSSs, (2) development of a risk-based screening process that triggers and helps define the scope of accelerated actions consistent with the final remedial action objectives for the Site, (3) use of field instrumentation for real time data collection, (4) a data management system that renders near real time field data assessment, and (5) a regulatory agency consultative process to facilitate timely decisions. This paper presents the process and interim results for these aspects of the accelerated closure program applied to Environmental Restoration activities at the Site.

  11. Error-Rate Estimation Based on Multi-Signal Flow Graph Model and Accelerated Radiation Tests.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Wang, Yueke; Xing, Kefei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Zelong

    2016-01-01

    A method of evaluating the single-event effect soft-error vulnerability of space instruments before launched has been an active research topic in recent years. In this paper, a multi-signal flow graph model is introduced to analyze the fault diagnosis and meantime to failure (MTTF) for space instruments. A model for the system functional error rate (SFER) is proposed. In addition, an experimental method and accelerated radiation testing system for a signal processing platform based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA) is presented. Based on experimental results of different ions (O, Si, Cl, Ti) under the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, the SFER of the signal processing platform is approximately 10-3(error/particle/cm2), while the MTTF is approximately 110.7 h. PMID:27583533

  12. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; Huning, M.; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  13. Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer: A local center's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shixiu . E-mail: wushixiu@medmail.com.cn; Xie Congying; Jin Xiance; Zhang Ping

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, toxicity, and clinical efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Method and Materials: Seventy-five patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique. Daily fraction of 2.5 Gy and 2.0 Gy were prescribed to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical tumor volume (CTV) to a total dose of 70 Gy and 56 Gy, respectively, in 38 days. In 24 of these patients, GTV was boosted to 80 Gy. Quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy was performed by assessing excretion uptake and excretion index of parotid glands. Results: In dosimetry, the mean doses delivered to the GTV, CTV1, and CTV2 were 68.1 Gy, 58.7 Gy, and 54.3 Gy, respectively. An average of 1% of the GTV and 3% of the CTV received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, whereas the mean doses delivered to the organ at risk were kept below tolerance limits. The mean doses to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotids were 31.1 Gy and 21.9 Gy, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy showed excretion index and uptake index decreased by 44.6% and 28.3%, respectively, in ipsilateral parotid (p < 0.05), whereas no significant decline in contralateral parotid was observed. Acute toxicities were well tolerated, except for the relatively high incidence of severe mucositis. No Grade 4 side effect occurred. With a median follow-up of 23.8 months (range, 10-39 months), the 2-year local progression-free, local-regional progression-free, and distant metastasis-free survival were 97.26%, 87.21%, and 82.03%, respectively. The 2-year overall survival was 86.81%. Conclusions: Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy yielded superior dose distribution over conventional radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and could be delivered with acceptable toxicity and risky organ sparing. Dose

  14. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  15. Accelerator driven system based on plutonium subcritical reactor and 660 MeV phasotron

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Chultem, D.; Furman, V. I.; Maltsev, A. A.; Onischenko, L. M.; Pogodajev, G. N.; Popov, Yu. P.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.; Dudarev, S. Yu.; Gudowski, W.; Janczyszyn, J.; Polanski, A.; Taczanowski, S.

    1999-11-16

    The proposal presents a PLUTONIUM BASED ENERGY AMPLIFIER TESTING CONCEPT which employs a plutonium subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator, operating in the the JINR (Dubna, Russia). To make the present conceptual design of the Plutonium Energy Amplifier we have chosen a nominal unit capacity of 20 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff between 0.94 and 0.95 and the energetic gain about 20.

  16. Accelerator Driven System Based on Plutonium Subcritical Reactor and 660 MeV Phasotron

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, V.A.; Barashenkov, V.S.; Buttsev, V.S.; Chultem, D.; Dudarev, S.Yu.; Furman, V.I.; Gudowski, W.; Janczyszyn, J.; Maltsev, A.A.; Onischenko, L.M.; Pogodajev, G.N.; Polanski, A.; Popov, Yu.P.; Puzynin, I.V.; Sissakian, A.N.; Taczanowski, S.

    1999-12-31

    The proposal presents a PLUTONIUM BASED ENERGY AMPLIFIER TESTING CONCEPT which employs a plutonium subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator. operating in the JINR (Dubna, Russia). To make the present conceptual design of the Plutonium Energy Amplifier we have chosen a nominal unit capacity of 20 kW (thermal). This corresponds to a multiplication coefficient, keff, between 0.94 and 0.95 and an energy gain about 20.

  17. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  18. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  19. Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator-Based Small Animal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Steven; Monjazeb, Arta M; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) scanning and printing technology is utilized to create phantom models of mice in order to assess the accuracy of ionizing radiation dosing from a clinical, human-based linear accelerator. Phantoms are designed to simulate a range of research questions, including irradiation of lung tumors and primary subcutaneous or orthotopic tumors for immunotherapy experimentation. The phantoms are used to measure the accuracy of dose delivery and then refine it to within 1% of the prescribed dose. PMID:26180678

  20. Chemistry technology base and fuel cycle of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system, a description of the pyrochemistry technology base and the fuel cycle for the system. The pyrochemistry technology base consists of four processes: direct oxide reduction, reductive extraction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. Each process and its utility is described. The fuel cycle is described for a liquid metal-based system with the focus being the conversion of commercial spent nuclear fuel to fuel for the transmutation system. Fission product separation and actinide recycle processes are also described.

  1. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  2. High brightness cathode experiments on the experimental test accelerator (ETA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.; Proulx, G.

    1984-01-01

    The experiments performed on the ETA during the months of September through October of 1984 were intended to accomplish two objectives; to discover or develop a source capable of producing an electron beam whose brightness is substantially higher than that of previous sources, and to determine, if possible, the mechanisms which limit the source brightness so that further enhancements might be obtained. The results of the experiments met these objectives to a limited degree. A cathode material (velvet) and a diode geometry were identified which resulted in more than a factor of two improvements in brightness over that obtained with previous flashboard cathodes. Experiments were performed which have yielded information about mechanisms which may limit beam brightness, and have suggested approaches for further work to improve brightness. However, the desired brightness of 10/sup 5/ A/(cm/sup 2/-rad/sup 2/) was not achieved in these experiments. This report contains a discussion of the cathodes used, the diode geometries employed, the diagnostics, the typical characteristics of a single beam experiment, and the characteristics of the collimator used to measure the brightness. The entire ensemble of brightness data is presented and broken down into classes of experiments. In addition, the results of an EBQ calculation of one diode geometry are discussed, and differences between the results of similar experiments on ETA and ATA are noted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  3. Experience in using workstations as hosts in an accelerator control environment

    SciTech Connect

    Abola, A.; Casella, R.; Clifford, T.; Hoff, L.; Katz, R.; Kennell, S.; Mandell, S.; McBreen, E.; Weygand, D.P.

    1987-03-01

    A new control system has been used for light ion acceleration at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The control system uses Apollo workstations in the dual role of console hardware computer and controls system host. It has been found that having a powerful dedicated CPU with a demand paging virtual memory OS featuring strong interprocess communication, mapped memory shared files, shared code, and multi-window capabilities, allows us to provide an efficient operation environment in which users may view and manage several control processes simultaneously. The same features which make workstations good console computers also provide an outstanding platform for code development. The software for the system, consisting of about 30K lines of ''C'' code, was developed on schedule, ready for light ion commissioning. System development is continuing with work being done on applications programs.

  4. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  5. Isentropic Compression Experiments Performed By LLNL On Energetic Material Samples Using The Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Reisman, D B; Forbes, J W; Hare, D E; Garcia, F; Uphaus, T M; Elsholz, A J; Tarver, C M; Eggert, J H

    2007-10-25

    Several experiments have been conducted by LLNL researchers using isentropic compression experiments (ICE) on energetic materials as samples from Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01) to Fiscal Year 2005 (FY05). Over this span of time, advancements of the experimental techniques and modeling of the results have evolved to produce improved results. This report documents the experiments that have been performed, provides details of the results generated, and modeling and analysis advances to fully understand the results. Publications on the topics by the various principal investigators (PI's) are detailed in the Appendices for quick reference for the work as it progressed.

  6. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium: Plant layout study and related design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, B.S.; Fontana, M.H.; Krakowski, R.A.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Williamson, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In preparation for and in support of a detailed R and D Plan for the Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium, an ABC Plant Layout Study was conducted at the level of a pre-conceptual engineering design. The plant layout is based on an adaptation of the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) detailed conceptual design that was completed in the early 1070s. Although the ABC Plant Layout Study included the Accelerator Equipment as an essential element, the engineering assessment focused primarily on the Target; Primary System (blanket and all systems containing plutonium-bearing fuel salt); the Heat-Removal System (secondary-coolant-salt and supercritical-steam systems); Chemical Processing; Operation and Maintenance; Containment and Safety; and Instrumentation and Control systems. Although constrained primarily to a reflection of an accelerator-driven (subcritical) variant of MSBR system, unique features and added flexibilities of the ABC suggest improved or alternative approaches to each of the above-listed subsystems; these, along with the key technical issues in need of resolution through a detailed R&D plan for ABC are described on the bases of the ``strawman`` or ``point-of-departure`` plant layout that resulted from this study.

  7. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  8. A Framework for 3D Model-Based Visual Tracking Using a GPU-Accelerated Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Capson, D W

    2012-01-01

    A novel framework for acceleration of particle filtering approaches to 3D model-based, markerless visual tracking in monocular video is described. Specifically, we present a methodology for partitioning and mapping the computationally expensive weight-update stage of a particle filter to a graphics processing unit (GPU) to achieve particle- and pixel-level parallelism. Nvidia CUDA and Direct3D are employed to harness the massively parallel computational power of modern GPUs for simulation (3D model rendering) and evaluation (segmentation, feature extraction, and weight calculation) of hundreds of particles at high speeds. The proposed framework addresses the computational intensity that is intrinsic to all particle filter approaches, including those that have been modified to minimize the number of particles required for a particular task. Performance and tracking quality results for rigid object and articulated hand tracking experiments demonstrate markerless, model-based visual tracking on consumer-grade graphics hardware with pixel-level accuracy up to 95 percent at 60+ frames per second. The framework accelerates particle evaluation up to 49 times over a comparable CPU-only implementation, providing an increased particle count while maintaining real-time frame rates. PMID:21301027

  9. Monte Carlo-based fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction method accelerated by a cluster of graphic processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Guotao; Gong, Hui; Deng, Yong; Fu, Jianwei; Luo, Qingming

    2011-02-01

    High-speed fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction for 3-D heterogeneous media is still one of the most challenging problems in diffusive optical fluorescence imaging. In this paper, we propose a fast FMT reconstruction method that is based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and accelerated by a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs). Based on the Message Passing Interface standard, we modified the MC code for fast FMT reconstruction, and different Green's functions representing the flux distribution in media are calculated simultaneously by different GPUs in the cluster. A load-balancing method was also developed to increase the computational efficiency. By applying the Fréchet derivative, a Jacobian matrix is formed to reconstruct the distribution of the fluorochromes using the calculated Green's functions. Phantom experiments have shown that only 10 min are required to get reconstruction results with a cluster of 6 GPUs, rather than 6 h with a cluster of multiple dual opteron CPU nodes. Because of the advantages of high accuracy and suitability for 3-D heterogeneity media with refractive-index-unmatched boundaries from the MC simulation, the GPU cluster-accelerated method provides a reliable approach to high-speed reconstruction for FMT imaging.

  10. An Experimental Study on the Fabrication of Glass-based Acceleration Sensor Body Using Micro Powder Blasting Method

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Sam; Yun, Dae-Jin; Cho, Myeong-Woo; Shin, Bong-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of the micro powder blasting technique for the micro fabrication of sensor structures using the Pyrex glass to replace the existing silicon-based acceleration sensor fabrication processes. As the preliminary experiments, the effects of the blasting pressure, the mass flow rate of abrasive and the number of nozzle scanning times on erosion depth of the Pyrex and the soda lime glasses were examined. From the experimental results, optimal blasting conditions were selected for the Pyrex glass machining. The dimensions of the designed glass sensor was 1.7×1.7×0.6mm for the vibrating mass, and 2.9×0.7×0.2mm for the cantilever beam. The machining results showed that the dimensional errors of the machined glass sensor ranged from 3 μm in minimum to 20 μm in maximum. These results imply that the micro powder blasting method can be applied for the micromachining of glass-based acceleration sensors to replace the exiting method.

  11. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  12. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  13. A computational study of dielectric photonic-crystal-based accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C. A.

    Future particle accelerator cavities may use dielectric photonic crystals to reduce harmful wakefields and increase the accelerating electric field (or gradient). Reduced wakefields are predicted based on the bandgap property of some photonic crystals (i.e. frequency-selective reflection/transmission). Larger accelerating gradients are predicted based on certain dielectrics' strong resistance to electrical breakdown. Using computation, this thesis investigated a hybrid design of a 2D sapphire photonic crystal and traditional copper conducting cavity. The goals were to test the claim of reduced wakefields and, in general, judge the effectiveness of such structures as practical accelerating cavities. In the process, we discovered the following: (1) resonant cavities in truncated photonic crystals may confine radiation weakly compared to conducting cavities (depending on the level of truncation); however, confinement can be dramatically increased through optimizations that break lattice symmetry (but retain certain rotational symmetries); (2) photonic crystal cavities do not ideally reduce wakefields; using band structure calculations, we found that wakefields are increased by flat portions of the frequency dispersion (where the waves have vanishing group velocities). A complete comparison was drawn between the proposed photonic crystal cavities and the copper cavities for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); CLIC is one of the candidates for a future high-energy electron-positron collider that will study in greater detail the physics learned at the Large Hadron Collider. We found that the photonic crystal cavity, when compared to the CLIC cavity: (1) can lower maximum surface magnetic fields on conductors (growing evidence suggests this limits accelerating gradients by inducing electrical breakdown); (2) shows increased transverse dipole wakefields but decreased longitudinal monopole wakefields; and (3) exhibits lower accelerating efficiencies (unless

  14. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a short RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.

  15. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a shortmore » RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.« less

  16. Three dimensional gait analysis using wearable acceleration and gyro sensors based on quaternion calculations.

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Miyagawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for three dimensional gait analysis using wearable sensors and quaternion calculations. Seven sensor units consisting of a tri-axial acceleration and gyro sensors, were fixed to the lower limbs. The acceleration and angular velocity data of each sensor unit were measured during level walking. The initial orientations of the sensor units were estimated using acceleration data during upright standing position and the angular displacements were estimated afterwards using angular velocity data during gait. Here, an algorithm based on quaternion calculation was implemented for orientation estimation of the sensor units. The orientations of the sensor units were converted to the orientations of the body segments by a rotation matrix obtained from a calibration trial. Body segment orientations were then used for constructing a three dimensional wire frame animation of the volunteers during the gait. Gait analysis was conducted on five volunteers, and results were compared with those from a camera-based motion analysis system. Comparisons were made for the joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal plane. The average RMSE and correlation coefficient (CC) were 10.14 deg and 0.98, 7.88 deg and 0.97, 9.75 deg and 0.78 for the hip, knee and ankle flexion angles, respectively. PMID:23877128

  17. Successes and lessons learned: How to accelerate the base closure process

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, V.C.; Stoll, R.

    1994-12-31

    Naval Station Puget Sound, Seattle, was nominated for closure by the Base Closure Commission in 1991 (BRAC II) and will be transferred in September of 1995. Historic activities have resulted in petroleum-related environmental issues. Unlike many bases being closed, the politically sensitive issues are not the economics of job losses. Because homeless housing is expected to be included in the selected reuse plan, the primary concerns of the public are reduced real estate values and public safety. In addition to a reuse plan adopted by the Seattle City Council, the Muckleshoot Indian tribe has also submitted an alternative reuse plan to the Navy. Acceleration methods described in this paper include methods for beginning the environmental impact statement (EIS) process before reuse plans are finalized; tracking development of engineering alternatives in parallel with environmental investigations; using field screening data to begin developing plans and specifications for remediation, instead of waiting 6 weeks for analytical results and data validation; using efficient communication techniques to facilitate accelerated review of technical documents by the BCT; expediting removal actions and performing ``cleanups incidental to investigation``; and effectively facilitating members of the Restoration Advisory Board with divergent points of view. This paper will describe acceleration methods that proved to be effective and methods that could be modified to be more effective at other sites.

  18. A compact ion source and accelerator based on a piezoelectric driver

    SciTech Connect

    Norgard, P.; Kovaleski, S. D.; VanGordon, J. A.; Baxter, E. A.; Gall, B. B.; Kwon, Jae Wan; Kim, Baek Hyun; Dale, G. E.

    2013-04-19

    Compact ion sources and accelerators using piezoelectric devices for the production of energetic ion beams are being evaluated. A coupled source-accelerator is being tested as a neutron source to be incorporated into oil-well logging diagnostics. Two different ion sources are being investigated, including a piezoelectric transformer-based plasma source and a silicon-based field ion source. The piezoelectric transformer plasma ion source uses a cylindrical, resonantly driven piezoelectric crystal to produce high voltage inside a confined volume filled with low pressure deuterium gas. The plasma generated in the confined chamber is ejected through a small aperture into an evacuated drift region. The silicon field ion source uses localized electric field enhancement produced by an array of sharp emitters etched into a silicon blank to produce ions through field desorption ionization. A second piezoelectric device of a different design is used to generate an accelerating potential on the order of 130 kV; this potential is applied to a deuterated target plate positioned perpendicular to the ion stream produced by either plasma source. This paper discusses the results obtained by the individual components as they relate to the final neutron source.

  19. Three Dimensional Gait Analysis Using Wearable Acceleration and Gyro Sensors Based on Quaternion Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Miyagawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for three dimensional gait analysis using wearable sensors and quaternion calculations. Seven sensor units consisting of a tri-axial acceleration and gyro sensors, were fixed to the lower limbs. The acceleration and angular velocity data of each sensor unit were measured during level walking. The initial orientations of the sensor units were estimated using acceleration data during upright standing position and the angular displacements were estimated afterwards using angular velocity data during gait. Here, an algorithm based on quaternion calculation was implemented for orientation estimation of the sensor units. The orientations of the sensor units were converted to the orientations of the body segments by a rotation matrix obtained from a calibration trial. Body segment orientations were then used for constructing a three dimensional wire frame animation of the volunteers during the gait. Gait analysis was conducted on five volunteers, and results were compared with those from a camera-based motion analysis system. Comparisons were made for the joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal plane. The average RMSE and correlation coefficient (CC) were 10.14 deg and 0.98, 7.88 deg and 0.97, 9.75 deg and 0.78 for the hip, knee and ankle flexion angles, respectively. PMID:23877128

  20. The Berkeley accelerator space effects facility (BASE) - A newmission for the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    2005-09-06

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the U.S. Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the Cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator and Space Effects (BASE) facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 AMeV ''cocktail'' of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  1. Radiative damping and electron beam dynamics in plasma-based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Schroeder, C B; Shadwick, B A; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2006-08-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on electron beam dynamics are studied in the context of plasma-based accelerators. Electrons accelerated in a plasma channel undergo transverse betatron oscillations due to strong focusing forces. These oscillations lead to emission by the electrons of synchrotron radiation, with a corresponding energy loss that affects the beam properties. An analytical model for the single particle orbits and beam moments including the classical radiation reaction force is derived and compared to the results of a particle transport code. Since the betatron amplitude depends on the initial transverse position of the electron, the resulting radiation can increase the relative energy spread of the beam to significant levels (e.g., several percent). This effect can be diminished by matching the beam into the channel, which could require micron sized beam radii for typical values of the beam emittance and plasma density. PMID:17025550

  2. Generating intense fully coherent soft x-ray radiation based on a laser-plasma accelerator.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Xiang, Dao; Deng, Haixiao; Huang, Dazhang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-06-01

    Laser-plasma based accelerator has the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of future x-ray light sources to the university-laboratory scale. However, the large energy spread of the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam may hinder the way for short wavelength free-electron laser generation. In this paper, we propose a novel method for directly imprinting strong coherent micro-bunching on the electron beam with large intrinsic energy spread by using a wavefront-tilted conventional optical laser beam and a weak dipole magnet. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate that this technique can be used for the generation of fully coherent femtosecond soft x-ray radiation at gigawatts level with a very short undulator. PMID:26072855

  3. Vibrotactile masking experiments reveal accelerated somatosensory processing in congenitally blind Braille readers

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Ye, Amanda J.; Lisak, Joy A.; Vargas, Maria G.; Goldreich, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Braille reading is a demanding task that requires the identification of rapidly varying tactile patterns. During proficient reading, neighboring characters impact the fingertip at about 100-ms intervals, and adjacent raised dots within a character at 50-ms intervals. Because the brain requires time to interpret afferent sensorineural activity, among other reasons, tactile stimuli separated by such short temporal intervals pose a challenge to perception. How, then, do proficient Braille readers successfully interpret inputs arising from their fingertips at such rapid rates? We hypothesized that somatosensory perceptual consolidation occurs more rapidly in proficient Braille readers. If so, Braille readers should outperform sighted participants on masking tasks, which demand rapid perceptual processing, but would not necessarily outperform the sighted on tests of simple vibrotactile sensitivity. To investigate, we conducted two-interval forced-choice vibrotactile detection, amplitude discrimination, and masking tasks on the index fingertips of 89 sighted and 57 profoundly blind humans. Sighted and blind participants had similar unmasked detection (25-ms target tap) and amplitude discrimination (compared to 100-micron reference tap) thresholds, but congenitally blind Braille readers, the fastest readers among the blind participants, exhibited significantly less masking than the sighted (masker: 50-Hz, 50-micron; target-masker delays ±50 and ±100 ms). Indeed, Braille reading speed correlated significantly and specifically with masking task performance, and in particular with the backward masking decay time constant. We conclude that vibrotactile sensitivity is unchanged, but that perceptual processing is accelerated in congenitally blind Braille readers. PMID:20980584

  4. An OpenACC-Based Unified Programming Model for Multi-accelerator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungwon; Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel SPMD programming model of OpenACC. Our model integrates the different granularities of parallelism from vector-level parallelism to node-level parallelism into a single, unified model based on OpenACC. It allows programmers to write programs for multiple accelerators using a uniform programming model whether they are in shared or distributed memory systems. We implement a prototype of our model and evaluate its performance with a GPU-based supercomputer using three benchmark applications.

  5. Physical activity recognition based on rotated acceleration data using quaternion in sedentary behavior: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y E; Choi, W H; Shin, T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests a physical activity assessment method based on quaternion. To reduce user inconvenience, we measured the activity using a mobile device which is not put on fixed position. Recognized results were verified with various machine learning algorithms, such as neural network (multilayer perceptron), decision tree (J48), SVM (support vector machine) and naive bayes classifier. All algorithms have shown over 97% accuracy including decision tree (J48), which recognized the activity with 98.35% accuracy. As a result, physical activity assessment method based on rotated acceleration using quaternion can classify sedentary behavior with more accuracy without considering devices' position and orientation. PMID:25571109

  6. The Energetic Particles Acceleration, Composition, and Transport (EPACT) experiment on the ISTP/wind spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Ramaty, R.; Mason, G. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Forman, M. A.; Webber, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    The EPACT experiment will measure abundances, spectra, and angular distributions of particles from 20 keV/amu to 500 MeV/amu. At high energies, isotopes will be resolved up through Z = 26, at intermediate energies elements with Z between 1 and 82 will be observed, and at low energies element abundances above Z = 2 will be resolved for the first time.

  7. The Energetic Particles Acceleration, Composition, and Transport (EPACT) experiment on the ISTP/wind spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, D. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Ramaty, R.; Mason, G. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Forman, M. A.; Webber, W. R.

    1990-03-01

    The EPACT experiment will measure abundances, spectra, and angular distributions of particles from 20 keV/amu to 500 MeV/amu. At high energies, isotopes will be resolved up through Z = 26, at intermediate energies elements with Z between 1 and 82 will be observed, and at low energies element abundances above Z = 2 will be resolved for the first time.

  8. A cell-based study on pedestrian acceleration and overtaking in a transfer station corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Xuemei; Ran, Bin

    2013-04-01

    Pedestrian speed in a transfer station corridor is faster than usual and sometimes running can be found among some of them. In this paper, pedestrians are divided into two categories. The first one is aggressive, and the other is conservative. Aggressive pedestrians weaving their way through crowd in the corridor are the study object of this paper. During recent decades, much attention has been paid to the pedestrians' behavior, such as overtaking (also deceleration) and collision avoidance, and that continues in this paper. After sufficiently analyzing the characteristics of pedestrian flow in transfer station corridor, a cell-based model is presented in this paper, including the acceleration (also deceleration) and overtaking analysis. Acceleration (also deceleration) in a corridor is fixed according to Newton's Law and then speed calculated with a kinematic formula is discretized into cells based on the fuzzy logic. After the speed is updated, overtaking is analyzed based on updated speed and force explicitly, compared to rule-based models, which herein we call implicit ones. During the analysis of overtaking, a threshold value to determine the overtaking direction is introduced. Actually, model in this paper is a two-step one. The first step is to update speed, which is the cells the pedestrian can move in one time interval and the other is to analyze the overtaking. Finally, a comparison between the rule-based cellular automata, the model in this paper and data in HCM 2000 is made to demonstrate our model can be used to achieve reasonable simulation of acceleration (also deceleration) and overtaking among pedestrians.

  9. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  10. Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Hallman, David M; Lyskov, Eugene; Hygge, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during "diverting" periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some responses may be

  11. The Coronal Physics Investigator (cpi) Experiment For Iss: A New Vision For Understanding Solar Wind Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Janzen, P. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Cranmer, S. R.; Forbes, T. G.; Isenberg, P. A.; Panasyuk, A. V.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    We propose an Explorer Mission of Opportunity program to develop and operate a large-aperture ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer called the Coronal Physics Investigator (CPI) as an attached International Space Station (ISS) payload. The primary goal of this program is to identify and characterize the physical processes that heat and accelerate the primary and secondary components of the fast and slow solar wind. Also, CPI can make key measurements needed to understand CMEs. CPI is dedicated to high spectral resolution measurements of the off-limb extended corona with far better stray light suppression than can be achieved by a conventional instrument. UVCS/SOHO allowed us to identify what additional measurements need to be made to answer the fundamental questions about how solar wind streams are produced, and CPI's next-generation capabilities were designed specifically to make those measurements. Compared to previous instruments, CPI provides unprecedented sensitivity, a wavelength range extending from 25.7 to 126 nm, higher temporal resolution, and the capability to measure line profiles of He II, N V, Ne VII, Ne VIII, Si VIII, S IX, Ar VIII, Ca IX, and Fe X, never before seen in coronal holes above 1.3 solar radii. CPI will constrain the properties and effects of coronal MHD waves by (1) observing many ions over a large range of charge and mass,(2) providing simultaneous measurements of proton and electron temperatures to probe turbulent dissipation mechanisms, and (3) measuring amplitudes of low-frequency compressive fluctuations. CPI is an internally occulted ultraviolet coronagraph that provides the required high sensitivity without the need for a deployable boom, and with all technically mature hardware including an ICCD detector. A highly experienced Explorer and ISS contractor, L-3 Com Integrated Optical Systems and Com Systems East will provide the tracking and pointing system as well as the instrument, and the integration to the ISS.

  12. Can Cognitive Activities during Breaks in Repetitive Manual Work Accelerate Recovery from Fatigue? A Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Hallman, David M.; Lyskov, Eugene; Hygge, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during “diverting” periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some responses may

  13. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  14. High Transformer ratios in collinear wakefield accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanreykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous experiment that successfully demonstrated wakefield transformer ratio enhancement in a 13.625 GHz dielectric-loaded collinear wakefield accelerator using the ramped bunch train technique, we present here a redesigned experimental scheme for even higher enhancement of the efficiency of this accelerator. Design of a collinear wakefield device with a transformer ratio R2, is presented. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2. To match the wavelength of the fundamental mode of the wakefield with the bunch length (sigmaz=2 mm) of the new Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) drive gun (where the experiment will be performed), a 26.625 GHz dielectric based accelerating structure is required. This transformer ratio enhancement technique based on our dielectric-loaded waveguide design will result in a compact, high efficiency accelerating structures for future wakefield accelerators.

  15. A high resolution, broad energy acceptance spectrometer for laser wakefield acceleration experiments.

    PubMed

    Sears, Christopher M S; Cuevas, Sofia Benavides; Schramm, Ulrich; Schmid, Karl; Buck, Alexander; Habs, Dieter; Krausz, Ferenc; Veisz, Laszlo

    2010-07-01

    Laser wakefield experiments present a unique challenge in measuring the resulting electron energy properties due to the large energy range of interest, typically several 100 MeV, and the large electron beam divergence and pointing jitter >1 mrad. In many experiments the energy resolution and accuracy are limited by the convolved transverse spot size and pointing jitter of the beam. In this paper we present an electron energy spectrometer consisting of two magnets designed specifically for laser wakefield experiments. In the primary magnet the field is produced by permanent magnets. A second optional electromagnet can be used to obtain better resolution for electron energies above 75 MeV. The spectrometer has an acceptance of 2.5-400 MeV (E(max)/E(min)>100) with a resolution of better than 1% rms for electron energies above 25 MeV. This high resolution is achieved by refocusing electrons in the energy plane and without any postprocessing image deconvolution. Finally, the spectrometer employs two complimentary detection mechanisms: (1) absolutely calibrated scintillation screens imaged by cameras outside the vacuum chamber and (2) an array of scintillating fibers coupled to a low-noise charge-coupled device. PMID:20687714

  16. A high resolution, broad energy acceptance spectrometer for laser wakefield acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Christopher M. S.; Cuevas, Sofia Benavides; Veisz, Laszlo; Schramm, Ulrich; Schmid, Karl; Buck, Alexander; Habs, Dieter; Krausz, Ferenc

    2010-07-15

    Laser wakefield experiments present a unique challenge in measuring the resulting electron energy properties due to the large energy range of interest, typically several 100 MeV, and the large electron beam divergence and pointing jitter >1 mrad. In many experiments the energy resolution and accuracy are limited by the convolved transverse spot size and pointing jitter of the beam. In this paper we present an electron energy spectrometer consisting of two magnets designed specifically for laser wakefield experiments. In the primary magnet the field is produced by permanent magnets. A second optional electromagnet can be used to obtain better resolution for electron energies above 75 MeV. The spectrometer has an acceptance of 2.5-400 MeV (E{sub max}/E{sub min}>100) with a resolution of better than 1% rms for electron energies above 25 MeV. This high resolution is achieved by refocusing electrons in the energy plane and without any postprocessing image deconvolution. Finally, the spectrometer employs two complimentary detection mechanisms: (1) absolutely calibrated scintillation screens imaged by cameras outside the vacuum chamber and (2) an array of scintillating fibers coupled to a low-noise charge-coupled device.

  17. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P.; Koppelman, David M.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J.; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  18. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  19. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  20. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  1. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  2. Proposed method for internal electron therapy based on high-intensity laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Michal; Barkai, Uri; Gannot, Israel

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods to treat cancer. However, due to the propagation pattern of high-energy photons in tissue and their inability to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues, healthy tissues may also be damaged, causing undesired side effects. A possible method for internal electron therapy, based on laser acceleration of electrons inside the patient's body, is suggested. In this method, an optical waveguide, optimized for high intensities, is used to transmit the laser radiation and accelerate electrons toward the tumor. The radiation profile can be manipulated in order to create a patient-specific radiation treatment profile by changing the laser characteristics. The propagation pattern of electrons in tissues minimizes the side effects caused to healthy tissues. A simulation was developed to demonstrate the use of this method, calculating the trajectories of the accelerated electron as a function of laser properties. The simulation was validated by comparison to theory, showing a good fit for laser intensities of up to 2×1020 (W/cm2), and was then used to calculate suggested treatment profiles for two tumor test cases (with and without penetration to the tumor). The results show that treatment profiles can be designed to cover tumor area with minimal damage to adjacent tissues.

  3. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks. PMID:21459008

  4. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  5. Doppler Broadening Analysis of Steel Specimens Using Accelerator Based In Situ Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Makarashvili, V.; Wells, D. P.; Roy, A. K.

    2009-03-10

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) techniques can be utilized as a sensitive probe of defects in materials. Studying these microscopic defects is very important for a number of industries in order to predict material failure or structural integrity. We have been developing gamma-induced pair-production techniques to produce positrons in thick samples ({approx}4-40 g/cm{sup 2}, or {approx}0.5-5 cm in steel). These techniques are called 'Accelerator-based Gamma-induced Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy'(AG-PAS). We have begun testing the capabilities of this technique for imaging of defect densities in thick structural materials. As a first step, a linear accelerator (LINAC) was employed to produce photon beams by stopping 15 MeV electrons in a 1 mm thick tungsten converter. The accelerator is capable of operating with 30-60 ns pulse width, up to 200 mA peak current at 1 kHz repetition rate. The highly collimated bremsstrahlung beam impinged upon our steel tensile specimens, after traveling through a 1.2 m thick concrete wall. Annihilation radiation was detected by a well-shielded and collimated high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). Conventional Doppler broadening spectrometry (DBS) was performed to determine S, W and T parameters for our samples.

  6. An epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on an ESQ-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Phillips, T.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Neutrons will be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction at proton energies of about 2.5 MeV with subsequent moderation and filtering for shaping epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. Moderator, filter, and shielding assemblies have been modeled using MCNP. Head-phantom dose distributions have been calculated using the treatment planning software BNCT{_}RTPE. The simulation studies have shown that a proton beam current of {approximately} 20 mA is required to deliver high quality brain treatments in about 40 minutes. The results also indicate that significantly higher doses can be delivered to deep-seated tumors in comparison to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor beam. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents desired. A novel power supply utilizing the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the ESQ-accelerator to deliver proton beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A lithium target has been designed which consists of a thin layer of lithium on an aluminum backing. Closely spaced, narrow coolant passages cut into the aluminum allow the removal of a 50kW heat-load by convective water cooling. The system under development is suitable for hospital installation and has the potential for providing neutron beams superior to reactor sources.

  7. ICA-based artefact and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved Resting State Network imaging

    PubMed Central

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F.; Auerbach, Edward J.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E.; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E.; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures were assessed using timeseries (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For timeseries and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition

  8. [AN EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE BASED ON CLICKERS].

    PubMed

    García Rodríguez, Jose Juan; Lara Domínguez, Pilar A; Torres Pérez, Luis Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Active learning or self-learning increases the student's participation and commitment to his studies; these conditions are necessary to improve academic performance. An intervention has been designed based on the experience in the use of clickers in other universities, but without the actual technology. This work has been performed in the School of Nursing affiliated to the University of Malaga (UMA) on students enrolled in their second year of Degree in Adult Nursing Course I. Three sessions of multiple-choice questions were scheduled on the subject "distance learning" in which master classes were not taught. The answers were collected on paper templates. We wanted to determine the degree of relationship between the attendance of sessions and the results obtained by students in the final examination of the subject, as well as, the questions dedicated to assess the "distance learning" matter. The results support a significant statistical difference in the correct answers by students according to the number of sessions attended. These differences are highest among students who did not attend any session and those who attended the three planned sessions. PMID:26540897

  9. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  10. Atomic oxygen ground-based accelerated tests of spacecraft materials and structures for long-term LEO missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Smirnova, Tatyana; Shumov, Andrey

    Spacecraft materials are degradated during long-term low earth orbit (LEO) flight. The Internation Space Station (ISS) is planed to be prolonged the term of action up to 20-25 years. To specify so long life one requires a validation of spacecraft material behaviour conservation for the period. The LEO environment includes atomic oxygen (AO) destructive incident flow. The appropriate AO fluence is proposed to be as high as 10E22-10E23 atom O/sq cm. The simulative ground-based test is evident to be acceptable if its duration is not too long usually under several hundreds of hours. In that case the rate of the test acceleration exceeds 100-200. One way to accelerate test is to increase oxygen particles energy. We test materials under oxygen plasma beam, formed by a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator, with the oxygen particle energy of 20 -30 eV. In this way we determine an AO effective fluence by a kapton equivalent technique. The beam varies from LEO incident flow by energy, flux and rates of the oxygen dissociation / ionization/ excitation. To evaluate the test adequacy we measured and compared with LEO data erosion yields of a number of polymer materials, applied on spacecraft external surfaces. There were: polyimide (kapton), polyamide (nylon), polyethylene, polyvinyl fluoride (tedlar), polysteren, polymethyl methacrylate, epoxy, polyethylene terephthalate (mylar), graphite. Their relative erosion yields, measured and normalized by polyimide in this way, practically coincide with the data of flight experiments on the ISS. The results ground to use our plasma mode for accelerated tests of spacecraft material durability for long-term LEO flights. We tested quite a number of polymer-based materials and structures usable on ISS and another LEO spacecrafts. The effective AO fluencies ran up to 3,5 10E22 atom O/sq cm corresponding to the ISS flight duration about 20 years. We studied material behaviors like mass and thickness losses, erosion yield, surface morphology

  11. Searching for Physics beyond the Standard Model with Accelerator Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, William C

    2008-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations . The first MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (E{sub {nu}} > 475 MeV), although a sizeable excess is observed at lower energies (E{sub {nu}}< 475 MeV). The lack of a significant excess at higher energies allows MiniBooNE to rule out simple 2 - {nu} oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the low-energy excess is presently unexplained. Additional antineutrino data and NuMI data may allow the collaboration to determine whether the excess is due, for example, to a neutrino neutral-current radiative interaction or to neutrino oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. If the excess is consistent with being due to sterile neutrinos, then future experiments at FNAL (BooNE) or ORNL (OscSNS) could prove their existence.

  12. Additive effect of BPA and Gd-DTPA for application in accelerator-based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F; Yamamoto, T; Nakai, K; Zaboronok, A; Matsumura, A

    2015-12-01

    Because of its fast metabolism gadolinium as a commercial drug was not considered to be suitable for neutron capture therapy. We studied additive effect of gadolinium and boron co-administration using colony forming assay. As a result, the survival of tumor cells with additional 5 ppm of Gd-DTPA decreased to 1/10 compared to the cells with boron only. Using gadolinium to increase the effect of BNCT instead of additional X-ray irradiation might be beneficial, as such combination complies with the short-time irradiation regimen at the accelerator-based neutron source. PMID:26242560

  13. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  14. Experimenters' reference based upon Skylab experiment management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined and amplified, as appropriate. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  15. Simultaneous processing of photographic and accelerator array data from sled impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, M. E.

    1982-12-01

    A Quaternion-Kalman filter model is derived to simultaneously analyze accelerometer array and photographic data from sled impact experiments. Formulas are given for the quaternion representation of rotations, the propagation of dynamical states and their partial derivatives, the observables and their partial derivatives, and the Kalman filter update of the state given the observables. The observables are accelerometer and tachometer velocity data of the sled relative to the track, linear accelerometer array and photographic data of the subject relative to the sled, and ideal angular accelerometer data. The quaternion constraints enter through perfect constraint observations and normalization after a state update. Lateral and fore-aft impact tests are analyzed with FORTRAN IV software written using the formulas of this report.

  16. Data quality management system (DQMS) for BAC detector in the ZEUS experiment at the HERA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszczak, Zbigniew; Jezynski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Kuthan, Marcin; Bigos, Grzegorz; Gierej, Artur

    2003-10-01

    The paper presents functional structure of database system of data measurement quality for BAC detector in ZEUS experiment. The system collects diagnostic and experimental data. Diagnostic data are: work parameters of the detector and electronics/photonics, tests of electronic/photonic blocks. These data are archived for certain period of time. The quality of current data collection process is estimated using these archived data. The result of such estimation is generated in a form of status map of the detector. Such maps, describing status of the hardware, are fundamental for elementary particle analysis by the calorimeter. The DAQ system, collecting data to the database, estimates data quality on-line during transmission and writing. This mechanism of fast on-line data quality management leads to early discoveries of detector work irregularities and faults.

  17. Monitoring extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex for "energy + transmutation" experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Vasil'ev, S. E.; Vishnevskiy, A. V.; Vladimirova, N. M.; Kudashkin, I. V.; Makan'kin, A. M.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    A monitoring system for measuring absolute intensity and the space—time structure of extracted beams of Nuclotron based on ionization and activation methods has been created and tested. The monitoring system provides a measurement of the absolute intensity of extracted beams with a precision of 10% and beam position with a precision of 0.5 mm.

  18. OpenARC: Extensible OpenACC Compiler Framework for Directive-Based Accelerator Programming Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Directive-based, accelerator programming models such as OpenACC have arisen as an alternative solution to program emerging Scalable Heterogeneous Computing (SHC) platforms. However, the increased complexity in the SHC systems incurs several challenges in terms of portability and productivity. This paper presents an open-sourced OpenACC compiler, called OpenARC, which serves as an extensible research framework to address those issues in the directive-based accelerator programming. This paper explains important design strategies and key compiler transformation techniques needed to implement the reference OpenACC compiler. Moreover, this paper demonstrates the efficacy of OpenARC as a research framework for directive-based programming study, by proposing and implementing OpenACC extensions in the OpenARC framework to 1) support hybrid programming of the unified memory and separate memory and 2) exploit architecture-specific features in an abstract manner. Porting thirteen standard OpenACC programs and three extended OpenACC programs to CUDA GPUs shows that OpenARC performs similarly to a commercial OpenACC compiler, while it serves as a high-level research framework.

  19. Acceleration of stochastic seismic inversion in OpenCL-based heterogeneous platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreirinha, Tomás; Nunes, Rúben; Azevedo, Leonardo; Soares, Amílcar; Pratas, Frederico; Tomás, Pedro; Roma, Nuno

    2015-05-01

    Seismic inversion is an established approach to model the geophysical characteristics of oil and gas reservoirs, being one of the basis of the decision making process in the oil&gas exploration industry. However, the required accuracy levels can only be attained by dealing and processing significant amounts of data, often leading to consequently long execution times. To overcome this issue and to allow the development of larger and higher resolution elastic models of the subsurface, a novel parallelization approach is herein proposed targeting the exploitation of GPU-based heterogeneous systems based on a unified OpenCL programming framework, to accelerate a state of art Stochastic Seismic Amplitude versus Offset Inversion algorithm. To increase the parallelization opportunities while ensuring model fidelity, the proposed approach is based on a careful and selective relaxation of some spatial dependencies. Furthermore, to take into consideration the heterogeneity of modern computing systems, usually composed of several and different accelerating devices, multi-device parallelization strategies are also proposed. When executed in a dual-GPU system, the proposed approach allows reducing the execution time in up to 30 times, without compromising the quality of the obtained models.

  20. UCLA Neptune Facility for Advanced Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Clayton, Christopher E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Rosenzweig, James B.; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2004-12-07

    The Neptune Laboratory at UCLA is being used for exploring concepts useful for advanced accelerators. This facility hosts a TW-class CO2 laser system and a high-brightness photoinjector producing a 14 MeV electron beam. The goal for the laboratory is to carry out experiments on high-gradient acceleration of externally injected electrons in both laser-driven relativistic plasma waves and EM laser field in vacuum. Experiments on plasma beat-wave acceleration using a prebunched electron beam, a high-energy gain 10-{mu}m inverse free electron laser accelerator, longitudinal electron beam shaping and laser based light-sources are planned.