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Sample records for accelerator beam current

  1. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  2. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M.; Clifft, Benny E.; Bollinger, Lowell M.

    1995-01-01

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  3. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  4. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  5. Limiting electron beam current for cyclic induction acceleration in a constant guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanunnikov, V.N.

    1982-09-01

    Theoretical relations are derived for the limiting beam current in a cyclic induction accelerator (CIA) with a constant guide field. The calculations are in agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that the limiting average beam current in a CIA is of the order of 100 microamperes, i.e., the level attained in microtrons and linear accelerators. The CIA may find industrial applications.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

  7. A NEW DIFFERENTIAL AND ERRANT BEAM CURRENT MONITOR FOR THE SNS* ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Peters, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    A new Differential and errant Beam Current Monitor (DBCM) is being implemented for both the Spallation Neutron Source's Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) and the Super Conducting Linac (SCL) accelerator sections. These new current monitors will abort the beam when the difference between two toroidal pickups exceeds a threshold. The MEBT DBCM will protect the MEBT chopper target, while the SCL DBCM will abort beam to minimize fast beam losses in the SCL cavities. The new DBCM will also record instances of errant beam, such as beam dropouts, to assist in further optimization of the SNS Accelerator. A software Errant Beam Monitor was implemented on the regular BCM hardware to study errant beam pulses. The new system will take over this functionality and will also be able to abort beam on pulse-to-pulse variations. Because the system is based on the FlexRIO hardware and programmed in LabVIEW FPGA, it will be able to abort beam in about 5 us. This paper describes the development, implementation, and initial test results of the DBCM, as well as errant beam examples.

  8. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.

    2012-12-21

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  9. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  10. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  11. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  12. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    PubMed

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  13. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N.

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  15. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, T F; Bonini, A L; Lima, R R; Maidana, N L; Malafronte, A A; Pascholati, P R; Vanin, V R; Martins, M N

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  16. Three-dimensional simulations of high-current beams in induction accelerators with WARP3d

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1995-09-01

    For many issues relevant to acceleration and propagation of heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion, understanding the behavior of the beam requires the self-consistent inclusion of the self-fields of the beams in multiple dimensions. For these reasons, the three-dimensional simulation code WARP3d A.Friedman was developed. The code combines the particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique with a realistic description of the elements which make up an accelerator. In this paper, the general structure of the code is reviewed and details of two ongoing applications are presented along with a discussion of simulation techniques used. The most important results of this work are presented.

  17. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  18. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  19. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes work carried out on DOE contract number DE-AC02-80ER10569 during the period December 15, 1979 to May 31, 1992. The original purpose of this research was to investigate the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three major objectives: development of a suitable ion injector, growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components into a suitable proof-of-principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. Work focused on the first two of these objectives. Control of the space charge waves` phase velocity was not obtained to the degree required for a working accelerator, so the project was duly terminated in favor of a program which focused on generating ultra high power microwave signals suitable for use in the next linear collider. Work done to develop suitable efficient, inexpensive, phase-stable microwave sources, with peak powers of up to 1 GW in the X band in pulses shorter than 1 ns, is described. Included are lists of the journal and conference papers resulting from this work, as well as a list of graduate students who completed their Ph.D. studies on the projects described in this report.

  20. Investigations of Beam Dynamics Issues at Current and Future Hadron Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, James; Lau, Stephen; Heinemann, Klaus; Bizzozero, David

    2015-03-12

    Final Report Abstract for DE-FG02-99ER4110, May 15, 2011- October 15, 2014 There is a synergy between the fields of Beam Dynamics (BD) in modern particle accelerators and Applied Mathematics (AMa). We have formulated significant problems in BD and have developed and applied tools within the contexts of dynamical systems, topological methods, numerical analysis and scientific computing, probability and stochastic processes, and mathematical statistics. We summarize the three main areas of our AMa work since 2011. First, we continued our study of Vlasov-Maxwell systems. Previously, we developed a state of the art algorithm and code (VM3@A) to calculate coherent synchrotron radiation in single pass systems. In this cycle we carefully analyzed the major expense, namely the integral-over-history (IOH), and developed two approaches to speed up integration. The first strategy uses a representation of the Bessel function J0 in terms of exponentials. The second relies on “local sequences” developed recently for radiation boundary conditions, which are used to reduce computational domains. Although motivated by practicality, both strategies involve interesting and rather deep analysis and approximation theory. As an alternative to VM3@A, we are integrating Maxwell’s equations by a time-stepping method, bypass- ing the IOH, using a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. DG is a generalization of Finite Element and Finite Volume methods. It is spectrally convergent, unlike the commonly used Finite Difference methods, and can handle complicated vacuum chamber geometries. We have applied this in several contexts and have obtained very nice results including an explanation of an experiment at the Canadian Light Source, where the geometry is quite complex. Second, we continued our study of spin dynamics in storage rings. There is much current and proposed activity where spin polarized beams are being used in testing the Standard Model and its modifications. Our work has focused

  1. Demonstration of Current Profile Shaping using Double Dog-Leg Emittance Exchange Beam Line at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Gwanghui; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Kim, Kwang-Je; Liu, Wanming; Namkung, Won; Piot, Philippe; Power, John; Sun, Yin-E; Whiteford, Charles; Wisniewski, Eric; Zholents, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Emittance exchange (EEX) based longitudinal current profile shaping is the one of the promising current profile shaping technique. This method can generate high quality arbitrary current profiles under the ideal conditions. The double dog-leg EEX beam line was recently installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) to explore the shaping capability and confirm the quality of this method. To demonstrate the arbitrary current profile generation, several different transverse masks are applied to generate different final current profiles. The phase space slopes and the charge of incoming beam are varied to observe and suppress the aberrations on the ideal profile. We present current profile shaping results, aberrations on the shaped profile, and its suppression.

  2. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  3. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  4. An improved pulse-line accelerator-driven, intense current-density, and high-brightness pseudospark electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    1996-02-01

    A high-voltage (200 kV), high current-density, low-emittance (23 {pi}{center_dot}mm mrd), high-brightness (8 {times} 10{sup 10} A/(mrd){sup 2}) electron beam was generated in a pseudospark chamber filled with 15 Pa nitrogen and driven by a modified pulse line accelerator. The beam ejected with {le}1-mm diameter, 2.2-kA beam current, 400-ns pulse length, and about 20 cm propagation distance. Exposure of 10 shots on the same film produced a hole of 1.6-mm diameter at 7 cm downstream of the anode, and showed its good reproducibility. After 60 shots, it was observed that almost no destructive damage traces were left on the surfaces of the various electrodes and insulators of the pseudospark discharge chamber. It was experimentally found that the quality of the pseudospark electron beam remains very high, even at high voltages (of several hundred kilovolts), similar to low voltages, and is much better than the quality of the cold-cathode electron beams.

  5. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  6. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  7. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device.

  8. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  9. Generation and control of a powerful electron-beam current in an accelerator based on a secondary-emission source and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizatsky, N. I.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Zakutin, V. V.; Reshetnyak, N. G.; Romas'ko, V. P.; Chertishchev, I. A.; Boriskin, V. N.; Dovbnya, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    An electron accelerator in which magnetron guns with secondary-emission cathodes of two types are used as a particle source is described. The electron-beam parameters are investigated in an electron energy range of 20-150 keV at a pulse length of 10-50 μs. Results of target irradiation by an electron beam are represented. The target surface structure is studied by the metallographic method, and the microhardness and strength of zirconium materials are measured. The possibility of beam current control by factors of 2.5-3.5 with various methods is shown.

  10. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-04

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  12. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  13. LEDA beam diagnostics instrumentation: Beam current measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, D.; Day, L.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Kasemir, K.-U.; Martinez, D.; Power, J. F.; Shurter, R.; Stettler, M.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7 MeV and current of 100 mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Two types of current measurements are used. The first is an AC or pulsed-current measurement which uses three LANL built toroids. They are placed in the beamline in such a way as to measure important transmission parameters and act as a differential current-loss machine protection system. The second system is a DC current measurement used to measure cw beam characteristics and uses toroids from Bergoz Inc. There are two of these systems, so they can also be used for transmission measurements. The AC system uses custom processing electronics whereas the DC system uses a modified Bergoz® electronics system. Both systems feature data acquisition via a series of custom TMS320C40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of these systems, the calibration technique, the differential current loss measurements and fast-protection processing, current droop characteristics for the AC system, and existing system noise levels. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  14. The Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Hopkins, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) consists of a long high-gradient accelerator structure (HGS) adjacent to an equal-length Free Electron Laser (FEL). In the FEL, a beam propagates through a long series of undulators. At regular intervals, waveguides couple microwave power out of the FEL into the HGS. To replenish energy given up by the FEL beam to the microwave field, induction accelerator units are placed periodically along the length of the FEL. In this manner it is expected to achieve gradients of more than 250 MV/m and thus have a serious option for a 1 TeV x 1 TeV linear collider. The state of present theoretical understanding of the TBA is presented with particular emphasis upon operation of the ''steady-state'' FEL, phase and amplitude control of the rf wave, and suppression of sideband instabilities. Experimental work has focused upon the development of a suitable HGS and the testing of this structure using the Electron Laser Facility (ELF). Description is given of a first test at ELF with a seven-cell 2..pi../3 mode structure which without preconditioning and with a not-very-good vacuum nevertheless at 35 GHz yielded an average accelerating gradient of 180 MV/m.

  15. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  16. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  17. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  18. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  19. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  20. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device.

  1. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-31

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies.

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration of polarized electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, D. V.; Andreev, N. E.; Cros, B.

    2016-11-01

    The acceleration of highly polarized electron beams are widely used in state-of-the-art high-energy physics experiments. In this work, a model for investigation of polarization dynamics of electron beams in the laser-plasma accelerator depending on the initial energy of electrons was developed and tested. To obtain the evolution of the trajectory and momentum of the electron for modeling its acceleration the wakefield structure was determined. The spin precession of the beam electron was described by Thomas-Bargman-Michel-Telegdi equations. The evolution of the electron beam polarization was investigated for zero-emittance beams with zero-energy spread.

  3. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  4. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  5. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  6. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  7. Beam break-up in the two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Travish, G.A.; Sessler, A.M.; Craig, G.D.; DeFord, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    We have studied numerically beam break-up (BBU) in the drive beam of a Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA), using transverse wakes calculated numerically using the AMOS Code. We examine only cumulative BBU due to the wake of the linear induction accelerator cavities. We do not consider regenerative BBU due to the relativistic klystron (RK) cavities. We find growth lengths of order /approximately/100 m for typical parameters. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Barnard, John J.; Faltens, Andris; Friedman, Alex; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (≥10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

  9. Ion source studies for particle beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Olsen, J.N.; Dorrell, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    High power particle beam accelerators are being developed for use in inertial confinement fusion applications. These pulsed power accelerators require sources of low atomic number ions (e.g., protons, deuterons, carbon, or lithium). The sources must be of high purity for efficient accelerator operation and proper target coupling, must have a rapid ''turn-on,'' and must be compatible with ion diode configurations under development. A particular type of source presently being investigated is the flashover ion source which generates ions by means of the vacuum flashover of an insulating anode material when the high voltage pulse arrives at the diode. We have developed an applied-magnetic-field, extraction ion diode for the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator specifically to investigate these sources. Extracted ion species are measured by means of a Thomson-parabola ion analyzer, dB/dt current monitors, and Faraday cups. Experiments have been performed to investigate the surface flashover mechanism and the effects of various dielectric source materials, anode preparation methods (including rf glow discharge cleaning), and vacuum conditions on ion species and diode operation.

  10. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  12. Tailoring accelerating beams in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2017-02-01

    An appropriate wave-front design will enable light fields that propagate along arbitrary trajectories, thus forming accelerating beams in free space. Previous strategies for designing such accelerating beams rely mainly on caustic methods, which start from diffraction integrals and deal only with two-dimensional fields. Here we introduce an alternate perspective to construct accelerating beams in phase space by designing the corresponding Wigner distribution function (WDF). We find that such a WDF-based method is capable of providing both the initial field distribution and the angular spectrum in need by projecting the WDF into the real space and the Fourier space, respectively. Moreover, this approach applies to the construction of both two- and three-dimensional fields, greatly generalizing previous caustic methods. It may therefore open a new route for construction of highly tailored accelerating beams and facilitate applications ranging from particle manipulation and trapping to optical routing as well as material processing.

  13. Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Stein, William E.; Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

  14. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  15. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W.

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  16. On the re-acceleration of bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Craig, G.D.; DeFord, J.F.; Yu, David U.L.

    1989-02-01

    We examine the re-acceleration of a bunched beam through a linear induction accelerator (LIA) cavity, with attention to the energy lost through coupling to the TM modes of the structure. We find that the energy lost at 1 kA peak current is a small fraction of the boost which the LIA is designed to impart. We discuss implications for a Relativistic Klystron or Free Electron Laser (FEL) version of the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA). 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J; Kim, S H

    2012-07-01

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  18. Laser-Bessel-Beam-Driven Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dazhi; Imasaki, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    A vacuum-laser-driven acceleration scheme using a laser Bessel beam is presented. In contrast to the conventional Gaussian beam, the Bessel beam demonstrates diffraction-free propagation, which implies the possibility of extending the effective interaction distance for a laser-electron system. In this method, the Bessel beam is truncated by annular slits to realize a series of nonsuccessive dim regions along the path of laser propagation, where the amplitude of the laser field is reduced, making the electron slightly decelerate as it travels in the decelerating phase. We analyzed the propagation characteristics of the truncated Bessel beam with scalar diffraction theory, and then introduced this approach with careful investigation of a three-stage acceleration model.

  19. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl

    2012-12-21

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  20. Prediction of back-scatter radiations to a beam monitor chamber of medical linear accelerators by use of the digitized target-current-pulse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Naoki; Kato, Hideki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Kawano, Makoto; Nishii, Yoshio; Nakamura, Masaru; Mukouyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In small-field irradiation, the back-scattered radiation (BSR) affects the counts measured with a beam monitor chamber (BMC). In general, the effect of the BSR depends on the opened-jaw size. The effect is significantly large in small-field irradiation. Our purpose in this study was to predict the effect of BSR on LINAC output accurately with an improved target-current-pulse (TCP) technique. The pulse signals were measured with a system consisting of a personal computer and a digitizer. The pulse signals were analyzed with in-house software. The measured parameters were the number of pulses, the change in the waveform and the integrated signal values of the TCPs. The TCPs were measured for various field sizes with four linear accelerators. For comparison, Yu's method in which a universal counter was used was re-examined. The results showed that the variance of the measurements by the new method was reduced to approximately 1/10 of the variance by the previous method. There was no significant variation in the number of pulses due to a change in the field size in the Varian Clinac series. However, a change in the integrated signal value was observed. This tendency was different from the result of other investigations in the past. Our prediction method is able to define the cutoff voltage for the TCP acquired by digitizer. This functionality provides the capability of clearly classifying TCPs into signals and noise. In conclusion, our TCP analysis method can predict the effect of BSR on the BMC even for small-field irradiations.

  1. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  2. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  3. A laser-plasma accelerator producing monoenergetic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Faure, J; Glinec, Y; Pukhov, A; Kiselev, S; Gordienko, S; Lefebvre, E; Rousseau, J-P; Burgy, F; Malka, V

    2004-09-30

    Particle accelerators are used in a wide variety of fields, ranging from medicine and biology to high-energy physics. The accelerating fields in conventional accelerators are limited to a few tens of MeV m(-1), owing to material breakdown at the walls of the structure. Thus, the production of energetic particle beams currently requires large-scale accelerators and expensive infrastructures. Laser-plasma accelerators have been proposed as a next generation of compact accelerators because of the huge electric fields they can sustain (>100 GeV m(-1)). However, it has been difficult to use them efficiently for applications because they have produced poor-quality particle beams with large energy spreads, owing to a randomization of electrons in phase space. Here we demonstrate that this randomization can be suppressed and that the quality of the electron beams can be dramatically enhanced. Within a length of 3 mm, the laser drives a plasma bubble that traps and accelerates plasma electrons. The resulting electron beam is extremely collimated and quasi-monoenergetic, with a high charge of 0.5 nC at 170 MeV.

  4. Collective Ion Acceleration and Electron Beam Propagation in Dielectric Guides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    PULSE 600 Under * Typical Experimental Conditions and (b) Transported Beam Current at Positions of 2 cm and 15 cm Down Guide . .3-6 3-4 Beam-Front...of the dielectric guide. A low-temperature plasma is formed at the irradiated surface of the guide by various processes , including volume breakdown...of the dielectric, surface flashover , and ionization and breakdown of desorbed gas. The ions of this plasma are accelerated electrostatically into the

  5. An Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakeman, Michael S.

    Currently particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider use RF cavities with a maximum field gradient of 50-100 MV/m to accelerate particles over long distances. A new type of plasma based accelerator called a Laser Plasma Accelerator (LPA) is being investigated at the LOASIS group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory which can sustain field gradients of 10-100 GV/m. This new type of accelerator offers the potential to create compact high energy accelerators and light sources. In order to investigate the feasibility of producing a compact light source an undulator-based electron beam diagnostic for use on the LOASIS LPA has been built and calibrated. This diagnostic relies on the principal that the spectral analysis of synchrotron radiation from an undulator can reveal properties of the electron beam such as emittance, energy and energy spread. The effects of electron beam energy spread upon the harmonics of undulator produced synchrotron radiation were derived from the equations of motion of the beam and numerically simulated. The diagnostic consists of quadrupole focusing magnets to collimate the electron beam, a 1.5 m long undulator to produce the synchrotron radiation, and a high resolution high gain XUV spectrometer to analyze the radiation. The undulator was aligned and tuned in order to maximize the flux of synchrotron radiation produced. The spectrometer was calibrated at the Advanced Light Source, with the results showing the ability to measure electron beam energy spreads at resolutions as low as 0.1% rms, a major improvement over conventional magnetic spectrometers. Numerical simulations show the ability to measure energy spreads on realistic LPA produced electron beams as well as the improvements in measurements made with the quadrupole magnets. Experimentally the quadrupoles were shown to stabilize and focus the electron beams at specific energies for their insertion into the undulator, with the eventual hope of producing an all optical

  6. Electron Beam/Converter Target Interactions in Radiographic Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J; Caporaso, G; Chambers, F; Chen, Y-J; Falabella, S; Goldin, F; Guethlein, G; Ho, D; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2003-05-27

    Linear induction accelerators used in X-ray radiography have single-pulse parameters of the order 20 MeV of electron beam energy, 2 kA of beam current, pulse lengths of 50-100 ns, and spot sizes of 1-2 mm. The thermal energy deposited in a bremsstrahlung converter target made of tantalum from such a pulse is {approx}80 kJ/cc, more than enough to bring the target material to a partially ionized state. The tail end of a single beam pulse, or any subsequent pulse in a multi-pulse train, undergoes a number of interactions with the target that can affect beam transport and radiographic performance. Positive ions extracted from the target plasma by the electron beam space charge can affect the beam focus and centroid stability. As the target expands on the inter-pulse time scale, the integrated line density of material decreases, eventually affecting the X-ray output of the system. If the target plume becomes sufficiently large, beam transport through it is affected by macroscopic charge and current neutralization effects and microscopic beam/plasma instability mechanisms. We will present a survey of some of these interactions, as well as some results of an extensive experimental and theoretical campaign to understand the practical amelioration of these effects, carried out at the ETA-II accelerator facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Beam dynamics activities at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been funded by the US Navy to build an infra-red FEL driven by an energy-recovering compact SRF-based linear accelerator. The machine is to produce a 1 kW IR photon beam. The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Division is presently engaged in detailed design and beam dynamics studies for the driver accelerator. Principle beam dynamics and beam transport considerations include: (1) generation and transport of a high-quality, high-current, space-charge dominated beam; (2) the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) during beam recirculation transport; (3) low-loss transport of a large momentum spread, high-current beam; (4) beam break up (BBU) instabilities in the recirculating accelerator; (5) impedance policing of transport system components; and (6) RF drive system control during energy recovery and FEL operation.

  8. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  9. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  10. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV N20e7+ beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0°, top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6° in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h =1 and h =2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h =1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h =2.

  11. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  12. Production of an Accelerated Oxygen-14 Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2002-05-03

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was Carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 108 ions/sec have been utilized for experiments. Development of Oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 seconds and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of Oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, Oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an Oxygen-14 beam have been performed.

  13. Nondestructive synchronous beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-12-15

    A fast current transformer is mounted after the deflectors of the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron. The measured signal is amplified and connected to the input of a lock-in amplifier. The lock-in amplifier performs a synchronous detection of the signal at the cyclotron second harmonic frequency. The magnitude of the signal detected is calibrated against a Faraday cup and corresponds to the beam intensity. It has exceptional resolution, long term stability, and can measure the beam current leaving the cyclotron as low as 1 nA.

  14. Beam alignment test for therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.R.; Larsen, R.D.; Bjarngard, B.D.

    1981-12-01

    Beam spot displacement, collimator asymmetry, and movement of either collimator or gantry rotational axis can cause misalignment of the X ray beam from a therapy accelerator. A test method, sensitive to all the above problems, consists of double-exposing a film, located at the isocenter, for two gantry positions, 180/sup o/ apart. Opposite halves of the field are blocked for each exposure. A lateral shift of one half with respect to the other indicates the presence of one of the problems mentioned above. Additional tests are described, each of which is sensitive to only one of the problems and capable of quantifying the error.

  15. Beam alignment tests for therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.R.; Larsen, R.D.; Bjarngard, B.E.

    1981-12-01

    Beam spot displacement, collimator asymmetry, and movement of either collimator or gantry rotational axis can cause misalignment of the X ray beam from a therapy accelerator. A test method, sensitive to all the above problems, consists of double-exposing a film, located at the isocenter, for two gantry positions, 180/sup 0/ apart. Opposite halves of the field are blocked for each exposure. A lateral shift of one half with respect to the other indicates the presence of one of the problems mentioned above. Additional tests are described, each of which is sensitive to only one of the problems and capable of quantifying the error.

  16. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  17. Electron beam dynamics in the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) accelerates a 2-kA electron beam to more than 17 MeV. The beam pulse has a greater than 1.5-microsecond flattop region over which the electron kinetic energy is constant to within 1%. The beam dynamics are diagnosed with 21 beam-position monitors located throughout the injector, accelerator, and after the accelerator exit, where we also have beam imaging diagnostics. We discuss the tuning of the injector and accelerator, and present data for the resulting beam dynamics. We discuss the tuning procedures and other methods used to minimize beam motion, which is undesirable for its application as a bremsstrahlung source for multi-pulse radiography of exlosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. We also present beam stability measurements, which we relate to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  18. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  19. Nonparaxial Near-Nondiffracting Accelerating Optical Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ru-Yu; Zhou, Ting

    2017-02-01

    We show that new families of accelerating and almost nondiffracting beams (solutions) for Maxwell's equations can be constructed. These are complex geometrical optics (CGO) solutions to Maxwell's equations with nonlinear limiting Carleman weights. They have the form of wave packets that propagate along circular trajectories while almost preserving a transverse intensity profile. We also show similar waves constructed using the approach combining CGO solutions and the Kelvin transform.

  20. Preferential acceleration and magnetic field enhancement in plasmas with e+/e- beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Cong Tuan; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of current filaments predicting preferential acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement in a plasma with e+/e- beam injection is presented. When the e+/e- beams are injected into a plasma, current filaments are formed. The beam particles are accelerated or decelerated depending on the types of current filaments in which they are trapped. It is found that in the electron/ion ambient plasma, the e+ beam particles are preferentially accelerated, while the e- beam particles are preferentially decelerated. The preferential particle acceleration/deceleration is absent when the ambient plasma is the e+/e- plasma. We also find that the particle momentum decrease can explain the magnetic field increase during the development of Weibel/filamentation instability. Supporting simulation results of particle acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement are presented. Our findings can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical plasmas with the e+/e- beam injection.

  1. Accelerated iterative beam angle selection in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Bangert, Mark; Unkelbach, Jan

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative methods for beam angle selection (BAS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning sequentially construct a beneficial ensemble of beam directions. In a naïve implementation, the nth beam is selected by adding beam orientations one-by-one from a discrete set of candidates to an existing ensemble of (n − 1) beams. The best beam orientation is identified in a time consuming process by solving the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem for every candidate beam and selecting the beam that yields the largest improvement to the objective function value. This paper evaluates two alternative methods to accelerate iterative BAS based on surrogates for the FMO objective function value. Methods: We suggest to select candidate beams not based on the FMO objective function value after convergence but (1) based on the objective function value after five FMO iterations of a gradient based algorithm and (2) based on a projected gradient of the FMO problem in the first iteration. The performance of the objective function surrogates is evaluated based on the resulting objective function values and dose statistics in a treatment planning study comprising three intracranial, three pancreas, and three prostate cases. Furthermore, iterative BAS is evaluated for an application in which a small number of noncoplanar beams complement a set of coplanar beam orientations. This scenario is of practical interest as noncoplanar setups may require additional attention of the treatment personnel for every couch rotation. Results: Iterative BAS relying on objective function surrogates yields similar results compared to naïve BAS with regard to the objective function values and dose statistics. At the same time, early stopping of the FMO and using the projected gradient during the first iteration enable reductions in computation time by approximately one to two orders of magnitude. With regard to the clinical delivery of noncoplanar IMRT treatments, we could

  2. The beam business: Accelerators in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Robert W.; Hamm, Marianne E.

    2011-06-15

    Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

  3. The First Observation of Intra Beam Stripping of Negative Hydrogen in a Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P; Galambos, John D

    2012-01-01

    We report on an experiment in which a negative hydrogen ions beam in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator was replaced with a beam of protons with similar size and dynamics. Beam loss in the superconducting part of the SNS accelerator was at least an order of magnitude lower for the proton beam. Also beam loss has a stronger dependence on intensity with H- than with proton beams. These measurements verify a recent theoretical explanation of unexpected beam losses in the SNS superconducting linear accelerator based on an intra beam stripping mechanism for negative hydrogen ions. An identification of the new physics mechanism for beam loss is important for the design of new high current linear ion accelerators and the performance improvement of existing machines

  4. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  5. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  6. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  7. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  8. Physics with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE: nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, A.; Riisager, K.; Van Duppen, P.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear-reaction studies have until now constituted a minor part of the physics program with post-accelerated beams at ISOLDE, mainly due to the maximum energy of REX-ISOLDE of around 3 MeV/u that limits reaction work to the mass region below A = 100. We give an overview of the current experimental status and of the physics results obtained so far. Finally, the improved conditions given by the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade are described.

  9. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  10. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  11. Superconducting Accelerating Structure for High-Current Cyclotrons for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    An accelerator driven molten salt fission core is being designed to provide reliable power by subcritical nuclear fission for the next few millennia. Fission is driven by proton beams from a flux-coupled stack of three high-current cyclotrons. A key innovation in attaining the needed beam current and efficiency is a superconducting Niobium rf accelerating cavity that can accelerate bunches in the 200 orbits uniformly. The unique design allows for several cavities to be stacked, and also provides uniform acceleration and eliminates higher order modes in the cyclotron. The design and properties of the superconducting cavity will increase the efficiency of the cyclotron and the overall energy amplification from the molten salt core by an order of magnitude compared to conventional designs.

  12. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, protons, antiprotons, electrons, and positrons currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameter necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) the ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z less than or = 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator.

  13. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  14. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  15. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  16. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  17. A beam-matching concept for medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, David; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Ottosson, Wiviann; Behrens, Claus F

    2009-01-01

    The flexibility in radiotherapy can be improved if a patient can be moved between any one of the department's medical linear accelerators without the need to change anything in the patient's treatment plan. For this to be possible, the dosimetric characteristics of the various accelerators must be the same, or nearly the same i.e. the accelerators must be beam-matched. During a period of nine months, eight Varian iX accelerators with 6 and 15 MV photon beams and 6-18 MeV electron beams (only four of the eight) were installed at our clinic. All accelerators fulfilled the vendor-defined "fine beam-match" criteria, and a more extensive set of measurements was carried out during commissioning. The measured absorbed dose data for each accelerator were compared with the first accelerator, chosen as reference, and the TPS calculations. Two of the eight accelerators showed a larger discrepancy for the 15 MV beam not revealed by the vendor-defined acceptance criteria, whereas the other six accelerators were satisfactorily matched. The beam-matching acceptance criteria defined by the vendor are not strict enough to guarantee optimal beam-match. Deviations related to dose calculations and to beam-matched accelerators may add up. The safest and most practical way to ensure that all accelerators are within clinical acceptable accuracy is to include TPS calculations in the evaluation. Further, comparisons between measurements and calculations should be done in absolute dose terms.

  18. Electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers for power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Pinhasi, Y.; Yakover, I.M.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    Novel concepts of electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers (EA-FELs) for energy transfer through the atmosphere are presented. The high average power attained from an EA-FEL makes it an efficient source of mm-wave for power beaming from a ground stations. General aspects of operating the FEL as a high power oscillator (like acceleration voltage, e-beam. current, gain and efficiency) are studied and design considerations are described. The study takes into account requirements of power beaming application such as characteristic dips in the atmospheric absorption spectrum, sizes of transmitting and receiving antennas and meteorological conditions. We present a conceptual design of a moderate voltage (.5-3 MeV) high current (1-10 Amp) EA-FEL operating at mm-wavelength bands, where the atmospheric attenuation allows efficient power beaming to space. The FEL parameters were calculated, employing analytical and numerical models. The performance parameters of the FEL (power, energy conversion efficiency average power) will be discussed in connection to the proposed application.

  19. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  20. Summary report of working group 4: Beam-driven acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Jing, C.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the urgent need for a TeV-class linear collider in High-Energy Physics (HEP), a clear path to buildable and affordable accelerator technologies has yet to be realized. Clearly, the identification and advancement of next generation accelerator technologies for a linear collider have been one of the main charges since the inception of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) workshop. The fundamental requirements of linear colliders for accelerator technologies are to demonstrate high wall-plug efficiency, high beam quality preservation, high effective gradient, scalability, etc. Within the AAC community, beam-driven wakefield acceleration schemes (the central subject of Working Group 4) are always promising and attractive approaches. Since the last AAC workshop, a few high profile experiments related to beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration have been conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's FACET facility. These experiments have successfully answered questions related to obtaining high beam energy transfer efficiency, demonstrating high gradient positron acceleration, and demonstrating high quality witness beam acceleration. Research on beam-driven structure-based wakefield acceleration has also demonstrated significant results for high gradient acceleration, including longitudinal bunch shaping for high efficiency and beam breakup control. As an important application or a stepping-stone facility, beam-driven plasma or structure-based wakefield accelerators for 5th generation FEL light sources have attracted broad attention. Studies have been undertaken on various aspects, ranging from the overall parameterizations to detailed beam generation and control technologies. Other related applications, such as high power RF and THz generation, beam modulation and energy chirp compensation, are also within the scope of our Working Group. In summary, WG4 examined the advancement of beam-driven wakefield accelerators (plasma and structure-based) in

  1. High-current ion-ring accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N. )

    1993-03-15

    An accelerator concept is outlined which enables 10[sup 15] to 10[sup 18] ions in the form of a charge neutralized ion ring to be accelerated to GeV energies. A repetition rate of 10 Hz will deliver an average current in the range of 0.1 A.

  2. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented.

  3. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-12-31

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam.

  4. Correcting the beam centroid motion in an induction accelerator and reducing the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Moir, D. C.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Axial beam centroid and beam breakup (BBU) measurements were conducted on an 80 ns FWHM, intense relativistic electron bunch with an injected energy of 3.8 MV and current of 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the coupling of the beam centroid motion to the BBU instability and validate the theory of this coupling for the first time. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in the BBU amplitude, ⟨ξ⟩, of 19% and a reduction in the BBU growth rate (Γ) of 4% by reducing beam centroid misalignments ˜50% throughout the accelerator. An investigation into the contribution of the misaligned elements is made. An alignment algorithm is presented in addition to a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results which include axial beam centroid oscillations, BBU amplitude, and growth with different dipole steering.

  5. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

    2011-03-01

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t < 1sec., 1sec < t < 10secs., 10secs < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still

  6. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  7. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  8. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza,E; Houck, T L; S M, Lidia; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-07-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5"-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  9. Heavy ion beam-ionosphere interactions: Electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, R.L.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Moore, T.E.; Kintner, P.M.; Cahill L.J. Jr.; Walker, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    Operation of a divergent 25-eV Ar/sup +/ gun within an auroral arc produced dramatic changes in the flux of electrons with energies between 1 keV and the 88-eV detector cutoff. The observations suggest that intense return currents flowed parallel to B/sub 0/ to neutralize the Ar/sup +/ beam, particularly within a few meters of the rocket. These neutralization currents were carried above and below the rocket by the few-eV electrons which were emitted by the gun and by colder ionospheric electrons. Such low-energy electrons could not be measured directly by detectors on the rocket. We concluded that generation of strong field-aligned return currents was the most important effect of ion gun operation, and that these field aligned currents were responsible for many other observable effects. Downgoing hectovolt electrons appear to have been accelerated because of interactions with waves or quasi-stationary electric fields that were generated by the field-aligned current. This acceleration took place throughout a cylinder centered on the rocket,with a radius of at least several meters. Acceleration of hectovolt electrons depended surprisingly little on the direction in which the Ar/sup +/ gun was pointing.

  10. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  11. Accelerating Airy beams in the presence of inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Studies have already been made of accelerating Airy beams in the presence of deterministic inhomogeneities, illustrating, in particular, that the inherent self-healing properties of such beams are preserved. The cases of a range-dependent linear transverse potential and a converging GRIN structure (harmonic oscillator) have been examined thoroughly. Examples will be given in this article of novel accelerating Airy beams in the presence of five other types of potential functions. Three of the resulting exact analytical solutions have a common salient characteristic property: they are constructed using the free-space accelerating Airy beam solution as a seed.

  12. Unveiling the propagation dynamics of self-accelerating vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-David, Jonathan; Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-09-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the varying polarization states and intensity patterns of self-accelerating vector beams. It is shown that as these beams propagate, the main intensity lobe and the polarization singularity gradually drift apart. Furthermore, the propagation dynamics can be manipulated by controlling the beams’ acceleration coefficients. We also demonstrate the self-healing dynamics of these accelerating vector beams for which sections of the vector beam are being blocked by an opaque or polarizing obstacle. Our results indicate that the self-healing process is almost insensitive for the obstacles’ polarization direction. Moreover, the spatial polarization structure also shows self- healing properties, and it is reconstructed as the beam propagates further beyond the perturbation plane. These results open various possibilities for generating, shaping and manipulating the intensity patterns and space variant polarization states of accelerating vector beams.

  13. Unveiling the propagation dynamics of self-accelerating vector beams

    PubMed Central

    Bar-David, Jonathan; Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the varying polarization states and intensity patterns of self-accelerating vector beams. It is shown that as these beams propagate, the main intensity lobe and the polarization singularity gradually drift apart. Furthermore, the propagation dynamics can be manipulated by controlling the beams’ acceleration coefficients. We also demonstrate the self-healing dynamics of these accelerating vector beams for which sections of the vector beam are being blocked by an opaque or polarizing obstacle. Our results indicate that the self-healing process is almost insensitive for the obstacles’ polarization direction. Moreover, the spatial polarization structure also shows self- healing properties, and it is reconstructed as the beam propagates further beyond the perturbation plane. These results open various possibilities for generating, shaping and manipulating the intensity patterns and space variant polarization states of accelerating vector beams. PMID:27671745

  14. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  15. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  16. High energy electron beam processing experiments with induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. L.; Birx, D. L.; Dave, V. R.

    1995-05-01

    Induction accelerators are capable of producing very high electron beam power for processing at energies of 1-10 MeV. A high energy electron beam (HEEB) material processing system based on all-solid-state induction accelerator technology is in operation at Science Research Laboratory. The system delivers 50 ns 500 A current pulses at 1.5 MeV and is capable of operating at high power (500 kW) and high (˜ 5 kHz) repetition rate. HEEB processing with induction accelerators is useful for a wide variety of applications including the joining of high temperature materials, powder metallurgical fabrication, treatment of organic-contaminated wastewater and the curing of polymer matrix composites. High temperature HEEB experiments at SRL have demonstrated the brazing of carbon-carbon composites to metallic substrates and the melting and sintering of powders for graded-alloy fabrication. Other experiments have demonstrated efficient destruction of low-concentration organic contaminants in water and low temperature free-radical cross-linking of fiber-reinforced composites with acrylated resin matrices.

  17. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  18. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl A.; Frost, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  19. In-line beam current monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Frost, C.A.

    1984-11-13

    An intense relativistic electron beam current monitor for a gas neutralized beam transport line includes a first foil for conducting plasma current to the wall where it is measured as it traverses an inductive loop formed by a cavity in the wall. An insulator foil separates the first foil from a second conducting foil which returns the current to the plasma environment.

  20. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  1. Optimization of accelerated charged particle beam for ADS energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis and optimization of energy efficiency for proton and ion beams in ADS systems is performed via simulation using a GEANT4 code with account for energy consumption for different accelerator types. It is demonstrated that for light nuclei, beginning from 7Li, with energies above 1 GeV/nucleon, ion beams are considerably (several times) more efficient than the 1-3 GeV proton beam. The possibility of achieving energy deposition equivalent to 1 GeV protons in a quasi-infinite uranium target with higher efficiency (and twice as small accelerator size) in the case of acceleration of light ions is substantiated.

  2. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  3. Charge-state enhancement for radioactive beam post-acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.; Dooling, J.

    1995-08-01

    A critical question for an ISOL-type radioactive-beam facility, such as that being discussed by the North American Isospin Laboratory Committee, is the efficiency and q/m of the ion source for the radioactive species. ISOLDE at CERN demonstrated that high efficiency is obtained for a wide variety of species in the 1{sup +} charge state. These ion sources also generally have excellent transverse emittances and low energy spreads. One possibility is to use this proven technology plus an ionizer stage to increase the output of such sources to 2, 3, or 4{sup +} with high efficiency. We are currently investigating technical options for such charge-state enhancement. There is a proposal by a Heidelberg/ISOLDE collaboration to build a {open_quotes}charge-state breeder{close_quotes} as part of an experiment called REX-ISOLDE. This concept would deliver batches of radioactive ions with low duty cycle, optimized for relatively low-intensity secondary beams, on the order of 10{sup 6}/sec. We are independently doing simulations of an alternative approach, called the Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier (EBQA), which would yield DC beams with improved transverse emittance and would not have the intensity limitation of the batch transfer process. The cost and efficiency of the EBQA will have to be compared with those of a normally-conducting CW RFQ followed by ion stripping, as alternatives for the first stage of a secondary ion accelerator.

  4. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  5. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Hyojae Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  6. Electron acceleration by a tightly focused cylindrical vector Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the electron acceleration by a tightly focused cylindrical vector Gaussian beam. Different from the Lax series field, cylindrical vector Gaussian beams are vector-beam solutions of Maxwell’s equations and its focusing property can be numerically analyzed by the Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction theory. Field differences exist between the cylindrical vector Gaussian beam and the Lax series field. The cylindrical vector Gaussian beam increases the asymmetry of the electromagnetic fields, which is more beneficial to the electron acceleration. When the beam waist falls down to the order of the wavelength, the high laser intensity zone is more proper to define the reflection, capture and transmission conditions of the electrons. The injection energy and the injected angle of the electron and the initial phase of the laser beam play important roles for the electron to enter and be trapped by the high laser intensity zone.

  7. Beam manipulation and acceleration with Dielectric-Lined Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-06-01

    The development of next-generation TeV+ electron accelerators will require either immense footprints based on conventional acceleraton techniques or the development of new higher{gradient acceleration methods. One possible alternative is beam-driven acceleration in a high-impedance medium such as a dielectric-lined-waveguide (DLW), where a highcharge bunch passes through a DLW and can excite gradients on the order of GV/m. An important characteristic of this acceleration class is the transformer ratio which characterizes the energy transfer of the scheme. This dissertation discusses alternative methods to improve the transformer ratio for beam-driven acceleration and also considers the use of DLWs for beam manipulation at low energy.

  8. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mc Cuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rose, Chris R; Sanchez, Manolito; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Williams, John; Scarpetti, Raymond; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  9. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

  10. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  11. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  12. Cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators with time-dependent parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2004-10-01

    A formalism presented in a previous paper for the analysis of cumulative beam breakup (BBU) with arbitrary time dependence of the beam current and with misalignment of the cavities and focusing elements [J. R. Delayen, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6, 084402 (2003)] is extended to include time dependence of the focusing and coupling between the beam and the dipole modes. Such time dependence, which could result from an energy chirp imposed on the beam or from rf focusing, is known to be effective in reducing BBU-induced instabilities and emittance growth. The analytical results are presented and applied to practical accelerator configurations and compared to numerical simulations.

  13. Corkscrew Motion of an Electron Beam due to Coherent Variations in Accelerating Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August

    2016-09-13

    Corkscrew motion results from the interaction of fluctuations of beam electron energy with accidental magnetic dipoles caused by misalignment of the beam transport solenoids. Corkscrew is a serious concern for high-current linear induction accelerators (LIA). A simple scaling law for corkscrew amplitude derived from a theory based on a constant-energy beam coasting through a uniform magnetic field has often been used to assess LIA vulnerability to this effect. We use a beam dynamics code to verify that this scaling also holds for an accelerated beam in a non-uniform magnetic field, as in a real accelerator. Results of simulations with this code are strikingly similar to measurements on one of the LIAs at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. The TRIUMF-ISAC Post-Accelerator for Radioactive Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.

    1998-04-01

    The ISAC radioactive ion beam facility under construction at TRIUMF comprises a 500 MeV proton beam (I <= 100 μA) from the TRIUMF cyclotron impinging on a thick target, an on-line source to ionize the radioactive products, a mass-separator for mass selection, an accelerator complex and experimental areas. The accelerator chain comprises a 35 MHz RF Quadrupole (RFQ) to accelerate beams of q/A >= 1/30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 105 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of q/A >= 1/6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. The accelerators have several noteworthy features. Both linacs are required to operate cw to preserve beam intensity. The RFQ, a four vane split-ring structure, has no bunching section; instead the beam is pre-bunched at 11.7 MHz with a single gap pseudo saw tooth buncher. The variable energy DTL is based on a unique separated function approach. Five independent interdigital H-mode (IH) structures operating at 0^circ synchronous phase provide the acceleration while quadrupole triplets and three gap bunching cavities between tanks provide transverse and longitudinal focussing respectively. Details of the accelerator design as well as the present status will be presented.

  15. Start-to-end simulation with rare isotope beam for post accelerator of the RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho

    2016-09-01

    The RAON accelerator for the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been developed to create and accelerate various kinds of stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams for a wide range of science applications. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams generated by the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system will be transported through the post accelerator, namely, from the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system and the post Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) to the superconducting linac (SCL3). The accelerated beams will be put to use in the low energy experimental hall or accelerated again by the superconducting linac (SCL2) in order to be used in the high energy experimental hall. In this paper, we will describe the results of the start-toend simulations with the rare isotope beams generated by the ISOL system in the post accelerator of the RAON accelerator. In addition, the error analysis and correction at the superconducting linac SCL3 will be presented.

  16. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  17. Beam dynamics simulations of post low energy beam transport section in RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyunchang Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-15

    RAON (Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness) heavy ion accelerator of the rare isotope science project in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams to be used for various science programs. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams which are generated by an isotope separation on-line system with a wide range of nuclei and charges will be transported through the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to transport many kinds of rare isotope beams stably to the RFQ, the post LEBT should be devised to satisfy the requirement of the RFQ at the end of post LEBT, simultaneously with the twiss parameters small. We will present the recent lattice design of the post LEBT in the RAON accelerator and the results of the beam dynamics simulations from it. In addition, the error analysis and correction in the post LEBT will be also described.

  18. Production of accelerating quad Airy beams and their optical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhijun; Wu, Qiong; Shi, Yile; Chen, Chen; Wu, Jiangmiao; Wang, Hui

    2014-06-16

    Based on a geometric caustic argument and diffraction catastrophe theory, we generate a novel form of accelerating beams using a symmetric 3/2 phase-only pattern. Such beams can be called accelerating quad Airy beams (AQABs) because they look very much like four face-to-face combined Airy beams. Optical characteristics of AQABs are subsequently investigated. The research results show that the beams have axial-symmetrical and centrosymmetrical transverse intensity patterns and quasi-diffraction-free propagation features for their four main lobes while undergoing transverse shift along parabolic trajectories. Moreover, we also demonstrate that AQABs possess self-construction ability when local areas are blocked. The unique optical properties of these beams will make them useful tools for future scientific applications.

  19. Optimization of Electron Beam Transport for a 3-MeV DC Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tiwari, R.; Sahu, G. K.; Thakur, K. B.; Mittal, K. C.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Transport of a low-current-density electron beam is simulated for an electrostatic accelerator system. Representative charged particles are uniformly assigned for emission from a circular indirectly-heated cathode of an axial electron gun. The beam is accelerated stepwise up to energy of 1 MeV electrostatically in a length-span of ~3 m using multiple accelerating electrodes in a column of ten tubes. The simulation is done under relativistic condition and the effect of the magnetic field induced by the cathode-heating filament current is taken into account. The beam diameter is tracked at different axial locations for various settings of the electrode potentials. Attempts have been made to examine and explain data on beam transport efficiency obtained from experimental observations.

  20. Efficient Optical Energy Harvesting in Self-Accelerating Beams

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Domenico; Hu, Yi; Wetzel, Benjamin; Robles, Raul A.; Mendoza González, Gregorio; Marti-Panameño, Erwin A.; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of energetically confined self-accelerating optical beams propagating along various convex trajectories. We show that, under an appropriate transverse compression of their spatial spectra, these self-accelerating beams can exhibit a dramatic enhancement of their peak intensity and a significant decrease of their transverse expansion, yet retaining both the expected acceleration profile and the intrinsic self-healing properties. We found our experimental results to be in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations. We expect further applications in such contexts where power budget and optimal spatial confinement can be important limiting factors. PMID:26299360

  1. Economics of electron beam accelerator facilities: Concept vs actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minbiole, Paul R.

    1995-02-01

    Electron beam accelerator facilities continue to demonstrate their ability to "add value" to a wide range of industrial products. The power, energy, and reliability of commercially available accelerators have increased steadily over the past several decades. The high throughput potential of modern electron beam facilities, together with the broad spectrum of commercial applications, result in the concept that an electron beam facility is an effective tool for adding economic value to industrial products. However, the high capital costs of such a facility (including hidden costs), together with practical limitations to high throughput (including several layers of inefficiencies), result in profit-and-loss economics which are more tenuous than expected after first analysis.

  2. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, Peter N.; Asseev, Vladislav N.; Mustapha, and Brahim

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modern ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.

  3. Explore the possibility of accelerating polarized He-3 beam in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2012-05-20

    As the world's first high energy polarized proton collider, RHIC has made significant progresses in measuring the proton spin structure in the past decade. In order to have better understanding of the contribution of up quarks and down quarks to the proton spin structure, collisions of high energy polarized neutron beams are required. Polarized He-3 beams offer an effectiveway to provide polarized neutron beams. In this paper, we present studies of accelerating polarized He-3 in RHIC with the current dual snake configuration. Possibilities of adding two more pairs of snakes for accelerating polarized He-3 were explored. Results of six snake configuration in RHIC are also reported in the paper.

  4. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric pulsar current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander; Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    The equatorial current sheet in pulsar magnetospheres is often regarded as an ideal site for particle acceleration via relativistic reconnection. Using 2D spherical particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle acceleration in the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere as a function of the injected plasma multiplicity and magnetization. We observe a clear transition from a highly charge-separated magnetosphere for low plasma injection with little current and spin-down power, to a nearly force-free solution for high plasma multiplicity characterized by a prominent equatorial current sheet and high spin-down power. We find significant magnetic dissipation in the current sheet, up to 30 per cent within 5 light-cylinder radii in the high-multiplicity regime. The simulations unambiguously demonstrate that the dissipated Poynting flux is efficiently channelled to the particles in the sheet, close to the Y-point within about 1-2 light-cylinder radii from the star. The mean particle energy in the sheet is given by the upstream plasma magnetization at the light cylinder. The study of particle orbits shows that all energetic particles originate from the boundary layer between the open and the closed field lines. Energetic positrons always stream outwards, while high-energy electrons precipitate back towards the star through the sheet and along the separatrices, which may result in auroral-like emission. Our results suggest that the current sheet and the separatrices may be the main source of high-energy radiation in young pulsars.

  5. The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, D.; Arranz, F.; Arroyo, J. M.; Barrera, G.; Brañas, B.; Casal, N.; García, M.; López, D.; Martínez, J. I.; Mayoral, A.; Ogando, F.; Parro, M.; Oliver, C.; Rapisarda, D.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-10-01

    The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator will be a 9 MeV, 125 mA cw deuteron accelerator prototype for verifying the validity of the 40 MeV accelerator design for IFMIF. A beam dump designed for maximum power of 1.12 MW will be used to stop the beam at the accelerator exit. The conceptual design for the IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump is based on a conical beam stop made of OFE copper. The cooling system uses an axial high velocity flow of water pressurized up to 3.4 × 10 5 Pa to avoid boiling. The design has been shown to be compliant with ASME mechanical design rules under nominal full power conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been performed to take into account the possible margin on the beam properties at the beam dump entrance. This analysis together with the study of the maintenance issues and the mounting and dismounting operations has led to the complete design definition.

  6. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark J.; Conde, Manoel E.

    2009-01-22

    Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

  7. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-08-01

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  8. Particle selection and beam collimation system for laser-accelerated proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Fourkal, Eugene; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2005-03-01

    In a laser-accelerated proton therapy system, the initial protons have broad energy and angular distributions, which are not suitable for direct therapeutic applications. A compact particle selection and collimation device is needed to deliver small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra. In this work, we characterize a superconducting magnet system that produces a desired magnetic field configuration to spread the protons with different energies and emitting angles for particle selection. Four magnets are set side by side along the beam axis; each is made of NbTi wires which carry a current density of approximately 10(5) A/cm2 at 4.2 K, and produces a magnetic field of approximately 4.4 T in the corresponding region. Collimation is applied to both the entrance and the exit of the particle selection system to generate a desired proton pencil beam. In the middle of the magnet system, where the magnetic field is close to zero, a particle selection collimator allows only the protons with desired energies to pass through for therapy. Simulations of proton transport in the presence of the magnetic field show that the selected protons have successfully refocused on the beam axis after passing through the magnetic field with the optimal magnet system. The energy spread for any given characteristic proton energy has been obtained. It is shown that the energy spread is a function of the magnetic field strength and collimator size and reaches the full width at half maximum of 25 MeV for 230 MeV protons. Dose distributions have also been calculated with the GEANT3 Monte Carlo code to study the dosimetric properties of the laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy applications.

  9. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H{sup −} ion beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, N. Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-08

    R and D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H{sup −} ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m{sup 2} for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m{sup 2} of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  10. High efficiency beam splitting for H/sup -/ accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Stipp, V.; Krieger, C.; Madsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beam splitting for high energy accelerators has typically involved a significant loss of beam and radiation. This paper reports on a new method of splitting beams for H/sup -/ accelerators. This technique uses a high intensity flash of light to strip a fraction of the H/sup -/ beam to H/sup 0/ which are then easily separated by a small bending magnet. A system using a 900-watt (average electrical power) flashlamp and a highly efficient collector will provide 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ splitting of a 50 MeV H/sup -/ beam. Results on the operation and comparisons with stripping cross sections are presented. Also discussed is the possibility for developing this system to yield a higher stripping fraction.

  11. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schäffer, P.; Schäffer, S.; Spädtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  12. Status of high current ion source operation at the GSI accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Gutermuth, B.; Heymach, F.; Krichbaum, H.; Leible, K.-D.; Ochs, K.; Schaeffer, P.; Schaeffer, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Stork, M.; Wesp, A.; Mayr, R.

    2008-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources, Penning ion sources, and filament driven multicusp ion sources are used for the production of high current ion beams of a variety of metallic and gaseous ions at the GSI accelerator facility. For accelerator operation, the ion sources have to provide a stable beam over a long period of time with an energy of 2.2 keV/u and a maximum mass over charge ratio of 65. The status of beam time operation at the high current injector is presented here giving an outline on important ion source data, such as ion beam current, ion beam spectrum, transversal emittance, life time, duty factor, and transmission along the low energy beam transport section.

  13. Long-pulse beam acceleration of MeV-class H(-) ion beams for ITER NB accelerator.

    PubMed

    Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Yamanaka, H; Inoue, T; Kojima, A; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to realize neutral beam systems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor whose target is to produce a 1 MeV, 200 A/m(2) during 3600 s D(-) ion beam, the electrostatic five-stages negative ion accelerator so-called "MeV accelerator" has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To extend pulse length, heat load of the acceleration grids was reduced by controlling the ion beam trajectory. Namely, the beam deflection due to the residual magnetic field of filter magnet was suppressed with the newly developed extractor with a 0.5 mm off-set aperture displacement. The new extractor improved the deflection angle from 6 mrad to 1 mrad, resulting in the reduction of direct interception of negative ions from 23% to 15% of the total acceleration power, respectively. As a result, the pulse length of 130 A/m(2), 881 keV H(-) ion beam has been successfully extended from a previous value of 0.4 s to 8.7 s. This is the first long pulse negative ion beam acceleration over 100 MW/m(2).

  14. Modernization of electron accelerator with a large cross section beam for radiation effects on materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, M. S.; Denisov, V. V.; Koval, N. N.; Sulakshin, S. A.; Shugurov, V. V.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the work on the creation of an automated wide-aperture electron accelerator with a grid plasma cathode based on the low-pressure arc discharge and outputting of a large section beam (750×150 mm) in the atmosphere through a outlet foil window. The distinctive feature of such electron accelerator is a weak correlation of beam parameters, as well as a high current beam extraction efficiency to air, reaching ≈ (80 ÷ 90)% of the current in the accelerating gap at an accelerating voltage of 200 kV, beam current amplitude in the atmosphere up to 30A, frequency and pulse duration up to 50 s-1 and 100 μs, respectively. The electron source provides a stable continuous operation for tens of hours in a repetitively pulsed modes at the maximum average beam power in the atmosphere is ≈5 kW. Examples of applications of such accelerator in the radiation-stimulated technology are given, showing the prospects of its using in scientific and technological purposes.

  15. ALPI Setup as the SPES Accelerator of Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoffi, G.; Bassato, G.; Battistella, A.; Bermudez, J.; Bortolato, D.; Canella, S.; Chalykh, B.; Comunian, M.; Facco, A.; Fagotti, E.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Gramegna, F.; Lamy, T.; Modanese, P.; Palmieri, A.; Pengo, R.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.; Roncolato, C.; Scarpa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project for a national exotic beam facility in Legnaro includes pivotal upgrades of the existing superconducting linac ALPI (Acceleratore Lineare Per Ioni), to make it appropriate as the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beam) accelerator. The new injector, consisting of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR)-type charge breeder and a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), will be described. Upgrade measures in ALPI to improve beam transmission and final energy, and handle low-intensity RIB will be explained, with the aim of increasing transmission to T > 90%, Ef by ~ 20%, reaching 10 MeV/u for the reference beam 132Sn.

  16. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  17. Beam transport channels and beam injection and extraction systems of the NICA accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, A. V.; Volkov, V. I.; Kolesnikov, S. Yu.; Meshkov, I. N.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Rabtsun, S. V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Sidorov, A. I.; Topilin, N. D.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Fateev, A. A.; Shvetsov, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    A new accelerator complex is being constructed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research as a part of the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) project. The goal is to conduct experiments with colliding ion beams (at the first stage of the project) and colliding polarized proton/deuteron beams (at the second stage). Transport beam channels and the systems of beam injection and extraction for synchrotrons and collider rings are an important connecting link for the whole accelerator facility. The design of the primary beam-transport channels and injection/extraction systems are presented. Special attention is paid to various aspects of dynamics of beams in their transfer between the NICA accelerators.

  18. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25 }m{sup −3} and 1.6 × 10{sup 28 }m{sup −3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ∼20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 λ{sub p} to 0.6 λ{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  19. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  20. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more » from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  1. Beam acceleration by plasma-loaded free-electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.; Serbeto, A.; D'olival, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    The use of a plasma-filled wiggler free-electron laser device operating near the plasma cutoff to accelerate electron beams is examined. Near the cutoff, the group velocity of the microwave field in the plasma is much less than the beam velocity. This scheme, therefore, operates in the pulse mode to accelerate electron beam bunches much shorter than the wiggler length. Between one bunch and the other, the wiggler is reloaded with microwave field. During the loading period, the laser-wiggler-plasma (SWL) Raman interaction generates a Langmuir mode with the laser and the wiggler as the primary energy sources. When the wiggler plasma is fully loaded with microwave field, a short electron bunch is fired into the device. In this accelerating period, the Langmuir mode is coupled to the laser-wiggler-beam (SWB) free-electron-laser interaction. The condition that the Langmuir phase velocity matches the free-electron-laser resonant beam velocity assures the simultaneous interaction of the SWL and SWB parametric processes. Beam acceleration is accomplished fundamentally via the space charge field of the Langmuir mode and the electron phase in the ponderomotive potential. Linear energy gain regime is accomplished when the phase velocity of the Langmuir mode is exactly equal to the speed of light.

  2. Analytical considerations of beam hardening in medical accelerator photon spectra.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, C

    1999-09-01

    Beam hardening is a well-known phenomenon for therapeutic accelerator beams passing through matter in narrow beam geometry. This study assesses quantitatively the magnitude of beam hardening of therapeutic beams in water. A formal concept of beam hardening is proposed which is based on the decrease of the mean attenuation coefficient with depth. On the basis of this concept calculations of beam hardening effects are easily performed by means of a commercial spreadsheet program. Published accelerator spectra and the tabulated values of attenuation coefficients serve as input for these calculations. It is shown that the mean attenuation coefficient starts at depth zero with an almost linear decrease and then slowly levels off to a limit value. A similar behavior is found for the beam hardening coefficient. A physically reasonable, semianalytical model is given which fits the data better than previously published functions. The energy dependence of the initial attenuation coefficient is evaluated and shown. It fits well to published experimental data. The initial beam hardening coefficient, however, shows no energy dependence. Its mean value (eta0) approximately 0.006 cm(-1)) is also in close agreement to the measured data.

  3. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  4. Accelerator research on MBE-4, an experimental multi-beam induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Meuth, H.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    The multiple beam accelerator MBE-4 is a device for research toward a heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion, based on the induction linac concept. Its main goal is proof of the principle of current amplification by acceleration and controlled self-similar beam pulse compression. Into the 16-m long device four beams, each with an initial current of 10 mA are injected from a Marx-driven diode at 200 keV. The current amplification is up to nine-fold, with a final beam energy of about 800 keV in the middle of the bunch. Now that all the apparatus' accelerator sections have been completed, installed and aligned, and its unaccelerated transport properties have been studied, our experimental research has reached the crucial phase of implementing appropriate accelerator schedules that approximate self-similar current-pulse compression. These schedules are established through a close interplay of computations using a one-dimensional simulation code and a manual empirical tuning procedure. In a first approach, with a rather vigorous schedule that uses most of the accelerator modules to their voltage limits, we have determined the limits of our capability for controlled pulse compression, mainly due to waveform shaping of the driving pulse-forming networks. We shall report on these results. In the future, we will also aim for gentler schedules that would model more closely an inertial confinement fusion scenario. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Beam breakup in an advanced linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August; Coleman, Joshua Eugene; McCuistian, Brian Trent

    2016-07-01

    Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) have been in operation for a number of years at the Los Alamos Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. A new multipulse LIA is being developed. We have computationally investigated the beam breakup (BBU) instability in this advanced LIA. In particular, we have explored the consequences of the choice of beam injector energy and the grouping of LIA cells. We find that within the limited range of options presently under consideration for the LIA architecture, there is little adverse effect on the BBU growth. The computational tool that we used for this investigation was the beam dynamics code linear accelerator model for DARHT (LAMDA). In conclusion, to confirm that LAMDA was appropriate for this task, we first validated it through comparisons with the experimental BBU data acquired on the DARHT accelerators.

  6. Two-beam, Multi-mode Detuned Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A two-beam accelerator structure is described having several novel features including all metal construction, no transfer structures required between the drive and accelerator channels, symmetric fields at the axes of each channel, RF micropulse widths on cavity irises that are less than half those for a conventional cavity at the same fundamental frequency by virtue of using several harmonically-related cavity modes, and a transformer ratio much greater than unity by the use of detuned cavities. Detuning is also shown to allow either parallel or anti-parallel directions for the drive and accelerated beams. A preliminary calculation for the dilution of emittance due to short-range wakes for drive beam parameters similar to those for CLIC shows this effect to be acceptably small.

  7. Beam breakup in an advanced linear induction accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Ekdahl, Carl August; Coleman, Joshua Eugene; McCuistian, Brian Trent

    2016-07-01

    Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) have been in operation for a number of years at the Los Alamos Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. A new multipulse LIA is being developed. We have computationally investigated the beam breakup (BBU) instability in this advanced LIA. In particular, we have explored the consequences of the choice of beam injector energy and the grouping of LIA cells. We find that within the limited range of options presently under consideration for the LIA architecture, there is little adverse effect on the BBU growth. The computational tool that we used for this investigation wasmore » the beam dynamics code linear accelerator model for DARHT (LAMDA). In conclusion, to confirm that LAMDA was appropriate for this task, we first validated it through comparisons with the experimental BBU data acquired on the DARHT accelerators.« less

  8. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  9. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  10. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  11. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  12. Laser Driven Ion accelerators - current status and perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zepf, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2009-01-22

    The interaction of ultra-intense lasers with thin foil targets has recently emerged as a route to achieving extreme acceleration gradients and hence ultra-compact proton and ion accelerators. There are a number of distinct physical processes by which the protons/ions can be accelerated to energies in excess of 10 MeV. The recent development is discussed and a new mechanism--Radiation Pressure Acceleration is highlighted as a route to achieving efficient production of relativistic ions beams.

  13. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  14. Accelerators for E-beam and X-ray processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auslender, V. L.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Faktorovich, B. L.; Gorbunov, V. A.; Kokin, E. N.; Korobeinikov, M. V.; Krainov, G. S.; Lukin, A. N.; Maximov, S. A.; Nekhaev, V. E.; Panfilov, A. D.; Radchenko, V. N.; Tkachenko, V. O.; Tuvik, A. A.; Voronin, L. A.

    2002-03-01

    During last years the demand for pasteurization and desinsection of various food products (meat, chicken, sea products, vegetables, fruits, etc.) had increased. The treatment of these products in industrial scale requires the usage of powerful electron accelerators with energy 5-10 MeV and beam power at least 50 kW or more. The report describes the ILU accelerators with energy range up to 10 MeV and beam power up to 150 kW.The different irradiation schemes in electron beam and X-ray modes for various products are described. The design of the X-ray converter and 90° beam bending system are also given.

  15. Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, F; Stockem, A; Boella, E; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Haberberger, D; Tochitsky, S; Gong, C; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2012-11-21

    We show that monoenergetic ion beams can be accelerated by moderate Mach number collisionless, electrostatic shocks propagating in a long scale-length exponentially decaying plasma profile. Strong plasma heating and density steepening produced by an intense laser pulse near the critical density can launch such shocks that propagate in the extended plasma at high velocities. The generation of a monoenergetic ion beam is possible due to the small and constant sheath electric field associated with the slowly decreasing density profile. The conditions for the acceleration of high-quality, energetic ion beams are identified through theory and multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The scaling of the ion energy with laser intensity shows that it is possible to generate ~200 MeV proton beams with state-of-the-art 100 TW class laser systems.

  16. Radiobiological effectiveness of laser accelerated electrons in comparison to electron beams from a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Baumann, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kaluza, Malte; Karsch, Leonhard; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Nicolai, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sauerbrey, Roland; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Pawelke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The notable progress in laser particle acceleration technology promises potential medical application in cancer therapy through compact and cost effective laser devices that are suitable for already existing clinics. Previously, consequences on the radiobiological response by laser driven particle beams characterised by an ultra high peak dose rate have to be investigated. Therefore, tumour and non-malignant cells were irradiated with pulsed laser accelerated electrons at the JETI facility for the comparison with continuous electrons of a conventional therapy LINAC. Dose response curves were measured for the biological endpoints clonogenic survival and residual DNA double strand breaks. The overall results show no significant differences in radiobiological response for in vitro cell experiments between laser accelerated pulsed and clinical used electron beams. These first systematic in vitro cell response studies with precise dosimetry to laser driven electron beams represent a first step toward the long term aim of the application of laser accelerated particles in radiotherapy.

  17. Studies of polarized beam acceleration and Siberian Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    We studied depolarization mechanisms of polarized proton acceleration in high energy accelerators with snakes and found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two. Thus the available betatron tune space becomes smaller. Some constraints on polarized beam colliders were also examined.

  18. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  19. A microsecond-pulsewidth, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Greenly, J.B.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    A relatively long-pulsewidth (0.1-1 {mu}s) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied-B{sub r}, magnetically-insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2-MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse-shaping.

  20. Physics of beam self-modulation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-10-15

    The self-modulation instability is a key effect that makes possible the usage of nowadays proton beams as drivers for plasma wakefield acceleration. Development of the instability in uniform plasmas and in plasmas with a small density up-step is numerically studied with the focus at nonlinear stages of beam evolution. The step parameters providing the strongest established wakefield are found, and the mechanism of stable bunch train formation is identified.

  1. Generation of Ramped Current Profiles in Relativistic Electron Beams Using Wakefields in Dielectric Structures.

    PubMed

    Andonian, G; Barber, S; O'Shea, F H; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Swinson, C; Rosenzweig, J B

    2017-02-03

    Temporal pulse tailoring of charged-particle beams is essential to optimize efficiency in collinear wakefield acceleration schemes. In this Letter, we demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation method that employs a beam wakefield interaction in a dielectric structure, followed by bunch compression in a permanent magnet chicane, to longitudinally tailor the pulse shape of an electron beam. This compact, passive, approach was used to generate a nearly linearly ramped current profile in a relativistic electron beam experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. Here, we report on these experimental results including beam and wakefield diagnostics and pulse profile reconstruction techniques.

  2. Generation of Ramped Current Profiles in Relativistic Electron Beams Using Wakefields in Dielectric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, G.; Barber, S.; O'Shea, F. H.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Swinson, C.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2017-02-01

    Temporal pulse tailoring of charged-particle beams is essential to optimize efficiency in collinear wakefield acceleration schemes. In this Letter, we demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation method that employs a beam wakefield interaction in a dielectric structure, followed by bunch compression in a permanent magnet chicane, to longitudinally tailor the pulse shape of an electron beam. This compact, passive, approach was used to generate a nearly linearly ramped current profile in a relativistic electron beam experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. Here, we report on these experimental results including beam and wakefield diagnostics and pulse profile reconstruction techniques.

  3. Advanced post-acceleration methodology for pseudospark-sourced electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Yin, H.; Zhang, L.; Shu, G.; He, W.; Zhang, Q.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.

    2017-02-01

    During its conductive phase, a pseudospark discharge is able to generate a low energy electron beam with a higher combined current density and brightness compared with electron beams formed from any other known type of electron source. In this paper, a configuration is proposed to post-accelerate an electron beam extracted from a single-gap pseudospark discharge cavity in order to achieve high quality high energy intense electron beams. The major advancement is that the triggering of the pseudospark discharge, the pseudospark discharge itself, and the post-accelerating of the electron beam are all driven by a single high voltage pulse. An electron beam with a beam current of ˜20 A, beam voltage of 40 kV, and duration of ˜180 ns has been generated using this structure. The beam energy can be adjusted through adjusting the amplitude of the voltage pulse and the operating voltage of the whole structure, which can be varied from 24 to 50 kV with an efficient triggering method under fixed gas pressure below ˜10 Pa.

  4. Accelerators for the PS neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steerenberg, R.; Calviani, M.; Gschwendtner, E.; Pardons, A.; Vincke, H.

    2013-02-01

    A recent memorandum for an experimental proposal [1] was discussed during the CERN PS and SPS experimental committee (SPSC) of April 2011 and at the Research Board of June 2011. The proposed experiment, with objective to investigate the anomalous νμ → νe oscillations, aims at re-using the discontinued CERN PS Neutrino Facility (PSNF) and experimental zones to install a 150 ton liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) as near detector and a 600 ton LArTPC as far detector. This article will summarize the experimental needs, the proposed facility layout, a primary beam production scheme and the requirements for the reconstruction of the PSNF.

  5. Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

    2012-02-01

    The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev∕u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV∕u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (≥Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Fully vectorial accelerating diffraction-free Helmholtz beams.

    PubMed

    Aleahmad, Parinaz; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Mills, Matthew S; Kaminer, Ido; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2012-11-16

    We show that new families of diffraction-free nonparaxial accelerating optical beams can be generated by considering the symmetries of the underlying vectorial Helmholtz equation. Both two-dimensional transverse electric and magnetic accelerating wave fronts are possible, capable of moving along elliptic trajectories. Experimental results corroborate these predictions when these waves are launched from either the major or minor axis of the ellipse. In addition, three-dimensional spherical nondiffracting field configurations are presented along with their evolution dynamics. Finally, fully vectorial self-similar accelerating optical wave solutions are obtained via oblate-prolate spheroidal wave functions. In all occasions, these effects are illustrated via pertinent examples.

  7. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  8. Auto-focusing accelerating hyper-geometric laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    We derive a new solution to the paraxial wave equation that defines a two-parameter family of three-dimensional structurally stable vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric (AH) beams, with their complex amplitude expressed via a degenerate hyper-geometric function. The AH beams are found to carry an orbital angular momentum and be auto-focusing, propagating on an accelerating path toward a focus, where the annular intensity pattern is ‘sharply’ reduced in diameter. An explicit expression for the complex amplitude of vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric-Gaussian beams is derived. The experiment has been shown to be in good agreement with theory.

  9. Laser-accelerated ion beam diagnostics with TOF detectors for the ELIMED beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milluzzo, G.; Scuderi, V.; Amico, A. G.; Borghesi, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Doria, D.; Dostal, J.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Romagnani, L.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Velyhan, A.

    2017-02-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams could represent the future of particle acceleration in several multidisciplinary applications, as for instance medical physics, hadrontherapy and imaging field, being a concrete alternative to old paradigm of acceleration, characterized by huge and complex machines. In this framework, following on from the ELIMED collaboration, launched in 2012 between INFN-LNS and ELI-Beamlines, in 2014 a three-years contract has been signed between the two institutions for the design and the development of a complete transport beam-line for high-energy ion beams (up to 60 MeV) coupled with innovative diagnostics and in-air dosimetry devices. The beam-line will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility and will be available for users. The measurement of the beam characteristics, such as energy spectra, angular distributions and dose-rate is mandatory to optimize the transport as well as the beam delivery at the irradiation point. In order to achieve this purpose, the development of appropriate on-line diagnostics devices capable to detect high-pulsed beams with high accuracy, represents a crucial point in the ELIMED beamline development. The diagnostics solution, based on the use of silicon carbide (SiC) and diamond detectors using TOF technique, will be presented together with the preliminary results obtained with laser-accelerated proton beams.

  10. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  11. Investigating the adiabatic beam grouping at the NICA accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, O. I.; Butenko, A. V.; Grebentsov, A. Yu.; Eliseev, A. V.; Meshkov, I. N.; Svetov, A. L.; Sidorin, A. O.; Slepnev, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The NICA complex comprises the Booster and Nuclotron synchrotrons for accelerating particle beams to the required energy and the Collider machine, in which particle collisions are investigated. The experimental heavy-ion program deals with ions up to Au+79. The light-ion program deals with polarized deuterons and protons. Grouping of a beam coasting in an ion chamber is required in many parts of the complex. Beam grouping may effectively increase the longitudinal emittance and particle losses. To avoid these negative effects, various regimes of adiabatic grouping have been simulated and dedicated experiments with a deuteron beam have been conducted at the Nuclotron machine. As a result, we are able to construct and optimize the beam-grouping equipment, which provides a capture efficiency near 100% either retaining or varying the harmonic multiplicity of the HF system.

  12. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  13. Error-induced beam degradation in Fermilab's accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Sung-Yong Phil

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and to explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced that the noise does matter to a beam with a preliminary model, we proceed to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are currently distributed around the Booster

  14. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Young Phil

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  15. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  16. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  17. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  18. Beam-current monitor for FMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Brousseau, A.T.

    1981-03-01

    The application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam is described. (GHT)

  19. ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR STRUCTURES FOR ELECTRON BEAM ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S D; Poole, B R

    2005-05-05

    Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) technology incorporates the energy storage mechanism, the switching mechanism, and the acceleration mechanism for electron beams. Electromagnetic simulations of DWA structures includes these effects and also details of the switch configuration and how that switch time affects the electric field pulse which accelerates the particle beam. DWA structures include both bi-linear and bi-spiral configurations with field gradients on the order of 20MV/m and the simulations include the effects of the beampipe, the beampipe walls, the DWA High Gradient Insulator (HGI) insulating stack, wakefield impedance calculations, and test particle trajectories with low emittance gain. Design trade-offs include the transmission line impedance (typically a few ohms), equilibration ring optimization, driving switch inductances, and layer-to-layer coupling effects and the associated affect on the acceleration pulse's peak value.

  20. Possibilities for Beam Stripping Solutions at a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, Uwe

    2006-08-29

    As part of the DOE RIA R&D effort we investigated the possibilities and problems of beam strippers in the different heavy ion accelerator components of a possible Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility. We focused on two beam stripping positions in the RIA heavy ion driver where benchmark currents of up to 5 particle μA 238-U were projected at energies of 10.5 MeV/u and 85 MeV/u respectively. In order to select feasible stripper materials, data from experiments with Uranium beams at Texas A&M and GSI were evaluated. Based on these results thermal estimates for a possible design were calculated and cooling simulations with commercially available software performed. Additionally, we performed simulations with the GEANT4 code on evaluating the radiation environment for our beam stripping solution at the 85 MeV/u position in the RIA driver.

  1. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  2. Beam Dump Design for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Fragmentation Line

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, W; Ahle, L E; Reyes, S

    2006-05-02

    Beam dumps for the heavy ion beams of the fragmentation line of the Rare Isotope Accelerator have been designed. The most severe operational case involves a continuous U beam impacting the beam dump with a power of 295 kW and a nominal spot diameter size of 5 cm. The dump mechanically consists of two rotating barrels with a water cooled outer wall of 2 mm thick aluminum. The barrels are 70 cm in diameter and axially long enough to intercept a variety of other beams. The aluminum wall absorbs approximately 15% of the U beam power with the rest absorbed in the water downstream of the wall. The water acts as an absorber of the beam and as a coolant for the 2 mm aluminum wall. The barrel rotates at less than 400 RPM, maximum aluminum temperatures are less than 100 C and maximum thermal fatigue stresses are low at 3.5 x 10{sup 7} Pa (5 ksi). Rotation of the dump results in relatively low radiation damage levels with an operating lifetime of years for most beams.

  3. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  4. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  5. Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Johnson, J. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-03-01

    A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM) Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU) instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I >2 kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

  6. Collimated electron beam accelerated at 12 kV from a Penning discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, D.; Oane, M.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-01-15

    A pulsed electron beam accelerated at 12 kV with a duration of 40 μs per pulse is obtained from a Penning discharge with a hollow anode and two cathodes. The electrons are extracted through a hole in one of the cathodes and focused by a pair of coils. The electron beam has a diameter of a few mm in the cross section, while the beam current reaches peak values of 400 mA, depending on the magnetic field inside the focussing coils. This relatively inexpensive and compact device is suitable for the irradiation of small material samples placed in high vacuum.

  7. A large distributed digital camera system for accelerator beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Honkavaara, K.

    2005-07-01

    Optical diagnostics, providing images of accelerated particle beams using radiation emitted by particles impinging a radiator, typically a fluorescent screen, has been extensively used, especially on electron linacs, since the 1970's. Higher intensity beams available in the last decade allow extending the use of beam imaging techniques to perform precise measurements of important beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and energy spread using optical transition radiation (OTR). OTR-based diagnostics systems are extensively used on the superconducting TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac driving the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (VUV-FEL) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron facility. Up to 30 optical diagnostic stations have been installed at various positions along the 250-m-long linac, each equipped with a high-performance digital camera. This paper describes the new approach to the design of the hardware and software setups required by the complex topology of such a distributed camera system.

  8. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  9. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  10. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.

    2013-11-07

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today’s CEBAF polarized source operating at ∼ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  11. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  12. Beam loading compensation for acceleration of multi-bunch electron beam train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengguang; Fukuda, Masafumi; Araki, Sakae; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Hirano, Koichiro; Sasao, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    The laser undulator compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench used with the compact, high-brightness X-ray generator at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). Our group is conducting experiments with LUCX to demonstrate the possibility of K-edge digital subtraction angiography, based on Compton scattering. One of the challenging problems is to generate high-brightness multi-bunch electron beams to compensate for the energy difference arising from the beam loading effect. In this paper we calculate the transient beam loading voltage and energy gain from the RF field in the gun and accelerating tube for a multi-bunch train. To do so we consider the process by which the RF field builds up in the gun and accelerating tube, and the special shape of the RF pulse. We generate and accelerate 100 bunches with a 50 nC electron bunch train, effectively compensating for the beam loading effect by adjusting the injection timing. Using a beam position monitor (BPM) and optical transition radiation (OTR) system, we measure the electron beam energy bunch by bunch. The average energy of a 100-bunch train is 40.5 MeV and the maximum energy difference from bunch to bunch is 0.26 MeV.

  13. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  14. ELIMED, future hadrontherapy applications of laser-accelerated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cuttone, Giacomo; Gammino, Santo; Bijan Jia, S.; Korn, Georg; Maggiore, Mario; Manti, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Prokupek, Jan; Renis, Marcella; Romano, Francesco; Schillaci, Francesco; Tomasello, Barbara; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Tramontana, Antonella; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    Laser-ion acceleration has recently gained a great interest as an alternative to conventional and more expensive acceleration techniques. These ion beams have desirable qualities such as small source size, high luminosity and small emittance to be used in different fields as Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics, etc. This is very promising specially for the future perspective of a new concept of hadrontherapy based on laser-based devices could be developed, replacing traditional accelerating machines. Before delivering laser-driven beams for treatments they have to be handled, cleaned from unwanted particles and characterized in order to have the clinical requirements. In fact ion energy spectra have exponential trend, almost 100% energy spread and a wide angular divergence which is the biggest issue in the beam transport and, hence, in a wider use of this technology. In order to demonstrate the clinical applicability of laser-driven beams new collaboration between ELI-Beamlines project researchers from Prague (Cz) and a INFN-LNS group from Catania (I) has been already launched and scientists from different countries have already express their will in joining the project. This cooperation has been named ELIMED (MEDical application at ELIBeamlines) and will take place inside the ELI-Beamlines infrastructure located in Prague. This work describes the schedule of the ELIMED project and the design of the energy selector which will be realized at INFN-LNS. The device is an important part of the whole transport beam line which will be realised in order to make the ion beams suitable for medical applications.

  15. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  16. Doubling Beam Intensity Unlocks Rare Opportunities for Discovery at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Segui, Jennifer A.

    2014-05-01

    Particle accelerators such as the Booster synchrotron at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produce high-intensity proton beams for particle physics experiments that can ultimately reveal the secrets of the universe. High-intensity proton beams are required by experiments at the “intensity frontier” of particle physics research, where the availability of more particles improves the chances of observing extremely rare physical processes. In addition to their central role in particle physics experiments, particle accelerators have found widespread use in industrial, nuclear, environmental, and medical applications. RF cavities are essential components of particle accelerators that, depending on the design, can perform multiple functions, including bunching, focusing, decelerating, and accelerating a beam of charged particles. Engineers are working to model the RF cavities required for upgrading the 40-year old Booster synchrotron. It is a rather complicated process to refurbish, test, and qualify the upgraded RF cavities to sustain an increased repetition rate of the RF field required to produce proton beams at double the current intensity. Both multiphysics simulation and physical measurements are used to evaluate the RF, thermal, and mechanical properties of the Booster RF cavities.

  17. Back-streaming ion emission and beam focusing on high power linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Nan; Yu, Haijun; Jiang, Xiaoguo; Wang, Yuan; Dai, Wenhua; Gao, Feng; Wang, Minhong; Li, Jin; Shi, Jinshui

    2011-08-01

    Ions released from target surfaces by impact of a high intensity and current electron beam can be accelerated and trapped in the beam potential, and further destroy the beam focus. By solving the 2D Poisson equation, we found that the charge neutralization factor of the ions to the beam under space charge limited condition is 1/3, which is large enough to disrupt the spot size. Therefore, the ion emission at the target in a single-pulse beam/target system must be source limited. Experimental results on the time-resolved beam profile measurement have also proven that. A new focus scheme is proposed in this paper to focus the beam to a small spot size with the existence of back-streaming ions. We found that the focal spot will move upstream as the charge neutralization factor increases. By comparing the theoretical and experimental focal length of the Dragon-I accelerator (20 MeV, 2.5 kA, 60 ns flattop), we found that the average neutralization factor is about 5% in the beam/target system.

  18. Electron capture acceleration channel in a slit laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. X.; Scheid, W.; Ho, Y. K.

    2007-03-12

    Using numerical simulations, the authors find that the electrons can be captured and accelerated to high energies (GeV) in a slit laser beam with an intensity of I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} {mu}m{sup 2}, where {lambda} is the laser wavelength in units of {mu}m. The range of the optimum incident energy is very wide, even up to GeV. These results are of interest for experiments because the relatively low intensity can be achieved with present chirped pulse amplification technique and a wide range of incident energies means that a multistage acceleration is possible.

  19. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  20. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  1. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang, S.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  2. Fermilab’s Accelerator Complex: Current Status, Upgrades and Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, M. E.

    2016-10-31

    We report on the status of the Fermilab accelerator complex, including recent performance, upgrades in progress, and plans for the future. Beam delivery to the neutrino experiments surpassed our goals for the past year. The Proton Improvement Plan is well underway with successful 15 Hz beam operation. Beam power of 700 kW to the NOvA experiment was demonstrated and will be routine in the next year. We are also preparing the Muon Campus to commission beam to the g-2 experiment.

  3. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  4. Electron Beam Focusing in the Linear Accelerator (linac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis

    2015-10-01

    To produce consistent data with an electron accelerator, it is critical to have a well-focused beam. To keep the beam focused, quadrupoles (quads) are employed. Quads are magnets, which focus the beam in one direction (x or y) and defocus in the other. When two or more quads are used in series, a net focusing effect is achieved in both vertical and horizontal directions. At start up there is a 5% calibration error in the linac at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This means that the momentum of particles passing through the quads isn't always what is expected, which affects the focusing of the beam. The objective is to find exactly how sensitive the focusing in the linac is to this 5% error. A linac was simulated, which contained 290 RF Cavities with random electric fields (to simulate the 5% calibration error), and a total momentum kick of 1090 MeV. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  5. Trends and applications for MeV electrostatic ion beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, G. A.; Stodola, S. E.

    2014-08-01

    The 1970s into the 1980s saw a major broadening of applications for electrostatic accelerators. Prior to this time, all accelerators were used primarily for nuclear structure research. In the 70s there was a significant move into production ion implantation with the necessary MeV ion beam analysis techniques such as RBS and ERD. Accelerators are still being built for these materials analysis techniques today. However, there is still a great ongoing expansion of applications for these machines. At the present time, the demand for electrostatic accelerators is near an all time high. The number of applications continues to grow. This paper will touch on some of the current applications which are as diverse as nuclear fission reactor developments and pharmacokinetics. In the field of nuclear engineering, MeV ion beams from electrostatic accelerators are being used in material damage studies and for iodine and actinide accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). In the field of pharmacokinetics, electrostatic MeV accelerators are being used to detect extremely small amounts of above background 14C. This has significantly reduced the time required to reach first in human studies. These and other applications will be discussed.

  6. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    PubMed

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100  μm long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5  μm transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length.

  7. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; and Alexander Pukhov

    2001-08-30

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined.

  8. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-06

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a

  9. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  10. Commissioning measurements for photon beam data on three TrueBeam linear accelerators, and comparison with Trilogy and Clinac 2100 linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Gloria P

    2013-01-07

    This study presents the beam data measurement results from the commissioning of three TrueBeam linear accelerators. An additional evaluation of the measured beam data within the TrueBeam linear accelerators contrasted with two other linear accelerators from the same manufacturer (i.e., Clinac and Trilogy) was performed to identify and evaluate any differences in the beam characteristics between the machines and to evaluate the possibility of beam matching for standard photon energies. We performed a comparison of commissioned photon beam data for two standard photon energies (6 MV and 15 MV) and one flattening filter-free ("FFF") photon energy (10 FFF) between three different TrueBeam linear accelerators. An analysis of the beam data was then performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the results and the possibility of "beam matching" between the TrueBeam linear accelerators. Additionally, the data from the TrueBeam linear accelerator was compared with comparable data obtained from one Clinac and one Trilogy linear accelerator models produced by the same manufacturer to evaluate the possibility of "beam matching" between the TrueBeam linear accelerators and the previous models. The energies evaluated between the linear accelerator models are the 6 MV for low energy and the 15 MV for high energy. PDD and output factor data showed less than 1% variation and profile data showed variations within 1% or 2 mm between the three TrueBeam linear accelerators. PDD and profile data between the TrueBeam, the Clinac, and Trilogy linear accelerators were almost identical (less than 1% variation). Small variations were observed in the shape of the profile for 15 MV at shallow depths (< 5 cm) probably due to the differences in the flattening filter design. A difference in the penumbra shape was observed between the TrueBeam and the other linear accelerators; the TrueBeam data resulted in a slightly greater penumbra width. The diagonal scans demonstrated significant differences

  11. Strong current sheet at a magnetosheath jet: Kinetic structure and electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, E.; Vaivads, A.; Graham, D. B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Yordanova, E.; Hietala, H.; André, M.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; Paterson, W. R.; Pollock, C. J.; Saito, Y.; Magnes, W.; Russell, C.; Torbert, R.; Ergun, R.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Burch, J.

    2016-10-01

    Localized kinetic-scale regions of strong current are believed to play an important role in plasma thermalization and particle acceleration in turbulent plasmas. We present a detailed study of a strong localized current, 4900 nA m-2, located at a fast plasma jet observed in the magnetosheath downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The thickness of the current region is ˜3 ion inertial lengths and forms at a boundary separating magnetosheath-like and solar wind-like plasmas. On ion scales the current region has the shape of a sheet with a significant average normal magnetic field component but shows strong variations on smaller scales. The dynamic pressure within the magnetosheath jet is over 3 times the solar wind dynamic pressure. We suggest that the current sheet is forming due to high velocity shears associated with the jet. Inside the current sheet we observe local electron acceleration, producing electron beams, along the magnetic field. However, there is no clear sign of ongoing reconnection. At higher energies, above the beam energy, we observe a loss cone consistent with part of the hot magnetosheath-like electrons escaping into the colder solar wind-like plasma. This suggests that the acceleration process within the current sheet is similar to the one that occurs at shocks, where electron beams and loss cones are also observed. Therefore, electron beams observed in the magnetosheath do not have to originate from the bow shock but can also be generated locally inside the magnetosheath.

  12. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-15

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  13. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  14. Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program

    SciTech Connect

    SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

    2000-06-01

    The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

  15. Relativistic electron beam acceleration by Compton scattering of extraordinary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, R.

    2006-05-15

    Relativistic transport equations, which demonstrate that relativistic and nonrelativistic particle acceleration along and across a magnetic field and the generation of an electric field transverse to the magnetic field, are induced by nonlinear wave-particle scattering (nonlinear Landau and cyclotron damping) of almost perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic waves in a relativistic magnetized plasma were derived from the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The relativistic transport equations show that electromagnetic waves can accelerate particles in the k{sup ''} direction (k{sup ''}=k-k{sup '}). Simultaneously, an intense cross-field electric field, E{sub 0}=B{sub 0}xv{sub d}/c, is generated via the dynamo effect owing to perpendicular particle drift to satisfy the generalized Ohm's law, which means that this cross-field particle drift is identical to the ExB drift. On the basis of these equations, acceleration and heating of a relativistic electron beam due to nonlinear wave-particle scattering of electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma were investigated theoretically and numerically. Two electromagnetic waves interact nonlinearly with the relativistic electron beam, satisfying the resonance condition of {omega}{sub k}-{omega}{sub k{sup '}}-(k{sub perpendicular}-k{sub perpendicula=} r{sup '})v{sub d}-(k{sub parallel}-k{sub parallel}{sup '})v{sub b}{approx_equal}m{omega}{sub ce}, where v{sub b} and v{sub d} are the parallel and perpendicular velocities of the relativistic electron beam, respectively, and {omega}{sub ce} is the relativistic electron cyclotron frequency. The relativistic transport equations using the relativistic drifted Maxwellian momentum distribution function of the relativistic electron beam were derived and analyzed. It was verified numerically that extraordinary waves can accelerate the highly relativistic electron beam efficiently with {beta}m{sub e}c{sup 2} < or approx. 1 GeV, where {beta}=(1-v{sub b}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}){sup -1/2}.

  16. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M.; Makowski, M.A.

    1991-02-01

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.

  17. Study of a national 2-GeV continuous beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Khoe, T.K.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1980-08-01

    Current trends in research in medium energy physics with electromagnetic probes are reviewed briefly and design objectives are proposed for a continuous beam 2 GeV electron accelerator. Various types of accelerator systems are discussed and exploratory designs developed for two concepts, the linac-stretcher ring and a double-sided microtron system. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that a linac-ring system which meets all the design objectives with the exception of beam quality and uses state-of-the-art technology can be built for approximately $29 million. However, the double-sided microtron shows promise for development into a substantially less expensive facility meeting all design objectives. Its technical feasibility remains to be established. Specific areas requiring additional engineering studies are discussed, and current efforts at Argonne and elsewhere are identified.

  18. Particle accelerations and current structures of Weibel and Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, C. M.; Huynh, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Particle accelerations of the Wibel instability (WI) and the Filamentation instability(FI) are studied by using PIC simuations, comparing them side-by-side. Although two instabilities are almost identical in the linear growth phase, significant differences are found in the nonlinear phase in their particle accelerations and current structures. The FI shows enhanced electron acceleration, whereas particle acceleration is almost absent in the WI. The different particle accelerations between the FI and the WI seem to be associated with their different current structures; a hollow electron current structure for the FI and a center filled current structure for that of the WI. Different electron distributions seem to bring in different current filament structures, eventually leading to different magnetic characteristics.

  19. Current understanding of SEP acceleration and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klecker, B.

    2013-02-01

    The solar energetic particle (SEP) populations of electrons and ions are highly variable in space and time, in intensity, energy, and composition. Over the last ~20 years advanced instrumentation onboard many spacecraft (e.g. ACE, Coronas, GOES, Hinode, RHESSI, SAMPEX, SDO, SOHO, STEREO, TRACE, Ulysses, Yokoh, to name a few) extended our ability to explore the characteristics of solar energetic particles by in-situ measurements in interplanetary space and by observing their source characteristics near the Sun by remote-sensing observation of electromagnetic emission over a wide frequency range. These measurements provide crucial information for understanding the sources of the particle populations and the acceleration and propagation processes involved. We are now able to measure intensity-time profiles and anisotropies, energy spectra, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the ionic charge of particles over an extended energy range of 0.01 to several 100 MeV/nuc and for a large dynamic range of particle intensities. Furthermore, multi-spacecraft in-situ observations at different solar longitudes and latitudes provide new insight into the acceleration and propagation processes of SEPs near the Sun and in interplanetary space. In this paper we present an overview of SEP observations, their implications for SEP acceleration and propagation processes, and discuss open questions.

  20. Minimization of three-dimensional beam emittance growth in rare-isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, B. H.; Yoon, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a research to minimize the three-dimensional (3D) emittance growth (EG) in the RAON accelerator, a heavy ion accelerator currently being developed in Korea to produce various rare isotopes. The emittance minimization is performed using the multi-objective genetic algorithm and the simplex method. We use them to analyze the driver linac for the in-flight fragmentation separator of the RAON facility and show that redesign of the 90-degree bending section of the RAON accelerator together with adjustment of optics in the upstream and downstream superconducting linacs can limit the 3D EG to 20 % in the entire region of the driver linac. Effects of various magnet and rf accelerating cavity errors on the beam-EG are also discussed.

  1. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q{sub ext} and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes.

  2. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  3. Application of rf superconductivity to high-brightness ion-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    A development program is underway to apply rf superconductivity to the design of cw linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams. The key issues associated with this endeavor have been delineated in an earlier paper. Considerable progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically to resolve a number of these issues. In this paper we summarize this progress. We also identify current and future work in the areas of accelerator technology and superconducting materials which will confront the remaining issues and/or provide added capability to the technology. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  5. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  6. INJECTION ACCELERATION AND EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTON BEAM FOR THE NEUTRINO FACILITY PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N; Barton, D; Ganetis, G; Jain, A; Lee, Y; Marneris, I; Meng, W; Raparia, D; Roser, T; Ruggiero, A; Tuozzolo, J; Wanderer, P; Weng, W

    2003-05-12

    The proposed ''neutrino-production'' project [1.2] to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) requires that the neutrino-production target be bombarded by a high intensity proton beam-pulse of {approx} 90 x 10{sup 12} protons of 28 GeV in energy and at a rate of 2.5 Hz, resulting in a 1 MW power of proton beam deposited on the target for the production of the neutrinos. In this paper we investigate the possibility of producing this high intensity proton beam, using as the main accelerator the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The following aspects of the project are reported in this paper: (a) The beam injection into the AGS synchrotron of 1.2 GeV H{sup -} beam produced by a super-conducting LINAC[3]; (b) The effect of the eddy currents induced on the vacuum chamber of the circulating beam during the ''ramping'' of the main magnets of the AGS; (c) The method of the beam extraction from the AGS and the optics of the 28 GeV beam extracted from the AGS.

  7. Acceleration of Polarized Beams Using Multiple Strong Partial Siberian Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Gupta, R. C.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Okamura, M.; Takano, J.

    2005-08-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization, but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20 - 30 % partial Siberian snake, both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical super-conducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  8. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  9. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; COURANT,E.; GLENN,J.W.; GUPTA,R.C.; HUANG,H.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; WILLEN,E.; OKAMURA,M.; TAKANO,J.

    2004-10-10

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  10. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  11. Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-12-15

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

  12. TeV/m Nano-Accelerator: Current Status of CNT-Channeling Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young Min; Lumpkin, Alex H.; Thangaraj, Jayakar Charles; Thurman-Keup, Randy Michael; Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2014-09-17

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in the accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider. The major challenge of channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require a high power driver in the hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV). This x-ray energy exceeds those for x-rays as of today, although x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon-based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper presents a beam- driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discusses feasible experiments with the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) in Fermilab.

  13. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Arun

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  14. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  15. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  16. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  17. Vacuum electron acceleration and bunch compression by a flat-top laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Wang, P X; Ho, Y K; Kong, Q; Gu, Y; Wang, S J

    2007-09-01

    The field intensity distribution and phase velocity characteristics of a flat-top laser beam are analyzed and discussed. The dynamics of electron acceleration in this kind of beam are investigated using three-dimensional test particle simulations. Compared with the standard (i.e., TEM(00) mode) Gaussian beam, a flat-top laser beam has a stronger longitudinal electric field and a larger diffraction angle. These characteristics make it easier for electrons to be trapped and accelerated by the beam. With a flat-top shape, the laser beam is also applicable to the acceleration of low energy electron and bunch compression.

  18. Beam dynamics in the ETA and ATA 10 kA linear induction accelerators: observations and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.; Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hester, R.E.; Melendez, R.; Neil, V.K.; Paul, A.C.; Struve, K.W.

    1981-03-06

    The 10 kA ETA and ATA linear induction accelerators are described. Beam instability is the major concern in these high current machines, and the current status of theoretical understanding, and experimental investigations with the 8 cavity ETA, are reviewed. Modifications to the induction cavities are described that have essentially eliminated the transverse resonant modes seen in the ETA.

  19. A new method to calculate the beam charge for an integrating current transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchi; Han Dan; Zhu Bin; Dong Kegong; Tan Fang; Gu Yuqiu

    2012-09-15

    The integrating current transformer (ICT) is a magnetic sensor widely used to precisely measure the charge of an ultra-short-pulse charged particle beam generated by traditional accelerators and new laser-plasma particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a new method to calculate the beam charge in an ICT based on circuit analysis. The output transfer function shows an invariable signal profile for an ultra-short electron bunch, so the function can be used to evaluate the signal quality and calculate the beam charge through signal fitting. We obtain a set of parameters in the output function from a standard signal generated by an ultra-short electron bunch (about 1 ps in duration) at a radio frequency linear electron accelerator at Tsinghua University. These parameters can be used to obtain the beam charge by signal fitting with excellent accuracy.

  20. Longitudinal and Transverse Instabilities in a High Current Modified Betatron Electron Accelerator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-17

    Conlinuod) image charges and currents on the toroidal chamber walls. The electron ring, which is assumed to have an energy spread, is taken to be located...We find an unstable hybrid mode of oscillation which is a coupled azimuthal and longitudinal mode and exists at beam energies below the transition... energy . The negative mass/kink instability associated with an ultra high current (I - 10 kA) modified beta- tron electron accelerator is analyzed and

  1. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  2. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T. M.; Palastro, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10 GV /m . The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible.

  3. Superstructure for high current applications in superconducting linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter

    2008-03-18

    A superstructure for accelerating charged particles at relativistic speeds. The superstructure consists of two weakly coupled multi-cell subunits equipped with HOM couplers. A beam pipe connects the subunits and an HOM damper is included at the entrance and the exit of each of the subunits. A coupling device feeds rf power into the subunits. The subunits are constructed of niobium and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The length of the beam pipe between the subunits is selected to provide synchronism between particles and rf fields in both subunits.

  4. Deflection by the image current and charges of a beam scraper

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Morton, P.L.

    1986-05-01

    Scrapers are often used in storage rings and accelerators to clean the transverse profile of the beam. When the beam is not exactly midway between the jaws of the scraper the transverse electric and magnetic fields produced by the image charges and currents are asymmetric. For a relativistic beam traveling through a longitudinally uniform tube with infinitely conducting walls the transverse force from the electric field is canceled by the transverse force from the magnetic field. When an off-center particle bunch passes by a longitudinal discontinuity in the beam tube the transverse force from the electric field are no longer cancelled by the transverse force from the magnetic field and particles in the bunch experience a transverse momentum kick which is independent of energy. It is shown that scrapers that pass close by high peak current beams can significantly degrade the beam emittance. A circular scraper was chosen for computer simulation. (LEW)

  5. Triggered beam pulser and current integrator for PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. T.; Skofronick, G.; Nelson, J. W.

    1987-03-01

    Two auxiliary circuits to facilitate PIXE analyses are described: a triggerable beam pulser tor pile-up reduction and dead time correction; and a versatile voltage to frequency converter for use with a beam current integrator.

  6. Lévy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams.

    PubMed

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schrödinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Lévy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Lévy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Lévy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

  7. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W.; Zhao, H. Y. Zhang, J. J.; Sha, Sh.; Zhang, Zh. L.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-07-15

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C{sup 6+} beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  8. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Jin, Q Y; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, J J; Sha, Sh; Zhang, Zh L; Li, Zh M; Liu, W; Zhang, X Zh; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2014-07-01

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C(6+) beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  9. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, A.; Abanades, A.; Leon, P. T.; Sordo, F.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    2008-06-01

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 μs repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity.

  10. ``Accelerators and Beams,'' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, R. R.; Browman, A. A.; Mead, W. C.; Williams, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive "On-Screen Laboratories," hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer.

  11. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  12. Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young; Miginsky, S.

    2012-07-02

    In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

  13. Numerical Modelling of Intense Electron Beam Transport in the Spiral Line Induction Accelerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-28

    arising in the context of the spiral line induction accelerator (SLIA), a device in which the beam is transported along an open-ended beam pipe ...field. Because the field coils are wound directly onto the spiral beam pipe , and because each bend is magnetically shielded from its neighbors, each... Spiral Line Induction Accelerator J. KRALL, S. SLINKER, M. LAMPE AND G. JOYCE Beam Physics Branch Plasma Physics Division August 28, 1992 _pw DTIC U)lz E

  14. Solar wind double ions beams and the heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    Double ion beams are often observed in the solar wind, but little work has been done in relating these beams to structures within the solar wind. Double ion beams are observed as beams of a given ion species and charge state occurring at two different energies. We use the three-dimensional ion plasma instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft to look for evidence of such beams associated with the heliospheric current sheet. In a subset chosen independently of plasma parameters consisting of 8 of cover 47 crossings of the current sheet made during the inecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission we find that these double ion beams are always present on either side of the current sheet. The double beams are present in both the proton and helium species. The secondary beam typically has a higher helium abundance, which suggests that these beams are formed in the helium-rich corona rather than in interplanetary space. The double beams are not present in the interior of the current sheet. Neither collisions nor effects of plasma beta can account for the disappearance of the double beams inside the current sheet in all eight cases. We postulate that these beams are formed by reconnection occurring near the Sun in the boundary region between the open field lines of the coronal holes and the closed field line region of the heliospheric current sheet. Such a scenario would be consistent with previous X ray measurements which suggect that reconnection is occurring in this region.

  15. Evidence for current sheet acceleration in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, L.R.; Speiser, T.W.

    1982-04-01

    The existence of the current sheet and the dawn to dusk electric field in the geomagnetic tail implies there is particle energization in the tail current sheet of the order 2--10% of the total solar wind energy incident upon the dayside magnetopause. In this paper we determine that ion acceleration in a current sheet with a small magnetic field across the sheet, via single-particle motion which violates the guiding center approximation, can account for this large energization in the tail. We calculate the distribution of accelerated ions which result from the urrent sheet acceleration and compare the results with distributions of accelerated ions frequently observed flowing earthwards along the outer boundary of the plasma sheet. The comparison indicates that the observed earthward flowing ions result from current sheet acceleration. Comparison with measurements of auroral ion predictions at low precipitation at low altitudes implies that the accelerated ions ejected from the current sheet are also an important source of auroral ion precipitation. In addition, these acceletated ions may be an important source of plasma sheet ions.

  16. Vaccine Biotechnology by Accelerated Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, Gabriela D.; Togoe, Iulian I.; Tudor, Laurentiu M.; Martin, Diana I.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.

    2007-04-01

    A new biotechnology for obtaining a commercial vaccine that contains either Fusobacterium necrophorum (F.n.) exotoxins inactivated by accelerated electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation, or exotoxins isolated from F.n. cultures irradiated with EB+MW, is presented. This vaccine is designed for prophylaxis of ruminant infectious pododermatitis (IP) produced by F.n. Also, the research results concerning the effects of combined chemical adjuvant and EB+MW irradiation on F.n. immune capacity are discussed. The vaccine's efficacy will be tested in ruminant farms in which IP evolves. It is expected that this new vaccine to offer a better protection, more than 60%, which is the best presently obtained result in ruminant farms.

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING AND ACCELERATING AN ION BEAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of producing and accelerating an ion beam comprising the steps of providing a magnetic field with a cusp that opens in an outward direction along a centerline that passes through a vertex of the cusp: providing an ionizing gas that sprays outward through at least one capillary-like orifice in a plenum that is positioned such that the orifice is on the centerline in the cusp, outward of the vortex of the cusp; providing a cathode electron source, and positioning it outward of the orifice and off of the centerline; and positively charging the plenum relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as m anode. A hot filament may be used as the cathode electron source, and permanent magnets may be used to provide the magnetic field.

  18. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-11-17

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  19. Electron-beam dynamics for an advanced flash-radiography accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2015-06-22

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in cell (PIC) codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup (BBU), image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. Beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  20. Experimental study of a Hall current plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin

    Electromagnetic propulsion holds the promise of potential prime space propulsion by combining high exhaust velocities with high mass flow rates compared to other electric propulsion devices. The primary objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the plasma acceleration due to Hall effect in the presence of applied magnetic and electric fields. This is the first attempt to integrate a non-equilibrium microwave plasma with a Hall current plasma accelerator. A linear Hall current plasma accelerator segmented with 5 pairs of electrodes was developed and tested. A non-equilibrium microwave plasma generated by a 6 kW microwave generator was used to feed the accelerator. The discharge voltage, current, and the Hall current through each pair of the electrodes were measured. Velocity measurement techniques including the MHD open-circuit, the combined emissive probe and MHD open-circuit, and the time-of-flight electrostatic probe were developed and implemented. The near field plasma properties were also measured by multiple Langmuir probes. Theoretical analyses were conducted using both electromagnetic and electrostatic models. Both models predicted that large axial electric field and ionization fraction are critical to obtaining high specific impulse and efficient acceleration. The role of the magnetic field is to trap the electrons, and thus distribute the electric field across the whole plasma for acceleration of ions. The experimental results show that axial discharge voltages increased with increasing magnetic field. A strong plasma acceleration zone was noted at the region closest to the cathode. Within this zone, the Hall current and Hall parameter are much larger than elsewhere along the flow path. So is the axial electric field. This suggested a very strong Hall effect in the accelerator. The mean Hall parameters varied from less than one to the order of 10 in the high power tests. Significant acceleration of the plasma by the linear Hall current

  1. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-07

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude.

  2. Designing of the low energy beam lines with achromatic condition in the RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2017-01-01

    The RAON accelerator has been built to create and accelerate stable heavy-ion beams and rare isotope beams. The stable heavy-ion beams are generated by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and accelerated by the low energy superconducting linac SCL1. The beams accelerated by the SCL1 are re-accelerated by the high energy superconducting linac SCL2 for the generation of rare isotope beams by using the in-flight fragmentation system or are put to use in the low energy experimental halls, which include the neutron science facility and the KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus after having passed through the low energy beam lines which have long deflecting sections. At the end of each beam line in the low energy experimental halls, the beams should meet the targets of the two facilities with the specific requirements satisfied. Namely, if the beam is to be sent safely and accurately to the targets and simultaneously, satisfy the requirements, an achromatic lattice design needs to be applied in each beam line. In this paper, we will present the lattice design of the low energy beam lines and describe the results of the beam dynamics simulations. In addition, the correction of the beam orbit, which is distorted by machine imperfections, will be discussed.

  3. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  4. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 106 neutrons s-1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 μm diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  5. Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

    2014-09-01

    Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

  6. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Month, Mel

    2000-06-01

    The field of accelerators and beams (A&B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A&B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of "distance" education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A&B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A&B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'être for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities.

  7. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage.

    PubMed

    Barberio, M; Veltri, S; Scisciò, M; Antici, P

    2017-03-07

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient.

  8. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Month, Mel

    2000-06-01

    The field of accelerators and beams (A and B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A and B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of ''distance'' education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A and B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A and B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'etre for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities. (c) 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  9. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient.

  10. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient. PMID:28266496

  11. Decontamination of Ametryne HDPE packaging using electron beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. L.; Andrade, D. C.; Melo, R. P.; Nagatomi, H. R.; Mori, M. N.

    2009-07-01

    This paper is part of a project to evaluate pesticide degradation on commercial polymeric (high-density polyethylene, HDPE) packaging material. The herbicide studied was Ametryne whose residues may be detectable in water, soil and on the surfaces for months or years, depending on the pesticide formulation and type of application. In order to evaluate the efficiency of radiation processing on removal of the pesticides contamination; the packaging material were irradiated using Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1,5 MeV energy and 37 kW, in batch system. The samples were irradiated with water, in various absorbed doses. Ametryne was analyzed by gas chromatography after extraction with hexane/dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) solution. The radiation processing yield was evaluated by the destruction G-value (Gd), and the electron beam irradiation processing, showed higher efficiency in destroying Ametryne in the HDPE packaging when the samples were irradiated in the presence of small quantities of water.

  12. Wakefield-induced ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T. J.; Schaper, L.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Osterhoff, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches [Martinez de la Ossa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 245003 (2013)]. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ( Ib 0 ≳ 8.5 kA ) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ( k p σ z ˜ k p ɛ n ˜ 0.1 ). In addition, we show that the amount of injected charge can be adjusted by tuning the concentration of the dopant gas species, which allows for controlled beam loading and leads to a reduction of the total energy spread of the witness beams. Electron bunches, produced in this way, fulfil the requirements to drive blowout regime plasma wakes at a higher density and to trigger WII injection in a second stage. This suggests a promising new concept of self-similar staging of WII injection in steps with increasing plasma density, giving rise to the potential of producing electron beams with unprecedented energy and brilliance from plasma-wakefield accelerators.

  13. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Li, Zenghai; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  14. Characteristics of the photon beam from a new 25-MV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J.E.; Andrew, J.W.; Michaels, H.B.; O'Brien, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    The Therac 25 is a relatively compact therapy machine, the heart of which is a double-pass electron linear accelerator. The electron beam is injected into the accelerator at the treatment head end of the machine and is accelerated back down the arm to an energy of 13 MeV. At this end of the machine a magnet system reflects the beam back into the structure where it gains up to an additional 12 MeV of energy. After leaving the linear accelerator the beam is bent by an achromatic head magnet through 270 degrees to the treatment head. The machine produces eight electron beams and a 25-MV photon beam. In this work only the parameters of the photon beam are addressed based on measurements at the first two clinical sites. Percentage depth doses, tissue phantom ratios, and beam symmetry and stability are presented and discussed.

  15. Characteristics of the photon beam from a new 25-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, J E; Andrew, J W; Michaels, H B; O'Brien, P F

    1985-01-01

    The Therac 25 is a relatively compact therapy machine, the heart of which is a double-pass electron linear accelerator. The electron beam is injected into the accelerator at the treatment head end of the machine and is accelerated back down the arm to an energy of 13 MeV. At this end of the machine a magnet system reflects the beam back into the structure where it gains up to an additional 12 MeV of energy. After leaving the linear accelerator the beam is bent by an achromatic head magnet through 270 degrees to the treatment head. The machine produces eight electron beams and a 25-MV photon beam. In this work only the parameters of the photon beam are addressed based on measurements at the first two clinical sites. Percentage depth doses, tissue phantom ratios, and beam symmetry and stability are presented and discussed.

  16. Trapping and dark current in plasma-based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-06-01

    The trapping of thermal electrons in a nonlinear plasma wave of arbitrary phase velocity is investigated. The threshold plasma wave amplitude for trapping plasma electrons is calculated, thereby determining the fraction trapped and the expected dark current in a plasma-based accelerator. It is shown that the presence of a laser field (e.g., trapping in the self-modulated regime of the laser wakefield accelerator) increases the trapping threshold. Implications for experimental and numerical laser-plasma studies are discussed.

  17. Comparing the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam from dedicated intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Hamid Reza; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Akbari, Mohammad Esmail; Mirzaei, Hamid Reza

    2015-03-08

    The specific design of the mobile dedicated intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) accelerators and different electron beam collimation system can change the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam with respect to the conventional accelerators. The aim of this study is to measure and compare the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam produced by intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators. To this end, percentage depth dose along clinical axis (PDD), transverse dose profile (TDP), and output factor of LIAC IORT and Varian 2100C/D conventional radiotherapy accelerators were measured and compared. TDPs were recorded at depth of maximum dose. The results of this work showed that depths of maximum dose, R90, R50, and RP for LIAC beam are lower than those of Varian beam. Furthermore, for all energies, surface doses related to the LIAC beam are substantially higher than those of Varian beam. The symmetry and flatness of LIAC beam profiles are more desirable compared to the Varian ones. Contrary to Varian accelerator, output factor of LIAC beam substantially increases with a decrease in the size of the applicator. Dosimetric characteristics of beveled IORT applicators along clinical axis were different from those of the flat ones. From these results, it can be concluded that dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative electron beam are substantially different from those of conventional clinical electron beam. The dosimetric characteristics of the LIAC electron beam make it a useful tool for intraoperative radiotherapy purposes.

  18. Impingement-Current-Erosion Characteristics of Accelerator Grids on Two-Grid Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    Accelerator grid sputter erosion resulting from charge-exchange-ion impingement is considered to be a primary cause of failure for electrostatic ion thrusters. An experimental method was developed and implemented to measure erosion characteristics of ion-thruster accel-grids for two-grid systems as a function of beam current, accel-grid potential, and facility background pressure. Intricate accelerator grid erosion patterns, that are typically produced in a short time (a few hours), are shown. Accelerator grid volumetric and depth-erosion rates are calculated from these erosion patterns and reported for each of the parameters investigated. A simple theoretical volumetric erosion model yields results that are compared to experimental findings. Results from the model and experiments agree to within 10%, thereby verifying the testing technique. In general, the local distribution of erosion is concentrated in pits between three adjacent holes and trenches that join pits. The shapes of the pits and trenches are shown to be dependent upon operating conditions. Increases in beam current and the accel-grid voltage magnitude lead to deeper pits and trenches. Competing effects cause complex changes in depth-erosion rates as background pressure is increased. Shape factors that describe pits and trenches (i.e. ratio of the average erosion width to the maximum possible width) are also affected in relatively complex ways by changes in beam current, ac tel-grid voltage magnitude, and background pressure. In all cases, however, gross volumetric erosion rates agree with theoretical predictions.

  19. A Four Channel Beam Current Monitor Data Acquisition System Using Embedded Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Jr., Robert Mitchell; Dalmas, Dale A.; Dale, Gregory E.

    2015-08-11

    Data acquisition from multiple beam current monitors is required for electron accelerator production of Mo-99. A two channel system capable of recording data from two beam current monitors has been developed, is currently in use, and is discussed below. The development of a cost-effective method of extending this system to more than two channels and integrating of these measurements into an accelerator control system is the main focus of this report. Data from these current monitors is digitized, processed, and stored by a digital data acquisition system. Limitations and drawbacks with the currently deployed digital data acquisition system have been identified as have been potential solutions, or at least improvements, to these problems. This report will discuss and document the efforts we've made in improving the flexibility and lowering the cost of the data acquisition system while maintaining the minimum requirements.

  20. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O’Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  1. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m−1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:27250570

  3. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; ...

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel ismore » created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  4. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  5. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high-current

  6. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  7. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  8. Traceable charge measurement of the pulses of a 27 MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, A.; Illemann, J.; Renner, F.; Makowski, C.; Kapsch, R.-P.

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a detailed description of measuring devices and calibration procedures which enable the nondestructive (non-intercepting) absolute measurement of the charge of individual beam pulses (macro-pulses) from an electron linear accelerator traceable to primary standards with high accuracy, i.e. with an expanded measurement uncertainty < 0.1%. In particular, we demonstrate the readout and calibration of a Bergoz integrating current transformer which is frequently applied at many different types of accelerators as a beam intensity monitor. The current transformer signal is calibrated against the absolute charge measurement by means of a custom-made compact Faraday cup with a high degree of collection efficiency for electron beams in the energy range of 6 MeV to 50 MeV (99.2% at 27 MeV), which is well known from measurements and consistently described by Monte Carlo calculations.

  9. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  10. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  11. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Chu, Tak Sum; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  12. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  13. Upward electron beams measured by DE-1: A primary source of dayside region-1 Birkeland currents

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.L.; Reiff, P.H.; Sugiura, M.

    1983-08-01

    Measurements made by the High Altitude Plasma Instrument on DE-1 have shown that intense upward electron beams with energies from roughly-equal20 eV to roughly-equal200 eV are a common feature of the region just equatorward of the morning-side polar cusp. Computations of the currents carried by these beams and by the precipitating cusp electrons show excellent agreement with the simultaneous DE-1 magnetometer measurements for both upward and downward Birkeland currents. The data indicate that cold ionospheric electrons, which carry the downward region-1 Birkeland currents on the morning side, are accelerated upward by potential drops of a few tens of eV at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. This acceleration process allows spacecraft above those altitudes to measure routinely the charge carriers of both downward and upward current systems.

  14. Upward electron beams measured by DE-1 - A primary source of dayside region-1 Birkeland currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Sugiura, M.

    1983-08-01

    Measurements made by the High Altitude Plasma Instrument on DE-1 have shown that intense upward electron beams with energies from about 20 eV to about 200 eV are a common feature of the region just equatorward of the morning-side polar cusp. Computations of the currents carried by these beams and by the precipitating cusp electrons show excellent agreement with the simultaneous DE-1 magnetometer measurements for both upward and downward Birkeland currents. The data indicate that cold ionospheric electrons, which carry the downward region-1 Birkeland currents on the morning side, are accelerated upward by potential drops of a few tens of eV at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. This acceleration process allows spacecraft above those altitudes to measure routinely the charge carriers of both downward and upward current systems.

  15. Upward electron beams measured by DE-1 - A primary source of dayside region-1 Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Sugiura, M.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements made by the High Altitude Plasma Instrument on DE-1 have shown that intense upward electron beams with energies from about 20 eV to about 200 eV are a common feature of the region just equatorward of the morning-side polar cusp. Computations of the currents carried by these beams and by the precipitating cusp electrons show excellent agreement with the simultaneous DE-1 magnetometer measurements for both upward and downward Birkeland currents. The data indicate that cold ionospheric electrons, which carry the downward region-1 Birkeland currents on the morning side, are accelerated upward by potential drops of a few tens of eV at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. This acceleration process allows spacecraft above those altitudes to measure routinely the charge carriers of both downward and upward current systems.

  16. Stable GeV Ion-Beam Acceleration from Thin Foils by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Geissler, M.

    2009-04-10

    A stable relativistic ion acceleration regime for thin foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses is suggested. In this regime, the 'light-sail' stage of radiation pressure acceleration for ions is smoothly connected with the initial relativistic 'hole-boring' stage, and a defined relationship between laser intensity I{sub 0}, foil density n{sub 0}, and thickness l{sub 0} should be satisfied. For foils with a wide range of n{sub 0}, the required I{sub 0} and l{sub 0} for the regime are theoretically estimated and verified with the particle-in-cell code ILLUMINATION. It is shown for the first time by 2D simulations that high-density monoenergetic ion beams with energy above GeV/u and divergence of 10 deg. are produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, which are within reach of current laser systems.0.

  17. Beam dynamics and error study of the medium energy beam transport line in the Korea Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San; Hahn, Garam

    2016-11-01

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator consists of an injector and a synchrotron for an ion medical accelerator that is the first carbon-ion therapy system in Korea. The medium energy beam transport(MEBT) line connects the interdigital H-mode drift tube linac and the synchrotron. We investigated the beam conditions after the charge stripper by using the LISE++ and the SRIM codes. The beam was stripped from C4+ into C6+ by using the charge stripper. We investigated the performance of a de-buncher in optimizing the energy spread and the beam distribution in z-dW/W (direction of beam progress-beam and energy) phase. We obtained the results of the tracking simulation and the error analysis by using the TRACK code. Possible misalignments and rotations of the magnets were considered in the simulations. States of the beam were examined when errors occurred in the magnets by the applying analytic fringe field model in TRACK code. The condition for the beam orbit was optimized by using correctors and profile monitors to correct the orbit. In this paper, we focus on the beam dynamics and the error studies dedicated to the MEBT beam line and show the optimized beam parameters for the MEBT.

  18. Absorbed dose distributions for X-ray beams and beams of electrons from the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tronc, D; Noël, A

    1978-11-01

    After a brief description of the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator a complete set of absorbed-dose distribution values is given. These values define the depths on the axis as a function of the depth dose and define the penumbra (as characterized by the positions of the intersections of the isodose curves with planes parallel to the phantom surface) for beams of X-rays and for beams of electrons. Tissue-maximum ratios are given for beams of X-rays. Analytical values for the electron depth dose curve are compared with the values obtained on the Sagittaire linear accelerator.

  19. Current driven instabilities of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chouetri, E. Y.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    A plasma instability that strongly influences the efficiency and lifetime of electromagnetic plasma accelerators was quantitatively measured. Experimental measurements of dispersion relations (wave phase velocities), spatial growth rates, and stability boundaries are reported. The measured critical wave parameters are in excellent agreement with theoretical instability boundary predictions. The instability is current driven and affects a wide spectrum of longitudinal (electrostatic) oscillations. Current driven instabilities, which are intrinsic to the high-current-carrying magnetized plasma of the magnetoplasmadynmic (MPD) accelerator, were investigated with a kinetic theoretical model based on first principles. Analytical limits of the appropriate dispersion relation yield unstable ion acoustic waves for T(i)/T(e) much less than 1 and electron acoustic waves for T(i)/T(e) much greater than 1. The resulting set of nonlinear equations for the case of T(i)/T(e) = 1, of most interest to the MPD thruster Plasma Wave Experiment, was numerically solved to yield a multiparameter set of stability boundaries. Under certain conditions, marginally stable waves traveling almost perpendicular to the magnetic field would travel at a velocity equal to that of the electron current. Such waves were termed current waves. Unstable current waves near the upper stability boundary were observed experimentally and are in accordance with theoretical predictions. This provides unambiguous proof of the existence of such instabilites in electromagnetic plasma accelerators.

  20. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  1. Beam position and energy monitoring in compact linear accelerators for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ruf, Marcel; Müller, Sven; Setzer, Stefan; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2014-02-01

    The experimental verification of a novel sensor topology capable of measuring both the position and energy of an electron beam inside a compact electron linear accelerator for radiotherapy is presented. The method applies microwave sensing techniques and allows for the noninterceptive monitoring of the respective beam parameters within compact accelerators for medical or industrial purposes. A state space feedback approach is described with the help of which beam displacements, once detected, can be corrected within a few system macropulses. The proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted with a prototype accelerator and customized hardware. Additionally, closed-loop operation with high accuracy is demonstrated.

  2. Capture and Control of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nurnberg, F; Alber, I; Harres, K; Schollmeier, M; Roth, M; Barth, W; Eickhoff, H; Hofmann, I; Friedman, A; Grote, D; Logan, B G

    2009-05-13

    This paper summarizes the ongoing studies on the possibilities for transport and RF capture of laser-accelerated proton beams in conventional accelerator structures. First results on the capture of laser-accelerated proton beams are presented, supported by Trace3D, CST particle studio and Warp simulations. Based on these results, the development of the pulsed high-field solenoid is guided by our desire to optimize the output particle number for this highly divergent beam with an exponential energy spectrum. A future experimental test stand is proposed to do studies concerning the application as a new particle source.

  3. Optical Tagging of Ion Beams Accelerated by Double Layers in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Timothy; Aguirre, Evan; Thompson, Derek; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    Experiments in helicon sources that investigate plasma expansion into weakly magnetized, low density regions reveal the production of supersonic ion beams attributed to acceleration by spatially localized double layer structures. Current efforts are aimed at mapping the ion velocity flow field utilizing 2D spatially scanning laser induced fluorescence (LIF) probes that yield metastable ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) for velocities along and perpendicular to the flow. Observation of metastable ion beams by LIF renders plausible a Lagrangian approach to studying the field-ion interaction via optical tagging. We propose a tagging scheme in which metastable state ion populations are modulated by optical pumping upstream of the double layer and the synchronous detection of LIF at the ion beam velocity is recorded downstream. Besides the unambiguous identification of the source of beam ions, this method can provide detailed dynamical information through time of flight analysis. Preliminary results will be presented. Please include this poster in session that includes poster authored by Evan Aguirre et al.

  4. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  5. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  6. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2016-07-12

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  7. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  8. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.

  9. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: thatmore » the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.« less

  10. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  11. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  12. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  13. Beam quality study for a grating-based dielectric laser-driven accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Jamison, S.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Li, Y.; Smith, J. D. A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures are considered to be one of the most promising technologies to reduce the size and cost of future particle accelerators. They offer high accelerating gradients of up to several GV/m in combination with mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper numerically investigates the beam quality for acceleration of electrons in a realistic dual-grating DLA. In our simulations, we use beam parameters of the future Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications facility to load an electron bunch into an optimized 100-period dual-grating structure where it interacts with a realistic laser pulse. The emittance, energy spread, and loaded accelerating gradient for modulated electrons are then analyzed in detail. Results from simulations show that an accelerating gradient of up to 1.13 ± 0.15 GV/m with an extremely small emittance growth, 3.6%, can be expected.

  14. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1994-11-01

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS.

  15. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1995-05-05

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs.

  17. Dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, P. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ivanov, I. E. Shumeiko, D. V.

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of a high-current relativistic electron beam is studied experimentally and by numerical simulation. The beam is formed in a magnetically insulated diode with a transverse-blade explosive-emission cathode. It is found experimentally that the radius of a 500-keV beam with a current of 2 kA and duration of 500 ns decreases with time during the beam current pulse. The same effect was observed in numerical simulations. This effect is explained by a change in the shape of the cathode plasma during the current pulse, which, according to calculations, leads to a change in the beam parameters, such as the electron pitch angle and the spread over the longitudinal electron momentum. These parameters are hard to measure experimentally; however, the time evolution of the radial profile of the beam current density, which can be measured reliably, coincides with the simulation results. This allows one to expect that the behavior of the other beam parameters also agrees with numerical simulations.

  18. Amending the uniformity of ion beam current density profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xu, Dequan; Liu, Ying; Xu, Xiangdong; Fu, Shaojun

    2008-03-01

    The uniformity of ion beam current density profile has been amended by changing the flow of the gas and making a new beam channel. The platform scanned in the horizontal orientation in this experiment, so the horizontal ion beam current distribution had hardly any effect on the etching uniformity and amending the ion beam current density profile in the vertical orientation was sufficient for the purpose of plat etching profile. The ratio of the ion source's working gas inputs has some effect for the uniformity and a ratio of 6.50sccm: 8.00sccm: 9.60sccm of the three gas inputs flow1: flow2: flow3 will lead to a more uniform profile. According to the horizontal distribution and the original vertical ion beam current density distribution measured by Faraday Cup, a new beam channel was made. The uniformity of ion beam current density profile is enhanced from +/-4.31%to +/-1.96% in this experiment.

  19. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams. PMID:27734940

  20. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-10-01

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams.

  1. Polymorphic beams and Nature inspired circuits for optical current.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, José A; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-10-13

    Laser radiation pressure is a basis of numerous applications in science and technology such as atom cooling, particle manipulation, material processing, etc. This light force for the case of scalar beams is proportional to the intensity-weighted wavevector known as optical current. The ability to design the optical current according to the considered application brings new promising perspectives to exploit the radiation pressure. However, this is a challenging problem because it often requires confinement of the optical current within tight light curves (circuits) and adapting its local value for a particular task. Here, we present a formalism to handle this problem including its experimental demonstration. It consists of a Nature-inspired circuit shaping with independent control of the optical current provided by a new kind of beam referred to as polymorphic beam. This finding is highly relevant to diverse optical technologies and can be easily extended to electron and x-ray coherent beams.

  2. Considerations of the low-velocity stage of a radioactive beams accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L.

    1992-12-01

    Studies of the low-velocity stages of a radioactive beams accelerator are summarized, highlighting the limitations of existing RFQ technology when applied to the specifications of the IsoSpin Laboratory.

  3. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Plum, Michael A; Peters, Charles C; Brown, David L; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

  4. Heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Ernest; Altemus, Rosemary; McCarthy, James; Biron, Don

    1982-12-01

    Various aspects of heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams are examined, among which are the dependences on boundary temperature, beam current density, and convective effects from an ambient gaseous environment. The design of a cooling system which extracts heat by forcing hydrogen (or helium) gas at a pressure of several Torr at near sonic velocities across a target surface is described. Boundary layer theory calculations and empirical measurements of the average heat transfer coefficient for the system are presented.

  5. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David Juarez

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  6. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  7. Laser ion acceleration toward future ion beam cancer therapy - Numerical simulation study -

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Shigeo; Izumiyama, Takeshi; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. Subjects and methods: An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. Results: When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. Conclusions: The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. PMID:24155555

  8. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined.

  9. Testing general relativity with laser accelerated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, L. A.; Harko, T.

    2012-07-09

    Electron accelerations of the order of 10{sup 21} g obtained by laser fields open up the possibility of experimentally testing one of the cornerstones of general relativity, the weak equivalence principle, which states that the local effects of a gravitational field are indistinguishable from those sensed by a properly accelerated observer in flat space-time. We illustrate how this can be done by solving the Einstein equations in vacuum and integrating the geodesic equations of motion for a uniformly accelerated particle.

  10. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: the case for current use

    PubMed Central

    Keisch, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of early stage breast cancer is evolving from traditional breast conservation techniques, employing conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation, to techniques in which partial breast irradiation is used in an accelerated fractionation scheme. A growing body of evidence exists, including favorable findings. Additional studies are under way that may ultimately prove equivalence. The logic behind this approach is reviewed, and the currently available data are presented to support the current use of carefully applied partial breast irradiation techniques in appropriately selected and informed patients. PMID:15987439

  11. Electron acceleration in the turbulent reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. P.; Huang, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    Context: We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the electron distribution in the presence of the strong inductive electric field in the reconnecting current sheets (RCS) of solar flares. Aims: We aim to study the characteristics of nonthermal electron-beam plasma instability and its influence on electron acceleration in RCS. Methods: Including the external inductive field, the one-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed with a realistic mass ratio for the first time. Results: Our principal findings are as follows: 1) the Buneman instability can be quickly excited on the timescale of 10-7 s for the typical parameters of solar flares. After saturation, the beam-plasma instabilities are excited due to the non-Maxwellian electron distribution; 2) the final velocity of the electrons trapped by these waves is of the same order as the phase speed of the waves, while the untrapped electrons continue to be accelerated; 3) the inferred anomalous resistance of the current sheet and the energy conversion rate are basically of the same order as those previously estimated, e.g., “the analysis of Martens”. Conclusions: The Buneman instability is excited on the timescale of 10-7 s and the wave-particle resonant interaction limits the low-energy electrons to be further accelerated in RCS.

  12. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.D.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.; Callis, R.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; Ferron, J.R.; James, R.A.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Matsuoka, M.

    1989-03-01

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (epsilon..beta../sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 10/sup 19/m/sup /minus/3/ < n/sub e/ < 4 /times/ 10/sup 19/m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 10/sup 20/m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of an asymmetric Monte Carlo beam model of a Siemens Primus accelerator.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Eric C; Sawkey, Daren L; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2012-03-08

    The assumption of cylindrical symmetry in radiotherapy accelerator models can pose a challenge for precise Monte Carlo modeling. This assumption makes it difficult to account for measured asymmetries in clinical dose distributions. We have performed a sensitivity study examining the effect of varying symmetric and asymmetric beam and geometric parameters of a Monte Carlo model for a Siemens PRIMUS accelerator. The accelerator and dose output were simulated using modified versions of BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc that allow lateral offsets of accelerator components and lateral and angular offsets for the incident electron beam. Dose distributions were studied for 40 × 40 cm² fields. The resulting dose distributions were analyzed for changes in flatness, symmetry, and off-axis ratio (OAR). The electron beam parameters having the greatest effect on the resulting dose distributions were found to be electron energy and angle of incidence, as high as 5% for a 0.25° deflection. Electron spot size and lateral offset of the electron beam were found to have a smaller impact. Variations in photon target thickness were found to have a small effect. Small lateral offsets of the flattening filter caused significant variation to the OAR. In general, the greatest sensitivity to accelerator parameters could be observed for higher energies and off-axis ratios closer to the central axis. Lateral and angular offsets of beam and accelerator components have strong effects on dose distributions, and should be included in any high-accuracy beam model.

  15. A prototype of a beam steering assistant tool for accelerator operations

    SciTech Connect

    M. Bickley; P. Chevtsov

    2006-10-24

    The CEBAF accelerator provides nuclear physics experiments at Jefferson Lab with high quality electron beams. Three experimental end stations can simultaneously receive the beams with different energies and intensities. For each operational mode, the accelerator setup procedures are complicated and require very careful checking of beam spot sizes and positions on multiple beam viewers. To simplify these procedures and make them reproducible, a beam steering assistant GUI tool has been created. The tool is implemented as a multi-window control screen. The screen has an interactive graphical object window, which is an overlay on top of a digitized live video image from a beam viewer. It allows a user to easily create and edit any graphical objects consisting of text, ellipses, and lines, right above the live beam viewer image and then save them in a file that is called a beam steering template. The template can show, for example, the area within which the beam must always be on the viewer. Later, this template can be loaded in the interactive graphical object window to help accelerator operators steer the beam to the specified area on the viewer.

  16. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, David U.; Clendenin, James E.; Kirby, Robert E.

    2004-06-01

    A photoelectron linear accelerator for producing a low emittance polarized electric beam. The accelerator includes a tube having an inner wall, the inner tube wall being coated by a getter material. A portable, or demountable, cathode plug is mounted within said tube, the surface of said cathode having a semiconductor material formed thereon.

  18. The two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron power source

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses the concept of a two-beam accelerator. Two versions are discussed; one employing a free electron laser, the second employing a branched beam sent through ''transfer cavities'' as in a klystron. 14 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  19. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  20. Collection and focusing of laser accelerated ion beams for therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Orzhekhovskaya, Anna; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2011-03-01

    Experimental results in laser acceleration of protons and ions and theoretical predictions that the currently achieved energies might be raised by factors 5-10 in the next few years have stimulated research exploring this new technology for oncology as a compact alternative to conventional synchrotron based accelerator technology. The emphasis of this paper is on collection and focusing of the laser produced particles by using simulation data from a specific laser acceleration model. We present a scaling law for the “chromatic emittance” of the collector—here assumed as a solenoid lens—and apply it to the particle energy and angular spectra of the simulation output. For a 10 Hz laser system we find that particle collection by a solenoid magnet well satisfies requirements of intensity and beam quality as needed for depth scanning irradiation. This includes a sufficiently large safety margin for intensity, whereas a scheme without collection—by using mere aperture collimation—hardly reaches the needed intensities.

  1. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  2. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.

    2010-02-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  3. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, John P.; Carlson, Benjamin T.; Duggins, Danielle O.; Hammond, Kenneth C.; De Santis, Stefano; Tencate, Alister J.

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  4. Accelerator systems and instrumentation for the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert Miles

    2005-12-01

    The neutrinos at the main injector (NuMI) neutrino beam facility began operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 2005. NuMI produces an intense, muon-neutrino beam to a number of experiments. Foremost of these experiments is MINOS-the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search-that uses two neutrino detectors in the beam, one at Fermilab and one in northern Minnesota, to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  5. Current correlations in a Majorana beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haim, Arbel; Berg, Erez; von Oppen, Felix; Oreg, Yuval

    2015-12-01

    We study current correlations in a T junction composed of a grounded topological superconductor and of two normal-metal leads which are biased at a voltage V . We show that the existence of an isolated Majorana zero mode in the junction dictates a universal behavior for the cross correlation of the currents through the two normal-metal leads of the junction. The cross correlation is negative and approaches zero at high bias voltages as -1 /V . This behavior is robust in the presence of disorder and multiple transverse channels, and persists at finite temperatures. In contrast, an accidental low-energy Andreev bound state gives rise to nonuniversal behavior of the cross correlation. We employ numerical transport simulations to corroborate our conclusions.

  6. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  7. Electron-Beam Dynamics for an Advanced Flash-Radiography Accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-11-17

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for multipulse flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Furthermore, beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in-cell codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup, image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and themore » resistive wall instability. The beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.« less

  8. BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT DIELECTRIC WALL INDUCTION ACCELERATOR SYSTEM FOR PULSED RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J F; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y

    2005-05-09

    Using dielectric wall accelerator technology, we are developing a compact induction accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. The accelerator would provide a 2-kA beam with an energy of 8 MeV, for a 20-30 ns flat-top. The design goal is to generate a 2-mm diameter, 10-rad x-ray source. We have a physics design of the system from injector to the x-ray converter. We present the results of injector modeling and PIC simulations of beam transport. We also discuss the predicted spot size and the on-axis x-ray dose.

  9. A 0.2 ns beam pulse for the 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, W. R.; Kritzinger, J. J.; Wikner, V. C.; Swart, T.; Schmitt, H.

    1984-01-01

    The 1.5 ns pulsed beam of the SUNI Van de Graaff accelerator has been used for neutron time-of-flight studies. To provide sufficient resolution for neutron scattering measurements at 22 MeV, a post-acceleration bunching system has been installed. Bunching of 2-6 MeV p, d and 3He beams is achieved in a simple quarter-wave coaxial resonator chamber designed for high Q and low power. The bunched pulse has a fwhm of less than 0.2 ns. The design and testing of the bunching system are outlined. Optimum power requirements are tabulated together with the induced beam energy spreads.

  10. Enhanced direct laser vacuum acceleration of a charged particle in crossing plane-wave laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Liu, C P; Wang, C; Shen, B F

    2015-09-30

    Strict theory shows that in the field of two laser beams crossing in vacuum with a phase delay π/2, a unique dynamics of the electron is observed. Unlike a single-beam case in which the velocity component along the laser magnetic field is always zero, the electron motion in the case of crossing beams is completely three-dimensional and hence a larger maximum value of the relativistic factor Γ, i.e. acceleration of an electron to larger energies, can be achieved. (laser acceleration of electrons)

  11. Pulsed power for particle beam accelerators in military applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.D.

    1980-06-20

    Techniques useful for generating and conditioning power for high energy pulsed accelerators with potential weapon applications are described. Pulsed electron accelerators are exemplified by ETA and ATA at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and RADLAC at Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque. Pulse-power techniques used in other applications are briefly mentioned, including some that may be useful for collective ion accelerators. The limitations of pulse-power and the general directions of desirable development are illustrated. The main needs are to increase repetition rate and to decrease size.

  12. Absorbed dose distribution for X-ray beams and beams of electrons from the Therac 10 Neptune linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tronc, D; Gayet, P

    1980-02-01

    After a brief presentation of the Therac 10 Neptune linear accelerator a complete set of dose distribution numerical values is given. These values define the depths on the axis as a function of the depth dose and define the penumbra (as characterized by the positions of the isodose curve intersections with parallel planes to the phantom surface) for beams of X-rays and for beams of electrons. Measurements of residual X-rays are given for a 10 MeV beam of electrons.

  13. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  14. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed.

  15. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Suppressing beam-centroid motion in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, E. O.; Archuleta, R.; Bender, H.; Broste, W.; Carlson, C.; Cook, G.; Frayer, D.; Harrison, J.; Hughes, T.; Johnson, J.; Jacquez, E.; McCuistian, B. Trent; Montoya, N.; Nath, S.; Nielsen, K.; Rose, C.; Schulze, M.; Smith, H. V.; Thoma, C.; Tom, C. Y.

    2011-12-01

    The second axis of the dual-axis radiography of hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6μs. It does this by slicing four micropulses out of a 2-μs long electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The 1.8-kA beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated to more than 16 MeV by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for multipulse flash radiography. High-frequency motion, such as from beam-breakup (BBU) instability, would blur the individual spots. Low-frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed-power variation, would produce spot-to-spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it. Using the methods discussed, we have reduced beam motion at the accelerator exit to less than 2% of the beam envelope radius for the high-frequency BBU, and less than 1/3 of the envelope radius for the low-frequency sweep.

  17. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  18. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-12-14

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process.

  19. Report on selected concerns regarding property accountability at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-24

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a federally funded research and development center at Newport News, Virginia, At the time of our review, Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) was operating CEBAF for the Department of Energy (DOE) under a management and operating (M&O) contract administered by DOE`s Oak Ridge Operations Office. SURA is currently operating CEBAF under a performance based management contract, The purpose of our inspection was to evaluate selected management issues regarding property accountability at CEBAF that we identified as a result of a complaint received by the Office of Inspector General. The complainant alleged a lack of accountability for Government equipment at CEBAF and the lack of an equipment inventory. Specifically, the complainant alleged, among other things, that after a named supervisor departed, CEBAF personnel had no idea what equipment had been assigned to the supervisor and could not account for any missing materials.

  20. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  1. Methods of optical diagnostics of electron-positron beams and interaction between plasma and high-current electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyacheslavov, L. N.; Ivantsivskii, M. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Popov, S. S.; Smaluk, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical diagnostics is widely used, both in plasma-physics experiments and in measuring parameters of electron and positron beams in accelerators. In doing so, the approaches with the same methodological base are often applied, which is explained by similarity of certain properties of objects under study despite the fact that these fields of physics are absolutely specific and require using the specialized techniques. The possibility of close contacts and cooperation among scientists concerned with similar problems in different fields of physics contributes to the fruitful exchange of ideas and helps to overcome these problems. It is especially characteristic of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, which is famous for pioneering works in the field of electron-positron colliders and controlled thermonuclear fusion. The first part of this paper presents a review of optical diagnostics of the stationary beam parameters in cyclic accelerators of electrons and positrons. The only techniques considered are those that became the recognized tools at colliders and storage rings of the latest generation, without which the routine operation of the facility is difficult to imagine. The second part of the paper describes optical diagnostics used in experiments of heating the plasma by a high-current electron beam.

  2. Accelerator systems and instrumentation for the NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaska, Robert Miles

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam facility began operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 2005. NuMI produces an intense, muon-neutrino beam to a number of experiments. Fore most of these experiments is MINOS---the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search---that uses two neutrino detectors in the beam, one at Fermilab and one in northern Minnesota, to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. NuMI is a conventional, horn-focused neutrino beam. It is designed to accept a 400 kW, 120 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator. The proton beam is steered onto a target, producing a secondary beam of mesons which are focused into a long evacuated volume where they decay to muons and neutrinos. Pulsed toroidal magnets (horns) focus an adjustable meson momentum range. Design of the beamline and its components is challenged by the 400 kW average proton beam power. To achieve such high proton power, the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) must store and accelerate ˜ 4x1013 protons per acceleration cycle. This requires the MI to be loaded with 6 or more batches of protons from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator. Such multiple-batch injection involves a synchronization of the two machines not previously required by the Fermilab accelerators. In this dissertation, we investigate timing errors that can arise between the two accelerators, and a feedback system which enables multiple Booster transfers into the Main Injector without significant loss of beam. Using this method of synchronous transfer, the Main Injector has delivered as many as 3x1013 protons per pulse to the NuMI beam. The instrumentation to assess the quality of the neutrino beam includes arrays of radiation-tolerant ionization chambers downstream of the decay volume. These arrays detect the remnant hadrons and tertiary muons produced with the neutrinos. This thesis discusses measurements using the arrays, including diagnostics of potential beam errors and

  3. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  4. Effects of a dielectric material in an ion source on the ion beam current density and ion beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Sakakita, H.; Nakamiya, A.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.

    2016-02-15

    To understand a strong focusing phenomenon that occurs in a low-energy hydrogen ion beam, the electron temperature, the electron density, and the space potential in an ion source with cusped magnetic fields are measured before and after the transition to the focusing state using an electrostatic probe. The experimental results show that no significant changes are observed before or after the transition. However, we found unique phenomena that are characterized by the position of the electrostatic probe in the ion source chamber. Specifically, the extracted ion beam current density and energy are obviously enhanced in the case where the electrostatic probe, which is covered by a dielectric material, is placed close to an acceleration electrode.

  5. Design, fabrication and first beam tests of the C-band RF acceleration unit at SINAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Sheng, Xing; Wang, Chaopeng; Tong, Dechun; Chen, Lifang; Zhong, Shaopeng; Tan, Jianhao; Lin, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-07-01

    C-band RF acceleration is a crucial technology for the compact Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A project focusing on C-band RF acceleration technology was launched in 2008, based on high-gradient accelerating structures powered by klystron and pulse compressor units. The target accelerating gradient is 40 MV/m or higher. Recently one prototype of C-band RF unit, consisting of a 1.8 m accelerating structure and a klystron with a TE0115 mode pulse compressor, has been tested with high-power and electron beam. Stable operation at 40 MV/m was demonstrated and, 50 MV/m approached by the end of the test. This paper introduces the C-band R&D program at SINAP and presents the experiment results of high-power and beam tests.

  6. The Computer Program LIAR for Beam Dynamics Calculations in Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Siemann, R.H.; Thompson, K.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    Linear accelerators are the central components of the proposed next generation of linear colliders. They need to provide acceleration of up to 750 GeV per beam while maintaining very small normalized emittances. Standard simulation programs, mainly developed for storage rings, do not meet the specific requirements for high energy linear accelerators. We present a new program LIAR ('LInear Accelerator Research code') that includes wakefield effects, a 6D coupled beam description, specific optimization algorithms and other advanced features. Its modular structure allows to use and to extend it easily for different purposes. The program is available for UNIX workstations and Windows PC's. It can be applied to a broad range of accelerators. We present examples of simulations for SLC and NLC.

  7. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  8. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  9. Summary of the Working Group 4: Future accelerator concepts including gamma-gamma, beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    The working group WG4 was aiming to focus its attention on various topics related to the future and novel accelerator concepts of colliders, new beam manipulation and focusing techniques, novel FEL schemes. The group planned in particular to consider new concepts of plasma (and other such method) based colliders; novel concepts of colliders including Higgs factories based on advanced linacs (and recirculating linacs), gamma-gamma collider, etc.; novel schemes of beam focusing including local chromaticity correction; beam control and manipulation schemes; emittance exchange, micro-bunch train, beam shaping (ramped beams, special distributions), flat beam transformations; novel FEL schemes, such as transversely tapered undulator, RF, optical and plasma based undulators. As many of these topics (e.g. novel concepts of plasma based colliders, the methods to create micro-bunch train and ramped beam distributions) could be of joint interest with WG1, the sought ways to arrange joint working group sessions for discussion of these topics.

  10. Acceleration of plasma electrons by intense nonrelativistic ion and electron beams propagating in background plasma due to two-stream instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the effects of the two-stream instability on the propagation of intense nonrelativistic ion and electron beams in background plasma. Development of the two-stream instability between the beam ions and plasma electrons leads to beam breakup, a slowing down of the beam particles, acceleration of the plasma particles, and transfer of the beam energy to the plasma particles and wave excitations. Making use of the particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP, and analytic theory we have simulated the effects of the two-stream instability on beam propagation over a wide range of beam and plasma parameters. Because of the two-stream instability the plasma electrons can be accelerated to velocities as high as twice the beam velocity. The resulting return current of the accelerated electrons may completely change the structure of the beam self - magnetic field, thereby changing its effect on the beam from focusing to defocusing. Therefore, previous theories of beam self-electromagnetic fields that did not take into account the effects of the two-stream instability must be significantly modified. This effect can be observed on the National Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) facility by measuring the spot size of the extracted beamlet propagating through several meters of plasma. Particle-in-cell, fluid simulations, and analytical theory also reveal the rich complexity of beam- plasma interaction phenomena: intermittency and multiple regimes of the two-stream instability in dc discharges; band structure of the growth rate of the two-stream instability of an electron beam propagating in a bounded plasma and repeated acceleration of electrons in a finite system. In collaboration with E. Tokluoglu, D. Sydorenko, E. A. Startsev, J. Carlsson, and R. C. Davidson. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Current limiting mechanisms in electron and ion beam experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The emission and collection of current from satellites or rockets in the ionosphere is a process which, at equilibrium, requires a balance between inward and outward currents. In most active experiments in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, the emitted current exceeds the integrated thermal current by one or more orders of magnitude. The system response is typically for the emitted current to be limited by processes such as differential charging of insulating surfaces, interactions between an emitted beam and the local plasma, and interactions between the beam and local neutral gas. These current limiting mechanisms have been illustrated for 20 years in sounding rocket and satellite experiments, which are reviewed here. Detailed presentations of the Spacecraft Charging at High Altitude (SCATHA) electron and ion gun experiments are used to demonstrate the general range of observed phenomena.

  12. The beat in laser-accelerated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Bränzel, J.; Koschitzki, Ch.; Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Priebe, G.; Sandner, W.

    2013-10-15

    Regular modulation in the ion velocity distribution becomes detectable if intense femtosecond laser pulses with very high temporal contrast are used for target normal sheath acceleration of ions. Analytical and numerical analysis of the experimental observation associates the modulation with the half-cycle of the driving laser field period. In processes like ion acceleration, the collective and laser-frequency determined electron dynamics creates strong fields in plasma to accelerate the ions. Even the oscillatory motion of electrons and its influence on the acceleration field can dominate over smoothing effects in plasma if a high temporal contrast of the driving laser pulse is given. Acceleration parameters can be directly concluded out of the experimentally observed modulation period in ion velocity spectra. The appearance of the phenomenon at a temporal contrast of ten orders between the intensity of the pulse peak and the spontaneous amplified emission background as well as remaining intensity wings at picosecond time-scale might trigger further parameter studies with even higher contrast.

  13. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  14. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  15. Multistaged acceleration of ions by circularly polarized laser pulse: Monoenergetic ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying; Wang Fengchao

    2007-07-15

    A multiple-staged ion acceleration mechanism in the interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse with a solid target is studied by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The ions are accelerated from rest to several MeV monoenergetically at the front surface of the target. After all the plasma ions are accelerated, the acceleration process is repeated on the resulting monoenergetic ions. Under suitable conditions multiple repetitions can be realized and a high-energy quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be obtained.

  16. Dark Current Simulation for Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Li, Z.; Zhan, X.; Srinivas, V.; Wang, J.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    The dynamics of field-emitted electrons in the traveling wave fields of a constant gradient (tapered) disk-loaded waveguide is followed numerically. Previous simulations have been limited to constant impedance (uniform) structures for sake of simplicity since only the fields in a unit cell is needed. Using a finite element field solver on a parallel computer, the fields in the tapered structure can now be readily generated. We will obtain the characteristics of the dark current emitted from both structure types and compare the two results with and without the effect of secondary electrons. The NLC and JLC detuned structures are considered to study if dark current may pose a problem for high gradient acceleration in the next generation of Linear Colliders.

  17. Laser-driven multicharged heavy ion beam acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Y.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. The laser pulse of <10 J laser energy, 36 fs pulse width, and the contrast level of ~1010 from 200 TW class Ti:sapphire J-KAREN laser system at JAEA is used in the experiment. Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated. This is achieved by the high intensity laser field of ˜ 1021Wcm-2 interacting with the solid density target. The demonstrated iron ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M) is difficult to be achieved by the conventional heavy ion source technique in the accelerators.

  18. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  19. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  20. Potential clinical impact of laser-accelerated beams in cancer ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obcemea, Ceferino

    2016-09-01

    In this article, I present three advantages of plasma-accelerated ion beams for cancer therapy. I discuss how: 1. low-emittance and well-collimated beams are advantageous in proximal normal tissue-sparing; 2. highly-peaked quasi-monoenergetic beams are ideal for fast energy selection and switching in Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) as a treatment delivery; 3. high fluence and ultra-short pulse delivery produce collective excitations in the medium and enhance the stopping power. This in turn produces denser ionization track signatures (spurs, blobs, etc.) in target tumors, higher linear energy transfer, higher Bragg peak, and higher radiobiological effectiveness at the micro-level.

  1. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  2. GENERATION AND CONTROL OF HIGH PRECISION BEAMS AT LEPTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Chiu Chao

    2007-06-25

    Parity violation experiments require precision manipulation of helicity-correlated beam coordinates on target at the nm/nrad-level. Achieving this unprecedented level of control requires a detailed understanding of the particle optics and careful tuning of the beam transport to keep anomalies from compromising the design adiabatic damping. Such efforts are often hindered by machine configuration and instrumentation limitations at the low energy end. A technique has been developed at CEBAF including high precision measurements, Mathematica-based analysis for obtaining corrective solutions, and control hardware/software developments for realizing such level of control at energies up to 5 GeV.

  3. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  4. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  5. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T. T. C.

    2007-08-10

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  6. Low Starting Electron Beam Current in Degenerate Band Edge Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new principle of operation in vacuum electron-beam-based oscillators that leads to a low beam current for starting oscillations. The principle is based on super synchronous operation of an electron beam interacting with four degenerate electromagnetic modes in a slow-wave structure (SWS). The four mode super synchronous regime is associated with a very special degeneracy condition in the dispersion diagram of a cold periodic SWS called degenerate band edge (DBE). This regime features a giant group delay in the finitelength SWS and low starting-oscillation beam current. The starting beam current is at least an order of magnitude smaller compared to a conventional backward wave oscillator (BWO) of the same length. As a representative example we consider a SWS conceived by a periodically-loaded metallic waveguide supporting a DBE, and investigate starting-oscillation conditions using Pierce theory generalized to coupled transmission lines (CTL). The proposed super synchronism regime can be straightforwardly adapted to waveguide geometries others than the periodically-loaded waveguide considered here since DBE is a general property that can be realized in a variety of structures.

  7. Limitation on the accelerating gradient of a wakefield excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam in rubidium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Clarke, C. I.; Litos, M.; Green, S. Z.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Fisher, A. S.; Wu, Z.; Walz, D.; Hogan, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the viability of using plasmas formed by ionization of high Z, low ionization potential element rubidium (Rb) for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The Rb vapor column confined by argon (Ar) buffer gas was used to reduce the expected limitation on the beam propagation length due to head erosion that was observed previously when a lower Z but higher ionization potential lithium vapor was used. However, injection of electrons into the wakefield due to ionization of Ar buffer gas and nonuniform ionization of Rb1 + to Rb2 + was a possible concern. In this paper we describe experimental results and the supporting simulations which indicate that such ionization of Ar and Rb1 + in the presence of combined fields of the beam and the wakefield inside the wake does indeed occur. Some of this charge accumulates in the accelerating region of the wake leading to the reduction of the electric field—an effect known as beam loading. The beam-loading effect is quantified by determining the average transformer ratio ⟨R ⟩ which is the maximum energy gained divided by the maximum energy lost by the electrons in the bunch used to produce the wake. ⟨R ⟩ is shown to depend on the propagation length and the quantity of the accumulated charge, indicating that the distributed injection of secondary Rb electrons is the main cause of beam loading in this experiment. The average transformer ratio is reduced from 1.5 to less than 1 as the excess charge from secondary ionization increased from 100 to 700 pC. The simulations show that while the decelerating field remains constant, the accelerating field is reduced from its unloaded value of 82 to 46 GeV /m due to this distributed injection of dark current into the wake.

  8. Medical linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator: design, fabrication and dosimetric characterization.

    PubMed

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crewson, C; Davis, W M; Sidhu, N P; Kundapur, V

    2015-09-07

    The goal of this work was to design, build and experimentally characterize a linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator for use at a nominal 6 MV beam energy. Monte Carlo simulation was used in the design and dosimetric characterization of a compact mini-beam collimator assembly mounted to a medical linear accelerator. After fabrication, experimental mini-beam dose profiles and central axis relative output were measured and the results used to validate the simulation data. The simulation data was then used to establish traceability back to an established dosimetric code of practice. The Monte Carlo simulation work revealed that changes in collimator blade width have a greater influence on the valley-to-peak dose ratio than do changes in blade height. There was good agreement between the modeled and measured profile data, with the exception of small differences on either side of the central peak dose. These differences were found to be systematic across all depths and result from limitations associated with the collimator fabrication. Experimental mini-beam relative output and simulation data agreed to better than ± 2.0%, which is well within the level of uncertainty required for dosimetric traceability of non-standard field geometries. A mini-beam collimator has now been designed, built and experimentally characterized for use with a commercial linear accelerator operated at a nominal 6 MV beam energy.

  9. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  10. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  11. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  12. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  13. Laser-wakefield acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams in the first plasma-wave period.

    PubMed

    Mangles, S P D; Thomas, A G R; Kaluza, M C; Lundh, O; Lindau, F; Persson, A; Tsung, F S; Najmudin, Z; Mori, W B; Wahlström, C-G; Krushelnick, K

    2006-06-02

    Beam profile measurements of laser-wakefield accelerated electron bunches reveal that in the monoenergetic regime the electrons are injected and accelerated at the back of the first period of the plasma wave. With pulse durations ctau >or= lambda(p), we observe an elliptical beam profile with the axis of the ellipse parallel to the axis of the laser polarization. This increase in divergence in the laser polarization direction indicates that the electrons are accelerated within the laser pulse. Reducing the plasma density (decreasing ctau/lambda(p)) leads to a beam profile with less ellipticity, implying that the self-injection occurs at the rear of the first period of the plasma wave. This also demonstrates that the electron bunches are less than a plasma wavelength long, i.e., have a duration <25 fs. This interpretation is supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  14. Beam property measurement of a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator for industrial purposes. A RF ion source was operated at 200 MHz with its matching circuit. The beam profile and emittance were measured behind an accelerating column to confirm the beam property from the RF ion source. The beam profile was measured at the end of the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using a beam profile monitor (BPM) and wire scanner. An Allison-type emittance scanner was installed behind the beam profile monitor (BPM) to measure the beam density in phase space. The measurement results for the beam profile and emittance are presented in this paper.

  15. Electromagnetic acceleration of material from a plate hit by a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1998-04-16

    An intense pulsed electron beam traversing a thin metal plate creates a volume of dense plasma. Current flows in this plasma as a result of the charge and magnetic field introduced by the relativistic electrons. A magnetic field may linger after the electron beam pulse because of the conductivity of the material. This field decays by both diffusing out of the conducting matter and causing it to expand. If the magnetized matter is of low density and high conductivity it may expand quickly. Scaling laws for this acceleration are sought by analyzing the idealization of a steady axisymmetric flow. This case simplifies a general formulation based on both Euler`s and Maxwell`s equations. As an example, fluid with conductivity {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 4} Siemens/m, density {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -3} kg/m{sup 3}, and initially magnetized to B = 1 Tesla can accelerate to v = 10{sup 4} m/s within a distance comparable to L = 1 mm and a time comparable to {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 100 ns, which is the magnetic diffusion time. If instead, {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 3} Siemens/m and {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -5} kg/m{sup 3} then v = 10{sup 5} m/s with a magnetic diffusion time {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 10 ns. These idealized flows have R{sub M} = {sigma}{mu}vL = 1, where R{sub M} is the magnetic Reynolds number. The target magnetizes by a thermal electric effect.

  16. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  17. Ion Beam Driven Shock Device Using Accelerated High Density Plasmoid by Phased Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko; Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Tsuchida, Minoru

    1997-07-01

    Different from three methods to generate high shock pressure by acceleration of high density plasma or particles (intense ion beams, plasma gun and rail gun) having their intrinsic deficiencies, new frontier is proposed to propel the shock physics and chemistry by using the high density plasma. In the present paper, new scheduled Z-pinch method is developed as a new device to generate high shock pressure. In the present method, plasma density can be compressed to the order of 10^18 to 10^19 cm-3, and high density plasma can be accelerated by zippering together with axial shock pressure, resulting in high-velocity launching of flyer. In the present paper, systematic experimental works are performed to demonstrate that high energy plasma flow can be electro-magnetically driven by the scheduled capillary Z-pinch, and to characterize the ion velocity and its current density. The estimated value of ion speed from the plasma-measurement reaches to 7 x 10^7 cm/s corresponding to 70 to 100 KeV for Ar. Copper flyer can be shot with the velocity range from 1km/s to 3km/s in the standard condition.

  18. Modifying proton fluence spectra to generate spread-out Bragg peaks with laser accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Schell, S; Wilkens, J J

    2009-10-07

    Currently, energy spectra of laser accelerated proton beams are far from being monoenergetic. For their application in radiation therapy, energy selection systems using magnetic fields have been proposed to single out particles with the desired energy. These systems allow the choice of protons between a lowest and a highest energy. In this work, we present a slight modification that allows us to influence the relative number of particles per energy bin. In fact, the transmitted spectrum can be shaped in such a way that it corresponds to a full spread out Bragg peak delivered simultaneously. This change of the spectrum can be achieved by inserting suitably formed scattering material at the central plane of the energy selection system where the particles are separated in space depending on their energy. With the help of Monte Carlo simulations we analysed both simple wedge geometries and various stacks of lead slices. We found that these configurations can provide energy spectra that naturally produce spread out Bragg peaks within one laser shot. This increases the particle efficiency of the whole system and makes laser accelerated protons more suitable for radiation therapy.

  19. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  20. Comparing current cluster, massively parallel, and accelerated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Kevin J; Davis, Kei; Hoisie, Adolfy; Kerbyson, Darren J; Pakin, Scott; Lang, Mike; Sancho Pitarch, Jose C

    2010-01-01

    Currently there is large architectural diversity in high perfonnance computing systems. They include 'commodity' cluster systems that optimize per-node performance for small jobs, massively parallel processors (MPPs) that optimize aggregate perfonnance for large jobs, and accelerated systems that optimize both per-node and aggregate performance but only for applications custom-designed to take advantage of such systems. Because of these dissimilarities, meaningful comparisons of achievable performance are not straightforward. In this work we utilize a methodology that combines both empirical analysis and performance modeling to compare clusters (represented by a 4,352-core IB cluster), MPPs (represented by a 147,456-core BG/P), and accelerated systems (represented by the 129,600-core Roadrunner) across a workload of four applications. Strengths of our approach include the ability to compare architectures - as opposed to specific implementations of an architecture - attribute each application's performance bottlenecks to characteristics unique to each system, and to explore performance scenarios in advance of their availability for measurement. Our analysis illustrates that application performance is essentially unrelated to relative peak performance but that application performance can be both predicted and explained using modeling.

  1. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  2. Focusing of a megavoltage electron beam in a medical accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, P. B.; Konrad, G. T.

    1991-05-01

    Due to packaging constraints in the radiotherapy machine gantry of Siemens Mevatrons, the electron linac used in the lower energy models has a long drift tube between the end of the linae and the 270° achromatic bend assembly. Space charge effects cause the electron beam to grow so that it frequently impinges upon the entrance hole to the bend assembly. A compact solenoid has been designed that is effective in increasing the transmitted beam through the bend assembly by over 40%. A permanent magnet design proved to be unsuccessful because of high transverse fields within the magnet. Trajectory calculations obtained through the electron linac design code PARMELA (Public domain code supplied to Siemens Medical Laboratories, Inc. by L.M. Young, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM) support the experimentally observed results. Data is presented for several electron energies over the normal operating range of 4-6 MV photons from these Mevatrons.

  3. Reduction of angular divergence of laser-driven ion beams during their acceleration and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakova, M.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma physics is a field of big interest because of its implications in basic science, fast ignition, medicine (i.e. hadrontherapy), astrophysics, material science, particle acceleration etc. 100-MeV class protons accelerated from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin target have been demonstrated. With continuing development of laser technology, greater and greater energies are expected, therefore projects focusing on various applications are being formed, e.g. ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration). One of the main characteristic and crucial disadvantage of ion beams accelerated by ultra-short intense laser pulses is their large divergence, not suitable for the most of applications. In this paper two ways how to decrease beam divergence are proposed. Firstly, impact of different design of targets on beam divergence is studied by using 2D Particlein-cell simulations (PIC). Namely, various types of targets include at foils, curved foil and foils with diverse microstructures. Obtained results show that well-designed microstructures, i.e. a hole in the center of the target, can produce proton beam with the lowest divergence. Moreover, the particle beam accelerated from a curved foil has lower divergence compared to the beam from a flat foil. Secondly, another proposed method for the divergence reduction is using of a magnetic solenoid. The trajectories of the laser accelerated particles passing through the solenoid are modeled in a simple Matlab program. Results from PIC simulations are used as input in the program. The divergence is controlled by optimizing the magnetic field inside the solenoid and installing an aperture in front of the device.

  4. Minimization of transverse beam-emittance growth in the 90-degree bending section of the RAON rare-isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, B. H.; Yoon, M.

    2016-11-01

    The major contribution of the transverse beam emittance growth (EG) in a RAON heavy-ion accelerator comes from the bending section, which consists of a charge-stripping section, a matching section, and a charge-selection section in sequence. In this paper, we describe our research to minimize the two-dimensional EG in the 90-degree bending section of the RAON currently being developed in Korea. The EG minimization was achieved with the help of multi-objective genetic algorithms and the simplex method. We utilized those algorithms to analyze the 90-degree bending section in a driver linac for the in-flight fragmentation system. Horizontal and vertical EGs were limited to below 10 % in the bending section by adjustment of the transverse beam optics upstream from the charge-stripping section, redesign of the charge-selection section, and optimization of the vertical beam optics at the entrance of a charge-selection section.

  5. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  6. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  7. Electron trapping and acceleration by the plasma wakefield of a self-modulating proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Petrenko, A. V.; Amorim, L. D.; Vieira, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Muggli, P.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that co-linear injection of electrons or positrons into the wakefield of the self-modulating particle beam is possible and ensures high energy gain. The witness beam must co-propagate with the tail part of the driver, since the plasma wave phase velocity there can exceed the light velocity, which is necessary for efficient acceleration. If the witness beam is many wakefield periods long, then the trapped charge is limited by beam loading effects. The initial trapping is better for positrons, but at the acceleration stage a considerable fraction of positrons is lost from the wave. For efficient trapping of electrons, the plasma boundary must be sharp, with the density transition region shorter than several centimeters. Positrons are not susceptible to the initial plasma density gradient.

  8. Beam polarimetry at the SPASCHARM experiment at IHEP U-70 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A. A.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, B. I.; Meshchanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Rykov, V. L.; Runzo, M. F.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the absolute polarimeters for the beam channel intended to transport polarized proton and antiproton beam at U70 accelerator. The circulating proton beam of 60 GeV/c and intensity 1013 p/cycle is slowly extracted from accelerator. It strakes the external an aluminum target of one interaction length. The emitted on forward direction Λ and \\bar Λ hyperons by parity violating process serve as the source of the polarized protons and antiprotons. In this case we expect to get the polarized antiproton beams in the momentum range 10-40 GeV/c with intensity, approximately 104 – 4x105 antiprotons/cycle, 106 protons/cycle.

  9. Beam Quality Requirements of Dosage Control in Laser Ion Acceleration for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jao-Jang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Liu, Chuan; Chen, C. D.; Wilks, Scott

    2010-11-01

    Ion beam accelerated by laser solid target interaction has vested interested in medical applications. Particle therapy for cancer treatment is one of the most promising prospects. Typical proton beam energy spread for cancer treatment is Delta E / E ˜ 0.2% for synchrotron accelerator and Delta E / E ˜1% for cyclotron after energy selection system. Passive scattering irradiation mechanism is a common practice to induce SOBP (spread out Bragg peak) for cancer treatment. We examine depth and lateral dose distribution of hardons energized by radiation pressure via various energy selection criteria. Monte Carol codes use PIC simulation results as the input of particle beams. Dose uniformity, distal falloff and lateral penumbra are discussed in related to beam energy spread, emittance and entrance spot size will be presented.

  10. Parameterization of photon beam dosimetry for a linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lebron, Sharon; Barraclough, Brendan; Lu, Bo; Yan, Guanghua; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, accurate data acquisition of photon beam dosimetric quantities is important for (1) beam modeling data input into a treatment planning system (TPS), (2) comparing measured and TPS modeled data, (3) the quality assurance process of a linear accelerator’s (Linac) beam characteristics, (4) the establishment of a standard data set for comparison with other data, etcetera. Parameterization of the photon beam dosimetry creates a data set that is portable and easy to implement for different applications such as those previously mentioned. The aim of this study is to develop methods to parameterize photon beam dosimetric quantities, including percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and total scatter output factors (S{sub cp}). Methods: S{sub cp}, PDDs, and profiles for different field sizes, depths, and energies were measured for a Linac using a cylindrical 3D water scanning system. All data were smoothed for the analysis and profile data were also centered, symmetrized, and geometrically scaled. The S{sub cp} data were analyzed using an exponential function. The inverse square factor was removed from the PDD data before modeling and the data were subsequently analyzed using exponential functions. For profile modeling, one halfside of the profile was divided into three regions described by exponential, sigmoid, and Gaussian equations. All of the analytical functions are field size, energy, depth, and, in the case of profiles, scan direction specific. The model’s parameters were determined using the minimal amount of measured data necessary. The model’s accuracy was evaluated via the calculation of absolute differences between the measured (processed) and calculated data in low gradient regions and distance-to-agreement analysis in high gradient regions. Finally, the results of dosimetric quantities obtained by the fitted models for a different machine were also assessed. Results: All of the differences in the PDDs’ buildup and the

  11. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  12. Laser-driven shock acceleration of ion beams from spherical mass-limited targets.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Kiefer, D; Geissler, M; Rykovanov, S G; Ramis, R; Hörlein, R; Osterhoff, J; Major, Zs; Veisz, L; Karsch, S; Krausz, F; Habs, D; Schreiber, J

    2009-03-06

    We report on experimental studies of ion acceleration from spherical targets of diameter 15 microm irradiated by ultraintense (1x10(20) W/cm2) pulses from a 20-TW Ti:sapphire laser system. A highly directed proton beam with plateau-shaped spectrum extending to energies up to 8 MeV is observed in the laser propagation direction. This beam arises from acceleration in a converging shock launched by the laser, which is confirmed by 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The temporal evolution of the shock-front curvature shows excellent agreement with a two-dimensional radiation pressure model.

  13. Proposed Dark Current Studies at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.P.; Conde, Manoel Eduardo; Gai, Wei; Power, John Gorham; Yusof, Z.M.; Spentzouris, L.K.; Dolgashev, V.A.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    A study of dark currents has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility (AWA). Emission of dark current is closely related to a breakdown. Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. An imaging system is being put together to identify single emitters on the cathode surface. This will allow us to study dark current properties in the gun. We also plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV). Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after can shed some light on a modification of metal surface after the breakdown.

  14. Return Current Electron Beams and Their Generation of "Raman" Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    1998-11-01

    For some years, we(A. Simon and R. W. Short, Phys. Rev. Lett. 53), 1912 (1984). have proposed that the only reasonable explanation for many of the observations of "Raman" scattering is the presence of an electron beam in the plasma. (The beam creates a bump-on-tail instability.) Two major objections to this picture have been observation of Raman when no n_c/4 surface was present, with no likely source for the electron beam, and the necessity for the initially outward directed beam to bounce once to create the proper waves. Now new observations on LLE's OMEGA(R. Petrasso et al), this conference. and at LULI(C. Labaune et al)., Phys. Plasma 5, 234 (1998). have suggested a new origin for the electron beam. This new scenario answers the previous objections, maintains electron beams as the explanation of the older experiments, and may clear up puzzling observations that have remained unexplained. The new scenario is based on two assumptions: (1) High positive potentials develop in target plasmas during their creation. (2) A high-intensity laser beam initiates spark discharges from nearby surfaces to the target plasma. The resulting return current of electrons should be much more delta-like, is initially inwardly directed, and no longer requires the continued presence of a n_c/4 surface. Scattering of the interaction beam from the BOT waves yields the observed Raman signal. Experimental observations that support this picture will be cited. ``Pulsation'' of the scattering and broadband ``flashes'' are a natural part of this scenario. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  15. Narrowband beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Injector accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph E. Dey; John S. Reid and James Steimel

    2001-07-12

    A narrowband beam loading compensation system was installed for the Main Injector Accelerating Cavities. This feedback operates solely on the fundamental resonant mode of the cavity. This paper describes modifications to the high level Radio Frequency system required to make the system operational. These modifications decreased the effect of steady-state beam loading by a factor of 10 and improved the reliability of paraphasing for coalescing.

  16. Control of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H.-E.; Swanson, K. K.; Barber, S. K.; Mao, H.-S.; Lehe, R.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a highly tunable, controlled-injection laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) through systematically varying parameters of a density shock injector. Beam energy, energy spread, charge and pointing can be controlled in the range of 50-300 MeV, with <10% energy spread, 1.5 mrad divergence and <1 mrad pointing fluctuation. The beams are repeatable, and suitable for high quality MeV Thomson photon sources or for injectors to staged systems.

  17. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Babzien, M.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Li, R. K.; Moody, J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sakai, Y.; Swinson, C.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Yakimenko, V.

    2014-09-01

    Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m-1 gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~1013 W cm-2) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m-1 accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing γ-rays by inverse Compton scattering.

  18. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-09-15

    Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~10(13) W cm(-2)) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m(-1) accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing γ-rays by inverse Compton scattering.

  19. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  20. Generation of high quality electron beams via ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Joshi, Chan; E217 SLAC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ionization injection in a beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator has been used to generate electron beams with over 30 GeV of energy in a 130 cm of lithium plasma. The experiments were performed using the 3 nC, 20.35 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as the driver of the wakefield. The ionization of helium atoms in the up ramp of a lithium plasma were injected into the wake and over the length of acceleration maintained an emittance on the order of 30 mm-mrad, which was an order of magnitude smaller than the drive beam, albeit with an energy spread of 10-20%. The process of ionization injection occurs due to an increase in the electric field of the drive beam as it pinches through its betatron oscillations. Thus, this energy spread is attributed to the injection region encompassing multiple betatron oscillations. In this poster, we will present evidence through OSIRIS simulations of producing an injected beam with percent level energy spread and low emittance by designing the plasma parameters appropriately, such that the ionization injection occurs over a very limited distance of one betatron cycle. Work at UCLA was supported by the NSF Grant Number PHY-1415386 and DOE Grant Number DE-SC0010064. Work at SLAC was supported by DOE contract number DE-AC02-76SF00515. Simulations used the Hoffman cluster at UCLA.

  1. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  2. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  3. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  4. Ti foil light in the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.R.; Chong, Y.P.; Goosman, D.R.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    An experiment is in progress to characterize the visible light produced when a Ti foil is immersed in the ATA 2 kA, 43 MeV beam. Results obtained to date indicate that the optical condition of the foil surface is a critical determinant of these characteristics, with a very narrow angular distribution obtained when a highly polished and flat foil is used. These data are consistent with the present hypothesis that the light is produced by transition radiation. Incomplete experiments to determine the foil angle dependence of the detected light and its polarization are summarized and remaining experiments are described.

  5. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z

  7. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro Popelier, Lara; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-02-07

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF{sub 6} is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition, and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350 V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10 mA for each component at RF power of 100 W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/− ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the applied

  8. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  9. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  10. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Steinke, S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Shaw, B. H.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Huijts, J. V.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-10-01

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T /m , enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  11. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  13. determination of current density distribution in an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir Prasad

    Electron beams are useful in many applications because they can be focused down to a spot far exceeding the physical limit of focusing visible light or x-rays. Additionally, electron beams are useful in transferring concentrated amounts of energy to a very small well defined region of a target for a fixed duration. This has led to the development of both scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) and electron beam lithography. The goal of this work was to develop a general method that accurately and easily yields the best estimate of the electron current density distribution of a focused electron beam, known as point spread function (PSF). The method developed is fast, easy to use and accurate. Two specific areas of research have been addressed for PSF determination. The first is concerned with the monotonic response of EUV photoresist as a function of electron beam dose. An external metrology is used for mapping the change in thickness that is smaller than the beam spot size. The method developed in this study simultaneously gives the photo-resist thickness change as a function of electron dose and electron beam PSF. A second thrust of this research has been to develop set of PSF characterization approaches that apply to the SEM. Here a knowledge of the PSF offers many benefits including the ability to monitor and optimize SEM performance such as astigmatism control. Perhaps, even more importantly, a knowledge of the PSF combined with a series of well-defined experimental steps has led to the development of new methods for improving the resolution of SEM images through computational means rather than very costly and complex equipment modification.

  14. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  15. Comparison of measured Varian Clinac 21EX and TrueBeam accelerator electron field characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Samantha A M; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Gagne, Isabelle M

    2015-07-08

    Dosimetric comparisons of radiation fields produced by Varian's newest linear accelerator, the TrueBeam, with those produced by older Varian accelerators are of interest from both practical and research standpoints. While photon fields have been compared in the literature, similar comparisons of electron fields have not yet been reported. In this work, electron fields produced by the TrueBeam are compared with those produced by Varian's Clinac 21EX accelerator. Diode measurements were taken of fields shaped with electron applicators and delivered at 100 cm SSD, as well as those shaped with photon MLCs without applicators and delivered at 70 cm SSD for field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 to 25 × 25 cm² at energies between 6 and 20 MeV. Additionally, EBT2 and EBT3 radio-chromic film measurements were taken of an MLC-shaped aperture with closed leaf pairs delivered at 70 cm SSD using 6 and 20 MeV electrons. The 6 MeV fields produced by the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX were found to be almost indistinguishable. At higher energies, TrueBeam fields shaped by electron applicators were generally flatter and had less photon contamination compared to the Clinac 21EX. Differences in PDDs and profiles fell within 3% and 3 mm for the majority of measurements. The most notable differences for open fields occurred in the profile shoulders for the largest applicator field sizes. In these cases, the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX data differed by as much as 8%. Our data indicate that an accurate electron beam model of the Clinac 21EX could be used as a starting point to simulate electron fields that are dosimetrically equivalent to those produced by the TrueBeam. Given that the Clinac 21EX shares head geometry with Varian's iX, Trilogy, and Novalis TX accelerators, our findings should also be applicable to these machines.

  16. A direct current rectification scheme for microwave space power conversion using traveling wave electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of the Vision-21 conference held three years ago allowed the present author to reflect and speculate on the problem of converting electromagnetic energy to a direct current by essentially reversing the process used in traveling wave tubes that converts energy in the form of a direct current to electromagnetic energy. The idea was to use the electric field of the electromagnetic wave to produce electrons through the field emission process and accelerate these electrons by the same field to produce an electric current across a large potential difference. The acceleration process was that of cyclotron auto-resonance. Since that time, this rather speculative ideas has been developed into a method that shows great promise and for which a patent is pending and a prototype design will be demonstrated in a potential laser power beaming application. From the point of view of the author, a forum such as Vision-21 is becoming an essential component in the rather conservative climate in which our initiatives for space exploration are presently formed. Exchanges such as Vision-21 not only allows us to deviate from the 'by-the-book' approach and rediscover the ability and power in imagination, but provides for the discussion of ideas hitherto considered 'crazy' so that they may be given the change to transcend from the level of eccentricity to applicability.

  17. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Accelerated Proton Beams for First Radiobiological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kluge, T.; Kraft, S.; Metzkes, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Richter, C.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Karsch, L.; Laschinsky, L.; Naumburger, D.

    2010-11-04

    We report on the generation of proton pulses with maximum energies exceeding 15 MeV by means of the irradiation of few micron thick metal foils by ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses at a power level of 100 TW. In contrast to the well known situation for longer laser pulses, here, a near linear scaling of the maximum proton energy with laser power can be found. Aiming for radiobiological applications the long and short term stability of the laser plasma accelerator as well as a compact energy selection and dosimetry system is presented. The first irradiation of in vitro tumour cells showing dose dependent biological damage is demonstrated paving the way for systematic radiobiological studies.

  18. Observation of optical transition radiation from electron beams generated by laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen; Nakamura, K.; Van, Tilborg J.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Sokollik, T.; Shiraishi, S.; Leemans, W. P.; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-02-01

    Laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) have made great progress, achieving electron beam with energy up to 1 GeV from a centimeter scale capillary plasma waveguide. Here, we report the measurement of optical transition radiation (OTR) from the capillary-based LPA electron beams. Transition radiation images, produced by electrons passing through two separate foils (located at 2.3 m and 3.8 m away from the exit of the LPA) were recorded with a high resolution imaging system, respectively. Two magnetic quadrupole lenses were placed right after the capillary to focus and collimate the electron beams. Significant localized spikes appeared in the OTR images when the electron beam was focused by the magnetic quadrupole lenses, indicating the coherence of the radiation and the existence of ultrashort longitudinal structures inside the electron beam.

  19. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  20. Ecliptic method for the determination of backscatter into the beam monitor chambers in photon beams of medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Darío Esteban; Alvarez, Guillermo Daniel; Nelli, Flavio Enrico

    2007-03-21

    A new method to measure the effect of the backscatter into the beam monitor chambers in linear accelerators is introduced from first principles. The technique, applicable to high-energy photon beams, is similar to the well-known telescopic method although here the heavy blocks are replaced by a very small, centred block on the shadow tray, thus the name 'ecliptic method'. This effect, caused mainly by backscattering from the secondary collimators, is known to be an output factor constituent and must be accounted for when detailed calculations involving the machine's head are required. Since its magnitude is generally small, experimental errors might obscure the behaviour of the phenomenon. Consequently, the procedure introduced goes along with an uncertainty assessment. Our theory was confirmed via measurements in cobalt-60 beams, where the studied effect does not contribute to the output factor. Measurements were also performed on our Saturne 41 linear accelerator and the results were qualitatively similar to those described elsewhere. The collimation systems were studied separately by varying one jaw setting while keeping the other at its maximum value. In the light of these results, we deduced an algorithm that can correlate the former data with the effect of backscattering to the beam monitor chambers for any rectangular field within 0.5%, which is of the order of the experimental uncertainty (0.6%). As we show, the experimental procedure is safe, simple, not invasive for the linac and requires only basic dosimetry equipment.

  1. Vibration attenuation of conductive beams by inducing eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irazu, L.; Elejabarrieta, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The increasing requirements for structural vibration control in many industries, require innovative attenuation techniques. In this work, the phenomenon of eddy currents is proposed to reduce the vibration of conductive and non-magnetic beam-like structures without modifying the system, neither the weight nor the stiffness. The motion of a conductive material in a stationary magnetic field induces eddy currents, which in turn generate a repulsive force and attenuate the vibration. In this study, the vibrational response of a thin aluminium beam under a partial and stationary magnetic field is analysed. The influence of the eddy currents is experimentally studied in the bandwidth from 0 to 1 kHz and a preliminary numerical model is proposed. The results show the vibration of all the length of the beam can be attenuated by inducing eddy currents, whereas the natural frequencies of the system remain unmodified. The attenuation of the vibration is more remarkable at low frequencies and when the position of the magnetic field coincides with a maximum vibration of a mode.

  2. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas M; Lapierre, Alain; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r(80%) = (212 ± 19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm(2) is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  3. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Thomas M. Lapierre, Alain Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  4. Phase control of the microwave radiation in free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    A phase control system for the FEL portion of Two-Beam Accelerator is proposed. The control keeps the phase error within acceptable bounds. The control mechanism is analyzed, both analytically in a ''resonant particle'' approximation and numerically in a multi-particle simulation code. Sensitivity of phase errors to the FEL parameters has been noticed.

  5. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  6. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  7. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  8. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  9. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  10. Heavy-ion beam dynamics in the RIA post-accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Aseev, V. N.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The RIA post-accelerator (RIB) includes three main sections: a room temperature injector with design ion charge-to-mass ratio 1/240 and output energy of {approx} 93 keV/u, a superconducting (SC) linac for ions with charge-to-mass ratio 1/66 or higher up to an energy of {approx} 1 MeV/u and a higher energy SC linac including existing ATLAS to produce 10 MeV/u beams up to uranium. Two strippers are installed between the sections. Extensive accelerator design studies and end-to-end beam dynamics simulations have been performed to minimize the cost of the linac while providing high-quality and high-intensity radioactive beams. Specifically, we have found that cost-effective acceleration in the front end can be provided by several hybrid RFQs proposed and developed for acceleration of low-velocity heavy ions. For beam focusing in the second section it is appropriate to use electrostatic lenses and SC quadrupoles inside common cryostats with the resonators.

  11. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kim, K. J.; Sun, Y. E.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  12. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.

    2009-01-22

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  13. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.J.; Piot, Philippe; Power, John Gorham; Sun, Y.E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  14. Optimization of Beam Injection Into the First Accelerating Module at TTF With Cavity Dipole Mode Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Kreps, G.; Schlarb, H.; Wendt, M.; Frisch, J.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.G.; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-04-10

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is a user facility for intense VUV-FEL light. The facility is densely equipped with diagnostics, essential in obtaining the necessary beam parameters, in particular the low emittance. However there is no dedicated component for alignment of the beam in the accelerating modules, each containing eight superconducting cavities. Large beam offsets can lead to an increase of the beam emittance. The centering of the beam in these modules is therefore important, mostly at the low energy end. A misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has already been observed using cavity dipole modes. This paper presents the experimental results of the optimization of the beam injection into the first module, based on the monitoring of dipole modes through the couplers installed for wakefield damping. For this we use a spectrum analyzer together with a multiplexer. By scanning the beam position and tilt with two pairs of steerers, we can find the trajectory which minimizes the dipole modes amplitude. The impact of the beam steering in the module on the beam is discussed. A time domain setup is also being presented.

  15. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 {mu}s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within {plus_minus} 100 {mu}m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  16. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 [mu]s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within [plus minus] 100 [mu]m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  17. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  18. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  19. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  20. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; ...

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3–AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility andmore » the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600°C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. In conclusion, the potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.« less

  1. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy.

  2. Experimental demonstration of x-ray betatron radiation spectrum from laser accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurent, Valentine; Michel, Pierre; Clayton, Chris; Pollock, Bradley; Doeppner, Tilo; Ralph, Joseph; Pak, Art; Wang, Tyan-Lin; Joshi, Chan; Tynan, George; Divol, Laurent; Palastro, John; Glenzer, Siegried; Froula, Dustin

    2008-11-01

    New laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments have been carried out at the Callisto Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will present results of the first experimental campaign on LWFA. The electron beam energy spectrum was measured with a two-screen spectrometer to avoid ambiguities due to the possible angle of the electron beam at the plasma exit [1]. Electron beams up to 300 MeV were measured. X-ray betatron radiation from the accelerated electrons were also measured. By using a set of filters acting like a spectral step function, the x-ray spectrum was reconstructed from fitting theoretical estimates; the radiation peaks at a few keVs. [1] R. Ischebeck et al., Proceedings of PAC 2007, Albuquerque NM, p. 4168. LLNL-ABS-405251

  3. Generation of high-quality electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. M. Elsied; Nasr, A. M. Hafz; Li, Song; Mohammad, Mirzaie; Thomas, Sokollik; Zhang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams of reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared. Supported by 973 National Basic Research Program of China (2013CBA01504) and Natural Science Foundation of China NSFC (11121504, 11334013, 11175119, 11374209)

  4. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  5. Application of real-time digitization techniques in beam measurement for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhan, Lin-Song; Gao, Xing-Shun; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Beam measurement is very important for accelerators. In this paper, modern digital beam measurement techniques based on IQ (In-phase & Quadrature-phase) analysis are discussed. Based on this method and high-speed high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion, we have completed three beam measurement electronics systems designed for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system (ADS). Core techniques of hardware design and real-time system calibration are discussed, and performance test results of these three instruments are also presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205153, 10875119), Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2030040029),and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  6. An improved 8 GeV beam transport system for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A new 8 GeV beam transport system between the Booster and Main Ring synchrotrons at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is presented. The system was developed in an effort to improve the transverse phase space area occupied by the proton beam upon injection into the Main Ring accelerator. Problems with the original system are described and general methods of beamline design are formulated. Errors in the transverse properties of a beamline at the injection point of the second synchrotron and their effects on the region in transverse phase space occupied by a beam of particles are discussed. Results from the commissioning phase of the project are presented as well as measurements of the degree of phase space dilution generated by the transfer of 8 GeV protons from the Booster synchrotron to the Main Ring synchrotron.

  7. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x{sub F} scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed.

  8. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  9. Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Bench, G

    2009-08-19

    A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

  10. Laser-driven electron beam acceleration and future application to compact light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hafz, N.; Jeong, T. M.; Lee, S. K.; Pae, K. H.; Sung, J. H.; Choi, I. W.; Yu, T. J.; Lee, J.; Jeong, Y. U.

    2009-07-25

    Laser-driven plasma accelerators are gaining much attention by the advanced accelerator community due to the potential these accelerators hold in miniaturizing future high-energy and medium-energy machines. In the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), the ponderomotive force of an ultrashort high intensity laser pulse excites a longitudinal plasma wave or bubble. Due to huge charge separation, electric fields created in the plasma bubble can be several orders of magnitude higher than those available in conventional microwave and RF-based accelerator facilities which are limited (up to approx100 MV/m) by material breakdown. Therefore, if an electron bunch is injected into the bubble in phase with its field, it will gain relativistic energies within an extremely short distance. Here, in the LWFA we show the generation of high-quality and high-energy electron beams up to the GeV-class within a few millimeters of gas-jet plasmas irradiated by tens of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses. Thus we realize approximately four orders of magnitude acceleration gradients higher than available by conventional technology. As a practical application of the stable high-energy electron beam generation, we are planning on injecting the electron beams into a few-meters long conventional undulator in order to realize compact X-ray synchrotron (immediate) and FEL (future) light sources. Stable laser-driven electron beam and radiation devices will surely open a new era in science, medicine and technology and will benefit a larger number of users in those fields.

  11. Spectrum bandwidth narrowing of Thomson scattering X-rays with energy chirped electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tong; Chen, Min Li, Fei-Yu; Yu, Lu-Le; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-06

    We study incoherent Thomson scattering between an ultrashort laser pulse and an electron beam accelerated from a laser wakefield. The energy chirp effects of the accelerated electron beam on the final radiation spectrum bandwidth are investigated. It is found that the scattered X-ray radiation has the minimum spectrum width and highest intensity as electrons are accelerated up to around the dephasing point. Furthermore, it is proposed that the electron acceleration process inside the wakefield can be studied by use of 90° Thomson scattering. The dephasing position and beam energy chirp can be deduced from the intensity and bandwidth of the scattered radiation.

  12. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  13. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, C.; Nakamura,K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.B.; Schroeder, C.; Hooker, S.M.

    2006-05-04

    GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radio frequency based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) and hence require tens to hundreds of meters to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometers to generate particle energies of interest to the frontiers of high-energy physics.Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) in which particles are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser pulse produce electric fields several orders of magnitude stronger (10-100 GV/m) and so offer the potential of very compact devices. However, until now it has not been possible to maintain the required laser intensity, and hence acceleration, over the several centimeters needed to reach GeV energies.For this reason laser-driven accelerators have to date been limited to the 100 MeV scale. Contrary to predictions that PW-class lasers would be needed to reach GeV energies, here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channeling a 40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We anticipate that laser-plasma accelerators based on capillary discharge waveguides will have a major impact on the development of future femtosecond radiation sources such as x-ray free electron lasers and become a standard building block for next generation high-energy accelerators.

  14. Artificial intelligence research in particle accelerator control systems for beam line tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pieck, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Tuning particle accelerators is time consuming and expensive, with a number of inherently non-linear interactions between system components. Conventional control methods have not been successful in this domain and the result is constant and expensive monitoring of the systems by human operators. This is particularly true for the start-up and conditioning phase after a maintenance period or an unexpected fault. In turn, this often requires a step-by-step restart of the accelerator. Surprisingly few attempts have been made to apply intelligent accelerator control techniques to help with beam tuning, fault detection, and fault recovery problems. The reason for that might be that accelerator facilities are rare and difficult to understand systems that require detailed expert knowledge about the underlying physics as well as months if not years of experience to understand the relationship between individual components, particularly if they are geographically disjoint. This paper will give an overview about the research effort in the accelerator community that has been dedicated to the use of artificial intelligence methods for accelerator beam line tuning.

  15. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  16. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  17. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  18. Dark Currents and Their Effect on the Primary Beam in an X-band Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wu, J.H.; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    We numerically study properties of primary dark currents in an X-band accelerating structure. For the H60VG3 structure considered for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) we first perform a fairly complete (with some approximations) calculation of dark current trajectories. These results are used to study properties of the dark current leaving the structure. For example, at accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m, considering two very different assumptions about dark current emission around the irises, we find that the fraction of emitted current leaving the structure to be a consistent {approx} 1%. Considering that {approx} 1 mA outgoing dark current is seen in measurement, this implies that {approx} 100 mA (or 10 pC per period) is emitted within the structure itself. Using the formalism of the Lienard-Wiechert potentials, we then perform a systematic calculation of the transverse kick of dark currents on a primary linac bunch. The result is {approx} 1 V kick per mA (or per 0.1 pC per period) dark current emitted from an iris. For an entire structure we estimate the total kick on a primary bunch to be {approx} 15 V. For the NLC linac this translates to a ratio of (final) vertical beam offset to beam size of about 0.2. However, with the assumptions that needed to be made--particularly the number of emitters and their distribution within a structure--the accuracy of this result may be limited to the order of magnitude.

  19. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LITHIUM BEAM EDGE PLASMA CURRENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTIC ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    PEAVY,J.J; CARY,W.P; THOMAS,D.M; KELLMAN,D.H; HOYT,D.M; DELAWARE,S.W; PRONKO,S.G.E; HARRIS,T.E

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 An edge plasma current density diagnostic employing a neutralized lithium ion beam system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The lithium beam control system is designed around a GE Fanuc 90-30 series PLC and Cimplicity{reg_sign} HMI (Human Machine Interface) software. The control system operates and supervises a collection of commercial and in-house designed high voltage power supplies for beam acceleration and focusing, filament and bias power supplies for ion creation, neutralization, vacuum, triggering, and safety interlocks. This paper provides an overview of the control system, while highlighting innovative aspects including its remote operation, pulsed source heating and pulsed neutralizer heating, optimizing beam regulation, and beam ramping, ending with a discussion of its performance.

  20. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.