Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator center university

  1. The Family Medicine Accelerated Track at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Betsy Goebel; Berk, Steven L

    2016-02-01

    Meeting Texas' future health care needs will be challenging, including the goal for a physician workforce more balanced toward primary care. To help expand the primary care physician workforce, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine developed the Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT), a three-year curriculum that culminates in the MD degree and links medical students to family medicine residency programs at TTUHSC campuses in Lubbock, Amarillo, or the Permian Basin (Odessa and Midland). Twenty current family medicine residents are graduates of the FMAT program, and 30 medical students are enrolled in the program, which is charting a path for curricular innovation in medical education that will be increasingly competency-based.

  2. Restoration of accelerator facilities damaged by Great East Japan Earthquake at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Takashi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Shimada, Kenzi; Yoshida, Hidetomo P; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University is a joint-use institution for education and research in a wide variety of fields ranging from physics to medicine. Accelerator facilities at the CYRIC provide opportunities for implementing a broad research program, including medical research using positron emission tomography (PET), with accelerated ions and radioisotopes. At the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, no human injuries occurred and a smooth evacuation was made in the CYRIC, thanks to the anti-earthquake measures such as the renovation of the cyclotron building in 2009 mainly to provide seismic strengthening, fixation of shelves to prevent the falling of objects, and securement of the width of the evacuation route. The preparation of an emergency response manual was also helpful. However, the accelerator facilities were damaged because of strong shaking that continued for a few minutes. For example, two columns on which a 930 cyclotron was placed were damaged, and thereby the 930 cyclotron was inclined. All the elements of beam transport lines were deviated from the beam axis. Some peripheral devices in a HM12 cyclotron were broken. Two shielding doors fell from the carriage onto the floor and blocked the entrances to the rooms. The repair work on the accelerator facilities was started at the end of July 2011. During the repair work, the joint use of the accelerator facilities was suspended. After the repair work was completed, the joint use was re-started at October 2012, one and a half years after the earthquake.

  3. The Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Brian P.

    2012-05-01

    In 1998 two teams traced back the expansion of the universe over billions of years and discovered that it was accelerating, a startling discovery that suggests that more than 70% of the cosmos is contained in a previously unknown form of matter, called Dark Energy. The 2011 Nobel Laureate for Physics, Brian Schmidt, leader of the High-Redshift Supernova Search Team, will describe this discovery and explain how astronomers have used observations to trace our universe's history back more than 13 billion years, leading them to ponder the ultimate fate of the cosmos.

  4. Universe acceleration and nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    A new model of nonlinear electrodynamics with a dimensional parameter β coupled to gravity is considered. We show that an accelerated expansion of the universe takes place if the nonlinear electromagnetic field is the source of the gravitational field. A pure magnetic universe is investigated, and the magnetic field drives the universe to accelerate. In this model, after the big bang, the universe undergoes inflation and the accelerated expansion and then decelerates approaching Minkowski spacetime asymptotically. We demonstrate the causality of the model and a classical stability at the deceleration phase.

  5. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  6. Fate of an accelerating universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.-A.; Hwang, W-Y. P.

    2006-01-15

    The presently accelerating universe may keep accelerating forever, eventually run into the event horizon problem, and thus be in conflict with the superstring idea. On the other hand, the current accelerating phase as well as the fate of the universe may be swayed by a negative cosmological constant, which dictates a big crunch. Based on the current observational data, in this paper we investigate how large the magnitude of a negative cosmological constant is allowed to be. In addition, for distinguishing the sign of the cosmological constant via observations, we point out that a measure of the evolution of the dark energy equation-of-state may be a good discriminator. Hopefully future observations will provide much more detailed information about dark energy and thereby indicate the sign of the cosmological constant as well as the fate of the presently accelerating universe.

  7. Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies of 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 15 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are standard candles, astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

  8. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... submit grant applications for the University Transportation Centers (UTCs) program. The Department... national university transportation Centers, regional university transportation Centers, and Tier...

  9. Accelerated Schools: The Satellite Center Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Jane

    The Accelerated Schools model attempts to restructure schools with high at-risk student populations and mainstream these students by the end of elementary school. A 6-year process of collaborative unity is used to identify challenge areas and move the school toward individualized solutions. The Accelerated Schools Satellite Center Project emerged…

  10. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... opportunity to submit applications for a grant as a Regional Center in the University Transportation Centers... will solicit competitive grant applications for two regional university transportation centers,...

  11. LIONs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, T.N.; Zdarko, R.W.; Simmons, R.H.; Bennett, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    The term LION is an acronym for Long Ionization Chamber. This is a distributed ion chamber which is used to monitor secondary ionization along the shield walls of a beam line resulting from incorrectly steered charged particle beams in lieu of the use of many discrete ion chambers. A cone of ionizing radiation emanating from a point source as a result of incorrect steering intercepts a portion of 1-5/8 inch Heliax cable (about 100 meters in length) filled with Argon gas at 20 psi and induces a pulsed current which is proportional to the ionizing charge. This signal is transmitted via the cable to an integrator circuit whose output is directed to an electronic comparators, which in turn is used to turn off the accelerated primary beam when preset limits are exceeded. This device is used in the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Beam Containment System (BCS) to prevent potentially hazardous ionizing radiation resulting from incorrectly steered beams in areas that might be occupied by people. This paper describes the design parameters and experience in use in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) area of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  12. Teaching and Research with Accelerators at Tarleton State University

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel K.

    2009-03-10

    Tarleton State University students began performing both research and laboratory experiments using accelerators in 1998 through visitation programs at the University of North Texas, US Army Research Laboratory, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Carderock. In 2003, Tarleton outfitted its new science building with a 1 MV pelletron that was donated by the California Institution of Technology. The accelerator has been upgraded and supports a wide range of classes for both the Physics program and the ABET accredited Engineering Physics program as well as supplying undergraduate research opportunities on campus. A discussion of various laboratory activities and research projects performed by Tarleton students will be presented.

  13. Detector design studies for Turkish Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksu, Burçin; Piliçer, Ercan

    2017-02-01

    The proposed Particle Factory detector at Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC-PF) aims to search for charm physics, CP violation and mixing of D0 mesons as well as new physics effects by investigating head-on collisions of 1 GeV electron from Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with 3.56 GeV positrons from synchrotron storage ring. In this work, we constructed the TAC-PF detector design by using a recently developed framework namely Detector Description for High Energy Physics (DD4hep). The baseline TAC-PF detector design and its qualifications were summarized, followed by a general description.

  14. Positron program at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2009-09-02

    Positron physics is an important part of the research activities at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). With positron annihilation spectroscopy, maps of nanodefects in materials have been obtained. For this purpose, positrons are generated by radioactive decay, photoactivation, or pair production. Preliminary tests of positron sources in the MeV range based on electron linacs have also been carried out at the IAC, and an expansion of this program is planned. A similar positron beam at Jefferson Lab would greatly improve our knowledge of the inner structure of the proton. In this paper, research with positrons at the IAC is reviewed. After a description of the Center's facilities, results from positron annihilation spectroscopy are discussed, together with future plans for testing a prototype positron source for CEBAF.

  15. Cosmic Accelerators: Engines of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan

    2009-06-23

    The universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. While the night sky appears calm, it is populated by colossal explosions, jets from supermassive black holes, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and shock waves of gas moving at supersonic speeds. These accelerators in the sky boost particles to energies far beyond those we can produce on earth. New types of telescopes, including the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting in space, are now discovering a host of new and more powerful accelerators. Please come and see how these observations are revising our picture of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  16. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, David; Forster, M.; Bates, D.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, Theodore; Roblin, Yves; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.

    2006-07-01

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  17. The Accelerator Markup Language and the Universal Accelerator Parser

    SciTech Connect

    Sagan, D.; Forster, M.; Bates, D.A.; Wolski, A.; Schmidt, F.; Walker, N.J.; Larrieu, T.; Roblin, Y.; Pelaia, T.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2006-10-06

    A major obstacle to collaboration on accelerator projects has been the sharing of lattice description files between modeling codes. To address this problem, a lattice description format called Accelerator Markup Language (AML) has been created. AML is based upon the standard eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format; this provides the flexibility for AML to be easily extended to satisfy changing requirements. In conjunction with AML, a software library, called the Universal Accelerator Parser (UAP), is being developed to speed the integration of AML into any program. The UAP is structured to make it relatively straightforward (by giving appropriate specifications) to read and write lattice files in any format. This will allow programs that use the UAP code to read a variety of different file formats. Additionally, this will greatly simplify conversion of files from one format to another. Currently, besides AML, the UAP supports the MAD lattice format.

  18. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  19. Rail accelerator research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Cybyk, B. Z.

    1982-01-01

    A rail accelerator was chosen for study as an electromagnetic space propulsion device because of its simplicity and existing technology base. The results of a mission feasibility study using a large rail accelerator for direct launch of ton-size payloads from the Earth's surface to space, and the results of initial tests with a small, laboratory rail accelerator are presented. The laboratory rail accelerator has a bore of 3 by 3 mm and has accelerated 60 mg projectiles to velocities of 300 to 1000 m/s. Rail materials of Cu, W, and Mo were tested for efficiency and erosion rate.

  20. Theory Challenges of the Accelerating Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2007-03-05

    The accelerating expansion of the universe presents an exciting, fundamental challenge to the standard models of particle physics and cosmology. I highlight some of the outstanding challenges in both developing theoretical models and interpreting without bias the observational results from precision cosmology experiments in the next decade that will return data to help reveal the nature of the new physics. Examples given focus on distinguishing a new component of energy from a new law of gravity, and the effect of early dark energy on baryon acoustic oscillations.

  1. Biological accelerator mass spectrometry at Uppsala University.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge; Palminger-Hallén, Ira; Ståhle, Lars

    2009-03-01

    A new research programme for the biological applications of accelerator mass spectrometry has been initiated at Uppsala University and the first results are presented. A (14)C-labelled pharmaceutical substance has been dissolved in human blood, plasma and urine and diluted over 3 orders of magnitude. The measured drug concentrations were found to be in good agreement with the predicted values. Furthermore, the effect of the sample preparation background contribution has been studied as the sample amount was varied down to sub-microl sizes.

  2. Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project: Status and Regional Importance

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, Oe.

    2010-01-21

    The Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project was started in 1997 with support of the State Planning Organization (SPO) of Turkey under Ankara University's coordination. After completing Feasibility Report (FR, 2000) and Conceptual Design Repot (CDR, 2005), third phase of the project was started in 2006 as an inter-university project with support of SPO. Third phase of the project has two main scientific goals: to write Technical Design Report (TDR) of TAC and to establish an Infrared Free Electron Laser (IR FEL) facility as a first step. The first facility and TDR studies are planned to be completed in 2012. Construction phase of TAC will cover 2013-2023. TAC collaboration include ten Turkish Universities: Ankara, Gazi, Istanbul, Bogazici, Dogus, Uludag, Dumlupmar, Nigde, Erciyes and S. Demirel Universities. It was planned that the first facility will be an IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung laboratory based on 15-40 MeV electron linac and two optical cavities with 2.5 and 9 cm undulators to scan 2-250 microns wavelength range. Main purpose of the facility is to use IR FEL for research in material science, nonlinear optics, semiconductors, biotechnology, medicine and photochemical processes. In this study; aims, regional importance, main parts and main parameters of TAC and TAC IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility are explained. Road map of the TAC project is given. National and international collaborations are explained.

  3. Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project: Status and Regional Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavaş, Ö.

    2010-01-01

    The Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project was started in 1997 with support of the State Planning Organization (SPO) of Turkey under Ankara University's coordination. After completing Feasibility Report (FR, 2000) and Conceptual Design Repot (CDR, 2005), third phase of the project was started in 2006 as an inter-university project with support of SPO. Third phase of the project has two main scientific goals: to write Technical Design Report (TDR) of TAC and to establish an Infrared Free Electron Laser (IR FEL) facility as a first step. The first facility and TDR studies are planned to be completed in 2012. Construction phase of TAC will cover 2013-2023. TAC collaboration include ten Turkish Universities: Ankara, Gazi, İstanbul, Boğaziçi, Doğuş, Uludağ, Dumlupmar, Niğde, Erciyes and S. Demirel Universities. It was planned that the first facility will be an IR FEL & Bremsstrahlung laboratory based on 15-40 MeV electron linac and two optical cavities with 2.5 and 9 cm undulators to scan 2-250 microns wavelength range. Main purpose of the facility is to use IR FEL for research in material science, nonlinear optics, semiconductors, biotechnology, medicine and photochemical processes. In this study; aims, regional importance, main parts and main parameters of TAC and TAC IR FEL & Bremsstrahlung facility are explained. Road map of the TAC project is given. National and international collaborations are explained.

  4. Role Strain in University Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Craig; Bozeman, Barry

    2007-01-01

    One way in which university faculty members' professional lives have become more complex with the advent of contemporary university research centers is that many faculty have taken on additional roles. The authors' concern in this article is to determine the extent to which role strain is experienced by university faculty members who are…

  5. Noncommutative accelerated multidimensional universe dominated by quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami

    2010-04-01

    Noncommutative Geometry recently attracted growing interest of cosmologists, mainly after the greatest success of unifying the forces of nature into a single gravitational spectral action in a purely algebraic way, rather than as being an entirely new formalism. In the present work, we discuss a multidimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker flat universe in which the perfect fluid has a Gaussian profile in time and depends on a fundamental minimal length sqrt{θ} like ρ= ρ(0)exp (- t 2/4 θ) for some positive constant ρ(0). This special form is motivated by a more recent noncommutative inflationary cosmological model, which was found to be able to drive the universe through a bounce without the need of any scalar field. Furthermore, we conjecture that the generalized equation of state has the special form p= ω a m ρ- ρ,( ω, m)∈ℝ where a( t) is the scale factor. It was found that the expansion of the multidimensional universe accelerates in time and is dominated for very large time by quintessence. Many additional consequences are revealed and discussed in some detail.

  6. Disjointed Governance in University Centers and Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, William

    2004-01-01

    Research centers and institutes are one example of how institutional governance has become increasingly disjointed; as the "suburbs" of the university expand, core governance structures lose influence. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  7. The National Center Test for University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the National Center Test for University Admissions, a unified national test in Japan, which is taken by 500,000 students every year. It states that implementation of the Center Test began in 1990, with the English component consisting only of the written section until 2005, when the listening section was first implemented…

  8. The Learning Technology Center at Vanderbilt University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bransford, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) Learning Technology Center, including profile of the center's personnel; description of representative projects, such as the Jasper-Woodbury Problem Solving Series, a multimedia literacy program for grades K-3, and the Adult Literacy Program; and a list of 14 representative publications by center…

  9. Quality Improvement in University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maffini, Cara S.; Toth, Paul L.

    2017-01-01

    University Counseling Centers (UCCs) experience high clinical demands and severe client presentations leaving counselors with limited time and resources to evaluate delivery of services. In this article, we present clinician-friendly quality improvement (QI) strategies used at a large Midwestern university and provide recommendations for…

  10. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ghosts in the self-accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2007-12-01

    The self-accelerating universe realizes the accelerated expansion of the universe at late times by large-distance modification of general relativity (GR) without a cosmological constant. The Dvali Gabadadze Porrati (DGP) braneworld model provides an explicit example of the self-accelerating universe. Recently, the DGP model became very popular for studying the observational consequences of the modified gravity models as an alternative to dark energy models in GR. However, it has been shown that the self-accelerating universe in the DGP model contains a ghost at the linearized level. The ghost carries negative energy densities and it leads to the instability of the spacetime. In this review, we review the origin of the ghost in the self-accelerating universe and explore the physical implications of the existence of the ghost.

  12. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  13. The magnetized universe: its origin and dissipation through acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Hui; Kronberg, Philip

    2010-09-02

    Problems of a magnetic universe and some, possible solutions: The greater the total energy of an astrophysical phenomena, the more restricted are the possible explanations. Magnetic energy is the most challenging because its origin is still considered problematic. We suggest that it is evident that the universe is magnetized because of radio lobes, extra galactic cosmic rays, an observed Faraday rotation measure, and the polarized emission of extra galactic radio structures. The implied energies are so large that only the formation of supermassive black holes, (SMBHs) at the center of every galaxy are remotely energetic enough to supply this immense energy, {approx} (1/10)10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}}c{sup 2}. (Only a galaxy cluster of 1000 galaxies has comparable energy, but is inversely rare.) Yet this energy appears to be largely transformed into accelerated relativistic particles, both electrons and ions. Only a large-scale coherent dynamo within the accretion disk forming the massive black hole makes a reasonable starting point. The subsequent winding of this dynamo derived flux by conducting, angular-momentum-dominated accreting matter produces the immense, coherent magnetic fluxes. We imbed this explanation in a list of similar phenomena at smaller scale and look for physical consistency among the various phenomena, especially the conversion of force-free magnetic energy into acceleration.

  14. Exploding Stars and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae are exceptionally interesting astronomical objects: they punctuate the end of stellar evolution, create the heavy elements, and blast the interstellar gas with energetic shock waves. By studying supernovae, we can learn how these important aspects of cosmic evolution take place. Over the decades, we have learned that some supernovae are produced by gravitational collapse, and others by thermonuclear explosions. By understanding what supernovae are, or at least learning how they behave, supernovae explosions have been harnessed for the problem of measuring cosmic distances with some astonishing results. Carefully calibrated supernovae provide the best extragalactic distance indicators to probe the distances to galaxies and to measure the Hubble constant. Even more interesting is the evidence from supernovae that cosmic expansion has been speeding up over the last 5 billion years. We attribute this acceleration to a mysterious dark energy whose effects are clear, but whose nature is obscure. Combining the cosmic expansion history traced by supernovae with clues from galaxy clustering and cosmic geometry from the microwave background has produced today's standard, but peculiar, picture of a universe that is mostly dark energy, braked (with diminishing effect) by dark matter, and illuminated by a pinch of luminous baryons. In this talk, I will show how the attempt to understand supernovae, facilitated by ever-improving instruments, has led to the ability to measure the properties of dark energy. Looking ahead, the properties of supernovae as measured at infrared wavelengths seem to hold the best promise for more precise and accurate distances to help us understand the puzzle of dark energy. My own contribution to this work has been carried out in joyful collaboration with many excellent students, postdocs, and colleagues and with generous support from the places I have worked, the National Science Foundation, and from NASA.

  15. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  16. University of Maryland--Educational Opportunity Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jerry L.

    This document describes a program at the University of Maryland-Educational Opportunity Center (UM-EOC) in College Park that fulfills a legislative mandate to provide information on and assistance to 1,500 adults, two-thirds of whom will be low-income, first-generation college participants who reside in 13 targeted communities in Prince George's…

  17. The industrial Center at Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect

    b.K. Hodge; Mary C. Emplaincourt

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

  18. Challenger Center's Window on the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Smith, S.; Bobrowsky, M.; Radnofsky, M.; Perelmuter, J.-M.; Jaggar, L.

    2001-11-01

    Challenger Center for Space Science Education's Window on the Universe program aims to create a network of under-served communities across the nation dedicated to sustained science, math, and technology education. Window communities presently include Broken Arrow, OK; Muncie, IN; Moscow, ID; Nogales, AZ; Tuskegee, AL; Marquette, MI; Altamont, KS; Washington, D.C.; and other emerging sites. Window uses themes of human space flight and the space sciences as interdisciplinary means to inspire entire communities. Practicing scientists and engineers engaged in these disciplines are invited to volunteer to become a part of these communities for a week, each visitor reaching roughly 2000 K-12 students through individual classroom visits and Family Science Night events during an intense Window on the Universe Week. In the same Window Week, Challenger Center scientists and educators present a workshop for local educators to provide training in the use of a K-12 educational module built around a particular space science and exploration theme. Window communities follow a 3-year development: Year 1, join the network, experience Window Week presented by Challenger Center and visiting researchers; Year 2, same as Year 1 plus workshop on partnering with local organizations to develop sources of visiting researchers and to enhance connections with local resources; Year 3 and subsequent, the community stages its own Window Week, with Challenger Center providing new education modules and training workshops for "master educators" from the Window community, after which the master educators return home to conduct training workshops of their own. Challenger Center remains a resource and clearinghouse for Window communities to acquire experience, technical information, and opportunities for distance collaboration with other Window communities. Window on the Universe is dedicated to assessing degree of success vs. failure in each program component and as a whole, using pre- and post

  19. Strong evidence for an accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridasu, Balakrishna S.; Luković, Vladimir V.; D'Agostino, Rocco; Vittorio, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    A recent analysis of supernova Ia (SN Ia) data claims a "marginal" ( 3σ) evidence for a cosmic acceleration. This result has been complemented with a non-accelerating Rh = ct cosmology, which was presented as a valid alternative to the ΛCDM model. In this paper we use the same analysis to show that non-marginal evidence for acceleration is truly found. We compare the standard Friedmann models to the Rh = ct cosmology by complementing SN Ia data with baryon acoustic oscillations, gamma ray bursts, and observational Hubble datasets. We also study the power-law model, which is a functional generalisation of Rh = ct. We find that the evidence for late-time acceleration cannot be refuted at a 4.56σ confidence level from SN Ia data alone, and at an even stronger confidence level (5.38σ) from our joint analysis. In addition, the non-accelerating Rh = ct model fails to statistically compare with the ΛCDM, having a Δ(AIC) 30.

  20. Supernovae, an accelerating universe and the cosmological constant

    PubMed Central

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of supernova explosions halfway back to the Big Bang give plausible evidence that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating since that epoch, approximately 8 billion years ago and suggest that energy associated with the vacuum itself may be responsible for the acceleration. PMID:10200242

  1. Supernovae, an accelerating universe and the cosmological constant.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, R P

    1999-04-13

    Observations of supernova explosions halfway back to the Big Bang give plausible evidence that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating since that epoch, approximately 8 billion years ago and suggest that energy associated with the vacuum itself may be responsible for the acceleration.

  2. Accelerated universes from type IIA compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blåbäck, Johan; Danielsson, Ulf; Dibitetto, Giuseppe E-mail: ulf.danielsson@physics.uu.se

    2014-03-01

    We study slow-roll accelerating cosmologies arising from geometric compactifications of type IIA string theory on T{sup 6}/(Z{sub 2}  ×  Z{sub 2}). With the aid of a genetic algorithm, we are able to find quasi-de Sitter backgrounds with both slow-roll parameters of order 0.1. Furthermore, we study their evolution by numerically solving the corresponding time-dependent equations of motion, and we show that they actually display a few e-folds of accelerated expansion. Finally, we comment on their perturbative reliability.

  3. Advanced Accelerator Applications University Participation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Hechanova

    2007-07-25

    Our research tasks span the range of technology areas for transmutation, gas-cooled reactor technology, and high temperature heat exchangers, including separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel, methods of fuel fabrication, reactor-accelerator coupled experiments, corrosion of materials exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic, and special nuclear materials protection and accountability.

  4. Linac-Based Photonuclear Applications at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Mayir; Starovoitova, Valeriia N.; Harmon, Frank

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, current Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) activities based on the exploitation of high energy bremsstrahlung photons generated by linear electron accelerators will be reviewed. These beams are used to induce photonuclear interactions for a wide variety of applications in materials science, activation analysis, medical research, and nuclear technology. Most of the exploited phenomena are governed by the familiar giant dipole resonance cross section in nuclei. By proper target and converter design, optimization of photon and photoneutron production can be achieved, allowing radiation fields produced with both photons and neutrons to be used for medical isotope production and for fission product transmutation. The latter provides a specific application example that supports long-term fission product waste management. Using high-energy, highpower electron accelerators, we can demonstrate transmutation of radio-toxic, long-lived fission products (LLFP) such as 99Tc and 129I into short lived species. The latest experimental and simulation results will be presented.

  5. An organizational survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees` opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  6. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  7. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  8. An organizational survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  9. 13 CFR 306.7 - Performance evaluations of University Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS University Center Economic...) Assess the University Center's contribution to providing technical assistance, conducting applied research, meeting program performance objectives (as evidenced by retention and creation of...

  10. 13 CFR 306.7 - Performance evaluations of University Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... University Centers. 306.7 Section 306.7 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRAINING, RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS University Center Economic... compete to receive Investment Assistance under the University Center Economic Development Program for...

  11. University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Asfour, Shihab, S.

    2007-01-29

    This report documents all activity of the University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center (MIIAC) grant awarded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP). This grant was coordinated through a collaborative effort with the Center for Advanced Energy Systems (CAES) located at Rutgers University in New Jersey (www.caes.rutgers.edu) which acted as the program’s Field Manager. The grant’s duration included fiscal years 2003-2006 (September 2002 – August 2006), and operated under the direction of Dr. Shihab Asfour, Director (MIIAC). MIIAC’s main goal was to provide energy assessments for local manufacturing firms. Energy consumption, productivity enhancement, and waste management were the focus of each assessment. Energy savings, cost savings, implementation costs, and simple payback periods were quantified using scientific methodologies and techniques. Over the four-year period of the grant, the total number of industrial assessments conducted was 91, resulting in 604 assessment recommendations and the following savings: 73,519,747 kWh, 435,722 MMBTU, and $10,024,453 in cost savings. A total of 16 undergraduate and graduate students were trained on energy assessment. Companies in over 40 different zip codes were assessed.

  12. Colleges and Universities Highway Traffic and Safety Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, James E., Ed.; Ritzel, Dale O., Ed.

    After consideration of the organizing of university safety centers and the growth and role of such centers in the future, descriptions are presented of the activities and practices in each of 16 existing college and university highway traffic and safety centers. Information is presented regarding center objectives, programs, staff composition,…

  13. Focusing of geodesic congruences in an accelerated expanding Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Albareti, F.D.; Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la E-mail: cembra@fis.ucm.es

    2012-12-01

    We study the accelerated expansion of the Universe through its consequences on a congruence of geodesics. We make use of the Raychaudhuri equation which describes the evolution of the expansion rate for a congruence of timelike or null geodesics. In particular, we focus on the space-time geometry contribution to this equation. By straightforward calculation from the metric of a Robertson-Walker cosmological model, it follows that in an accelerated expanding Universe the space-time contribution to the Raychaudhuri equation is positive for the fundamental congruence, favoring a non-focusing of the congruence of geodesics. However, the accelerated expansion of the present Universe does not imply a tendency of the fundamental congruence to diverge. It is shown that this is in fact the case for certain congruences of timelike geodesics without vorticity. Therefore, the focusing of geodesics remains feasible in an accelerated expanding Universe. Furthermore, a negative contribution to the Raychaudhuri equation from space-time geometry which is usually interpreted as the manifestation of the attractive character of gravity is restored in an accelerated expanding Robertson-Walker space-time at high speeds.

  14. Dark Energy Coupled with Relativistic Dark Matter in Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2003-10-01

    Recent observations favour an accelerating Universe dominated by the dark energy. We take the effective Yang-Mills condensate as the dark energy and couple it to a relativistic matter which is created by the decaying condensate. The dynamic evolution has asymptotic behaviour with finite constant energy densities, and the fractional densities OmegaLambda~0.7 for dark energy and Omegam~0.3 for relativistic matter are achieved at proper values of the decay rate. The resulting expansion of the Universe is in the de Sitter acceleration.

  15. Locating Bound Structures in the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David; Batuski, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the overwhelming evidence of the universe’s accelerating expansion, the question of what structures are gravitationally bound becomes one of utmost interest. Dunner et al. 2006 (D06) and Busha et al. 2003 (B03) set out to answer this question analytically, and they arrived at fairly different answers owing to the differences in their assumptions of velocities at the present epoch. Applying their criteria to different superclusters, it’s possible to make predictions about what structures may be bound. We apply the criteria of D06 and B03 to the Aquarius, Microscopium, Corona Borealis, and Shapley superclusters to make predictions about what structures might be bound and compare with the results of simple N-body simulations to determine which method is a better predictor and to determine the likelihood that parts or all of the superclusters listed above are bound. We find that D06 tend to predict more structure to be bound than B03, and the results of the N-body simulations usually lie somewhere in between the two sets of predictions. Observational evidence, and simulation data suggests that pairs of clusters in Aquarius and Microscopium are gravitationally bound, and that Shapley contains a large complex of clusters that are bound, along with some additional bound pairs. The likelihood that any of the clusters in Corona Borealis are bound to one another is very small, contrary to the claims of Small et al. 1998, who claimed that the entire supercluster is likely gravitationally bound. Busha M. T., Adams F. C., Wechsler R. H., Evrard A. E., 2003, ApJ, 596, 713 Dunner R., Araya P. A., Meza A., Reisenegger A., 2006, MNRAS, 306, 803 Small T. A., Ma C., Sargent W. L. W., Hamilton D., 1998, ApJ, 492, 45

  16. Resource Letter DEAU-1: Dark energy and the accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2008-03-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on dark energy and the accelerating universe. It is intended to be of use to researchers, teachers, and students at several levels. Journal articles, books, and websites are cited for the following topics: Einstein's cosmological constant, quintessence or dynamical scalar fields, modified cosmic gravity, relations to high-energy physics, cosmological probes and observations, terrestrial probes, calculational tools and parameter estimation, teaching strategies and educational resources, and the fate of the universe.

  17. Undulant Universe: Expansion with alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Requejo, Olga Mena; Quigg, Chris

    2005-03-15

    If the equation of state for 'dark energy' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  18. The University of Mississippi Geoinformatics Center (UMGC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easson, Gregory L.

    2003-01-01

    The overarching goal of the University of Mississippi Geoinformatics Center (UMGC) is to promote application of geospatial information technologies through technology education, research support, and infrastructure development. During the initial two- year phase of operation the UMGC has successfully met those goals and is uniquely positioned to continue operation and further expand the UMGC into additional academic programs. At the end of the first funding cycle, the goals of the UMGC have been and are being met through research and educational activities in the original four participating programs; Biology, Computer and Information Science, Geology and Geological Engineering, and Sociology and Anthropology, with the School of Business joining the UMGC in early 2001. Each of these departments is supporting graduate students conducting research, has created combination teaching and research laboratories, and supported faculty during the summer months.

  19. The Galactic Center: A Petaelectronvolt Cosmic-ray Acceleration Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi-Qing; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Zhen; Li, Hai-Jin; Chen, Tian-Lu

    2017-02-01

    The multiteraelectronvolt γ-rays from the galactic center (GC) have a cutoff at tens of teraelectronvolts, whereas the diffuse emission has no such cutoff, which is regarded as an indication of petaelectronvolt proton acceleration by the HESS experiment. It is important to understand the inconsistency and study the possibility that petaelectronvolt cosmic-ray acceleration could account for the apparently contradictory point and diffuse γ-ray spectra. In this work, we propose that the cosmic rays are accelerated up to greater than petaelectronvolts in the GC. The interaction between cosmic rays and molecular clouds is responsible for the multiteraelectronvolt γ-ray emissions from both the point and diffuse sources today. Enhanced by the small volume filling factor (VFF) of the clumpy structure, the absorption of the γ-rays leads to a sharp cutoff spectrum at tens of teraelectronvolts produced in the GC. Away from the GC, the VFF grows, and the absorption enhancement becomes negligible. As a result, the spectra of γ-ray emissions for both point and diffuse sources can be successfully reproduced under such a self-consistent picture. In addition, a “surviving tail” at ∼100 TeV is expected from the point source, which can be observed by future projects CTA and LHAASO. Neutrinos are simultaneously produced during proton-proton (PP) collision. With 5–10 years of observations, the KM3Net experiment will be able to detect the petaelectronvolt source according to our calculation.

  20. Rice University observations of the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    The most sensitive of the four balloon fight observations of the galactic center made by Rice University was conducted in 1974 from Rio Cuarto, Argentina at a float altitude of 4 mbar. The count rate spectrum of the observed background and the energy spectrum of the galactic center region are discussed. The detector used consists of a 6 inch Nal(T 1ambda) central detector collimated to approximately 15 deg FWHM by a Nal(T lamdba) anticoincidence shield. The shield in at least two interaction mean free paths thick at all gamma ray energies. The instrumental resolution is approximately 11% FWHM at 662 keV. Pulses from the central detector are analyzed by two 256 channel PHA's covering the energy range approximately 20 keV to approximately 12 MeV. The detector is equatorially mounted and pointed by command from the ground. Observations are made by measuring source and background alternately for 10 minute periods. Background is measured by rotating the detector 180 deg about the azimuthal axis.

  1. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe by particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ibotombi N.; Devi, Bembem Y.

    2016-04-01

    A spatially flat FRW Universe in the context of particle creation has been discussed by assuming a variable deceleration parameter which is a function of scale factor. A dust model in which creation of particles giving a negative creation pressure has been studied. Treating the Universe as an open adiabatic system, it is supposed that matter creation takes place out of gravitational energy. In this model, the Universe shows an accelerating phase of its expansion. Total number of particles increases while number of particle density decreases. Some physical implications of this model are investigated.

  2. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, James

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  3. University Research Centers: Heuristic Categories, Issues, and Administrative Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    University-based research centers can bring prestige and revenue to the institutions of higher education with which they are affiliated. Collaborating with corporations, units of government, and foundations, centers provide services to organizational leaders, policy makers, and communities. University research centers continue to increase in…

  4. Accelerated expansion of the universe à la the Stueckelberg mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Arık, Metin; Katırcı, Nihan; Kavuk, Mehmet E-mail: metin.arik@boun.edu.tr E-mail: mehmet.kavuk@boun.edu.tr

    2014-07-01

    We investigate a cosmological model in which the Stueckelberg fields are non-minimally coupled to the scalar curvature in a gauge invariant manner. We present not only a solution that can be considered in the context of the late time acceleration of the universe but also a solution compatible with the inflationary cosmology. Distinct behaviors of the scalar and vector fields together with the real valued mass gained by the Stueckelberg mechanism lead the universe to go through the two different accelerated expansion phases with a decelerated expansion phase between them. On the other hand, in the solutions we present, if the mass is null then the universe is either static or exhibits a simple power law expansion due to the vector field potential.

  5. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES&H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES&H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  6. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  7. Accelerating universe from an evolving Λ in higher dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, D.; Chatterjee, S.

    2008-04-01

    We find exact solutions in 5D inhomogeneous matter dominated model with a varying cosmological constant. Adjusting arbitrary constants of integration one can also achieve acceleration in our model. Aside from an initial singularity our spacetime is regular everywhere including the centre of the inhomogeneous distribution. We also study the analogous homogeneous universe in (4 + d) dimensions. Here an initially decelerating model is found to give late acceleration in conformity with the current observational demands. We also find that both anisotropy and number of dimensions have a role to play in determining the time of flip, in fact the flip is delayed in multidimensional models. Some astrophysical parameters like the age, luminosity distance, etc., are also calculated and the influence of extra dimensions is briefly discussed. Interestingly our model yields a larger age of the universe compared to many other quintessential models.

  8. The Process of Developing a University Neighborhood in a Downtown Urban Environment: Baltimore's UniversityCenter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler-Young, Angela; And Others

    This paper discusses the development and evolution of the University of Maryland's UniversityCenter in downtown Baltimore since its conception in 1991. UniversityCenter is a geographic location, one of six downtown districts that resulted from Baltimore's latest development plan. It contains not only the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus,…

  9. Accelerated expansion of the Universe and multidimensional theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, A. G.

    2007-09-01

    A condition for accelerated expansion of the Universe is derived from multidimensional formulas of gravitation, which is a generalization of the general theory of relativity for n dimensions. The model of a one-component ideal isotropic substance with a power-law diagonal metric is used as initial one. Restrictions on the state equations of our 3D space and accompanying additional dimensions are obtained.

  10. High energy focused ion beam technology and applications at the Louisiana Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, G. A.; Dymnikov, A. D.; Rout, B.; Zachry, D. P.

    2007-07-01

    The high energy focused ion beam (HEFIB) system at the Louisiana Accelerator Center (LAC) of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, USA, is constructed on one of the beamlines of a National Electrostatics Corporation 1.7 MV 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator. The HEFIB system has several components, including a versatile magnetic quadrupole sextuplet lens focusing system defined as the Russian magnetic sextuplet (RMS) system having the same demagnifications, the same focal lengths and the same positions of the focal points in xz and yz planes as the Russian quadruplet and a one-piece concrete supporting base and integrated endstation with air isolation. A review of recent microlithography and HEFIB system developments at LAC are presented, as well as new results using heavy ion (HI) beam lithography on crystalline silicon.

  11. An Artist in the University Medical Center. Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, A. Everette, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "An Artist in the University Medical Center" (M. Lesser, New Orleans: Tulane University Press, 1989), in which the artist captures the human side of the complex Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans (Louisiana). The interplay of drawings, etchings, watercolors, and prose conveys traditions of nurturing in the hospital. (SLD)

  12. Suggestions for Successfully Establishing a University Selling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, C. David; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the multiple benefits a university selling center offers to students, faculty members, administrators, and the general business community. The seven essential steps in first establishing a university selling center are addressed: find a champion, obtain the support of administration, find a white knight, establish a board of…

  13. The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winokur, Marc A.; Valentine, Deborah P.; Drendel, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Work Research Center is an innovative university-community partnership within the School of Social Work in the College of Applied Human Sciences at Colorado State University. The center is focused on working with county and state child welfare agencies to generate applied research that translates into evidence-based practice for serving…

  14. Dark Energy Coupled with Dark Matter in the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2004-06-01

    To model the observed Universe containing both dark energy and dark matter, we study the effective Yang Mills condensate model of dark energy and add a non-relativistic matter component as the dark matter, which is generated out of the decaying dark energy at a constant rate Gamma, a parameter of our model. For the Universe driven by these two components, the dynamic evolution still has asymptotic behaviour: the expansion of the Universe is accelerating with an asymptotically constant rate H, and the densities of both components approach to finite constant values. Moreover, OmegaLambdasimeq0.7 for dark energy and Omegamsimeq0.3 for dark matter are achieved if the decay rate Gamma is chosen such that Gamma/H~1.

  15. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Brau, James E [University of Oregon

    2016-07-12

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  16. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2010-11-23

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  17. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  19. Accelerating Universes from Compactification on a Warped Conifold

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    2007-02-09

    We find a cosmological solution corresponding to the compactification of 10D supergravity on a warped conifold that easily circumvents the ''no-go'' theorem given for a warped or flux compactification, providing new perspectives for the study of supergravity or superstring theory in cosmological backgrounds. With fixed volume moduli of the internal space, the model can explain a physical Universe undergoing an accelerated expansion in the 4D Einstein frame, for a sufficiently long time. The solution found in the limit that the warp factor dependent on the radial coordinate y is extremized (giving a constant warping) is smooth and it supports a flat four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology undergoing a period of accelerated expansion with slowly rolling or stabilized volume moduli.

  20. The University Library: The Center of a University Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frade, Patricia A.; Washburn, Allyson

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a formal study conducted in 2001 at Brigham Young University to determine the value of the library to the university community. Methods used to collect data for the study included an e-mail survey, usage statistics, naturalistic observations, and interviews. Two years after the study, the authors wondered if the conclusions of…

  1. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  2. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  3. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  4. Universal scalings for laser acceleration of electrons in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alexey; Zhang, Xi; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    We analytically investigate the acceleration of electrons undergoing betatron oscillations in an ion channel, driven by a laser beam propagating with superluminal (or luminal) phase velocity. The universal scalings for the maximum attainable electron energy are found for arbitrary laser and plasma parameters by deriving a set of dimensionless equations for paraxial ultra-relativistic electron motion. One of our analytic predictions is the emergence of forbidden zones in the electrons' phase space. For an individual electron, these give rise to a threshold-type dependence of the final energy gain on the laser intensity. The universal scalings are also generalized to the resonant laser interaction with the third harmonic of betatron motion and to the case when the laser beam is circularly polarized.

  5. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies.

    PubMed

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-7) torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-10) torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  6. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige; Gruen, Eberhard; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Srama, Ralf; and others

    2012-07-15

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  7. The Louisiana State University Law Center's Bijural Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costonis, John J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the bijural program of Louisiana State University Law Center. The program educates all first-degree law students in both the common law and civil law traditions, preparing them for the increasing globalization of legal practice. (EV)

  8. Implications of an absolute simultaneity theory for cosmology and universe acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift-distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe.

  9. Implications of an Absolute Simultaneity Theory for Cosmology and Universe Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kipreos, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift–distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  10. Student-Centered Integrated Anatomy Resource Sessions at Alfaisal University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Michele; Arain, Nasir Nisar; Assale, Tawfic Samer Abu; Assi, Abdulelah Hassan; Albar, Raed Alwai; Ganguly, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    Alfaisal University is a new medical school in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that matriculates eligible students directly from high school and requires them to participate in a hybrid problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. PBL is a well-established student-centered approach, and the authors have sought to examine if a student-centered,…

  11. Establishing a University-Based Mars Mission Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines one university's process of planning and preparing a successful proposal for a space research center which focused on a broad, cross-disciplinary study. States that as a result of the center, four new graduate courses were offered and a higher than average enrollment was attracted to the school. (RT)

  12. The Educational Research Center, Riyadh University: Objectives and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Halim, Ahmed El-Mahdi

    Objectives, challenges, and needs of an educational research and development center at Biyadh University, Saudi Arabia are discussed. Major objectives of the center are to cooperate with the ministry of education and other agencies in conducting projects, to foster research projects of qualified individuals, and to exchange information and…

  13. Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Rise of Complexity in an Accelerated Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, H.; Riazi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Observational data (Supernovae type Ia data) indicate that the rate of the universe expansion is increasing, which means that, in the framework of General Relativity, the current phase of the expansion is due to an unknown source of energy. Therefore, the nature of dominated fluid in cosmos, as the source of energy, is mysterious. Here, by considering this property of current accelerating phase along with the concept of thermodynamics equilibrium we try to find possible values for the state parameter ( ω) of the dominated fluid in a ( n+1)-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. Our results are compatible with previous work for Gauss-Bonnet gravity and point to a universe which is so close to its thermodynamic equilibrium state. By the evolution of the cosmos, the baryonic content of the cosmos is participating in longer range interactions, including gravity and electromagnetism, and structure formation is begun which leads to an increase in the complexity content of the universe. Therefore, a true model for the cosmos should show this rise of complexity and information. In order to achieve this goal, we introduce a simple model including free particles in an expanding box and try to count the number of the states of energy. This configuration shows that the entropy of these number of states as the measure for complexity is increased when dominated fluid satisfies special condition ( ω ≥ -1) which is compatible with the results of the Supernovae type Ia data and the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Finally, We see that the rate of increase in the complexity content of the universe increases in the ω → -1 limit.

  14. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  15. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  16. Radiation Pressure Forces, the Anomalous Acceleration, and Center of Mass Motion for the TOPEX/POSEIDON Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, Daniel G.; Born, George H.

    2000-01-01

    Shortly after launch of the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) spacecraft (s/c), the Precision Orbit Determination (POD) Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Center for Space Research at the University of Texas, discovered residual along-track accelerations, which were unexpected. Here, we describe the analysis of radiation pressure forces acting on the T/P s/c for the purpose of understanding and providing an explanation for the anomalous accelerations. The radiation forces acting on the T/P solar army, which experiences warping due to temperature gradients between the front and back surfaces, are analyzed and the resulting along-track accelerations are determined. Characteristics similar to those of the anomalous acceleration are seen. This analysis led to the development of a new radiation form model, which includes solar array warping and a solar array deployment deflection of as large as 2 deg. As a result of this new model estimates of the empirical along-track acceleration are reduced in magnitude when compared to the GSFC tuned macromodel and are less dependent upon beta(prime), the location of the Sun relative to the orbit plane. If these results we believed to reflect the actual orientation of the T/P solar array then motion of the solar array must influence the location of the s/c center of mass. Preliminary estimates indicate that the center of mass can vary by as much as 3 cm in the radial component of the s/c's position due to rotation of the deflected, warped solar array panel .The altimeter measurements rely upon accurate knowledge of the center of mass location relative to the s/c frame of reference. Any radial motion of the center of mass directly affects the altimeter measurements.

  17. The Syracuse University Center for Training and Research in Hypersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John; Blankson, Isaiah (Technical Monitor); Robinson, Stephen K. (Technical Monitor); Walsh, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, Griffin Y. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In Fall 1993, NASA Headquarters established Centers for Hypersonics at the University of Maryland, the University of Texas-Arlington, and Syracuse University. These centers are dedicated to research and education in hypersonic technologies and have the objective of educating the next generation of engineers in this critical field. At the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics this goal is being realized by focusing resources to: Provide an environment in which promising undergraduate students can learn the fundamental engineering principles of hypersonics so that they may make a seamless transition to graduate study and research in this field; Provide graduate students with advanced training in hypersonics and an opportunity to interact with leading authorities in the field in both research and instructional capacities; and Perform fundamental research in areas that will impact hypersonic vehicle design and development.

  18. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  19. The polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Mulhollan, G.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Witte, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator has been running with polarized electrons both in the collider (SLC) mode and in the fixed target mode. The accelerators polarized electron source is based on a thin, strained GaAs photocathode, which is held at a negative high voltage and illuminated by a Titanium Sapphire laser. The reliability of the source was better than 95% during the eight-month-long 1993 SLC run. A beam polarization of 63% was measured by the SLD experiment at the SLC interaction point in the 1993 data run. The fixed-target experiment E143 measured a beam polarization of 85% in its 1993--94 run. These polarization measurements, made at high energy, are in good agreement with measurements made at low energy on a calibrated Mott polarimeter. The higher beam polarization in the fixed target experiment is due to a thinner, more highly strained GaAs photocathode than had been used earlier, and to the experiment`s low beam current requirements. The SLC is now running with the high polarization photocathode. Details of the source, and experience with the high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on the accelerator in the current SLC run, will be presented.

  20. Group Treatment of Eating Disorders in a University Counseling Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Gregory; And Others

    Sociocultural pressures to pursue an unrealistic ideal of thinness have contributed to an increasing number of students seeking help at a university counseling center for the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. To help these students, a group treatment technique was developed using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Treatment…

  1. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the…

  2. The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2004-01-01

    During the summer and on weekends, it is not unusual to see many children, the youngest holding their parents' hands, walking to classes amongst the beautiful landscaping and old buildings of Northwestern University on Lake Michigan's shores in Evanston, Illinois. The Center for Talent Development (CTD) has been offering services and programs to…

  3. Collection Development Strategies for a University Center Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurt, Charlene S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In 1990, George Mason University (Virginia) proposed building a combined library/student center. Examines the processes, policies, and procedures used to develop a new library collection combining multiculturalism, diversity, and core texts. Discusses the collection development plan, strategies, and policy; faculty involvement; key series and sets…

  4. Have Less? Do More! Marketing University Counseling Center Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreier, Barry A.

    Many university and college counseling centers are experiencing increased financial constraints and a growing lack of general institutional support. This paper suggests that psycho-educational programming may be one solution for reaching more students while spending less in financial and staff hour resources. Although educational programming may…

  5. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  6. Extended Sessions in Ongoing Process Groups at University Counseling Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Brian

    Common in the 1960s, marathon groups are now rarely used. With the emerging effects of managed care, short-term brief focused therapies have become the therapeutic norm, and group counseling has become popular because of its low cost and therapeutic effectiveness. Most groups at university counseling centers run for one semester. A strategically…

  7. Walk-In Triage Systems in University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Katharine S.; Love, Michael M.; Chapman, Kelsey M.; Horn, Angela J.; Haak, Patricia P.; Shen, Claire Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    To meet the complex mental health needs of students, some university counseling centers (UCCs) have implemented walk-in triage intake systems, which have not yet been empirically investigated. This study compared client and clinician differences (N = 5564) between a traditional scheduled intake system (Year 1) and a walk-in triage system (Year 2)…

  8. Integrating Mindfulness Meditation within a University Counseling Center Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurash, Cheryl; Schaul, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    This paper documents the development of a mindfulness meditation component within a University Counseling Center setting. The specific focus is upon the inclusion of meditation as it pertains to both organizational structure and psychotherapy training. The integration of a meditation practice into any organization is a slow process that poses…

  9. University Center and Community Hospital: Problems in Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlov, Alvin R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A case study of the University of Chicago Medical Center highlights the tensions, strains, and resistances that inhibit the development of an urban health care system. It raises questions about the role of the research and teaching hospital in regional health care planning, especially as suburban facilities are drawing away patients. (Author/LBH)

  10. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  11. Off-center observers versus supernovae in inhomogeneous pressure universes

    SciTech Connect

    Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P.; Denkiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-09-10

    Exact luminosity distance and apparent magnitude formulae are applied to the Union2 557 supernovae sample in order to constrain the possible position of an observer outside of the center of symmetry in spherically symmetric inhomogeneous pressure Stephani universes, which are complementary to inhomogeneous density Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void models. Two specific models are investigated. The first allows a barotropic equation of state at the center of symmetry without the need to specify a scale factor function (model IIA). The second has no barotropic equation of state at the center, but has an explicit dust-like scale factor evolution (model IIB). It is shown that even at 3σ CL, an off-center observer cannot be further than about 4.4 Gpc away from the center of symmetry, which is comparable to the reported size of a void in LTB models with the most likely value of the distance from the center at about 341 Mpc for model IIA and 68 Mpc for model IIB. The off-center observer cannot be farther away from the center than about 577 Mpc for model IIB at 3σ CL. It is determined that the best-fit parameters which characterize inhomogeneity are Ω{sub inh} = 0.77 (dimensionless: model IIA) and α = 7.31 × 10{sup –9} (s km{sup –1}){sup 2/3} Mpc{sup –4/3} (model IIB).

  12. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  13. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  14. Implementation of the Boston University Space Physics Acquisition Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1998-01-01

    The tasks carried out during this grant achieved the goals as set forth in the initial proposal. The Boston University Space Physics Acquisition CEnter (BUSPACE) now provides World Wide Web access to data from a large suite of both space-based and ground-based instruments, archived from different missions, experiments, or campaigns in which researchers associated with the Center for Space Physics (CSP) at Boston University have been involved. These archival data sets are in digital form and are valuable for retrospective data analysis studies of magnetospheric as well as ionospheric, thermospheric, and mesospheric physics. We have leveraged our grass-roots effort with the NASA seed money to establish dedicated hardware (computer and hard disk augmentation) and student support to grow and maintain the system. This leveraging of effort now permits easy access by the space physics community to many underutilized, yet important data sets, one example being that of the SCATHA satellite.

  15. Developments and applications of accelerator system at the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, S.; Kurita, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamada, H.; Mori, J.; Hamachi, H.; Kimura, S.; Shimoda, T.; Hiroto, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Ohtani, N.; Yasuda, K.; Ishigami, R.; Sasase, M.; Ito, Y.; Hatashita, M.; Takagi, K.; Kume, K.; Fukuda, S.; Yokohama, N.; Kagiya, G.; Fukumoto, S.; Kondo, M.

    2005-12-01

    At the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center (WERC), an accelerator system with a 5 MV tandem accelerator and a 200 MeV proton synchrotron is used for ion beam analyses and irradiation experiments. The study of cancer therapy with a proton beam is also performed. Therefore, the stable operation and efficient sharing of beam time of the system are required, based on the treatment standard. Recent developments and the operation status of the system put stress on the tandem accelerator operation, magnifying the problems.

  16. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  17. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Australian National University's 14UD accelerator: experience and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, L. K.; Ophel, T. R.; Allan, G. L.; Bird, J. R.; Davie, R. F.

    1990-12-01

    Although the major emphasis of the joint ANU/ANSTO accelerator mass spectrometry program has been the measurement of 36Cl samples, both 14C and 10Be capabilities have been implemented recently on the 14UD accelerator. The new developments and operating experience are reviewed.

  19. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two recent major reports on the health of the oceans in the United States have warned that coastal development and population pressures are responsible for the dramatic degradation of U.S. ocean and coastal environments. The significant consequences of this increased population density, particularly in sub/tropical coastal regions, can be seen in recent weather events: Hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, and Katrina in the US Gulf of Mexico states, and the Tsunami in Southeast Asia in December 2004, all causing significant deaths and destruction. Microbial contamination, man-made chemicals, and a variety of harmful algal blooms and their toxins are increasingly affecting the health of coastal human populations via the seafood supply, as well as the commercial and recreational use of coastal marine waters. At the same time, there has been the realization that the oceans are a source of unexplored biological diversity able to provide medicinal, as well as nutritional, benefits. Therefore, the exploration and preservation of the earth's oceans have significant worldwide public health implications for current and future generations. The NSF/NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health Center (COHH) at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and its collaborators builds on several decades of collaborative and interdisciplinary research, education, and training to address the NIEHS-NSF research initiative in Oceans and Human Health. The COHH focuses on issues relevant to the Southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as global Sub/Tropical areas worldwide, to integrate interdisciplinary research between biomedical and oceanographic scientists. The Center includes three Research Projects: (1) research into the application of toxic algal culture, toxin analysis, remote sensing, oceanography, and genomics to subtropical/tropical Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) organism and toxin distribution; (2) exploring the interaction between functional genomics and oceanography of the subtropical

  20. Accelerating the commercialization of university technologies for military healthcare applications: the role of the proof of concept process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Rosibel; DeLong, Hal; Kenyon, Jessica; Wilson, Eli

    2011-06-01

    The von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at UC San Diego (vonliebig.ucsd.edu) is focused on accelerating technology transfer and commercialization through programs and education on entrepreneurism. Technology Acceleration Projects (TAPs) that offer pre-venture grants and extensive mentoring on technology commercialization are a key component of its model which has been developed over the past ten years with the support of a grant from the von Liebig Foundation. In 2010, the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center partnered with the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), to develop a regional model of Technology Acceleration Program initially focused on military research to be deployed across the nation to increase awareness of military medical needs and to accelerate the commercialization of novel technologies to treat the patient. Participants to these challenges are multi-disciplinary teams of graduate students and faculty in engineering, medicine and business representing universities and research institutes in a region, selected via a competitive process, who receive commercialization assistance and funding grants to support translation of their research discoveries into products or services. To validate this model, a pilot program focused on commercialization of wireless healthcare technologies targeting campuses in Southern California has been conducted with the additional support of Qualcomm, Inc. Three projects representing three different universities in Southern California were selected out of forty five applications from ten different universities and research institutes. Over the next twelve months, these teams will conduct proof of concept studies, technology development and preliminary market research to determine the commercial feasibility of their technologies. This first regional program will help build the needed tools and processes to adapt and replicate this model across other regions in the

  1. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  2. The Universe Observation Center: an educational center devoted to Astronomy in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D.

    The Universe Observation Center (in Catalan language, Centre d'Observació de l'Univers, COU) is located in close proximity to the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec, OAM), in eastern Catalonia (Spain). Both centers comprise the Montsec Astronomical Park (Parc Astronòmic Montsec, PAM), managed by the Consorci del Montsec. Montsec Mountain remains the finest location for astronomical observation in Catalonia, as demonstrated by a site-testing campaign conducted by the Astronomy and Meteorology Department of the University of Barcelona. The COU consists of a Central Building (including a permanent exhibition and three classrooms possessing broadband Internet access), the Telescope Park (two astronomical domes equipped with medium-size telescopes, a coelostat for solar observation, and a portable telescope park), the Eye of Montsec (a digital planetarium and, at the same time, an extremely innovative platform for sky observation) and the Garden of the Universe (a tour of the land surrounding the COU, visiting several areas within it). The COU will offer to the Spanish academic community a host of fascinating and unique activities in the fields of astronomy and geology. The Center is open not only to students (from primary school through university), but also to amateur astronomers, people interested in science and the general public.

  3. A Fine-Tooth Comb to Measure the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    worth recalling that the kind of precision required, 1 cm/s, corresponds, on the focal plane of a typical high-resolution spectrograph, to a shift of a few tenths of a nanometre, that is, the size of some molecules," explains PhD student and team member Constanza Araujo-Hauck from ESO. The new calibration technique comes from the combination of astronomy and quantum optics, in a collaboration between researchers at ESO and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics. It uses ultra-short pulses of laser light to create a 'frequency comb' - light at many frequencies separated by a constant interval - to create just the kind of precise 'ruler' needed to calibrate a spectrograph. After successful tests in the MPQ laboratory in 2007, the team have successfully tested a prototype device using the laser comb at the VTT (Vacuum Tower Telescope) solar telescope in Tenerife, on 8 March 2008, measuring the spectrum of the Sun in infrared light. The results are already impressive, and the technique promises to achieve the accuracy needed to study these big astronomical questions. "In our tests in Tenerife, we have already achieved beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. Now we are going to make the system more versatile, and develop it even further," says team member Tilo Steinmetz, from Menlo Systems GmbH, a spin-off company from the Max Planck Institute, which was founded to commercialise the frequency comb technique. Having tested the technique on a solar telescope, a new version of the system is now being built for the HARPS planet-finder instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla in Chile, before being considered for future generations of instruments. One of the ambitious project to be realised with the E-ELT, called CODEX, aims to measure the recently discovered acceleration of the universe directly, by following the velocities of distant galaxies and quasars over a 20-year period. This would let astronomers test Einstein's general relativity and the nature of the recently

  4. Sensitivity Upgrades to the Idaho Accelerator Center Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S. J.; Kinlaw, M. T.; Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2007-10-26

    Past experiments have shown that discrimination between between fissionable and non-fissionable materials is possible using an interrogation technique that monitors for high energy prompt fission neutrons. Several recent upgrades have been made to the neutron time of flight spectrometer at the Idaho Accelerator Center with the intent of increasing neutron detection sensitivity, allowing for system use in nonproliferation and security applications.

  5. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  6. DYNAMICS: Teaching the Concepts of Acceleration Center and Virtual Work in Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, I. C.; Rogers, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The main advantage of using these concepts lies in the reduction of algebraic work involved in solving certain dynamics problems. A brief analytical treatment of the acceleration center and a description of a virtual work principle for equipollent systems in the kinetics of rigid bodies are provided. (MVL)

  7. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

  8. Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center, Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Arenson, Christine; Rose, Molly; Lyons, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center in early 2007. The Center facilitates many diverse student and faculty projects on interprofessional education yearly. Faculty development programs include, most recently, the second Jefferson Interprofessional Education conference, IPE scholarly lecture series, an IPE and care practicum, and multiple lecture/discussions to select faculty/administrative groups. At present, there is no external funding for any of the programs. The Health Mentor Program is one of the major student programs. It is a required two-year longitudinal interprofessional chronic illness program for all medical, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy and couples and family therapy students. It began in the fall of 2007 and is integrated into existing coursework in each of the participating disciplines.

  9. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dorland, William

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  10. [Activities of Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The final report of NASA funded activities at Iowa State University (ISU) for the period between 1/96 and 1/99 includes two main areas of activity. The first is the development and delivery of an x-ray simulation package suitable for evaluating the impact of parameters affects the inspectability of an assembly of parts. The second area was the development of images processing tools to remove reconstruction artifacts in x-ray laminagraphy images. The x-ray simulation portion of this work was done by J. Gray and the x-ray laminagraphy work was done by J. Basart. The report is divided into two sections covering the two activities respectively. In addition to this work reported the funding also covered NASA's membership in the NSF University/Industrial Cooperative Research Center.

  11. Deceleration versus acceleration universe in different frames of F(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oikonomou, V. K.; Tretyakov, Petr V.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we study the occurrence of accelerating universe versus decelerating universe between the F (R) gravity frame (Jordan frame) and non-minimally coupled scalar field theory frame, and the minimally coupled scalar field theory frame (Einstein frame) for various models. As we show, if acceleration is imposed in one frame, it will not necessarily correspond to an accelerating metric when transformed in another frame. As we will demonstrate, this issue is model and frame-dependent but it seems there is no general scheme which permits to classify such cases.

  12. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  13. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  14. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shun-Ping; Sung, Wen-Hsu; Kuo, Fon-Chu; Kuo, Terry B.J.; Chen, Jin-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional center-of-mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5) and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5). The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each) was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML) acceleration (r = −0.83 to −0.93, p < 0.05), and between anterior–posterior (AP) acceleration and running distance (r = −0.8953 to −0.9653, p < 0.05), but not for vertical control of the center of mass. This study suggests that runners reduce stride length to minimize mediolateral sway and the effects of braking on the trunk; moreover, cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated. PMID:25713664

  15. Self-accelerating universe in modified gravity with dynamical torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, V.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a model belonging to the class of gravities with dynamical torsion. The model is free of ghosts and gradient instabilities about Minkowski and torsionless Einstein backgrounds. We find that at zero cosmological constant, the model admits a self-accelerating solution with a non-Riemannian connection. Small value of the effective cosmological constant is obtained at the expense of the hierarchy between the dimensionless couplings.

  16. The Universe Observing Center a modern center to teach and communicate astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Salvador J.

    2011-06-01

    The Universe Observing Center is one of the parts of the Parc Astronòmic Montsec (PAM). PAM is an initiative of the Catalan government, through the Consorci del Montsec (Montsec Consortium), to take advantage of the capabilities and potential of the Montsec region to develop scientific research, training and outreach activities, particularly in the field of Astronomy. The choice of the Montsec mountains to install the PAM was motivated by the magnificent conditions for observing the sky at night; the sky above Montsec is the best (natural sky free of light pollution) in Catalonia for astronomical observations. The PAM has two main parts: the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM) and the Universe Observing Center (COU). The OAdM is a professional observatory with an 80-cm catadioptric telescope (Joan Oró Telescope). This telescope is a robotic telescope that can be controlled from anywhere in the world via the Internet. The COU is a large multipurpose center which is intended to become an educational benchmark for teaching and communicate astronomy and other sciences in Catalonia. The management of the COU has three main goals: 1) Teach primary and secondary school students in our Educational Training Camp. 2) Teach university students housing the practical astronomy lectures of the universities. 3) Communicate astronomy to the general public. The COU comprises special areas for these purposes: the Telescopes Park with more than 20 telescopes, a coelostat for solar observations and two dome containing full-automated telescopes. The most special equipment is ``The Eye of Montsec'', with its 12m dome containing a multimedia digital planetarium and a platform for direct observation of the sky and the environment. During 2009 we expect around 10000 visitors in Montsec area to enjoy science with Montsec dark skies and an special natural environment.

  17. Cosmological Relativity: A General-Relativistic Theory for the Accelerating Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, M.; Behar, S.

    Recent observations of distant supernovae imply, in defiance of expectations, that the universe growth is accelerating, contrary to what has always been assumed that the expansion is slowing down due to gravity. In this paper a general-relativistic cosmological theory that gives a direct relationship between distances and redshifts in an expanding universe is presented. The theory is actually a generalization of Hubble's law taking gravity into account by means of Einstein's theory of general relativity. The theory predicts that the universe can have three phases of expansion, decelerating, constant and accelerating, but it is shown that at present the first two cases are excluded, although in the past it had experienced them. Our theory shows that the universe now is definitely in the stage of accelerating expansion, confirming the recent experimental results.

  18. A universal postprocessing toolkit for accelerator simulation and data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1998-12-16

    The Self-Describing Data Sets (SDDS) toolkit comprises about 70 generally-applicable programs sharing a common data protocol. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), SDDS performs the vast majority of operational data collection and processing, most data display functions, and many control functions. In addition, a number of accelerator simulation codes use SDDS for all post-processing and data display. This has three principle advantages: first, simulation codes need not provide customized post-processing tools, thus simplifying development and maintenance. Second, users can enhance code capabilities without changing the code itself, by adding SDDS-based pre- and post-processing. Third, multiple codes can be used together more easily, by employing SDDS for data transfer and adaptation. Given its broad applicability, the SDDS file protocol is surprisingly simple, making it quite easy for simulations to generate SDDS-compliant data. This paper discusses the philosophy behind SDDS, contrasting it with some recent trends, and outlines the capabilities of the toolkit. The paper also gives examples of using SDDS for accelerator simulation.

  19. Use of accelerating clinical improvement in reorganization of care: the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Kobokovich, L J

    1997-01-01

    Accelerating clinical improvement is a unique strategic method for accelerating the rate and effectiveness of improvements in strategically important clinical services. It promotes real reduction in the cost of service while preserving the quality and value within the system. Based on the components of process, value, benchmarking, change, and learning, the method can be used in any system or setting to produce value-driven change. Accelerating clinical improvement is being used within the Obstetrical Department of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center to decrease postpartum length of stay for families with spontaneous vaginal delivery. Familiarity with the method led to additional and ongoing improvements in the system. This method is important for nurses because it is continuous, multidisciplinary, addresses values of concern to families and providers, and is easily incorporated by nurse providers in any clinical setting.

  20. Exploring defocus matting: nonparametric acceleration, super-resolution, and off-center matting.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Neel; Matusik, Wojciech; Avidan, Shai; Pfister, Hanspeter; Freeman, William T

    2007-01-01

    Defocus matting is a fully automatic and passive method for pulling mattes from video captured with coaxial cameras that have different depths of field and planes of focus. Nonparametric sampling can accelerate the video-matting process from minutes to seconds per frame. In addition a super-resolution technique efficiently bridges the gap between mattes from high-resolution video cameras and those from low-resolution cameras. Off-center matting pulls mattes for an external high-resolution camera that doesn't share the same center of projection as the low-resolution cameras used to capture the defocus matting data.

  1. Is the Expansion of the Universe Accelerating? All Signs Point to Yes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, D.; Hayden, B.

    2016-12-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is one of the most profound discoveries in modern cosmology, suggesting a universe in which 70% of the mass-energy density has an unknown form spread uniformly across the universe. This result has been well established using a combination of cosmological probes, resulting in a “standard model” of modern cosmology that is a combination of a cosmological constant with cold dark matter and baryons. The first compelling evidence for the acceleration came in the late 1990s, when two independent teams studying Type Ia supernovae discovered that distant SNe Ia were dimmer than expected. The combined analysis of modern cosmology experiments, including SNe Ia, the Hubble constant, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background, has now measured the contributions of matter and the cosmological constant to the energy density of the universe to better than 0.01, providing a secure measurement of acceleration. A recent study has claimed that the evidence for acceleration from SNe Ia is “marginal.” Here we demonstrate errors in that analysis that reduce the acceleration significance from SNe Ia, and further demonstrate that conservative constraints on the curvature or matter density of the universe increase the significance even more. Analyzing the Joint Light-curve Analysis supernova sample, we find 4.2σ evidence for acceleration with SNe Ia alone, and 11.2σ in a flat universe. With our improved supernova analysis and not rejecting all other cosmological constraints, we find that acceleration is quite secure.

  2. Center of pressure velocity reflects body acceleration rather than body velocity during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Abe, Masaki O; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the center of pressure (COP) velocity reflects the center of mass (COM) acceleration due to a large derivative gain in the neural control system during quiet standing. Twenty-seven young (27.2±4.5 years) and twenty-three elderly (66.2±5.0 years) subjects participated in this study. Each subject was requested to stand quietly on a force plate for five trials, each 90 s long. The COP and COM displacements, the COP and COM velocities, and the COM acceleration were acquired via a force plate and a laser displacement sensor. The amount of fluctuation of each variable was quantified using the root mean square. Following the experimental study, a simulation study was executed to investigate the experimental findings. The experimental results revealed that the COP velocity was correlated with the COM velocity, but more highly correlated with the COM acceleration. The equation of motion of the inverted pendulum model, however, accounts only for the correlation between the COP and COM velocities. These experimental results can be meaningfully explained by the simulation study, which indicated that the neural motor command presumably contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity. In conclusion, the COP velocity fluctuation reflects the COM acceleration fluctuation rather than the COM velocity fluctuation, implying that the neural motor command controlling quiet standing posture contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity.

  3. The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X.

    2011-11-29

    The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

  4. Laser wakefield acceleration experiments at the University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Reed, S.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Levin, M.; Zigler, A.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing the laser power and electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 8x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 100 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using f/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of the laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. Betatron motion of electrons was also observed depending on laser power and electron density.

  5. An investigation into the symmetry, or lack thereof, of our universes accelerating expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrow, Joseph M.

    2004-05-01

    Is the accelerating expansion of our universe symmetric? Is the acceleration isotropic or anisotropic in space and time? To investigate the extent to which the expansion is isotropic or anisotropic, I will graph distance moduli vs. redshift for high-z SNe Ia observed in different parts of the sky. Such graphs reveal how the recessional velocity changes with distance, and a change in the slope indirectly indicates acceleration. I will compare my graphs with the same graph obtained by the High-Z Supernova Search Team and note any differences in the acceleration of SNe Ia located at similar redshifts. Carroll, Bradley W., and Ostlie, Dale A.; An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics, Addison-Weslery Publishing Company, Inc. 1996. Freedman, Roger A., and Kaufmann III, William J.; Universe, W.H Freeman and Company, 2002. http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/cfa/oir/Research/supernova/HighZ.html

  6. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  7. Goddard Space Flight Center's Partnership with Florida International University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishe, N. D.; Graham, S. C.; Gutierrez, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been collaborating with Florida International University's High Performance Database Research Center (FIU HPDRC) for nearly ten years. Much of this collaboration was funded through a NASA Institutional Research Award (IRA). That award involved research in the Internet dissemination of geospatial data, and in recruiting and training student researchers. FIU's TerraFly web service presently serves more than 10,000 unique users per day by providing an easy-to-use mechanism for exploring geospatial data and imagery. IRA-supported students have received 47 Bachelor's degrees, 20 Master's degrees, and 2 Doctoral degrees at FIU. FIU leveraged IRA funding into over \\$19 million in other funding and donations for their research and training activities and has published nearly 150 scientific papers acknowledging the NASA IRA award. GSFC has worked closely with FIU HPDRC in the development of their geospatial data storage and dissemination research. TerraFly presents many NASA datasets such as the nationwide mosaic of LandSat 5, the PRISM precipitation model, the TRMM accumulated rainfall worldwide; as well as USGS aerial photography nationwide at 30cm to 1m resolutions, demographic data, Ikonos satellite imagery, and many more. Our presentation will discuss the lessons learned during the collaboration between GSFC and FIU as well as our current research projects.

  8. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  9. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  10. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  11. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  12. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential efficacy of total body center of mass (COM) acceleration for feedback control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) following spinal cord injury (SCI) was investigated. COM acceleration may be a viable alternative to conventional joint kinematics due to its rapid responsiveness, focal representation of COM dynamics, and ease of measurement. A computational procedure was developed using an anatomically-realistic, three-dimensional, bipedal biomechanical model to determine optimal patterns of muscle excitations to produce targeted effects upon COM acceleration from erect stance. The procedure was verified with electromyographic data collected from standing able-bodied subjects undergoing systematic perturbations. Using 16 muscle groups targeted by existing implantable neuroprostheses, data were generated to train an artificial neural network (ANN)-based controller in simulation. During forward simulations, proportional feedback of COM acceleration drove the ANN to produce muscle excitation patterns countering the effects of applied perturbations. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the clinical case of maximum constant excitation, the controller reduced UE loading by 43% in resisting external perturbations and by 51% during simulated one-arm reaching. Future work includes performance assessment against expected measurement errors and developing user-specific control systems. PMID:22773529

  13. A history of thyratron lifetimes at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Ficklin, D.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has been in almost continuous operation since the middle 1960s, providing a remarkable opportunity to amass thyratron data. This paper reviews the history of this thyratron usage, focusing primarily on data collected during the last ten years of accelerator operation. There have been two distinct operating conditions during the history of operation at SLAC. Prior to 1985, the fundamental thyratron operating points were 46 kV anode voltage (Epy), 4.2 kA peak current, 3.8 {mu}s equivalent square pulse (esp), with a maximum repetition rate of 360 pulses per second (pps). The accelerator was upgraded during 1985, and the thyratron operating points are now 46 kV Epy, 6.3 kA, 5.4 {mu}s esp, with a maximum repetition rate of 120 pps. The SLAC high-energy physics research program requires that each of the available modulator klystron units provide a stable microwave energy source. Within these constraints, this paper explores historical thyratron lifetimes at SLAC, reviewing the available data to determine how long these thyratrons can be expected to operate before failure currently or recently used in the 243 accelerator modulators.

  14. Direct measurement of the positive acceleration of the universe and testing inhomogeneous models under gravitational wave cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Yoo, Chul-Moon E-mail: anishi@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-04-01

    One possibility for explaining the apparent accelerating expansion of the universe is that we live in the center of a spherically inhomogeneous universe. Although current observations cannot fully distinguish ΛCDM and these inhomogeneous models, direct measurement of the acceleration of the universe can be a powerful tool in probing them. We have shown that, if ΛCDM is the correct model, DECIGO/BBO would be able to detect the positive redshift drift (which is the time evolution of the source redshift z) in 3–5 year gravitational wave (GW) observations from neutron-star binaries, which enables us to rule out any Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void model with monotonically increasing density profile. We may even be able to rule out any LTB model unless we allow unrealistically steep density profile at z ∼ 0. This test can be performed with GW observations alone, without any reference to electromagnetic observations, and is more powerful than the redshift drift measurement using Lyman α forest.

  15. Radiation Safety System of the B-Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.

    1998-10-12

    The radiation safety system (RSS) of the B-Factory accelerator facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is described. The RSS, which is designed to protect people from prompt radiation exposure due to beam operation, consists of the access control system (ACS) and the radiation containment system (RCS). The ACS prevents people from being exposed to the very high radiation levels inside a beamline shielding housing. The ACS consists of barriers, a standard entry module at every entrance, and beam stoppers. The RCS prevents people from being exposed to the radiation outside a shielding housing, due to either normal or abnormal operation. The RCS consists of power limiting devices, shielding, dump/collimator, and an active radiation monitor system. The inter-related system elements for the ACS and RCS, as well as the associated interlock network, are described. The policies and practices in setting up the RSS are also compared with the regulatory requirements.

  16. The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bruce S.; Gouveia, Kristine; Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD) is an academic research center that specializes in discovery using high throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) integrated with virtual screening, as well as knowledge mining and drug informatics. With a primary focus on identifying small molecules that can be used as chemical probes and as leads for drug discovery, it is a central core resource for research and translational activities at UNM that supports implementation and management of funded screening projects as well as “up-front” services such as consulting for project design and implementation, assistance in assay development and generation of preliminary data for pilot projects in support of competitive grant applications. The HTFC platform in current use represents advanced, proprietary technology developed at UNM that is now routinely capable of processing bioassays arrayed in 96-, 384- and 1536-well formats at throughputs of 60,000 or more wells per day. Key programs at UNMCMD include screening of research targets submitted by the international community through NIH’s Molecular Libraries Program; a multi-year effort involving translational partnerships at UNM directed towards drug repurposing - identifying new uses for clinically approved drugs; and a recently established personalized medicine initiative for advancing cancer therapy by the application of “smart” oncology drugs in selected patients based on response patterns of their cancer cells in vitro. UNMCMD discoveries, innovation, and translation have contributed to a wealth of inventions, patents, licenses and publications, as well as startup companies, clinical trials and a multiplicity of domestic and international collaborative partnerships to further the research enterprise. PMID:24409953

  17. The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bruce S; Gouveia, Kristine; Oprea, Tudor I; Sklar, Larry A

    2014-03-01

    The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD) is an academic research center that specializes in discovery using high throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) integrated with virtual screening, as well as knowledge mining and drug informatics. With a primary focus on identifying small molecules that can be used as chemical probes and as leads for drug discovery, it is a central core resource for research and translational activities at UNM that supports implementation and management of funded screening projects as well as "up-front" services such as consulting for project design and implementation, assistance in assay development and generation of preliminary data for pilot projects in support of competitive grant applications. The HTFC platform in current use represents advanced, proprietary technology developed at UNM that is now routinely capable of processing bioassays arrayed in 96-, 384- and 1536-well formats at throughputs of 60,000 or more wells per day. Key programs at UNMCMD include screening of research targets submitted by the international community through NIH's Molecular Libraries Program; a multi-year effort involving translational partnerships at UNM directed towards drug repurposing - identifying new uses for clinically approved drugs; and a recently established personalized medicine initiative for advancing cancer therapy by the application of "smart" oncology drugs in selected patients based on response patterns of their cancer cells in vitro. UNMCMD discoveries, innovation, and translation have contributed to a wealth of inventions, patents, licenses and publications, as well as startup companies, clinical trials and a multiplicity of domestic and international collaborative partnerships to further the research enterprise.

  18. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  19. Some Cosmological Models for Poincare Gauge Gravity and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    Two cosmological Models for the Poincare Gauge Gravity theory with a non vanishing torsion are proposed. It is shown that the torsion plays an important role in explaining the accelerated expansion of the universe. Some of the cosmological parameters are also expressed in terms of the redshift and the dark energy scenarios are discussed.

  20. [Hypertensive emergencies at the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo].

    PubMed

    Ellenga, Mbolla B F; Gombet, T R; Mahoungou, Guimbi K C; Otiobanda, G F; Ossou, Nguiet P M; Ikama, M S; Kimbally-Kaky, G; Etitiele, F

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study conducted in the emergency department of the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo was to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hypertensive emergencies. With a total of 76 patients admitted during the study period, the prevalence of hypertensive emergency was 4%. The sex ratio was 1 and mean patient age was 57.3 years (range, 30 to 80 years). Risk factors included obesity in 62 cases (81.6%), history of hypertension in 65 (85.5%) and low socioeconomic level in 58 (76.3%). Mean delay for consultation was 50 hours (range, 1 to 240 hours). The disease underlying the hypertensive emergency was stroke with 38 cases (50%), heart failure in 20 (26.3%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 11 (14.4%), malignant hypertension in 9 (11.8%), and renal failure in 10 (13.1%). The mean length of emergency treatment was 14.7 hours (range, 5 to 48 hours). Eight deaths (10.5%) occurred during hospitalization in the emergency department.

  1. Promoting one health: the University of Missouri Research Center for Human/Animal Interaction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    The University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is home to the Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction. This center uniquely addresses a growing area of research that focuses on how the human-animal bond impacts health in people and animals. This article highlights the One Health basis for the center, several research projects, and future goals for the center.

  2. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  3. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    ScienceCinema

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  4. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  5. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Shugay, Yulia; Barinov, Oleg; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir

    Space monitoring data center of Moscow State University provides operational information on radiation state of the near-Earth space. Internet portal http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ gives access to the actual data characterizing the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation conditions in the magnetosphere and heliosphere in the real time mode. Operational data coming from space missions (ACE, GOES, ELECTRO-L1, Meteor-M1) at L1, LEO and GEO and from the Earth’s surface are used to represent geomagnetic and radiation state of near-Earth environment. On-line database of measurements is also maintained to allow quick comparison between current conditions and conditions experienced in the past. The models of space environment working in autonomous mode are used to generalize the information obtained from observations on the whole magnetosphere. Interactive applications and operational forecasting services are created on the base of these models. They automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons using data from LEO orbits. Special forecasting services give short-term forecast of SEP penetration to the Earth magnetosphere at low altitudes, as well as relativistic electron fluxes at GEO. Velocities of recurrent high speed solar wind streams on the Earth orbit are predicted with advance time of 3-4 days on the basis of automatic estimation of the coronal hole areas detected on the images of the Sun received from the SDO satellite. By means of neural network approach, Dst and Kp indices online forecasting 0.5-1.5 hours ahead, depending on solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field, measured by ACE satellite, is carried out. Visualization system allows representing experimental and modeling data in 2D and 3D.

  7. Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Report Leadership Team Our Demonstration Schools Gallaudet University Our Demonstration Schools Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) ... Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002 Copyright © 2015 Gallaudet University Stay Connected Facebook Twitter Subscribe Odyssey News and ...

  8. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts & History Home Shared Governance Committee Institutional Profile Moon Shots Program Joint Commission Survey Who Was MD ... ORBIT Proteomics Translational Research Accelerator B-Cell Lymphoma Moon Shot™ The B-Cell Lymphoma Moon Shot is ...

  9. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  10. University Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy Advance Accelerator Applications Program

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW). Because a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians will be needed to conduct the investigations of science and technology for transmutation, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project.

  11. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Positioning a University Outreach Center: Strategies for Support and Continuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skivington, Kristen D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a strong case can be made for supporting outreach as a value-added function in a university. Specific strategies for positioning outreach within the university by developing a power base are outlined. The case of the University of Michigan-Flint is offered as an example of this approach. Seven lessons learned in the process are noted.…

  13. Recent results from the University of Washington's 38 mm ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Turenne, J. A.; Chew, G.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    The ram accelerator is a propulsive device that accelerates projectiles using gasdynamic cycles similar to those which generate thrust in airbreathing ramjets. The projectile, analogous to the centerbody of a ramjet, travels supersonically through a stationary tube containing a gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixture. The projectile itself carries no onboard propellant. A combustion zone follows the projectile and stabilizes the shock structure. The resulting pressure distribution continuously accelerates the projectile. Several modes of ram accelerator operation have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. At velocities below the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed of the propellant mixture, the thermally choked propulsion mode accelerates the projectiles. At projectile velocities between approximately 90 and 110 percent of the C-J speed, a transdetonative propulsion mode occurs. At velocities beyond 110 percent of the C-J speed, projectiles experience superdetonative propulsion. This paper presents recent experimental results from these propulsion modes obtained with the University of Washington's 38-mm bore ram accelerator. Data from investigations with hydrogen diluted-gas mixtures are also introduced.

  14. Data-Base Systems Pace Growth of Computer Center at Major Midwestern University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technological Horizons in Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes Iowa State University's Computation Center. Center's responsibilities include computer science research and providing computing services to the university. System Industries' Trade and Exchange program (permitting used Digital Equipment Corporation disk drives to be exchanged for new SI equipment at substantial cost savings) was used to…

  15. Financing Public Higher Education: The Impact of Responsibility Center Management on a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappone, David J.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the impacts on public universities of implementing an incentive-based budgeting system, this dissertation focuses on one university's extensive experience with Responsibility Center Management. The financial and non-financial impacts of Responsibility Center Management will be considered by examining the extent to which commonly held…

  16. Taming the Anxious Mind: An 8-Week Mindfulness Meditation Group at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an eight-week mindfulness meditation-based group that took place at a university counseling center. The group is patterned after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Group members are taught…

  17. Acceleration of Dominant Supermassive Black Hole Singularities Serving as the Catalyst of Dark Energy in the Formation of Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John

    2013-04-01

    Cosmological process analysis is used to develop the singularity acceleration hypothesis which is based on nine universe formation axioms. Singularity acceleration universe formation is a cyclic process analogous to a branching universe having the following seven phases reoccurring in each daughter universe: 1. A phase transition big bang that forms a new universe 2. Expansion of the new universe and its structure 3. Dispersion of its mass and increasing entropy 4. Isolation of its galaxy clusters and supercluster complexes beyond event horizons 5. Many separate consolidations of all forms of matter, forces, and energy within these supercluster complexes into dominant supermassive black hole gravitational singularities 6. The resulting acceleration of singularities warping space to the speed of light 7. The independent separation of each of these singularities from the universe causing a big bang phase transition and producing all forms of matter, forces, and energy in a new universe.

  18. Accelerated expansion of the universe in a non-trivial extra-dimensional topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Ahmad Rami

    2009-11-01

    The recent observational available data for an accelerated expansion state of the present universe, obtained from distant SNeIa gave strong support to the search of alternative cosmologies. Recently, there have been a number of different attempts to modify Einstein’s gravity to yield accelerated expansion at late times. Unfortunately, many of the theoretical models discussed in the literature are plagued with theoretical problems, in particular the singularity problem at the origin of time. In the present work we have analyzed a multidimensional spacetime Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model with a decaying cosmological constant and a varying gravitational constant. Many interesting consequences are revealed, in particular the behavior of the scale factor and the shape of the universe in terms of the number of extra dimensions.

  19. Universality of the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    AlGendy, Mohammad; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2014-08-20

    On the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star, the effective centrifugal force decreases the effective acceleration due to gravity (as measured in the rotating frame) at the equator while increasing the acceleration at the poles due to the centrifugal flattening of the star into an oblate spheroid. We compute the effective gravitational acceleration for relativistic rapidly rotating neutron stars and show that for a star with mass M, equatorial radius R{sub e} , and angular velocity Ω, the deviations of the effective acceleration due to gravity from the nonrotating case take on a universal form that depends only on the compactness ratio M/R{sub e} , the dimensionless square of the angular velocity Ω{sup 2}R{sub e}{sup 3}/GM, and the latitude on the star's surface. This dependence is universal, in that it has very little dependence on the neutron star's equation of state. The effective gravity is expanded in the slow-rotation limit to show the dependence on the effective centrifugal force, oblate shape of the star, and the quadrupole moment of the gravitational field. In addition, an empirical fit and simple formula for the effective gravity is found. We find that the increase in the acceleration due to gravity at the poles is of the same order of magnitude as the decrease in the effective acceleration due to gravity at the equator for all realistic value of mass, radius, and spin. For neutron stars that spin with frequencies near 600 Hz, the difference between the effective gravity at the poles and the equator is about 20%.

  20. To theory of asymptotically stable accelerating Universe in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Garkun, A.S.; Kudin, V.I.; Minkevich, A.V. E-mail: kudzin_w@tut.by

    2014-12-01

    Homogeneous isotropic cosmological models built in the framework of the Poincar'e gauge theory of gravity based on general expression of gravitational Lagrangian with indefinite parameters are analyzed. Special points of cosmological solutions for flat cosmological models at asymptotics and conditions of their stability in dependence of indefinite parameters are found. Procedure of numerical integration of the system of gravitational equations at asymptotics is considered. Numerical solution for accelerating Universe without dark energy is obtained.

  1. Access and Finance Issues: The University of Alabama's Education Policy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the 1920s, the Education Policy Center (EPC) is the oldest center or institute at The University of Alabama. Our work centers on four interrelated areas: (a) access and finance of public higher education, (b) college completion, (c) Pell Grants, and (d) rural community colleges. As place-based institutions with service delivery…

  2. Centers and Institutes at The Pennsylvania State University. A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Mary M.

    This paper discusses 43 autonomous and semiautonomous centers on The Pennsylvania State University's main campus. It deals with (1) the history and origin of the Penn State centers, and notes that the centers established between 1887 and 1955 generally represented areas in agriculture, engineering and technology, life sciences and the physical and…

  3. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  4. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  5. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  6. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Suprotim; Raje, Sanyukta; Kumar, Satish; Sartor, Dale; Greenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  7. A new world of biomedical research - the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, C.

    1997-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore`s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is one of the leading AMS facilities in the world, performing about 25% of all AMS analyses. It is also at the forefront of the emerging field of AMS as applied to biomedical research. AMS is so sensitive that it can identify just a few molecules of a substance among trillions of molecules. This sensitivity makes possible for the first time the study of toxins, dietary nutrients, drugs, and other substances in dosages that are relevant to humans. Work with volunteer subjects indicates that a chemical that is produced when meat is cooked adversely affects human DNA more than it does the DNA of laboratory animals. This research supports the need to pursue additional human biological risk assessment using AMS. Livermore is also performing studies of the human metabolism of calcium, which are difficult without AMS.

  8. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  9. Peripheries and Centers: Research Universities in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2009-01-01

    The research university is a central institution of the twenty-first century--providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating leaders of the academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities--they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed…

  10. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Hogan, Mark

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  11. University programs of the U.S. Department of Energy advanced accelerator applications program

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D. E.; Ward, T. E.; Bresee, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY-01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of transmutation of nuclear waste. An Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF), which may be built during the first decade of the 21st Century, is a major component of this effort. The ADTF would include a large, state-of-the-art charged-particle accelerator, proton-neutron target systems, and accelerator-driven R&D systems. This new facility and its underlying science and technology will require a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians. In addition, other applications of nuclear science and engineering (e.g., proliferation monitoring and defense, nuclear medicine, safety regulation, industrial processes, and many others) require increased academic and national infrastructure and student populations. Thus, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project to support the infrastructure requirements of nuclear energy, science and technology fields as well as the special needs of the DOE transmutation program. In this paper we describe university programs that have supported, are supporting, and will support the R&D necessary for the AAA Project. Previous work included research for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, current (FY-01) programs include graduate fellowships and research for the AAA Project, and it is expected that future programs will expand and add to the existing programs.

  12. Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this material shall not imply approval or acceptance by the U.S. Department of Education of the findings, conclusions, or recommendations herein. Gallaudet University is an equal opportunity employer and does not ...

  13. An overview of the comprehensive proton therapy machine quality assurance procedures implemented at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center-Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zullo, John R.; Wu, Richard Y.; Zhu Mingping; Ding Xiaoning; Martin, Craig; Ciangaru, George; Gillin, Michael T.

    2009-06-15

    The number of proton and carbon ion therapy centers is increasing; however, since the publication of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report, there has been no dedicated report dealing with proton therapy quality assurance. The purpose of this article is to describe the quality assurance procedures performed on the passively scattered proton therapy beams at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center in Houston. The majorities of these procedures are either adopted from procedures outlined in the American Association of Physicists in Medical Task Group (TG) 40 report or are a modified version of the TG 40 procedures. In addition, new procedures, which were designed specifically to be applicable to the synchrotron at the author's center, have been implemented. The authors' procedures were developed and customized to ensure patient safety and accurate operation of synchrotron to within explicit limits. This article describes these procedures and can be used by others as a guideline for developing QA procedures based on particle accelerator specific parameters and local regulations pertinent to any new facility.

  14. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  15. Learning at the Center: A Proposal for Dynamic Assessment in a Combined University and Community Adult Learning Center Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Lisa; Pauchulo, Ana Laura; Brooke, Auralia; Corrigan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    We ask the reader to consider a proposal for cooperative renewal in the evaluation of a course (OurU) offered in partnership between a university and community-based adult learning center. This proposal's aim is to enhance adult learners' ability to evaluate their learning experiences, with the goal of adopting more learner-directed content into…

  16. Growth of a Science Center: The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CESAME) at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafney, Leo; Bynum, R. David; Sheppard, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the origin and development of CESAME (The Center for Science and Mathematics Education) at Stony Brook University. The analysis identifies key ingredients in areas of personnel, funding, organizational structures, educational priorities, collaboration, and institutionalization. After a discussion of relevant issues in…

  17. User-Centered Design in Practice: The Brown University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordac, Sarah; Rainwater, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study in user-centered design that explores the needs and preferences of undergraduate users. An analysis of LibQual+ and other user surveys, interviews with public service staff, and a formal American with Disabilities Act accessibility review served as the basis for planning a redesign of the Brown University…

  18. The University of Illinois Film Center Collection Use Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Terry R.

    This report describes a study which used computer analyses of the center's film booking records for fiscal year 1981 to identify those subject areas in the collection for which holdings did not seem to accurately reflect the clientele's levels of interest, as indicated by their use of the collection. Results identified 60 subject areas which met…

  19. Marathon Group Therapy: Potential for University Counseling Centers and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Thomas; Harris, Rafael S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive analysis of marathon group therapy was conducted, specifying issues of set-up, screening, preparation, start-up, introduction to group process, facilitating therapeutic moments throughout the weekend, termination, and follow-up. Factors and dynamics unique to this modality are outlined for marathon groups in university counseling…

  20. Accreditation Standards for University and College Counseling Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Vivian; Hattauer, Edward; Brandel, Irvin W.; Buckles, Nancy; Davidshofer, Charles; Deakin, Spencer; Erskine, Charlene; Hurley, George; Locher, Linda; Piorkowski, Geraldine; Simono, R. B.; Spivack, James; Steel, Catherine M.

    2003-01-01

    The accreditation standards outlined in the article are used by the International Association of Counseling Services as the basis for the formal accreditation of college and university counseling programs throughout the United States, Canada, and Australia. They reflect the program elements and practice standards that are deemed essential in a…

  1. Reforming the University: The Role of the Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieber, Sam D.; Lazarsfeld, Paul F.

    The authors seek to show the potentiality of research organizations for the achievement of basic university goals, and to isolate the conditions that impede or promote the success of these integrative agencies. In addition, they examine the role of the managerial scholars who are in the positions of leadership since they believe this role is vital…

  2. Northeast Parallel Architectures Center (NPAC) at Syracuse University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Computer Architecture Architecture: Alliant Principle Investigator: Sergio R R Chavez , Syracuse University This project is to convert the wait and signal...consist of a simpler 2D problem to test and define the computational model. The frame buffer of -the connection machine will display a Julia set

  3. Collaboration between schools of social work and university medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bracht, N F; Briar, S

    1979-05-01

    Although the interface involving social work, medicine, and the other health professions occurs primarily in the day-to-day world of practice in hospitals and other health agencies, an equally important opportunity exists for interaction at the university level between schools of social work and schools for health professionals. This artice analyzes one school's effort to build effective interdisciplinary linkages.

  4. The Accelerating Universe: Infinite Expansion, the Cosmological Constant, and the Beauty of the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2000-12-01

    Advance Praise for The Accelerating Universe "The Accelerating Universe is not only an informative book about modern cosmology. It is rich storytelling and, above all, a celebration of the human mind in its quest for beauty in all things." -Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams "This is a wonderfully lucid account of the extraordinary discoveries that have made the last years a golden period for observational cosmology. But Mario Livio has not only given the reader one clear explanation after another of what astronomers are up to, he has used them to construct a provocative argument for the importance of aesthetics in the development of science and for the inseparability of science, art, and culture." -Lee Smolin, author of The Life of the Cosmos "What a pleasure to read! An exciting, simple account of the universe revealed by modern astronomy. Beautifully written, clearly presented, informed by scientific and philosophical insights." -John Bahcall, Institute for Advanced Study "A book with charm, beauty, elegance, and importance. As authoritative a journey as can be taken through modern cosmology." -Allan Sandage, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington

  5. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health - Columbia University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  6. Guidelines for Group Experiences in the College and University Counseling Center: A Statement of Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyne, Robert K.

    1973-01-01

    This article is one attempt to relate the general suggestions of the 1972 ACPA proposed statement on the use of group experiences in higher education to the college and university counseling center. (Author)

  7. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  8. Nonsingular and accelerated expanding universe from effective Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenci, Vitorio A.

    2010-03-01

    The energy-momentum tensor coming from one-parameter effective Yang-Mills theory is here used to describe the matter-energy content of the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann cosmology in its early stages. The behavior of all solutions is examined. Particularly, it is shown that only solutions corresponding to an open model allow the universe to evolve into an accelerated expansion. This result appears as a possible mechanism for an inflationary phase produced by a vector field. Further, depending on the value of some parameters characterizing the system, the resulting models are classified as singular or nonsingular.

  9. The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University: An Example of Replication and Reformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This article describes implementation of the talent search model developed by Julian Stanley at the Center for Talent Development of Northwestern University. While remaining true to the basic components of the talent search, the talent center at Northwestern has emphasized using talent search as a means to influence programming in local schools…

  10. A Program Showcase: University of Hawai'i at Manoa Children's Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Children's Center, located in Honolulu, offers a full-day child care and preschool program for up to 125 children, ages two through five in one of seven classrooms. As part of the University community, the Children's Center is a site for students, faculty, and the community members to observe good practice in early childhood education and…

  11. Predicting Early Center Care Utilization in a Context of Universal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Janson, Harald; Naerde, Ane

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports predictors for center care utilization prior to 18 months of age in Norway, a country with a welfare system providing up to one-year paid parental leave and universal access to subsidized and publicly regulated center care. A community sample of 1103 families was interviewed about demographics, family, and child characteristics…

  12. A Further Review of the California State University's Contra Costa Center. Commission Report 89-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    A follow-up report on the California State University's Contra Costa Center, a proposed permanent off-campus center, is presented. The California Postsecondary Education Commission approved the original proposal in 1987, contingent on finding solutions to concerns about transportation access and services to disadvantaged students. The university…

  13. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  14. Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

  15. Provision of emergency contraceptive pills at college and university student health centers in Florida.

    PubMed

    Hemmick, Rob S; McCarthy, Susan K

    2007-01-01

    Provision of emergency contraceptive (EC) pills at Florida university and college student health centers was examined. Practices related to dosages, pill brands, advance prescriptions, restrictions, written policy, printed materials, routine contraceptive counseling, and publicity were identified. Barriers for centers not providing EC pills and practices were also determined.

  16. A Wish List for the Advancement of University and College Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, John B.

    2016-01-01

    University and college counseling centers continue to meet emerging challenges in higher education. This article addresses three issues: the need for a more unified organizational structure to represent the profession, the potential value for counseling centers in seeking accreditation, and the importance of specialized training for those entering…

  17. Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monty, Randall William

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental purpose of "Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone" is to investigate the situatedness of Writing Center Studies, defining it as an autonomous (sub)discipline and interdisciplinary contact zone within the larger discipline of Rhetoric and Composition. In order to meet…

  18. The Center on Race and Social Problems at the University of Pittsburgh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Larry E.; Bangs, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh established the Center on Race and Social Problems (CRSP). CRSP, which is the first race research center to be housed in a school of social work, has six foci: economic disparities; educational disparities; interracial group relations; mental health; youth, families, and elderly;…

  19. Renata Adler Memorial Research Center for Child Welfare and Protection, Tel-Aviv University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronen, Tammie

    2011-01-01

    The Renata Adler Memorial Research Center for Child Welfare and Protection operates within the Bob Shapell School of Social Work at Tel-Aviv University in Israel. The main aims of this research center are to facilitate study and knowledge about the welfare of children experiencing abuse or neglect or children at risk and to link such knowledge to…

  20. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  1. Integrating Student-Centered Learning in Finance Courses: The Case of a Malaysian Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janor, Hawati; Rahim, Ruzita Abdul; Rahman, Aisyah Abdul; Auzairy, Noor Azryani; Hashim, Noor Azuan; Yusof, Muhamad Zain

    2013-01-01

    The student-centered learning (SCL) approach is an approach to education that focuses on learners and their needs, rather than relying upon the input of the teacher's. The present paper examines how the SCL approach is integrated as a learner-centered paradigm into finance courses offered at a business school in a research university in Malaysia.…

  2. Columbia University to Open Network of International Collaborative-Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2009-01-01

    In what university officials say represents a new approach to the internationalization of higher education, Columbia University is building a network of six to eight research institutes in capitals around the world. The Columbia Global Centers, as they are called, are designed for faculty members and students from various disciplines to…

  3. Pressures We Face in Running Counseling Centers on College and University Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilman, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Georgetown University Counseling and Psychiatric Service director Philip Meilman discusses two distinct emerging pressures faced by directors of college and university counseling centers. The first of these is the pressure to provide more of, and an increasing range of, counseling and psychiatric services. The second is related:…

  4. A Place of Her Own: The Case for University-Based Centers for Women Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riebe, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The author describes the benefits of university-based women entrepreneur centers as an educational and outreach strategy and argues for their establishment and support by universities interested in educating women entrepreneurs and advancing women-owned businesses. Based on extensive research on women business owners and firsthand experience with…

  5. Lessons Learned Concerning a Student Centered Teaching Style by University Mathematics Professors from Secondary School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Phyllis; Kennedy, Kristin T.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper discusses the use of student centered teaching techniques in mathematics classes at the secondary level and at the university level. It appears that secondary mathematics teachers are more versatile than university professors in utilizing these teaching techniques in the classroom. This is partially driven by the No Child Left…

  6. Schools of Promise: A School District-University Partnership Centered on Inclusive School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George; Bull, Thomas; Cosier, Meghan; Dempf-Aldrich, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    A university-school district partnership, Schools of Promise (SOP), was formed to improve elementary schools for all children through whole-school reform. This effort focused on the concepts of belonging and inclusion, positioning the needs of marginalized students at the center of the reform through a university-facilitated restructuring of…

  7. Technology Entrepreneurship Promoted by Universities' Incubation Centers in Taiwan: Its Successes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, the Small and Medium Enterprise Administration (SMEA) in Taiwan has supported various institutions to establish incubation centers (ICs) for facilitating start-ups and innovation. At present, there are 79 ICs in total and 65 (or 83%) of them are established in universities/colleges. Most ICs in the universities/colleges offering…

  8. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  9. Can-AMS: The New Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility At The University Of Ottawa

    SciTech Connect

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Kotzer, T.; Litherland, A. E.

    2011-06-01

    The Canadian Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Ottawa will be equipped with a new, 3 MV tandem accelerator with peripheral equipment for the analysis of elements ranging from tritium to the actinides. This facility, along with a wide array of support instrumentation recently funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, will be located in a new science building on the downtown campus of the University of Ottawa. In addition to providing the standard AMS measurements on {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I for earth, environmental, cultural and biomedical sciences, this facility will incorporate the new technologies of anion isobar separation at low energies using RFQ chemical reaction cells for {sup 36}Cl and new heavy element applications, integrated sample combustion and gas ion source for biomedical and environmental {sup 14}C analysis and the use of novel target matrices for expanding the range of applicable elements and simplifying sample preparation, all currently being developed at IsoTrace. This paper will outline the design goals for the new facility, present some details of the new AMS technologies, in particular the Isobar Separator for Anions and discuss the design of the AMS system resulting from these requirements.

  10. MCNP Neutron Simulations: The Effectiveness of the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory Pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Daniel; Nguyen, Thien An; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of the Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky is marked by the unique addition of a pit in the main neutron scattering room underneath the neutron source and detection shielding assembly. This pit was constructed as a neutron trap in order to decrease the amount of neutron flux within the laboratory. Such a decrease of background neutron flux effectively reduces as much noise as possible in detection of neutrons scattering off of desired samples to be studied. This project uses the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to model the structure of the accelerator complex, gas cell, and the detector's collimator and shielding apparatus to calculate the neutron flux in various sections of the laboratory. Simulations were completed with baseline runs of 107 neutrons of energies 4 MeV and 17 MeV, produced respectively by 3H(p,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He source reactions. In addition, a comparison model of the complex with simply a floor and no pit was designed, and the respective neutron fluxes of both models were calculated and compared. The results of the simulations seem to affirm the validity of the pit design in significantly reducing the overall neutron flux throughout the accelerator complex, which could be used in future designs to increase the precision and reliability of data. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  11. Illinois State University Kellogg Project. Professional Development Center. Teaching-Learning Center. Third Annual Report, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rives, Stanley G.; And Others

    The third year report of a four-year Kellogg project to develop a model faculty and instructional development program is presented. The goals for the third year are outlined and details of the activities of the Teaching-Learning Center are discussed. Among the activities described are consulting with faculty members, funding to enable faculty to…

  12. Relative Humidity in Limited Streamer Tubes for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, M.I.; Convery, M.; Menges, W.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-12-15

    The BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center studies the decay of B mesons created in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The outermost layer of the detector, used to detect muons and neutral hadrons created during this process, is being upgraded from Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) to Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). The standard-size LST tube consists of eight cells, where a silver-plated wire runs down the center of each. A large potential difference is placed between the wires and ground. Gas flows through a series of modules connected with tubing, typically four. LSTs must be carefully tested before installation, as it will be extremely difficult to repair any damage once installed in the detector. In the testing process, the count rate in most modules showed was stable and consistent with cosmic ray rate over an approximately 500 V operating range between 5400 to 5900 V. The count in some modules, however, was shown to unexpectedly spike near the operation point. In general, the modules through which the gas first flows did not show this problem, but those further along the gas chain were much more likely to do so. The suggestion was that this spike was due to higher humidity in the modules furthest from the fresh, dry inflowing gas, and that the water molecules in more humid modules were adversely affecting the modules' performance. This project studied the effect of humidity in the modules, using a small capacitive humidity sensor (Honeywell). The sensor provided a humidity-dependent output voltage, as well as a temperature measurement from a thermistor. A full-size hygrometer (Panametrics) was used for testing and calibrating the Honeywell sensors. First the relative humidity of the air was measured. For the full calibration, a special gas-mixing setup was used, where relative humidity of the LST gas mixture could be varied from almost dry to almost fully saturated. With the sensor calibrated, a set of sensors was used to measure humidity vs. time

  13. Cosmology with gamma-ray bursts. II. Cosmography challenges and cosmological scenarios for the accelerated Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demianski, Marek; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2017-02-01

    Context. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe is one of the fundamental challenges in physics today. Cosmography provides information about the evolution of the universe derived from measured distances, assuming only that the space time geometry is described by the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric, and adopting an approach that effectively uses only Taylor expansions of basic observables. Aims: We perform a high-redshift analysis to constrain the cosmographic expansion up to the fifth order. It is based on the Union2 type Ia supernovae data set, the gamma-ray burst Hubble diagram, a data set of 28 independent measurements of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and some Gaussian priors on h and ΩM. Methods: We performed a statistical analysis and explored the probability distributions of the cosmographic parameters. By building up their regions of confidence, we maximized our likelihood function using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Results: Our high-redshift analysis confirms that the expansion of the Universe currently accelerates; the estimation of the jerk parameter indicates a possible deviation from the standard ΛCDM cosmological model. Moreover, we investigate implications of our results for the reconstruction of the dark energy equation of state (EOS) by comparing the standard technique of cosmography with an alternative approach based on generalized Padé approximations of the same observables. Because these expansions converge better, is possible to improve the constraints on the cosmographic parameters and also on the dark matter EOS. Conclusions: The estimation of the jerk and the DE parameters indicates at 1σ a possible deviation from the ΛCDM cosmological model.

  14. The center of excellence on elder abuse and neglect at the University of California, Irvine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Elaine A; Twomey, Mary S; Mosqueda, Laura

    2010-07-01

    The Center of Excellence on Elder Abuse and Neglect at the University of California, Irvine, integrates the work of five discrete but interacting domains related to elder mistreatment. These domains are local projects, research, training and education, technical assistance, and policy and advocacy. The Center is structured in such a way as to maximize information sharing and cross-pollination between the domains, build on lessons learned, and explore new ideas. This article describes the history of the Center, offers examples that highlight how the Center works, and considers the future of this model for the field of elder mistreatment.

  15. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

  16. A Co-Investigator Project for the Cornell University Cleft Accelerated Plasma Experimental Rocket-CAPER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    The CAPER rocket campaign was to follow the SCIFER experiment as a detailed study of the ion acceleration processes in the Cleft Ion Fountain (CIF) above 1000 km altitude. The SCIFER rocket demonstrated that the experiment was feasible and that the CIF acceleration processes on the dayside are different from those observed in the discrete aurora on the nightside. The responsibility of the GI/UAF co-investigator project was to provide the real-time acquisition and display of large-and small-scale ground observations, and satellite solar wind data at the launch control center at Longyearbyen, Svalbard for the determination of the launch conditions and the later interpretation of the rocket observations. The rocket campaign was proposed for January of 1998, but was slipped to January of 1999. The rocket was launched on January 21, 1999 at 06 h 13 m 30 s UT. All of the GI/UAF co-investigator systems functioned well, except the narrow-field TV camera which was to follow the 140 km conjugate of the payload on command from GPS tracking data sent from Andoya. The data were not available during the flight, and the camera tracked the nominal conjugate. Unfortunately, the trajectory was well west of nominal, so no useful narrow-field conjugate data were acquired . In addition, the payload missed the region of more intense precipitation, brighter aurora, stronger currents, and likely large fluxes of transverse ion acceleration. On the other hand, good data were acquired across a region of the ionosphere that appears to have had a double convection boundary because of the IMF switching its z component shortly before launch. These data are important for understanding the reaction of the magnetosphere and ionosphere to changes in the IMF.

  17. Modeling the Gamma-Ray Emission in the GALACTIC CENTER with a Fading Cosmic-ray Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  18. Center for Molecular Electronics, University of Missouri, St. Louis. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Missouri, St. Louis to proceed with the detailed design and construction of the proposed Center for Molecular Electronics. The proposed Center would consist of laboratories and offices housed in a three-story building on the University campus. The proposed modular laboratories would be adaptable for research activities principally related to physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering. Proposed research would include the development and application of thin-film materials, semi-conductors, electronic sensors and devices, and high-performance polymers. Specific research for the proposed Center has not yet been formulated, therefore, specific procedures for any particular process or study cannot be described at this time. The proposed construction site is an uncontaminated panel of land located on the University campus. This report contains information about the environmental assessment that was performed in accordance with this project.

  19. The Warping of Extra Spaces Accelerates the Expansion of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    Generic cosmological models derived from higher-dimensional theories with warped extra-dimensions have a nonzero cosmological constant-like term induced on the 3 + 1 space-time, or a physical three-brane. In the scenario where this 3 + 1 space-time is an inflating de Sitter "bran" embedded in a higher-dimensional space-time, described by warped geometry, the four-dimensional cosmological term is determined in terms of two length scales: one is a scale associated with the size of extra-dimension(s) and the other is a scale associated with the warping of extra-space(s). The existence of this term in four dimensions provides a tantalizing possibility of explaining the observed accelerating expansion of the universe from fundamental theories of gravity, e.g. string theory.

  20. Acceleration of the universe: a reconstruction of the effective equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan

    2016-07-01

    This work is based upon a parametric reconstruction of the effective or total equation of state in a model for the Universe with accelerated expansion. The constraints on the model parameters are obtained by maximum-likelihood analysis using the supernova distance modulus data, observational Hubble data, baryon acoustic oscillation data and cosmic microwave background shift parameter data. For statistical comparison, the same analysis has also been carried out for the w cold dark matter (wCDM) dark energy model. Different model selection criteria (Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion) give the clear indication that the reconstructed model is well consistent with the wCDM model. Then both the models [weff(z) model and wCDM model] have also been presented through (q0,j0) parameter space. Tighter constraint on the present values of dark energy equation of state parameter (wDE(z = 0)) and cosmological jerk (j0) have been achieved for the reconstructed model.

  1. Cherenkov Telescope Array: Unveiling the Gamma Ray Universe and its Cosmic Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.

    2016-10-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international initiative to build the next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory which will have a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV - 10 TeV range and an extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA is planned to consist of two arrays (one in the North and another in the South Hemisphere) and will provide the deepest insight ever reached into the non-thermal high-energy Universe and its particle accelerators.

  2. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  3. σCDM coupled to radiation: Dark energy and Universe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.; Müller, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the Chiral Cosmological Model (CCM) coupled to cold dark matter (CDM) has been investigated as σCDM model to study the observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Dark sector fields (as Dark Energy content) coupled to cosmic dust were considered as the source of Einstein gravity in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Such model had a beginning at the matter-dominated era. The purposes of our present investigation are two-fold: To extend “life” of the σCDM for earlier times to radiation-dominated era and to take into account variation of the exponential potential V = V0exp -λ φ MP + V0exp -λ χ MP via variation of the interaction parameter λ. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to investigate possible values of initial conditions constrained by the measured amount of the dark matter, dark energy and radiation component today. Our analysis includes dark energy contribution to critical density, the ratio of the kinetic and potential energies, deceleration parameter, effective equation of state (EoS) and evolution of DE EoS with variation of coupling constant λ. A comparison with the ΛCDM model was performed. A new feature of the model is the existence of some values of potential coupling constant, leading to a σCDM solution without transition into accelerated expansion epoch.

  4. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  5. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  6. Implementing RECONSIDER, a diagnostic prompting computer system, at the Georgetown University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Broering, N C; Corn, M; Ayers, W R; Mistry, P

    1988-04-01

    RECONSIDER, a computer program for diagnostic prompting developed at the University of California, San Francisco, has been implemented at the Georgetown University Medical Center as part of the Integrated Academic Information Management System Model Development grant project supported by the National Library of Medicine. The system is available for student use in the Biomedical Information Resources Center of the Dahlgren Memorial Library. Instruction on use of the computer system is provided by the library and instruction on medical use of the knowledge base is directed by the faculty. The implementation, capabilities, enhancements such as the addition of Current Medical Information and Terminology (5th ed.), and evaluation of the system are reported.

  7. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research.

  8. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small

  9. The University of North Carolina Pain Center-I. Organization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Jawahar N.; Gregg, John M.

    1982-01-01

    The University of North Carolina Comprehensive Pain Center, which has been in existence since 1972, is a pain evaluation, treatment and research program based upon individual diagnosis, comprehensive evaluation, and individualized therapy. This is done within the framework of a concurrent program involving anesthesiologists, oral surgeons, neurosurgeons, psychiatrists, physicians from family medicine, clinical psychologists, social workers and specialized nurses. The Center is organized in both the inpatient and outpatient modes. This presentation will briefly describe the operation of the Pain Center and discuss plans for future expansion. PMID:6961827

  10. Evaluation of Courses and Programs Offered Under the Auspices of Wayne State University and the University of Michigan at the University Center for Adult Education, Detroit, Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dada, Paul O. A.

    By use of interviews, questionnaires, and observation, the courses and programs offered by the University Center for Adult Education, in Detroit, were evaluated. The courses concerned Communication and Language Art, Environment, Practical Economics, Behavioral Science, Technology, Extension Courses, and Special Events. Evaluation findings show…

  11. Critical limits (alert values) for physician notification: universal or medical center specific limits?

    PubMed

    Lum, G

    1998-01-01

    The concept of critical limits (alert values), defined as an imminent life threatening laboratory result requiring immediate physician notification, has been widely adopted as a standard of good laboratory practice. Although virtually all laboratories have tests with critical limits, surveys have shown that there is no universal alert value list. Recently, nine VA medical centers in the New England region, which now constitute one consolidated entity, were surveyed with the objective of summarizing critical limits. Universal (100 percent) critical limit tests for clinical chemistry were: Calcium; mean low/high, 6.5/12.4 mg/dL: Glucose 48/432 mg/dL: Potassium 2.8/6.1 mmol/L: Sodium 121/159 mmol/L. Universal hematology tests included: Hematocrit 22.2/59.7 percent: Platelet count 61K/983K: white blood count 1.9K/29K. Although there was universal agreement that abnormal coagulation tests (PT, PTT) should be included on the hematology critical limit list, there was wide variation in the reporting of coagulation tests (seconds and INR) and patient therapeutic status (anticoagulant or no-anticoagulant). Universal alert values for microbiology were: Positive blood culture: Positive cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) culture: Positive CSF Gram stain. There was no universal agreement regarding critically high (potentially toxic) therapeutic drugs, with two medical centers declining to notify physicians of any abnormally high therapeutic drug level. No other qualitative critical limits for other laboratory sections, such as physician notification of an unexpected malignancy (surgical pathology) were universal. Medical center specific critical limits, designed to meet the clinical needs of each facility, are the norm in the nine medical centers. Laboratories do need periodically to review their critical limit lists with appropriate clinical input to avoid including critical limits for laboratory tests not required for urgent physician notification and patient evaluation and treatment.

  12. The changing face of academic health centers: a path forward for the University of Colorado Denver.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M Roy; Krugman, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    This article describes a decade of major changes at an academic health center (AHC) and university. The authors describe two major changes undertaken at the University of Colorado and its AHC during the past 10 years and the effects of these changes on the organization as a whole. First, the AHC's four health professional schools and two partner hospitals were completely relocated from a space-limited urban campus to a closed Army base. The impact of that change and the management of its potential disruption of academic programs are discussed in detail. In the middle of this total relocation, the AHC campus was consolidated with a general academic campus within the University of Colorado system, compounding the challenge. The authors describe the strategies employed to implement this major consolidation, including changing the organizational structure and selecting the new name of the university--the University of Colorado Denver.

  13. Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments Delivered at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minami, Takuya; Davies, D. Robert; Tierney, Sandra Callen; Bettmann, Joanna E.; McAward, Scott M.; Averill, Lynnette A.; Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Benbrook, Amy R.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment data from a university counseling center (UCC) that utilized the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 (OQ-45; M. J. Lambert et al., 2004), a self-report general clinical symptom measure, was compared against treatment efficacy benchmarks from clinical trials of adult major depression that utilized similar measures. Statistical analyses suggested…

  14. Working with Clients Who Have Religious/Spiritual Issues: A Survey of University Counseling Center Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ian S.; Hill, Clara E.; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Freitas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    University counseling center therapists (N = 220) completed an Internet survey about religion/spirituality in therapy, with 200 of these therapists describing therapy with a recent client whose issues involved religion/spirituality. Common client religion/spirituality issues were questioning one's childhood religion, exploring…

  15. Building "Bob": A Project Exploring the Human Body at Western Illinois University Preschool Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouette, Scott

    2008-01-01

    When the children at Western Illinois University Preschool Center embarked on a study of human bodies, they decided to build a life-size model of a body, organ by organ from the inside out, to represent some of the things they were learning. This article describes the building of "Bob," the human body model, highlighting the children's…

  16. 75 FR 10219 - Solicitation of Applications for the FY 2010 University Center Economic Development Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... goal of enhancing regional economic development by promoting a favorable business environment to... Doc No: 2010-4591] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Economic Development Administration [Docket No.: 100210082-0082-01] Solicitation of Applications for the FY 2010 University Center Economic Development...

  17. Serving Generation 1.5 Learners in the University Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonus, Terese

    2003-01-01

    Explains how a key academic support service--the university writing center, can assist Generation 1.5 students (long-term U.S. residents and English language learners fluent in spoken English) as they develop their writing skills. (Author/VWL)

  18. The Development and Testing of a Typology of Adult Education Programs in University Residential Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskey, John H.

    This study was designed to develop and field test a typology of framework providing for the systematic description, definition, and classification of activities in university continuing education centers. Basic questions pertained to whether such a typology could be developed, and whether other investigators and practitioners could use the…

  19. A Report on the Design and Construction of the University of Massachusetts Computer Science Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Office of the Inspector General, Boston.

    This report describes a review conducted by the Massachusetts Office of the Inspector General on the construction of the Computer Science and Development Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. The office initiated the review after hearing concerns about the management of the project, including its delayed completion and substantial…

  20. EPA Announces Grant Funding to the University of Maryland to Support Regional Environmental Finance Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (August 25, 2015) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has selected the University of Maryland as one of the nine winners of a six-year grant to support a regional Environmental Finance Center. Through the Environmental Finance C

  1. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  2. Team Teaching Verbal, Mathematics, and Learning Skills. Howard University. The Center for Academic Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Joan; Byrd, Roland

    Team teaching was used in three undergraduate courses to explore its potential for enhancing students' academic development. The courses were part of a program offered to freshmen with unrealized academic potential through the Howard University (District of Columbia) Center for Academic Reinforcement (CAR). A three-hour block of time was set aside…

  3. Evolving a University Center to a Branch Campus: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Steven C.; Plumb, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is now expected to respond to community demands that include fueling economic development and addressing the needs of a wider range of students. Colleges and universities have responded to these demands using a variety of delivery models. A study was conducted by the Ardmore Higher Education Center to identify the advantages and…

  4. The University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's Health Information Services Outreach Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Susan B.; And Others

    Begun in 1980, the University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's statewide Outreach Program is a composite of many services and projects designed to meet the medical and health information needs of the state's diverse and scattered population. The only major biomedical library in New Mexico, the Library has built the program on existing…

  5. The Indiana University Chemical Information Center Program of Chemical Literature Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Describes three chemical information science courses offered by Indiana University (IU) Department of Chemistry. Also describes goals and operation of IU's Chemical Information Center, created to implement online searching of chemical databases and to assume operation of the IU dissemination of information services based on Chemical Abstracts…

  6. The University-Center Baccalaureate Degree in California: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    The community college baccalaureate and the university-center baccalaureate models are gaining traction in the state of California as alternatives to addressing the need for greater access to baccalaureate degree programs and to increase the baccalaureate-educated workforce. Little is known about the characteristics and factors associated with the…

  7. Instructors' Perceptions and Barriers of Learner-Centered Instruction in English at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawalbeh, Tha'er Issa; AlAsmari, AbdulRahman Awad

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to examine the instructors' perceptions of learner-centered instruction and possible barriers to implementing this instructional method in teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at the university level in the Saudi Arabian context. To do this, four questions were posed. The first question investigates instructors'…

  8. Religion and Spirituality in Group Counseling: Beliefs and Practices of University Counseling Center Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Brian C.; Cornish, Marilyn A.; Wade, Nathaniel G.; Tucker, Jeritt R.

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-four counselors at 9 university counseling centers participated in a study regarding religion and spirituality (R/S) in group counseling. The majority indicated that R/S is an appropriate topic for group counseling and that some religious and spiritual interventions are appropriate to use. However, counselors rarely use these interventions.…

  9. Instructors' Perceived Effectiveness of Current Professional Development Programs at Taif University English Language Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawalbeh, Tha'er Issa

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aimed to explore the EFL instructors perceived effectiveness of current professional development programs run at Taif University English Language Center (TUELC) in Saudi Arabia, and to provide suggestions to improve the current situation of these programs. To achieve these purposes, the researcher tried to answer three questions.…

  10. School-University Partnerships. Perspectives: Center for Excellence in Education, Monograph Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapan, Stephen D., Ed; Minner, Sam, Ed.

    This monograph features four papers that highlight school-based teacher training programs through Northern Arizona University's (NAU) Center for Excellence in Education (CEE). The first paper, "Reflection, Research, and Practice in a School-based Teacher Education Program (Peggy Ver Velde, Sherry L. Markel, Jeanne Dustman, Barbara Campbell,…

  11. Arrival: Notes from the 2005 "Views on Understanding" Summer Institute, Harvard University Project Zero Research Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Of all the summer institutes for educators, the Harvard University Project Zero Research Center's "Views on Understanding" institute stands out as one of the few offering extensive exchanges amongst researchers and practitioners from all over the world. "Arrival" captures the experience of one participant while capturing the essences of plenary…

  12. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and…

  13. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance…

  14. Head Start Evaluation and Research Center, Boston University. Report of Research, September, 1966-August, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfunkel, Frank; And Others

    This document is a report of research conducted from September 1966 to August 1967 by the Head Start Evaluation and Research Center of Boston University. Eleven studies and projects are reported, many of them in preliminary or incomplete form because either they are ongoing studies or the data analysis is not finished. The 11 studies contain six…

  15. Racial and Ethnic Minority Clients' Utilization of a University Counseling Center: An Archival Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, M. Meghan; Yakushka, Oksana F.; Sanford-Martens, Tiffany C.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the utilization of a university counseling center's services by non-international racial and ethnic minority students via an archival approach. A total of 242 participants were included. Data were examined utilizing ANOVA, bivariate correlation, and chi-square analyses. Results support previous assertions that minority…

  16. Broom Closet or Fish Bowl? An Ethnographic Exploration of a University Queer Center and Oneself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teman, Eric D.; Lahman, Maria K. E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors detail an educational ethnography of a university queer cultural center's role on campus and in the surrounding community. The data include participant observation, in-depth interviews, and artifacts. The authors review lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, ally, and questioning (LGBTAQ) issues in higher education, heterosexual…

  17. The Medical Library and Media Center of Keio University in Tokyo: report on a visit.

    PubMed Central

    Accart, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Medical Library and Media Center at Keio University in Tokyo offers many facilities to its users: access to medical information within a large catalog of monographs and journals, online searching and CD-ROM databases, and a dynamic interlibrary loan service. This article is a report of a professional visit to the library on September 30, 1993. PMID:7703947

  18. History of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, while quite a mouthful, is aptly named, since it has contributed substantially to the legacy of Jean Mayer, to the scientific stature of the USDA and, in Atwater’s tradition, to the d...

  19. NASA Lewis Research Center/university graduate research program on engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  20. NASA Lewis Research Center/University Graduate Research Program on Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  1. Using Electronic Information Resources Centers by Faculty Members at University Education: Competencies, Needs and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouelenein, Yousri

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factual situation of electronic information resources centers to faculty members at university education. Competencies that faculty members should possess regarding this issue were determined. Also their needs for (scientific research skills and teaching) were assessed. In addition, problems that hinder their…

  2. Brief Therapy at a University Counseling Center: Working Alliance, Readiness to Change, and Symptom Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Megan; Laux, John M.; Ritchie, Martin H.; Piazza, Nick J.; Tiamiyu, Mojisola F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated whether students receiving short-term individual counseling at a university counseling center showed progress as evidenced by perceived client and counselor outcomes and the roles that client readiness to change and working alliance played in this setting. The results indicated that the counselor reports, not the client…

  3. NINR Centers of Excellence: A logic model for sustainability, leveraging resources and collaboration to accelerate cross-disciplinary science

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Susan G.; Schiffman, Rachel; Redeker, Nancy S.; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Weglicki, Linda S.; Grady, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The NINR Centers of Excellence program is a catalyst enabling institutions to develop infrastructure and administrative support for creating cross-disciplinary teams that bring multiple strategies and expertise to bear on common areas of science. Centers are increasingly collaborative with campus partners and reflect an integrated team approach to advance science and promote the development of scientists in these areas. The purpose of this paper is to present a NINR Logic Model for Center Sustainability. The components of the logic model were derived from the presentations and robust discussions at the 2013 NINR Center Directors’ meeting focused on best practices for leveraging resources and collaboration as methods to promote center sustainability. Collaboration through development and implementation of cross-disciplinary research teams is critical to accelerate the generation of new knowledge for solving fundamental health problems. Sustainability of centers as a long-term outcome beyond the initial funding can be enhanced by thoughtful planning of inputs, activities, and leveraging resources across multiple levels. PMID:25085328

  4. The National Osteopathic Research Center at the University of North Texas Health Science Center: inception, growth, and future.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Scott T; McCormick, Justin; Degenhardt, Brian F; Hahn, Marc B

    2009-06-01

    The osteopathic profession has long recognized the need to carry out research in order to improve clinical care. Osteopathic physicians have a particular obligation to carry out research in areas, such as osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), that are unique to osteopathic medicine. OMM is similar to manual therapy that is performed by other types of practitioners, but it has some distinctive characteristics. Osteopathic doctors also use OMM to treat infectious disease-not just musculoskeletal disorders.In 2001, several osteopathic professional organizations agreed to jointly fund a national osteopathic research center at one of the osteopathic medical colleges. Five osteopathic colleges submitted research proposals in response to a request for applications. The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) was chosen to be the site for the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC) and was funded for four years with $1.1M. Between 2002 and 2007, the ORC received an additional $11M in research support from multiple sources including federal funds. With this support, it has made substantive contributions to science. These include oversight of the recently completed four-year, $1.5M multicenter study on the efficacy of OMM as a treatment for pneumonia in the elderly and a three-year, $1.9M National Institutes of Health-funded developmental research center to perform mechanistic studies of some OMM actions.The authors discuss the long-term costs, benefits, and sustainability of the national ORC at UNTHSC in the contexts of research accomplished, the training of new medical osteopathic researchers, and an effort to develop other successful regional osteopathic research centers.

  5. The University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women: science inspired by women's stories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carol E

    2011-09-01

    Research in the violence against women area has been undertaken for more than 30 years, but individual researchers who have made these scholarly contributions have not been advantaged by adequate attention, funding, or organizational structure within the university setting. This article offers a detailed description of a model of an interdisciplinary research center designed to provide an academic architecture within which research on intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and other forms of violence against women can flourish and advance. The article describes the impetus for creation of the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women, its current mission, organizational structure, financial operations, and initiatives related to research, education, and public service. Practical strategies for establishing and sustaining a center of this type are offered.

  6. Preparing for College Success: Exploring the Impact of the High School Cambridge Acceleration Program on U.S. University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart D.; Werno, Magda A.

    2016-01-01

    This case study sought to gain a better understanding of the impact of the Cambridge Acceleration Program on students' transition from high school to college at one American university. The findings from an online questionnaire indicate that many participants develop a range of skills that are perceived as important in the context of university…

  7. A 5-year scientometric analysis of research centers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Kamran; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Ghalichi, Leila; Khalili, Malahat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) has the oldest and highest number of research centers among all Iranian medical universities, this study was conducted to evaluate scientific output of research centers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) using scientometric indices and the affecting factors. Moreover, a number of scientometric indicators were introduced. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate a 5-year scientific performance of research centers of TUMS. Data were collected through questionnaires, annual evaluation reports of the Ministry of Health, and also from Scopus database. We used appropriate measures of central tendency and variation for descriptive analyses. Moreover, uni-and multi-variable linear regression were used to evaluate the effect of independent factors on the scientific output of the centers. Results: The medians of the numbers of papers and books during a 5-year period were 150.5 and 2.5 respectively. The median of the "articles per researcher" was 19.1. Based on multiple linear regression, younger age centers (p=0.001), having a separate budget line (p=0.016), and number of research personnel (p<0.001) had a direct significant correlation with the number of articles while real properties had a reverse significant correlation with it (p=0.004). Conclusion: The results can help policy makers and research managers to allocate sufficient resources to improve current situation of the centers. Newly adopted and effective scientometric indices are is suggested to be used to evaluate scientific outputs and functions of these centers. PMID:26157724

  8. University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Crotty, G.; Cai, L.; Sana, P.; Doolittle, A.; Ropp, M.; Krygowski, T.; Narasimha, S.

    1995-09-01

    This is a second annual report since the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education was established at Georgia Tech. The major focus of the center is crystalline silicon, and the mission of the Center is to improve the fundamental understanding of the science and technology of advanced photovoltaic devices and materials, to fabricate high-efficiency cells, and develop low-cost processes, to provide training and enrich the equational experience of students in this field, and to increase US competitiveness by providing guidelines to industry and DOE to achieve cost-effective and high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. This report outlines the work of the Center from July 1993--June 1994.

  9. Performance evaluation of extension education centers in universities based on the balanced scorecard.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-02-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance evaluation indices have been selected and then utilizing the decision making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) and analytic network process (ANP), respectively, further establishes the causality between the four BSC perspectives as well as the relative weights between evaluation indices. According to this previous result, an empirical analysis of the performance evaluation of extension education centers of three universities at Taoyuan County in Taiwan is illustrated by applying VlseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR). From the analysis results, it indicates that "Learning and growth" is the significant influential factor and it would affect the other three perspectives. In addition, it is discovered that "Internal process" perspective as well as "Financial" perspective play important roles in the performance evaluation of extension education centers. The top three key performance indices are "After-sales service", "Turnover volume", and "Net income". The proposed evaluation model could be considered as a reference for extension education centers in universities to prioritize their improvements on the key performance indices after performing VIKOR analyses.

  10. Establishment of a Beta Test Center for the NPARC Code at Central State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okhio, Cyril B.

    1996-01-01

    Central State University has received a supplementary award to purchase computer workstations for the NPARC (National Propulsion Ames Research Center) computational fluid dynamics code BETA Test Center. The computational code has also been acquired for installation on the workstations. The acquisition of this code is an initial step for CSU in joining an alliance composed of NASA, AEDC, The Aerospace Industry, and academia. A post-Doctoral research Fellow from a neighboring university will assist the PI in preparing a template for Tutorial documents for the BETA test center. The major objective of the alliance is to establish a national applications-oriented CFD capability, centered on the NPARC code. By joining the alliance, the BETA test center at CSU will allow the PI, as well as undergraduate and post-graduate students to test the capability of the NPARC code in predicting the physics of aerodynamic/geometric configurations that are of interest to the alliance. Currently, CSU is developing a once a year, hands-on conference/workshop based upon the experience acquired from running other codes similar to the NPARC code in the first year of this grant.

  11. The Preparation of Master's-Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Brian M.; Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated college and university counseling center directors' perceptions of the adequacy of the preparation of master's-level counselors for work in college and university counseling centers. Results indicated that counselors were rated on average as prepared; however, many directors had concerns about counselors'…

  12. Phase III of construction of University Fitness Center and Human Performance Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, James

    2009-09-30

    This grant did not include administrative expenses/legal expenses, land or rights-of-way purchases or relocation expenses. The construction funds for the Fitness Center $932,100 and the Performance Lab $23,900 totaled $956,000. Actual dollars expended totaled, $956,509.22, $932,609.22 for the Fitness Center and $23,900 for the Performance Lab. The University contributed $509.22. The projects are completed and in use. All inspections and occupancy permits have been obtained. All contractors have released all construction leans.

  13. Research and educational initiatives at the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, E.; Lagraff, J.; Davidson, B.; Bogucz, E.; Dang, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Manufacturing Engineering and the Northeast Parallel Architectures Center of Syracuse University have been funded by NASA to establish a program to educate young engineers in the hypersonic disciplines. This goal is being achieved through a comprehensive five-year program that includes elements of undergraduate instruction, advanced graduate coursework, undergraduate research, and leading-edge hypersonics research. The research foci of the Syracuse Center for Hypersonics are three-fold; high-temperature composite materials, measurements in turbulent hypersonic flows, and the application of high-performance computing to hypersonic fluid dynamics.

  14. Development and operation of the Loma Linda University Medical Center proton facility.

    PubMed

    Slater, Jerry D

    2007-08-01

    The Proton Treatment Center at Loma Linda University Medical Center, the world's first hospital-based proton facility, opened in 1990 after two decades of development. Its early years were marked by a deliberately cautious approach in clinical utilization of protons, with intent to establish hospital-based proton therapy on a scientific basis. The facility was designed to be upgradeable, and development since 1990 has proceeded in three distinct phases of upgrades, both in technology and clinical applications. Upgrades continue, all of them based on an underlying program of basic and clinical research; future new applications of proton radiation therapy are expected to follow.

  15. The First National Student Conference: NASA University Research Centers at Minority Institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Editor); Mebane, Stacie (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference includes contributions from 13 minority universities with NASA University Research Centers. Topics discussed include: leadership, survival strategies, life support systems, food systems, simulated hypergravity, chromium diffusion doping, radiation effects on dc-dc converters, metal oxide glasses, crystal growth of Bil3, science and communication on wheels, semiconductor thin films, numerical solution of random algebraic equations, fuzzy logic control, spatial resolution of satellite images, programming language development, nitric oxide in the thermosphere and mesosphere, high performance polyimides, crossover control in genetic algorithms, hyperthermal ion scattering, etc.

  16. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  17. Non-actively controlled double-inverted-pendulum-like dynamics can minimize center of mass acceleration during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morimoto, Hiroki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2015-08-01

    Multiple joint movements during human quiet standing exhibit characteristic inter-joint coordination, shortly referred to as reciprocal relationship, in which angular acceleration of the hip joint is linearly and negatively correlated with that of the ankle joint (antiphase coordination) and, moreover, acceleration of the center of mass (CoM) of the double-inverted-pendulum (DIP) model of the human body is close to zero constantly. A question considered in this study is whether the reciprocal relationship is established by active neural control of the posture, or rather it is a biomechanical consequence of non-actively controlled body dynamics. To answer this question, we consider a DIP model of quiet standing, and show that the reciprocal relationship always holds by Newton's second law applied to the DIP model with human anthropometric dimensions, regardless of passive and active joint torque patterns acting on the ankle and hip joints. We then show that characteristic frequencies included in experimental sway trajectories with the reciprocal relationship match with harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the stable antiphase eigenmode of the non-actively controlled DIP-like unstable body dynamics. The results suggest that non-actively controlled DIP-like mechanical dynamics is a major cause of the minimization of the CoM acceleration during quiet standing, which is consistent with a type of control strategy that allows switching off active neural control intermittently for suitable periods of time during quiet standing.

  18. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  19. A patient-centered health care delivery system by a university obstetrics and gynecology department.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Garland D; Nelson-Becker, Carolyn; Hannigan, Edward V; Berenson, Abbey B; Hankins, Gary D V

    2005-01-01

    At the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, we developed an off-site clinic system that offers a wide array of services to low-income women and their infants over a large geographic area. These clinics strove toward cultural sensitivity and competency. This patient-centered approach was well accepted and appreciated by our patients. The clinics offered unique, value-added services including combined location with other needed services, on-site laboratory and antepartum testing, the option for delivery at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in a Birth Center by certified nurse midwives from the clinics, 2 high-level ultrasound "hub" centers in the outlying region that offer level II ultrasound and maternal-fetal medicine specialist consultation on site, and linkage of all sites to our electronic medical record, telemedicine, and telegenetics consultation. We also developed an off-site domiciliary facility at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. From 1989 to 2004, our clinics grew from 12 to 38 (now serving 123 Texas counties). Annual patient visits increased from approximately 34,000 to 342,926. Deliveries at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston grew from 3,959 in 1990 to an estimated 6,400 in 2004. Underscoring this increase was the probable loss of at least 1,500 deliveries to local hospitals that had previously denied or discouraged admission to Medicaid-eligible pregnant women. Many women chose to deliver in our hospital even although they had to travel a longer distance to reach our facility. Our experience has shown that patient-centered care can be a viable business strategy to maintain and expand patient volumes and will work even where there are serious geographic disadvantages.

  20. Joining Forces: How Student Success Centers Are Accelerating Statewide Community College Improvement Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.

    2013-01-01

    There's an emerging trend in the national college completion movement. A group of small but powerful Student Success Centers is creating statewide impact in states traditionally devoid of a strong centralized tradition of community college governance. Growing directly out of a decade of hard work to dramatically boost student completion rates in…

  1. State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse Leasing Practices. Report No. 95-S-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany.

    This document presents results of an audit of the leasing practices of the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center at Syracuse covering the period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1995. The audit investigated whether the Center and the Center's Clinical Practice Management Plan members engage in appropriate and economic leasing…

  2. J-PAS: The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepa, J.; Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Moles, M.; Sodré, L.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cristóbal, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Abramo, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Overzier, R.; Hernández-Monteagudo, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Kanaan, A.; Carvano, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; J-PAS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory in Spain with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5 m telescope and a 4.7 sq.deg. camera with 1.2 Gpix. Starting in late 2016, J-PAS will observe 8500 sq.deg. of Northern Sky and measure Δz˜0.003(1+z) photo-z for 9× 107 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ˜ 14 Gpc3 up to z=1.3 and becoming the first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV. J-PAS will detect 7× 105 galaxy clusters and groups, setting constraints on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from its BAO measurements. Thanks to the superb characteristics of the site (seeing ˜ 0.7 arcsec), J-PAS is expected to obtain a deep, sub-arcsec image of the Northern sky, which combined with its unique photo-z precision will produce one of the most powerful cosmological lensing surveys before the arrival of Euclid. J-PAS's unprecedented spectral time domain information will enable a self-contained SN survey that, without the need for external spectroscopic follow-up, will detect, classify and measure σz˜ 0.5 redshifts for ˜ 4000 SNeIa and ˜ 900 core-collapse SNe. The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach: a contiguous system of 54 filters with 145 Å width, placed 100 Å apart over a multi-degree FoV is a powerful redshift machine, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a 4.7 sq.deg. IFU and it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations.

  3. Establishment of a university academic spine center: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Burton, Douglas C; Khan, Talal W; Dixon, Kimberly A; Asher, Marc A; Varghese, George

    2013-01-01

    In fewer than five years, the University of Kansas Hospital Spine Center became the largest and most comprehensive spine care facility in the greater metropolitan Kansas City area. The 22,000-square-foot facility has 27 exam rooms, four specialized diagnostic rooms, 11 pre-/post-interventional procedure rooms, and a 4000-square-foot outpatient rehabilitation gym. Patients can meet with their physicians, undergo diagnostic tests and treatment, and attend therapy sessions in one location. The multidisciplinary Spine Center brings together orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, neurologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, pain-management anesthesiologists, radiologists, and physical and occupational therapists. The Spine Center became successful because a group of physicians bought into the philosophy of a comprehensive interdisciplinary program, were willing to sacrifice some territorial claims, and were willing to put patient care and the good of the institution above individual egos.

  4. University of Chicago Center for Personalized Therapeutics: research, education and implementation science

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, M Eileen; Maitland, Michael L; O’Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Cox, Nancy J; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is aimed at advancing our knowledge of the genetic basis of variable drug response. The Center for Personalized Therapeutics within the University of Chicago comprises basic, translational and clinical research as well as education including undergraduate, graduate, medical students, clinical/postdoctoral fellows and faculty. The Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics is the educational arm of the Center aimed at training clinical and postdoctoral fellows in translational pharmacology and pharmacogenomics. Research runs the gamut from basic discovery and functional studies to pharmacogenomic implementation studies to evaluate physician adoption of genetic medicine. The mission of the Center is to facilitate research, education and implementation of pharmacogenomics to realize the true potential of personalized medicine and improve the lives of patients. PMID:24024891

  5. Jackson State University's Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications: New facilities and new paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce E.; Elliot, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Jackson State University recently established the Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications, a Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing laboratory. Taking advantage of new technologies and new directions in the spatial (geographic) sciences, JSU is building a Center of Excellence in Spatial Data Management. New opportunities for research, applications, and employment are emerging. GIS requires fundamental shifts and new demands in traditional computer science and geographic training. The Center is not merely another computer lab but is one setting the pace in a new applied frontier. GIS and its associated technologies are discussed. The Center's facilities are described. An ARC/INFO GIS runs on a Vax mainframe, with numerous workstations. Image processing packages include ELAS, LIPS, VICAR, and ERDAS. A host of hardware and software peripheral are used in support. Numerous projects are underway, such as the construction of a Gulf of Mexico environmental data base, development of AI in image processing, a land use dynamics study of metropolitan Jackson, and others. A new academic interdisciplinary program in Spatial Data Management is under development, combining courses in Geography and Computer Science. The broad range of JSU's GIS and remote sensing activities is addressed. The impacts on changing paradigms in the university and in the professional world conclude the discussion.

  6. EFRC:CST at the University of Texas at Austin - A DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Zhu, Xiaoyang (Director, Understanding Charge Separation and Transfer at Interfaces in Energy Materials); CST Staff

    2016-07-12

    'EFRC:CST at the University of Texas at Austin - A DOE Energy Frontier Research Center' was submitted by the EFRC for Understanding Charge Separation and Transfer at Interfaces in Energy Materials (EFRC:CST) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFRC:CST is directed by Xiaoyang Zhu at the University of Texas at Austin in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  7. Deuteron frozen-spin- polarized target for nd experiments at the VdG accelerator of Charles University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N. S.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Brož, J.; Černý, J.; Doležal, Z.; Fedorov, A. N.; Gurevich, G. M.; Ivanov, M. P.; Kodyš, P.; Kubík, P.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; Lukhanin, O. O.; Matafonov, V. N.; Neganov, A. B.; Pisarev, I. L.; Švejda, J.; Shilov, S. N.; Usov, Yu. A.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-08-01

    A frozen-spin- polarized deuteron target cooled by the 3He/ 4He dilution refrigerator is described. Fully deuterated 1,2-propanediol was used as a target material. Deuteron vector polarization about 40% was obtained for the target in the shape of a cylinder of 2-cm diameter and 6-cm length. The target is intended for a study of 3N interactions at the polarized neutron beam generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator at the Charles University in Prague.

  8. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Southern Center on Environmentally-Driven Disparities in Birth Outcomes (SCEDDBO) - University of Michigan and Duke University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  9. Managing knowledge and technology to foster innovation at the Ohio State University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Cain, Timothy J; Rodman, Ruey L; Sanfilippo, Fred; Kroll, Susan M

    2005-11-01

    Biomedical knowledge is expanding at an unprecedented rate-one that is unlikely to slow anytime in the future. While the volume and scope of this new knowledge poses significant organizational challenges, it creates tremendous opportunities to release and direct its power to the service of significant goals. The authors explain how the Center for Knowledge Management at The Ohio State University Medical Center, created during the academic year 2003-04, is doing just that by integrating numerous resource-intensive, technology-based initiatives-including personnel, services and infrastructure, digital repositories, data sets, mobile computing devices, high-tech patient simulators, computerized testing, and interactive multimedia-in a way that enables the center to provide information tailored to the needs of students, faculty and staff on the medical center campus and its surrounding health sciences colleges. The authors discuss how discovering, applying, and sharing new knowledge, information assets, and technologies in this way is a collaborative process. This process creates open-ended opportunities for innovation and a roadmap for working toward seamless integration, synergy, and substantial enhancement of the academic medical center's research, educational, and clinical mission areas.

  10. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  11. The Center of Excellence for Hypersonics Training and Research at the University of Texas at Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Over the period of this grant (1986-92), 23 graduate students were supported by the Center and received education and training in hypersonics through MS and Ph.D. programs. An additional 8 Ph.D. candidates and 2 MS candidates, with their own fellowship support, were attracted to The University of Texas and were recruited into the hypersonics program because of the Center. Their research, supervised by the 10 faculty involved in the Center, resulted in approximately 50 publications and presentations in journals and at national and international technical conferences. To provide broad-based training, a new hypersonics curriculum was created, enabling students to take 8 core classes in theoretical, computational, and experimental hypersonics, and other option classes over a two to four semester period. The Center also developed an active continuing education program. The Hypersonics Short Course was taught 3 times, twice in the USA and once in Europe. Approximately 300 persons were attracted to hear lectures by more than 25 of the leading experts in the field. In addition, a hypersonic aerodynamics short course was offered through AIAA, as well as short courses on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and advanced CFD. The existence of the Center also enabled faculty to leverage a substantial volume of additional funds from other agencies, for research and graduate student training. Overall, this was a highly successful and highly visible program.

  12. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs.

  13. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  14. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  15. Sankofan socio-ethical reflections: the Tuskegee University National Bioethics Center's decade of operation, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Earl, Riggins R

    2010-08-01

    Primarily, this is a Sankofan socio-ethical analysis of the moral foundation of the Tuskegee University National Bioethics Center's decade of operation. The first section of the study will do the following: a) a Sankofan socio-ethical analysis of the Center's raison d'être; and b) definitions of ethical terms and the social world of the infamous syphilis study. The second section, as a result of the analysis, will address the Center's following challenges: c) the Center's challenge of theory and practice; d) the Center's challenge of moral heritage; and e) the Center's challenge of the future.

  16. The design of the electron beam dump unit of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cite, L. H.; Yilmaz, M.

    2016-03-01

    The required simulations of the electron beam interactions for the design of electron beam dump unit for an accelerator which will operate to get two Infra-Red Free Electron Lasers (IR-FEL) covering the range of 3-250 microns is presented in this work. Simulations have been carried out to understand the interactions of a bulk of specially shaped of four different and widely used materials for the dump materials for a 77 pC, 40 MeV, 13 MHz repetition rate e-beam. In the simulation studies dump materials are chosen to absorb the 99% of the beam energy and to restrict the radio-isotope production in the bulk of the dump. A Lead shielding also designed around the dump core to prevent the leakage out of the all the emitted secondary radiations, e.g., neutrons, photons. The necessary dump material requirements, for the overall design considerations and the possible radiation originated effects on the dump unit, are discussed and presented.

  17. Routine Use of Continuous, Hyperfractionated, Accelerated Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Five-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Omar S. Lester, Jason; Cameron, Alison; Ironside, Janet; Gee, Amanda; Falk, Stephen; Morgan, Sally A.; Worvill, Jackie; Hatton, Matthew Q.F.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the results from continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) used as the standard fractionation for radical RT in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in five United Kingdom centers. Methods and Materials: In 2005, the CHART consortium identified six U.K. centers that had continued to use CHART after the publication of the CHART study in 1997. All centers had been using CHART for >5 years and agreed to use a common database to audit their results. Patients treated with CHART between 1998 and December 2003 were identified to allow a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment details, and survival were recorded retrospectively. Five centers completed the data collection. Results: A total of 583 patients who had received CHART were identified. Of these patients, 69% were male, with a median age of 68 years (range, 31-89); 83% had performance status 0 or 1; and 43% had Stage I or II disease. Of the 583 patients, 99% received the prescribed dose. In only 4 patients was any Grade 4-5 toxicity documented. The median survival from the start of RT was 16.2 months, and the 2-year survival rate of 34% was comparable to that reported in the original study. Conclusion: The results of this unselected series have confirmed that CHART is deliverable in routine clinical practice, with low levels of toxicity. Importantly, this series has demonstrated that the results of CHART reported from the randomized trial can be reproduced in routine clinical practice.

  18. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  19. [Lung disease and HIV infection in children at the Charles de Gaulle university pediatric hospital center in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Kouéta, Fla; Yé, Diarra; Dao, Lassina; Zoungrana-Kaboré, Alice; Ouédraogo, Sylvie Armelle P; Napon, M; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological aspects of lung diseases in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, we conducted a retrospective case control study covering a 3-year period from January 2003 through December 2005 at Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital Center in Ouagadougou. HIV-positive patients hospitalised for lung disease were matched to HIV-negative patients controls, hospitalised for the same symptoms, by age and date of hospitalisation. The study included 186 patients (93 HIV-positive and 93 HIV-negative) and collected data on age, sex, clinical signs, radiological signs and short-term course. Of the 93 HIV-positive children suspected to have been contaminated by mother-to-child transmission, 92 had HIV1 and 1 had a double infection of HIV1 and 2. The mean age in both groups was 48 months. Clinically severe lung disease (44%) was more common in HIV-positive children. Radiology showed that interstitial syndrome was significantly more common in HIV-positive children (p=0001) with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 60%. The case-fatality rate was 4.2% among HIV-positive children. This study allows us to remind paediatricians of the importance of lung disease in HIV-infected children. Moreover, the vertical transmission responsible for disease in all our patients shows the need to accelerate the scaling up of the program for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in our country.

  20. [Researches on virology at the Tohoku University Research Center in the Philippines].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Hitoshi; Saito, Mariko; Okamoto, Michiko; Tamaki, Raita; Kamigaki, Taro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has established the Tohoku-RITM Collaborative Research Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases at Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in the Philippines in 2008. Our aim of the center is to conduct operational researches, which can contribute to control of infectious diseases in the Philippines. Therefore most of our researches in the Philippines are being conducted in the fields. Main research themes include severe acute respiratory infections in children, influenza disease burden study, molecular epidemiology of rabies, and viral etiology of acute diarrhea. The study on severe acute respiratory infections in children in Leyte Island has recruited hospitalized cases with severe pneumonia. We showed that enterovirus 68 was one of important causative agents in severe pneumonia cases. We also conducted other analyses including molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pathogenesis of human rhinoviruses (HRV). Based on these studies, we initiated more comprehensive researches in the Philippines since 2010.

  1. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  2. A new synchrotron light source at Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbauer, Roger L.; Ajmera, Pratul; Poliakoff, Erwin D.; Craft, Ben C.; Saile, Volker

    1990-05-01

    A 1.2-GeV synchrotron light source is being constructed at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) at Louisiana State University. The expressed purpose of the center, which has been funded by a grant from the US Department of Energy, is to develop X-ray lithography techniques for manufacturing microcircuits, although basic science programs are also being established. The storage ring will be optimized for the soft-X-ray region and will be the first commercially manufactured electron storage ring in the United States. The magnetic lattice is based on a design developed by Chasman and Green and will allow up to three insertion devices to be installed for higher-energy and higher-intensity radiation. In addition to the lithography effort, experimental programs are being established in physics, chemistry, and related areas.

  3. The University of Nebraska at Omaha Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandgenett, Neal

    2000-01-01

    Within the context of innovative coursework and other educational activities, we are proposing the establishment of a University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Center for the Use of Space Data in Teaching and Learning. This Center will provide an exciting and motivating process for educators at all levels to become involved in professional development and training which engages real life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The Center will facilitate innovative courses (including online and distance education formats), systematic degree programs, classroom research initiatives, new instructional methods and tools, engaging curriculum materials, and various symposiums. It will involve the active participation of several Departments and Colleges on the UNO campus and be well integrated into the campus environment. It will have a direct impact on pre-service and in-service educators, the K12 (kindergarten through 12th grade) students that they teach, and other college students of various science, mathematics, and technology related disciplines, in which they share coursework. It is our belief that there are many exciting opportunities represented by space data and imagery, as a context for engaging mathematics, science, and technology education. The UNO Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning being proposed in this document will encompass a comprehensive training and dissemination strategy that targets the improvement of K-12 education, through changes in the undergraduate and graduate preparation of teachers in science, mathematics and technology education.

  4. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-12-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs receive reimbursement from local, state, and private funding sources and their viability depends on the demonstration of outcomes. Using the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) assessment tool, an SBHC-university nursing partnership evaluated the use of preventive health services by fifth and sixth grade students (n = 690). Findings suggest that the vast majority of early adolescents needed a referral for a physical exam, nutrition, mental health, or health education services. This article describes key components for a successful SBHC-university nursing partnership that can evaluate and improve existing school health programs.

  5. The new library building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    PubMed Central

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M; Olivier, E R

    1985-01-01

    The new University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Library opened in June 1983, replacing the 1968 library building. Planning a new library building provides an opportunity for the staff to rethink their philosophy of service. Of paramount concern and importance is the need to convey this philosophy to the architects. This paper describes the planning process and the building's external features, interior layouts, and accommodations for technology. Details of the move to the building are considered and various aspects of the building are reviewed. Images PMID:3995205

  6. Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems, New Mexico State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen; DeLeon, Phillip; Borah, Deva; Lyman, Ray

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems activities at New Mexico State University. Presentations cover the following topics: (1) small satellite communications, including nanosatellite radio and virtual satellite development; (2) modulation and detection studies, including details on smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) spectra and highlights of an adaptive turbo multiuser detector; (3) decoupled approaches to nonlinear ISI compensation; (4) space internet testing; (4) optical communication; (5) Linux-based receiver for lightweight optical communications without a laser in space, including software design, performance analysis, and the receiver algorithm; (6) carrier tracking hardware; and (7) subband transforms for adaptive direct sequence spread spectrum receivers.

  7. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Formative Center for the Evaluation of Environmental Impacts on Fetal Development - Brown University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  8. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua; Parker, Jack; Brandt, Craig; Holladay, Susan; Wolfe, Amy; Bogle, Mary Anna; Lowe, Kenneth; Hyder, Kirk

    2006-06-01

    The Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge (Fig. 1), Tennessee supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) goal of understanding the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites for new solutions to environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. In particular, the FRC provides the opportunity for researchers to conduct studies that promote the understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of existing remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies. It offers a series of contaminated sites around the former S-3 Waste Disposal Ponds and uncontaminated sites in which investigators and students conduct field research or collect samples for laboratory analysis. FRC research also spurs the development of new and improved characterization and monitoring tools. Site specific knowledge gained from research conducted at the FRC also provides the DOE-Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) the critical scientific knowledge needed to make cleanup decisions for the S-3 Ponds and other sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR).

  9. Measuring the wobble of radiation field centers during gantry rotation and collimator movement on a linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang; Gao, Song

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The isocenter accuracy of a linear accelerator is often assessed with star-shot films. This approach is limited in its ability to quantify three dimensional wobble of radiation field centers (RFCs). The authors report a Winston-Lutz based method to measure the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation, collimator rotation, and collimator field size change. Methods: A stationary ball-bearing phantom was imaged using multileaf collimator-shaped radiation fields at various gantry angles, collimator angles, and field sizes. The center of the ball-bearing served as a reference point, to which all RFCs were localized using a computer algorithm with subpixel accuracy. Then, the gantry rotation isocenter and the collimator rotation axis were derived from the coordinates of these RFCs. Finally, the deviation or wobble of the individual RFC from the derived isocenter or rotation axis was quantified. Results: The results showed that the RFCs were stable as the field size of the multileaf collimator was varied. The wobble of RFCs depended on the gantry angle and the collimator angle and was reproducible, indicating that the mechanical imperfections of the linac were mostly systematic and quantifiable. It was found that the 3D wobble of RFCs during gantry rotation was reduced after compensating for a constant misalignment of the multileaf collimator. Conclusions: The 3D wobble of RFCs can be measured with submillimeter precision using the proposed method. This method provides a useful tool for checking and adjusting the radiation isocenter tightness of a linac.

  10. Difference in Postural Control during Quiet Standing between Young Children and Adults: Assessment with Center of Mass Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Oba, Naoko; Sasagawa, Shun; Yamamoto, Akio; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The development of upright postural control has often been investigated using time series of center of foot pressure (COP), which is proportional to the ankle joint torque (i.e., the motor output of a single joint). However, the center of body mass acceleration (COMacc), which can reflect joint motions throughout the body as well as multi-joint coordination, is useful for the assessment of the postural control strategy at the whole-body level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate children's postural control during quiet standing by using the COMacc. Ten healthy children and 15 healthy young adults were instructed to stand upright quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. The COMacc as well as the COP in the anterior-posterior direction was obtained from ground reaction force measurement. We found that both the COMacc and COP could clearly distinguish the difference between age groups and visual conditions. We also found that the sway frequency of COMacc in children was higher than that in adults, for which differences in biomechanical and/or neural factors between age groups may be responsible. Our results imply that the COMacc can be an alternative force platform measure for assessing developmental changes in upright postural control.

  11. The Acceleration of the Universe in the Light of Supernovae: The Key Role of CTIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuy, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of acceleration and dark energy arguably constitutes the most revolutionary discovery in astrophysics in recent years. The Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) played a key role in this amazing discovery through three systematic surveys organized by staff astronomers: the “Tololo Supernova Program“ (1986-2000), the Calán/Tololo Project (1989-1993), and the “High-Z Supernova Search Team” (1994-1998). CTIO's state of the art instruments also were fundamental in the independent discovery of acceleration by the “Supernova Cosmology Project” (1992-1999). Here I summarize the work on supernovae carried out from CTIO that led to the discovery of acceleration and dark energy and provide a brief historical summary on the use of Type Ia supernovae in cosmology in order to provide context for the CTIO contribution.

  12. GPU-Accelerated Stony-Brook University 5-class Microphysics Scheme in WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, J.; Huang, B.; Huang, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system. Microphysics plays an important role in weather and climate prediction. Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the WRF, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University scheme (SBU-YLIN) is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In the past few years, co-processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) has been a disruptive technology in High Performance Computing (HPC). GPUs use the ever increasing transistor count for adding more processor cores. Therefore, GPUs are well suited for massively data parallel processing with high floating point arithmetic intensity. Thus, it is imperative to update legacy scientific applications to take advantage of this unprecedented increase in computing power. CUDA is an extension to the C programming language offering programming GPU's directly. It is designed so that its constructs allow for natural expression of data-level parallelism. A CUDA program is organized into two parts: a serial program running on the CPU and a CUDA kernel running on the GPU. The CUDA code consists of three computational phases: transmission of data into the global memory of the GPU, execution of the CUDA kernel, and transmission of results from the GPU into the memory of CPU. CUDA takes a bottom-up point of view of parallelism is which thread is an atomic unit of parallelism. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions. To test SBU-YLIN, we used a CONtinental United States (CONUS) benchmark data set for 12 km resolution domain for October 24, 2001. A WRF domain is a geographic region of interest discretized into a 2-dimensional grid parallel to the ground. Each grid point has

  13. The City University of New York and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center Heliophysics Education Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Marchese, P.; Ng, C.; Austin, S. A.; Frost, J.; Cheung, T. K.; Tremberger, G.; Robbins, I.; Paglione, T.; Damas, C.; Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.

    2010-12-01

    The City University of New York and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center Heliophysics Education Consortium provides undergraduate student research, curriculum enhancement and academic program development, and professional development for faculty in order to support two of NASA’s Heliophysics Science objectives: a) understand the physical processes of the space environment from the Sun to Earth; and b) understand how human society, technological systems and the habitability of Earth are affected by solar variability. Research projects include Electron Density: Interaction between the Solar Wind and the Earth’s Ionosphere/Magnetosphere, Microsatellite-based Monitoring of Ion Density in the Ionosphere, D-Layer Ionosphere & EM pulses from Sun, Solar Weather and Tropical Cyclone Activity, Ratio Plot Analysis of Jupiter’s Stratosphere and Building of VLF Antenna Systems and Monitoring Solar Activity using the Stanford University Solar Weather monitor known as “Super-SID”. Faculty development began with a workshop at the Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) at GSFC. The project is supported by NASA award NNX10AE72G.

  14. Mississippi State University Center for Air Sea Technology FY95 Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeske, Lanny; Corbin, James H.

    1995-01-01

    The Mississippi State University (MSU) Center for Air Sea Technology (CAST) evolved from the Institute for Naval Oceanography's (INO) Experimental Center for Mesoscale Ocean Prediction (ECMOP) which was started in 1989. MSU CAST subsequently began operation on 1 October 1992 under an Office of Naval Research (ONR) two-year grant which ended on 30 September 1994. In FY95 MSU CAST was successful in obtaining five additional research grants from ONR, as well as several other research contracts from the Naval Oceanographic Office via NASA, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private industry. In the past, MSU CAST technical research and development has produced tools, systems, techniques, and procedures that improve efficiency and overcome deficiency for both the operational and research communities residing with the Department of Defense, private industry, and university ocean modeling community. We continued this effort with the following thrust areas: to develop advanced methodologies and tools for model evaluation, validation and visualization, both oceanographic and atmospheric; to develop a system-level capability for conducting temporally and ; spatially scaled ocean simulations driven by or are responsive to ocean models, and take into consideration coupling to atmospheric models; to continue the existing oceanographic/atmospheric data management task with emphasis on distributed databases in a network environment, with database optimization and standardization, including use of Mosaic and World Wide Web (WWW) access; and to implement a high performance parallel computing technology for CAST ocean models

  15. Play in the Sandpit: A University and a Child-Care Center Collaborate in Facilitated-Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga; French-Lee, Stacey; Bulunuz, Nermin; Bulunuz, Mizrap

    2010-01-01

    Sand play commonly occupies children at preschools, child-development centers, and school and park playgrounds. The authors review the research on sand play and present a small study on outdoor sand play conducted at a university-based, child-development center using a method they call "facilitated-action research." This study had four…

  16. The Emergence of University-Based Education Policy Centers. ERIC/CEM Trends and Issues Series, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.; Hall, Gayle C.

    A closeup look is provided of a trend in the field of educational policy in the 1980's: the establishment of university-based centers that have a mission of providing state policymakers with nonpartisan, reliable data on education policy options. The development and characteristics of education policy centers are examined. The first section…

  17. Evidence-Informed Leadership in the Japanese Context: Middle Managers at a University Self-Access Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, John; Brown, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the steering of a self-access learning center in a Japanese university by its "middle management" committee over the first years of its operation. Middle management practice was informed by an ethnographic archive of various facets of center use, particularly concerning language policy and curriculum integration, issues about…

  18. Identifying the HIV Testing Beliefs of Healthcare Provider Staff at a University Student Health Center: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cornelia A.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the views and perceptions of healthcare provider staff regarding HIV testing and the implementation of HIV testing as a routine part of medical practice in a university student health center at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). This study further explored whether healthcare provider staff promoted…

  19. A Model for the University Operating as a Center for the Formation of a Local Environment for Adult Ongoing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukraintseva, Irina I.; Romanov, Maksim S.; Neskoromnykh, Nataliya I.; Khovyakova, Anna L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper features the results of a study conducted as part of the project "The Development of Universities as Centers for the Formation of a Local Environment for the Ongoing Education of the Adult Population of a City", undertaken by Sochi State University in 2016 as an assignment commissioned by the Ministry of Education and Science…

  20. The birth of the RCMI Clinical Research Center is a joint venture of the University of Hawaii and Kapiolani Health.

    PubMed

    Trockman, C; Pelke, S; Skidmore, H; Greenwood, F; Easa, D

    1997-04-01

    Hawaii established a Clinical Research Center with collaboration from the University of Hawaii Pacific Biomedical Research Center, the John A. Burns School of Medicine and Kapiolani Health via a five year award from the Research Centers in Minority Institutions of the National Institutes of Health. Support offered includes consultative services for protocol design; epidemiological and biostatistical analysis; design of study forms; and data and specimen collection and analysis.

  1. University Satellite Consortium and Space Education in Japan Centered on Micro-Nano Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasuka, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2002-01-01

    in Japan especially centered on micro or nano class satellites. Hands-on training using micro-nano satellites provide unique opportunity of space education to university level students, by giving them a chance to experience the whole space project cycle from mission creation, satellite design, fabrication, test, launch, operation through analysis of the results. Project management and team working are other important skills that can be trained in these projects. include 1) low cost, which allows one laboratory in university to carry out a project, 2) short development period such as one or two year, which enables students to obtain the results of their projects before they graduate, and 3) small size and weight, which enables fabrication and test within usually very narrow university laboratory areas. In Japan, several projects such as CanSat, CubeSat or Whale Observation Satellite have been carried out, proving that micro-nano satellites provide very unique and valuable educational opportunity. with the objective to make a university student and staff community of these micro-nano satellite related activities in Japan. This consortium aims for many activities including facilitating information and skills exchange and collaborations between member universities, helping students to use ground test facilities of national laboratories, consulting them on political or law related matters, coordinating joint development of equipments or projects, and bridging between these university activities and the needs or interests of the people in general. This kind of outreach activity is essential because how to create missions of micro-nano satellites should be pursued in order for this field to grow larger than a merely educational enterprise. The final objectives of the consortium is to make a huge community of the users, mission creators, investors and manufactures(i.e., university students) of micro-nano satellites, and provide a unique contribution to the activation of

  2. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross – sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum data elements set evaluated using the check list in these centers. Using the findings from the first step and survey of internal and external documentation forms, designed a questionnaire containing a minimum data speech therapy files and it shared between 36 Speech therapy experts using 5 options of Likert scale. Validity of questionnaire was examined through its validity and reliability of content by retest. For data analysis, data processing was performed using descriptive statistics by SPSS21 software. Results: The minimum data set for speech therapy were divided into two categories: clinical and administrative data. The Name and surname, date of birth, gender, address, telephone number, date of admission and the number of treatments, the patient’s complaint, the time of occurrence of injury or disorder, reason and age of disease considered as the most important elements for management data and health history. For the most important elements of clinical information were selected Short-term and long-term aims and development of speech history. Conclusion: The design and implementation of suitable data collection of speech therapy for gathering of data, we recommended planning for the control and prevention of speech disorders to providing high quality and good care of patient in speech therapy centers. PMID:26483600

  3. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Materials and Methods: Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann–Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal–Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Results: The results of this study indicated that dental students achieved better oral health attitudes and behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students (P < 0.05). Students in advanced academic levels and female students demonstrated better oral health attitudes and behavior. Conclusion: Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted. PMID:27891310

  4. An Experiment in ''Less Time, More Options": A Study of Accelerated University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwin, James L.; And Others

    This study investigated the characteristics and experiences of 59 college students accelerated from their freshman to their junior year. The students showed high academic performance and few social problems, but questions of personal identity remained problematic; the best single predictor of academic success was found to be freshman grade-point…

  5. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  6. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  7. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  8. Accelerated expansion of the Universe without an inflaton and resolution of the initial singularity from Group Field Theory condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2017-01-01

    We study the expansion of the Universe using an effective Friedmann equation obtained from the dynamics of GFT (Group Field Theory) isotropic condensates. The evolution equations are classical, with quantum correction terms to the Friedmann equation given in the form of effective fluids coupled to the emergent classical background. The occurrence of a bounce, which resolves the initial spacetime singularity, is shown to be a general property of the model. A promising feature of this model is the occurrence of an era of accelerated expansion, without the need to introduce an inflaton field with an appropriately chosen potential. We discuss possible viability issues of this scenario as an alternative to inflation.

  9. A simple model of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a symmetric manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2013-07-01

    We construct a simple model of universe which "unifies" vacuum energy and radiation on the one hand, and matter and dark energy on the other hand in the spirit of a generalized Chaplygin gas model. Specifically, the phases of early inflation and late accelerated expansion are described by a generalized equation of state p/c2 = αρ+kρ1+1/n having a linear component p = αρc2 and a polytropic component p = kρ1+1/nc2. For α = 1/3, n = 1 and k = -4/(3ρP), where ρP = 5.161099 g/m3 is the Planck density, this equation of state describes the transition between the vacuum energy era and the radiation era. For t >= 0, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion that brings it from the Planck size lP = 1.6210-35 m to a size a1 = 2.6110-6 m on a timescale of about 23.3 Planck times tP = 5.3910-44 s (early inflation). When t > t1 = 23.3tP, the universe decelerates and enters in the radiation era. We interpret the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era as a second order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ = 0). For α = 0, n = -1 and k = -ρΛ, where ρΛ = 7.0210-24 g/m3 is the cosmological density, the equation of state p/c2 = αρ+kρ1+1/n describes the transition from a decelerating universe dominated by pressureless matter (baryonic and dark matter) to an accelerating universe dominated by dark energy (late inflation). This transition takes place at a size a2 = 0.204lΛ. corresponding to a time t2 = 0.203tΛ where lΛ = 4.38 1026 m is the cosmological length and tΛ = 1.46 1018 s the cosmological time. The present universe turns out to be just at the transition between these two periods (t0 ~ t2). Our model gives the same results as the standard ΛCDM model for t >> tP and completes it by incorporating a phase of early inflation for t < 23.3tP in a very natural manner. Furthermore, it reveals a nice "symmetry" between the early and the late

  10. A simple model of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a symmetric manner

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2013-07-23

    We construct a simple model of universe which 'unifies' vacuum energy and radiation on the one hand, and matter and dark energy on the other hand in the spirit of a generalized Chaplygin gas model. Specifically, the phases of early inflation and late accelerated expansion are described by a generalized equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} having a linear component p = αρc{sup 2} and a polytropic component p = kρ{sup 1+1/n}c{sup 2}. For α= 1/3, n= 1 and k=−4/(3ρ{sub P}), where ρ{sub P}= 5.1610{sup 99} g/m{sup 3} is the Planck density, this equation of state describes the transition between the vacuum energy era and the radiation era. For t≥ 0, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion that brings it from the Planck size l{sub P}= 1.6210{sup −35} m to a size a{sub 1}= 2.6110{sup −6} m on a timescale of about 23.3 Planck times t{sub P}= 5.3910{sup −44} s (early inflation). When t > t{sub 1}= 23.3t{sub P}, the universe decelerates and enters in the radiation era. We interpret the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era as a second order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ= 0). For α= 0, n=−1 and k=−ρ{sub Λ}, where ρ{sub Λ}= 7.0210{sup −24} g/m{sup 3} is the cosmological density, the equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} describes the transition from a decelerating universe dominated by pressureless matter (baryonic and dark matter) to an accelerating universe dominated by dark energy (late inflation). This transition takes place at a size a{sub 2}= 0.204l{sub Λ}. corresponding to a time t{sub 2}= 0.203t{sub Λ} where l{sub Λ}= 4.38 10{sup 26} m is the cosmological length and t{sub Λ}= 1.46 10{sup 18} s the cosmological time. The present universe turns out to be just at the transition between these two periods (t{sub 0}∼t{sub 2}). Our model gives the same results as the standard

  11. Java Based Tool To Explore The Discovery Of Dark Energy And The Accelerated Expansion Of The Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, Milan; Lim, R.; Hu, Z.; Park, D.; Wells, D.; Wong, F.; Perrault, S.; Shvarts, E.; Levitin, S.; Rios, M.; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.

    2008-05-01

    The discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe through observations of High-Redshift supernovae and its implication for the existence of Dark Energy as the dominant component of our universe, surely counts as one of the most important moments in the entire history of physics and astronomy. This discovery has great appeal to the general public, both because of the heroic lore to observe distant supernovae and because of the strange relativistic properties of the Dark Energy. To bring this development to the non-professionals, the Cal State L.A. Science Visualization project developed an easy to use Java based tool, which may be used in college, pre-college or public science education. The tool utilizes multimedia presentations, such as graphs or images, to simulate the search for and observations of high-redshift supernovae, and interactively leads to the discovery of the created universe fluid content. Model universes are selected in a semi-random manner, which displays range of interesting possibilities for the effective equation of state, the shape of the Hubble diagram, or the nature of the expansion. The Java-based tool is deployed through Java webstart for both high-end and low-end terminal users across platforms.

  12. University of Maryland Wall Washer Retrofit - LED Modules Replace Halogen Lamps in a Performing Arts Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Abell, Thomas C.; Perrin, Tess E.

    2015-08-03

    The University of Maryland (UMD) began retrofitting halogen wall washers in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (CSPAC) in April 2014. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting (SSL) GATEWAY program documented this process through the final installation in March 2015, summarized in this report. The wall washers illuminate hallways lining the atrium, providing task illuminance for transitioning between spaces and visual interest to the atrium boundaries. The main goals of the retrofit were to maintain the visual appearance of the space while reducing maintenance costs – energy savings was considered an additional benefit by UMD Facilities Management. UMD Facilities Management is pleased with the results of this retrofit, and continues to initiate LED retrofit projects across the UMD campus.

  13. Measuring service quality at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions, across all four clinics the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients' expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm's evaluation of its service quality.

  14. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  15. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  16. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    PubMed

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  17. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities.

  18. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected With Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan

    2015-10-01

    As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered to become an Ebola Treatment Center as part of the US effort to manage the threat. We developed detailed policies and procedures for Ebola patient management at our university hospital. Both the EMS system and county public health made significant contributions during the development process. This article shares information about this process and the outcomes to inform other institutions facing similar challenges of preparing for an emerging threat with limited resources. The discussion includes information about management of (1) patients who arrive by ambulance with prior notification, (2) spontaneous walk-in patients, and (3) patients with confirmed Ebola who are interfacility transfers. Hospital management includes information about Ebola screening procedures, personal protective equipment selection and personnel training, erection of a tent outside the main facility, establishing an Ebola treatment unit inside the facility, and infectious waste and equipment management. Finally, several health policy considerations are presented.

  19. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  20. Gravitationally neutral dark matter-dark antimatter universe crystal with epochs of decelerated and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, I. A.; Trigger, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    A large-scale self-similar crystallized phase of finite gravitationally neutral universe (GNU)—huge GNU-ball—with spherical 2D-boundary immersed into an endless empty 3D- space is considered. The main principal assumptions of this universe model are: (1) existence of stable elementary particles-antiparticles with the opposite gravitational “charges” (M+gr and M -gr), which have the same positive inertial mass M in = |M ±gr | ≥ 0 and are equally presented in the universe during all universe evolution epochs; (2) the gravitational interaction between the masses of the opposite charges” is repulsive; (3) the unbroken baryon-antibaryon symmetry; (4) M+gr-M-gr “charges” symmetry, valid for two equally presented matter-antimatter GNU-components: (a) ordinary matter (OM)-ordinary antimatter (OAM), (b) dark matter (DM)-dark antimatter (DAM). The GNU-ball is weightless crystallized dust of equally presented, mutually repulsive (OM+DM) clusters and (OAM+DAM) anticlusters. Newtonian GNU-hydrodynamics gives the observable spatial flatness and ideal Hubble flow. The GNU in the obtained large-scale self-similar crystallized phase preserves absence of the cluster-anticluster collisions and simultaneously explains the observable large-scale universe phenomena: (1) the absence of the matter-antimatter clusters annihilation, (2) the self-similar Hubble flow stability and homogeneity, (3) flatness, (4) bubble and cosmic-net structures as 3D-2D-1D decrystallization phases with decelerative (a ≤ 0) and accelerative (a ≥ 0) expansion epochs, (5) the dark energy (DE) phenomena with Λ VACUUM = 0, (6) the DE and DM fine-tuning nature and predicts (7) evaporation into isolated huge M±gr superclusters without Big Rip.

  1. Late time acceleration of the 3-space in a higher dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin E-mail: tdereli@ku.edu.tr

    2013-02-01

    We present cosmological solutions for (1+3+n)-dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity with an arbitrary dilaton coupling constant w and exponential dilaton self-interaction potentials in the string frame. We focus particularly on the class in which the 3-space expands with a time varying deceleration parameter. We discuss the number of the internal dimensions and the value of the dilaton coupling constant to determine the cases that are consistent with the observed universe and the primordial nucleosynthesis. The 3-space starts with a decelerated expansion rate and evolves into accelerated expansion phase subject to the values of w and n, but ends with a Big Rip in all cases. We discuss the cosmological evolution in further detail for the cases w = 1 and w = ½ that permit exact solutions. We also comment on how the universe would be conceived by an observer in four dimensions who is unaware of the internal dimensions and thinks that the conventional general relativity is valid at cosmological scales.

  2. Commission Review of a Proposal by California State University Bakersfield to Establish the CSUB Antelope Valley Educational Center. Commission Report 03-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews a proposal by the California State University Board of Trustees and California State University, Bakersfield, to establish a permanent Stated-approved education center in Antelope Valley. The proposed center would be named the CSU Bakersfield Antelope Valley Education Center, and it would serve the growing populations of…

  3. Establishment of a National Wind Energy Center at University of Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Su Su

    2016-10-31

    The DOE-supported project objectives are to: establish a national wind energy center (NWEC) at University of Houston and conduct research to address critical science and engineering issues for the development of future large MW-scale wind energy production systems, especially offshore wind turbines. The goals of the project are to: (1) establish a sound scientific/technical knowledge base of solutions to critical science and engineering issues for developing future MW-scale large wind energy production systems, (2) develop a state-of-the-art wind rotor blade research facility at the University of Houston, and (3) through multi-disciplinary research, introducing technology innovations on advanced wind-turbine materials, processing/manufacturing technology, design and simulation, testing and reliability assessment methods related to future wind turbine systems for cost-effective production of offshore wind energy. To achieve the goals of the project, the following technical tasks were planned and executed during the period from April 15, 2010 to October 31, 2014 at the University of Houston: (1) Basic research on large offshore wind turbine systems (2) Applied research on innovative wind turbine rotors for large offshore wind energy systems (3) Integration of offshore wind-turbine design, advanced materials and manufacturing technologies (4) Integrity and reliability of large offshore wind turbine blades and scaled model testing (5) Education and training of graduate and undergraduate students and post- doctoral researchers (6) Development of a national offshore wind turbine blade research facility The research program addresses both basic science and engineering of current and future large wind turbine systems, especially offshore wind turbines, for MW-scale power generation. The results of the research advance current understanding of many important scientific issues and provide technical information for solving future large wind turbines with advanced design

  4. Minimum acceleration with constraints of center of mass: a unified model for arm movements and object manipulation.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir

    2012-09-01

    Daily interaction with the environment consists of moving with or without objects. Increasing interest in both types of movements drove the creation of computational models to describe reaching movements and, later, to describe a simplified version of object manipulation. The previously suggested models for object manipulation rely on the same optimization criteria as models for reaching movements, yet there is no single model accounting for both tasks that does not require reminimization of the criterion for each environment. We suggest a unified model for both cases: minimum acceleration with constraints for the center of mass (MACM). For point-to-point reaching movement, the model predicts the typical rectilinear path and bell-shaped speed profile as previous criteria. We have derived the predicted trajectories for the case of manipulating a mass-on-spring and show that the predicted trajectories match the observations of a few independent previous experimental studies of human arm movement during a mass-on-spring manipulation. Moreover, the previously reported "unusual" trajectories are also well accounted for by the proposed MACM. We have tested the predictions of the MACM model in 3 experiments with 12 subjects, where we demonstrated that the MACM model is equal or better (Wilcoxon sign-rank test, P < 0.001) in accounting for the data than three other previously proposed models in the conditions tested. Altogether, the MACM model is currently the only model accounting for reaching movements with or without external degrees of freedom. Moreover, it provides predictions about the intermittent nature of the neural control of movements and about the dominant control variable.

  5. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Suh, T; Cho, W; Jung, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center.

  6. The teaching of rheumatology at the University. The journey from teacher based to student-centered learning.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Antonio; de Toro, Javier; Nolla, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, university education has undergone profound changes as a result of the creation of the European Space for Higher Education. It has gone from a teacher-centered model, based on the transmission of knowledge through lectures, to being student-centered, based on the acquisition of skills and attaching great importance to independent learning. This transformation involves the need to reorganize academic activity and employ new teaching tools, such as active learning methodologies, more in line with current requirements. In this article, the backbones of the European Space for Higher Education are presented, and diverse experiences of teaching innovation described under Reumacademia and from three Spanish universities.

  7. Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CESTEME)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-08

    and Mathematics Education (CESTEME) The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as...Final Report: Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CESTEME) Report...Devices as Student Response Systems In Freshman Level Mathematics Courses Ms. Shontrice N. Garrett (Jackson State University), Dr. Jana Talley (Jackson

  8. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  9. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility.

    PubMed

    Bricault, P G; Ames, F; Dombsky, M; Labrecque, F; Lassen, J; Mjos, A; Minor, G; Tigelhoefer, A

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  10. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC) provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements. PMID:20822530

  11. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers.

  12. Iowa State University's undergraduate minor, online graduate certificate and resource center in NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Nicola; Larson, Brian F.; Gray, Joseph N.

    2014-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is a `niche' subject that is not yet offered as an undergraduate or graduate major in the United States. The undergraduate minor in NDE offered within the College of Engineering at Iowa State University (ISU) provides a unique opportunity for undergraduate aspiring engineers to obtain a qualification in the multi-disciplinary subject of NDE. The minor requires 16 credits of course work within which a core course and laboratory in NDE are compulsory. The industrial sponsors of Iowa State's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, and others, strongly support the NDE minor and actively recruit students from this pool. Since 2007 the program has graduated 10 students per year and enrollment is rising. In 2011, ISU's College of Engineering established an online graduate certificate in NDE, accessible not only to campus-based students but also to practicing engineers via the web. The certificate teaches the fundamentals of three major NDE techniques; eddy-current, ultrasonic and X-ray methods. This paper describes the structure of these programs and plans for development of an online, coursework-only, Master of Engineering in NDE and thesis-based Master of Science degrees in NDE.

  13. Perception of the nursing team of a Surgical Center regarding Hospital Accreditation at a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hellen Maria de Lima Graf; Peniche, Aparecida de Cássia Giani

    2015-02-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of nursing teams at a surgical center regarding the process of hospital accreditation, in the evaluative aspects of structure, process, and result. Method The study takes a quantitative and exploratory-descriptive approach, carried out at a university hospital. Result The population consisted of 69 nursing professionals, and the data collection was performed in the months of January and February 2014 by way of a questionnaire, utilizing the Likert scale. The methodology used a Cronbach's Alpha equal to 0.812. In the comparison of the three aspects, the one with the highest favorability score was "result", with an average of 47.12 (dp±7.23), and the smallest was "structure," with an average of 40.70 (dp±5.19). Conclusion This situational diagnostic can assist in the restructuring of the vulnerable areas evaluated in these three aspects, mainly in the aspect of structure, with a goal of level 2 accreditation by the ONA (Brazilian's National Organization for Accreditation) defended by the Institution.

  14. Desert architecture for educational buildings, a case study: A center for training university graduates

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeid, M.

    1996-10-01

    A new program for training graduates in desert development is being implemented by the Desert Development Center (DDC) of the American University in Cairo. The facilities consist of fifty bed/sitting rooms for accommodating 100 students. Each unit consists of two rooms and a bathroom for the use of 4 students; a lecture theater which can house 120 students, with adjoining office for trainers as well as necessary facilities; a general cafeteria which can serve 120--150 persons and an adjoining dining room for teaching staff. The cafeteria building also houses the kitchen; a cold storage area; a laundry room, storerooms, sleeping quarters and services for the labor force of the building complex; a system of solar water heaters; and a special sanitary sewage system for treatment of waste water produced by the building`s activities. When designing and implementing this complex, architectural elements and building philosophy based on the concept of integrating with the environment were considered. Elements included orientation heights and building materials suited to the desert environment, thick walls, outer and inner finishing materials, roofs, malkafs, floors, colors, solar heaters, lighting, green areas, windbreaks, terraces, and furniture. The paper includes a general evaluation of this educational building based on the PRA approach (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) involving those living and working in it. As a result of her position with the project, the author was able to evaluate the original designs, recommend modifications, and evaluate their implementation and fulfillment of the original goals of the projects.

  15. Factitious disease: clinical lessons from case studies at Baylor University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Savino, Adria C; Fordtran, John S

    2006-07-01

    Factitious disease is defined as the intentional production (or feigning) of disease in oneself to relieve emotional distress by assuming the role of a sick person. Although the self-induction of disease is a conscious act, the underlying motivation is usually unconscious. It has been estimated that 3% to 5% of physician-patient encounters involve factitious disease. This article presents 6 case studies from Baylor University Medical Center that highlight various clinical aspects of factitious disease. Patients with factitious diseases are extremely difficult to recognize because they do not appear different from patients with authentic causes of similar symptoms, because their psychiatric abnormalities are not appreciated, and because doctors and nurses have alowindex of suspicion. Since patients with factitious disease present a false medicalhistory, their physicians prescribe unnecessary procedures and therapies that may result in iatrogenic disease. In many cases, damage to these patients from doctors' actions exceeds the harm resulting from the patients' self-induced illness. The clues that should suggest factitious disease, the diagnostic roles of the clinician and a consulting psychiatrist, and the ethical conflicts that confront doctors taking care of such patients are discussed. To help keep factitious disease in clinical perspective, one of the case studies involves the antithesis of factitious disease, where a patient was mistakenly diagnosed as having psychogenic pain when in fact the symptoms were caused by an overlooked physical disease. Better knowledge of the clinical features of factitious disease might have prevented the disastrous outcome.

  16. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

    PubMed

    Preskitt, John T

    2011-04-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional "weekend warrior." The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months.

  17. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional “weekend warrior.” The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months. PMID:21566750

  18. Outcomes of Older Adults with Burn Injury: University Clinical Center of Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    B. Duci, Shkelzen; M. Arifi, Hysni; R. Ahmeti, Hasan; K. Zatriqi, Violeta; A. Buja, Zejn; T. Hoxha, Enver; Y. Mekaj, Agon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advances in burn care over the past 50 years have brought about remarkable improvement in mortality rates such that survival has become an expected outcome even in patients with extensive injuries. Although these improvements have occurred in all age groups, survival in older adults still lags far behind that in younger cohorts. This study determines the outcomes of older adults with burn injury in University Clinical Center of Kosovo. METHODS This is a retrospective study that includes 56 burn patients, older than 60 years who were admitted at the Department of Plastic Surgery, between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. Data processing was done with the statistical package of Stat 3. From the statistical parameters the structural index, arithmetic median, and standard deviation were calculated. RESULTS Fifty six burned patient older than 60 years were included during a 10-year period. Of the 56 elderly patients 29 were women and 27 were men with a mean age of 66.7 years (range, 60-85 years). The differences were not statistically significant for both genders regarding the causes of burn injury. CONCLUSION Considering the gradual increase of the elderly population in our country based on the data of the Ministry of Public Services, an increase is expected to the incidence of burn injuries in the population of this category of our country. PMID:26284184

  19. Counseling center-based tele-mental health for students at a rural university.

    PubMed

    Khasanshina, Elena V; Wolfe, Wendy L; Emerson, Ellen N; Stachura, Max E

    2008-01-01

    Students attending rural academic institutions often have no immediate access to psychiatrists to supplement on-site Counseling Center (CC) services. Because the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) could not cost-effectively provide on-site psychiatry services to Georgia Southern University (GSU) students, the two institutions explored telehealth services delivered by supervised Psychiatry residents using Web-based videoconferencing on MCGs virtual private network. GSU counselors completed client severity rating forms. CC clients in ongoing therapy who were judged to be in need of psychiatric services were referred to the Tele-clinic (TC). CC counselors referred the most challenged students to TC according to total distress score on intake, clinician intake assessment of client difficulty, and client need for medications. After seeing the clients in TC, MCG residents also completed GSU CC client severity rating forms. Post-intake and satisfaction surveys already in use at the GSU CC were completed both by CC clients not in TC and by CC clients jointly enrolled in TC. TC and CC populations were compared by gender, race, past mental health treatment, past psychiatric hospitalization, and past and current use of psychotropic drugs. Telepsychiatry conducted using low bandwidth videoconferencing successfully supplemented GSU CC mental healthcare, especially for clients with the most serious problems, and did so without travel from campus and within the milieu of daily student life. Cost-effective telepsychiatry services can successfully supplement management of students with mental health issues who attend rural, smaller, and/or resource-challenged academic institutions.

  20. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center: New Facility Set-up

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Yusa, Ken; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Torikai, Kota; Yoshida, Yukari; Kitada, Yoko; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated tumors compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. C-ion RT for the first patient at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was initiated in March of 2010. The major specifications of the facility were determined based on the experience of clinical treatments at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), with the size and cost being reduced to one-third of those at NIRS. The currently indicated sites of cancer treatment at GHMC are lung, prostate, head and neck, liver, rectum, bone and soft tissue. Between March 2010 and July 2011, a total of 177 patients were treated at GHMC although a total of 100 patients was the design specification during the period in considering the optimal machine performance. In the present article, we introduce the facility set-up of GHMC, including the facility design, treatment planning systems, and clinical preparations. PMID:24213124

  1. Prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in the university medical center of Rabat, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to determine the hospital-acquired infections (HAI) prevalence in all institutions of Rabat University Medical Center, to ascertain risk factors, to describe the pathogens associated with HAI and their susceptibility profile to antibiotics. Materials and methods Point-prevalence survey in January 2010 concerning all patients who had been in the hospital for at least 48 hours. At bedside, 27 investigators filled a standardized questionnaire from medical records, temperature charts, radiographs, laboratory reports and by consultation with the ward’s collaborating health professionals. Risk factors were determined using logistic regression. Results 1195 patients involved, occupancy rate was 51%. The prevalence of HAI was 10.3%. Intensive care units were the most affected wards (34.5%). Urinary tract infection was the most common infected site (35%). Microbiological documentation was available in 61% of HAI. Staphylococcus was the organism most commonly isolated (18.7%) and was methicillin-resistant in 50% of cases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with HAI were advanced age, longer length of hospital stay, presence of comorbidity, invasive devices and use of antibiotic use. Conclusion HAI prevalence was high in this study. Future prevention program should focus on patients with longer length of stay, invasive devices, and overprescribing antibiotics. PMID:23031793

  2. Operational control of radiation conditions in Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Shugay, Yulia; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of Moscow State University provides mission support for Russian satellites and give operational analysis of radiation conditions in space. SMDC Web-sites (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/ and http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/) give access to current data on the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation state of Earth's magnetosphere and heliosphere in near-real time. For data analysis the models of space environment factors working online have been implemented. Interactive services allow one to retrieve and analyze data at a given time moment. Forecasting applications including solar wind parameters, geomagnetic and radiation condition forecasts have been developed. Radiation dose and SEE rate control are of particular importance in practical satellite operation. Satellites are always under the influence of high-energy particle fluxes during their orbital flight. The three main sources of particle fluxes: the Earth's radiation belts, the galactic cosmic rays, and the solar energetic particles (SEP), are taken into account by SMDC operational services to estimate the radiation dose caused by high-energy particles to a satellite at LEO orbits. ISO 15039 and AP8/AE8 physical models are used to estimate effects of galactic cosmic rays and radiation belt particle fluxes. Data of geosynchronous satellites (GOES or Electro-L1) allow to reconstruct the SEP fluxes spectra at a given low Earth orbit taking into account the geomagnetic cut-off depending on geomagnetic activity level.

  3. 75 FR 1681 - University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program Grants (49 U.S.C. 5506); Suspension of Competitions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... (49 U.S.C. 5506); Suspension of Competitions AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology Administration... intends to suspend competitions for its University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program grants (49 USC... for future UTC competitions are not known at this time. As more information is available about...

  4. COST STUDIES AT THE CAMPUS AND OFF-CAMPUS CENTERS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, 1964-65. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LINS, L. JOSEPH; AND OTHERS

    RESPONSES TO A QUESTIONNAIRE SENT TO A SAMPLE OF STUDENTS AT THE NINE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN CENTERS PROVIDED INFORMATION CONCERNING THE STUDENTS' EXPENSES WHILE ATTENDING THESE LOWER DIVISION COMMUTER INSTITUTIONS. ANALYSES WERE BASED ON 345 SINGLE FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES WHO PAID FULL RESIDENT FEES. INCLUDING ESTIMATES OF ROOM AND BOARD BY…

  5. Nutrition Education in the Dental School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Jean L.

    1990-01-01

    Nutrition instruction at the Dental School of the University of Texas Health Science Center (San Antonia) has been required for 20 years and is now an integrated part of the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs with both didactic (freshman year) and clinical (sophomore year) components. (MSE)

  6. The Florida Student Student Services Centers: Factors Influencing Students' Decisions To Enroll in Nova Southeastern University's Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, Blair

    A brief survey was administered to 182 students in selected business master's program classes in April and May 2001 at the Florida Student Service Centers of Nova Southeastern University (NSU). The purpose was to gain insight into the factors that led to students' decisions to attend NSU rather than some other institution. The survey included…

  7. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  8. Genome Science: A Video Tour of the Washington University Genome Sequencing Center for High School and Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Susan K.; Easter, Carla; Holmes, Andrea; Cohen, Brian; Bednarski, April E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has ushered in a new era of biology. The technologies developed to facilitate the sequencing of the human genome are now being applied to the sequencing of other genomes. In 2004, a partnership was formed between Washington University School of Medicine Genome Sequencing Center's Outreach Program and Washington…

  9. Thirdspace Explorations in Online Writing Studios: Writing Centers, Writing in the Disiplines and First Year Composition in the Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miley, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the use of online writing studios housed in the University Writing Center and attached to a Writing in the Disciplines course in the College of Technology and a First Year Composition program. The original goal of the online writing studio, modified from Grego and Thompson's (2009) writing studio approach, was to create an…

  10. The Experimental Teaching Reform in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Undergraduate Students in Peking University Health Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and…

  11. State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 93-S-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report addresses the compliance of the Clinical Practice Management Plan at the Health Science Center (HSC) at Brooklyn with policies established by the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees. An executive summary highlights the scope of the audit, audit observations and conclusions, and comments of SUNY officials. An…

  12. State University of New York, Health Science Center at Stony Brook: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 94-S-34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    An evaluation was done of the use of funds generated by clinical practices at the Clinical Practice Management Plan of the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center (HSC) at Stony Brook. The audit looked at compliance with Board of Trustee policies regarding: (1) whether 5 percent of the gross receipts from clinical practices were…

  13. Probing the accelerating Universe with redshift-space distortions in VIPERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the growth rate of structure at z=0.8. It has been obtained from the redshift-space distortions observed in the galaxy clustering pattern in the VIMOS Public Redshift survey (VIPERS) first data release. VIPERS is a large galaxy redshift survey probing the large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2 with an unprecedented accuracy. This measurement represents a new reference in the distant Universe, which has been poorly explored until now. We obtain σ8 = 0.47 +/- 0.08 at z = 0.8 that is consistent with the predictions of standard cosmological models based on Einstein gravity. This measurement alone is however not accurate enough to allow the detection of possible deviations from standard gravity.

  14. Using Dark Matter Haloes to Learn about Cosmic Acceleration: A New Proposal for a Universal Mass Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit or overpredict the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy or a modified gravity implement a modified Press-Schechter formalism, which relates the linear overdensities to the abundance of dark matter haloes at the same time. We critically examine the universality of the Press-Schechter formalism for different cosmologies, and show that the halo abundance is best correlated with spherical linear overdensity at 94% of collapse (or observation) time. We then extend this argument to ellipsoidal collapse (which decreases the fractional time of best correlation for small haloes), and show that our results agree with deviations from modified Press-Schechter formalism seen in simulated mass functions. This provides a novel universal prescription to measure linear density evolution, based on current and future observations of cluster (or dark matter) halo mass function. In particular, even observations of cluster abundance in a single epoch will constrain the entire history of linear growth of cosmological of perturbations.

  15. The André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory - The new accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.; Klein, M.; Mous, D. J. W.; Alary, J.-F.

    2015-10-01

    The University of Ottawa, Canada, has installed a multi-element, 3 MV tandem AMS system as the cornerstone of their new Advanced Research Complex and the principal analytical instrument of the André E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. Manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., the Netherlands, it is equipped with a 200 sample ion source, a high resolution, 120° injection magnet, a 90° high energy analysis magnet (mass-energy product 350 MeV-AMU), a 65°, 1.7 m radius electric analyzer and a 2 channel gas ionization detector. It is designed to analyze isotopes ranging from tritium to the actinides and to accommodate the use of fluoride target materials. This system is being extended with a second injection line, consisting of selected components from the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. This line will contain a pre-commercial version of the Isobar Separator for Anions, manufactured by Isobarex Corp., Bolton, Ontario, Canada. This instrument uses selective ion-gas reactions in a radio-frequency quadrupole cell to attenuate both atomic and molecular isobars. This paper discusses the specifications of the new AMS equipment, reports on the acceptance test results for 10Be, 14C, 26Al and 127I and presents typical spectra for 10Be and actinide analyses.

  16. University of Illinois at Chicago's interdisciplinary center for research on violence: changing systems to prevent violence in Chicago and beyond.

    PubMed

    Schewe, Paul; Bell, Carl C; Bennett, Larry; Goldstein, Paul J; Gordon, Rebecca; Mattaini, Mark; O'Brien, Patricia; Riger, Stephanie; Risser, Heather J; Rosenbaum, Dennis P; Schuck, Amie M; Simmons, Barbara; Ullman, Sarah E

    2011-09-01

    This article describes an interdisciplinary center at the University of Illinois at Chicago focused on collaborative research on violence. Our center is unique in its emphasis on developing infrastructure and distinctive processes for overcoming obstacles to interdisciplinary research; the involvement of outside policy makers, advocates, and service providers in jointly discussing and developing research proposals; the breadth of commitments from leading violence researchers and administrators across five colleges; and the innovativeness of proposed research projects that support interdisciplinary activity and show promise for funding. The center has developed an infrastructure to address violence-related issues in both research and teaching. This article discusses the challenges of implementation and boundary spanning in a university context and makes recommendations for sustainability.

  17. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  18. Iowa Acceleration Scale Manual: A Guide for Whole-Grade Acceleration K-8. (3rd Edition, Manual)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assouline, Susan G.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann; Forstadt, Leslie; Lipscomb, Jonathon

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from years of nationwide use has resulted in a 3rd Edition of this unique, systematic, and objective guide to considering and implementing academic acceleration. Developed and tested by the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa, the IAS ensures that acceleration decisions are systematic, thoughtful, well reasoned, and defensible.…

  19. Accelerating health equity: the key role of universal health coverage in the Sustainable Development Goals.

    PubMed

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Mills, Anne; Palu, Toomas

    2015-04-29

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), to be committed to by Heads of State at the upcoming 2015 United Nations General Assembly, have set much higher and more ambitious health-related goals and targets than did the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The main challenge among MDG off-track countries is the failure to provide and sustain financial access to quality services by communities, especially the poor. Universal health coverage (UHC), one of the SDG health targets indispensable to achieving an improved level and distribution of health, requires a significant increase in government investment in strengthening primary healthcare - the close-to-client service which can result in equitable access. Given the trend of increased fiscal capacity in most developing countries, aiming at long-term progress toward UHC is feasible, if there is political commitment and if focused, effective policies are in place. Trends in high income countries, including an aging population which increases demand for health workers, continue to trigger international migration of health personnel from low and middle income countries. The inspirational SDGs must be matched with redoubled government efforts to strengthen health delivery systems, produce and retain more and relevant health workers, and progressively realize UHC.

  20. The Peer-Interactive Writing Center at the University of New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The one-on-one format of tutoring, which is the norm for "writing" centers, can foster the much-maligned view of a "writing center" as a fix-it shop and undermine the role of the tutor as a co-learner and facilitator of peer-to-peer interactions. The peer-interactive "writing center approach", presented here, moves…

  1. The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education at Case Western Reserve University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Daniel J.; Singer, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the year 2000, the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education is a multidisciplinary center located at a school of social work that engages in collaborative, community-based research and evaluation that spans multiple systems and disciplines. The Center currently occupies 4,200 sq. ft. with multiple offices and…

  2. Experience with multimodality telepathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Wiley, Clayton A; Demetris, Anthony; Lesniak, Andrew; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Cable, William; Contis, Lydia; Parwani, Anil V

    2012-01-01

    Several modes of telepathology exist including static (store-and-forward), dynamic (live video streaming or robotic microscopy), and hybrid technology involving whole slide imaging (WSI). Telepathology has been employed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) for over a decade at local, national, and international sites. All modes of telepathology have been successfully utilized to exploit our institutions subspecialty expertise and to compete for pathology services. This article discusses the experience garnered at UPMC with each of these teleconsultation methods. Static and WSI telepathology systems have been utilized for many years in transplant pathology using a private network and client-server architecture. Only minor clinically significant differences of opinion were documented. In hematopathology, the CellaVision(®) system is used to transmit, via email, static images of blood cells in peripheral blood smears for remote interpretation. While live video streaming has remained the mode of choice for providing immediate adequacy assessment of cytology specimens by telecytology, other methods such as robotic microscopy have been validated and shown to be effective. Robotic telepathology has been extensively used to remotely interpret intra-operative neuropathology consultations (frozen sections). Adoption of newer technology and increased pathologist experience has improved accuracy and deferral rates in teleneuropathology. A digital pathology consultation portal (https://pathconsult.upmc.com/) was recently created at our institution to facilitate digital pathology second opinion consults, especially for WSI. The success of this web-based tool is the ability to handle vendor agnostic, large image files of digitized slides, and ongoing user-friendly customization for clients and teleconsultants. It is evident that the practice of telepathology at our institution has evolved in concert with advances in technology and user experience. Early and

  3. A microtomography beamline at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Jin, Hua; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2002-03-01

    A microtomography beamline has been recently assembled and is currently operating at the Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron (CAMD). It has been installed on a bending magnet white-light beamline at port 7A. With the storage ring operating at 1.5 GeV, this beamline has a maximum usable x-ray energy of ˜15 keV. The instrumentation consists of computer-controlled positioning stages for alignment and rotation, a CsI(Tl) phosphor screen, a reflecting mirror, a microscope objective (1:1, 1:4), and Linux/LabVIEW-controlled charge coupled device. With the 1:4 objective, the maximum spatial resolution is 2.25 μm. The positioning and image acquisition computers communicate via transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP). A small G4/Linux cluster has been installed for the purpose of on-site reconstruction. Instrument, alignment and reconstruction programs are written in MATLAB, IDL, and C. The applications to date are many and we present several examples. Several biological samples have been studied as part of an effort on biological visualization and computation. Future improvements to this microtomography station include the addition of a double-multilayer monochromator, allowing one to evaluate the three-dimensional elemental composition of materials. Plans also include eventual installation at the CAMD 7 T wiggler beamline, providing x rays in excess of 50 keV to provide better penetration of higher mass-density materials.

  4. Proposed center for advanced industrial processes. Washington State University, College of Engineering and Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The DOE proposes to authorize Washington State University (WSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes (CAIP). The proposed project would involve construction of a three story building containing laboratories, classrooms, seminar rooms, and graduate student and administrative office space. Existing buildings would be demolished. The proposed facility would house research in thermal/fluid sciences, bioengineering, manufacturing processes, and materials processing. Under the {open_quotes}no-action{close_quotes} DOE would not authorize WSU to proceed with construction under the grant. WSU would then need to consider alternatives for proceeding without DOE funds. Such alternatives (including delaying or scaling back the project), would result in a postponement or slight reduction in the minor adverse environmental, safety and health Impacts of the project evaluated in this assessment. More importantly, these alternatives would affect the important environmental, safety, health, and programmatic benefits of the projects. The surrounding area is fully urbanized and the campus is intensely developed around the proposed site. The buildings scheduled for demolition do not meet State energy codes, are not air conditioned, and lack handicapped access. Sensitive resources (historical/archeological, protected species/critical habitats, wetlands/floodplains, national forests/parks/trails, prime farmland and special sources of water) would not be affected as they do not occur on or near the proposed site. Cumulative impacts would be small. The proposed action is not related to other actions being considered under other NEPA reviews. There is no conflict between the proposed action and any applicable Federal, State, regional or local land use plans and policies.

  5. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  6. Final Technical Report for Industrial Assessment Center at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran

    2008-01-09

    The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program at West Virginia University (WVU), which is funded by the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has provided a unique opportunity to enhance efficient energy utilization in small to medium-sized manufacturers. It has also provided training to engineering students in the identification and analysis of efficient energy use in each aspect of the manufacturing process and associated supporting elements. The outcomes of the IAC Program at WVU have assisted the manufacturers and the students in having a heightened sensitivity to industrial energy conservation, waste reduction, and productivity improvement, as well as a better understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing processes and the supporting elements through which efficient energy utilization can be enhanced. The IAC at WVU has conducted 101 energy assessments from 2002 until 2006. The focus of the industrial assessments has been on energy savings. It has been the IAC’s interest to strongly focus on energy savings and on waste minimization and productivity improvements that strictly have an impact on energy. The IAC at WVU was selected as the Center of the year in 2005 from amongst 26 centers and has obtained a ranking within the top 5 in the previous few years. From 2002 to 2006, the total recommended energy savings produced by the IAC at WVU is 1,214,414 MMBtu, of which the electricity accounts for 93,826,067 kWh (equivalent to 320,226 MMBtu) and natural gas for 871,743 MMBtu. The balance is accounted for in savings in other fuels, mainly coal and wood. This results in an average recommended energy savings of 928,971 kWh from electricity and 8,631 MMBtu from natural gas per facility. The total CO2 emissions saved from 2002 to 2006 is 154,462 tons, with an average of 1,529.3 tons per facility. The average recommended energy cost savings per facility is

  7. Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied…

  8. The Berrien County Math and Science Center at Andrews University: A University and Local High Schools Consortium Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Gordon; Adkin, Sally

    1995-01-01

    Describes a program at Andrews University developed along with the Berrien County Intermediate School District that utilizes college faculty to provide instruction to talented and motivated high school students. Explains logistics (curriculum design, administrative arrangement, and financial aspects) of the program, challenges, and benefits.…

  9. Hydrodynamic vacuum sources of dark matter self-generation in an accelerating universe without a Big Bang

    SciTech Connect

    Chefranov, S. G.; Novikov, E. A.

    2010-11-15

    these dark matter particles. Good quantitative agreement of this exact solution with the cosmological observations of SnIa, SDSS-BAO, and the decrease in the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe has been obtained.

  10. Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing - a GATE Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan-Dearborn

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, P. K.

    2012-08-30

    The Center for Lightweighting Materials and Processing (CLAMP) was established in September 1998 with a grant from the Department of Energy’s Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) program. The center received the second round of GATE grant in 2005 under the title “Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing”. Using the two grants, the Center has successfully created 10 graduate level courses on lightweight automotive materials, integrated them into master’s and PhD programs in Automotive Systems Engineering, and offered them regularly to the graduate students in the program. In addition, the Center has created a web-based lightweight automotive materials database, conducted research on lightweight automotive materials and organized seminars/symposia on lightweight automotive materials for both academia and industry. The faculty involved with the Center has conducted research on a variety of topics related to design, testing, characterization and processing of lightweight materials for automotive applications and have received numerous research grants from automotive companies and government agencies to support their research. The materials considered included advanced steels, light alloys (aluminum, magnesium and titanium) and fiber reinforced polymer composites. In some of these research projects, CLAMP faculty have collaborated with industry partners and students have used the research facilities at industry locations. The specific objectives of the project during the current funding period (2005 – 2012) were as follows: (1) develop new graduate courses and incorporate them in the automotive systems engineering curriculum (2) improve and update two existing courses on automotive materials and processing (3) upgrade the laboratory facilities used by graduate students to conduct research (4) expand the Lightweight Automotive Materials Database to include additional materials, design case studies and make it more

  11. Study of acceleration of center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Na, Eunjin; Hwang, Hyesun; Woo, Youngkeun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test between healthy subjects and patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy participants and thirty patients with stroke volunteered for this study. Acceleration of the center of mass was measured using a wireless tri-axial accelerometer during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test. Accelerometer data were analyzed using BTS G-studio software. [Results] The phase duration was significantly longer and the anterior-posterior, mediolateral, and vertical acceleration ranges were significantly lower during sit-to-stand for patients with stroke than for healthy controls. Further, phase duration and the mediolateral acceleration range during stand-to-sit differed significantly between healthy controls and subjects with stroke. [Conclusions] During training for the sit-to-stand activity, the focus should be all three balance dimensions, but during training for the stand-to-sit activity, the focus should be on improving mediolateral balance and asymmetrical foot positioning should be recommended. PMID:27799669

  12. The Perceived Effectiveness of Brief Therapy at a University Counseling Center: The Relationship among Working Alliance, Readiness to Change, and Client Symptom Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Megan M.

    2009-01-01

    A sample of university counseling center students was investigated to determine whether student clients who attended short term individual counseling at a university counseling center show progress as evidenced by perceived client and counselor outcomes, and to explore how client motivation to change and working alliance affected counseling…

  13. Research on fabrication of aspheres at the Center of Optics Technology (University of Applied Science in Aalen); Techical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Burger, Jochen; Bich, Andreas; Gall, Christoph; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The Center of Optics Technology at the University of Applied Science, founded in 2003, is part of the School of Optics & Mechatronics. It completes the existing optical engineering department with a full optical fabrication and metrology chain and serves in parallel as a technology transfer center, to provide area industries with the most up-to-date technology in optical fabrication and engineering. Two examples of research work will be presented. The first example is the optimizing of the grinding process for high precision aspheres, the other is generating and polishing of a freeform optical element which is used as a phase plate.

  14. Planning and Implementing a Disaster Recovery Capability for a Mainframe-Based Hospital Information System: Duke University Medical Center's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J. David; Walker, L. Phillip; Aaron, Walter H.; Whitesell, Judy J.; Stead, William W.

    1988-01-01

    Since October 1986, the Medical Center Information Systems Department at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) has been developing and implementing a plan to provide for the continuation of the functions performed by Duke Hospital's central computing system in the event of a disaster that would disable the central hardware configuration for an extended amount of time. The key characteristic of the plan is that it provides for the full function and performance of the system to be returned to the end users within twenty four hours of the primary system's failure.

  15. The Connecticut Mental Health Center: Celebrating 50 Years of a Successful Partnership Between the State and Yale University.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jeanne L; Anez-Nava, Luis; Baranoski, Madelon; Cole, Robert; Davidson, Larry; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam; Dike, Charles; DiLeo, Paul J; Duman, Ronald S; Kirk, Thomas; Krystal, John; Malison, Robert T; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J; Srihari, Vinod; Styron, Thomas; Tebes, Jacob K; Woods, Scott; Zonana, Howard; Jacobs, Selby C

    2016-12-01

    September 28, 2016, marked the 50th anniversary of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, a state-owned and state-operated joint venture between the state and Yale University built and sustained with federal, state, and university funds. Collaboration across these entities has produced a wide array of clinical, educational, and research initiatives, a few of which are described in this column. The missions of clinical care, research, and education remain the foundation for an organization that serves 5,000 individuals each year who are poor and who experience serious mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

  16. University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

  17. Tests of the Accelerating Universe with Near-Infrared Observations of a High-Redshift Type IA Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam G.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Liu, Michael C.; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Diercks, Alan; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Jha, Saurabh; Kirshner, Robert P.; Leibundgut, B.; Phillips, M. M.; Reiss, David; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris; Spyromilio, J.; Stubbs, Christopher; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Tonry, John; Woudt, Patrick; Brunner, Robert J.; Dey, Arjun; Gal, Roy; Graham, James; Larkin, James; Odewahn, Steve C.; Oppenheimer, Ben

    2000-06-01

    We have measured the rest-frame B-, V-, and I-band light curves of a high-redshift type Ia supernova (SN Ia), SN 1999Q (z=0.46), using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based near-infrared detectors. A goal of this study is the measurement of the color excess, EB-I, a sensitive indicator of interstellar or intergalactic dust, which could affect recent cosmological measurements from high-redshift SNe Ia. Our observations disfavor a 30% opacity of SN Ia visual light by dust as an alternative to an accelerating universe. This statement applies to both Galactic-type dust (rejected at the 3.4 σ confidence level) and grayer dust (grain size >0.1 μm, rejected at the 2.3-2.6 σ confidence level) as proposed by Aguirre. The rest-frame I-band light curve shows the secondary maximum 1 month after the B maximum typical of nearby SNe Ia of normal luminosity, providing no indication of evolution as a function of redshift out to z~0.5. An expanded set of similar observations could improve the constraints on any contribution of extragalactic dust to the dimming of high-redshift SNe Ia.

  18. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  19. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  20. Production and isolation of homologs of flerovium and element 115 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Despotopulos, John D.; Kmak, Kelly N.; Gharibyan, Narek; Brown, Thomas A.; Grant, Patrick M.; Henderson, Roger A.; Moody, Kent J.; Tumey, Scott J.; Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Sudowe, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    Here, new procedures have been developed to isolate no-carrier-added (NCA) radionuclides of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of flerovium (Hg, Sn) and element 115 (Sb), produced by 12–15 MeV proton irradiation of foil stacks with the tandem Van-de-Graaff accelerator at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) facility. The separation of 113Sn from natIn foil was performed with anion-exchange chromatography from hydrochloric and nitric acid matrices. A cation-exchange chromatography method based on hydrochloric and mixed hydrochloric/hydroiodic acids was used to separate 124Sb from natSn foil. A procedure using Eichrom TEVA resin was developed to separate 197Hg from Au foil. These results demonstrate the suitability of using the CAMS facility to produce NCA radioisotopes for studies of transactinide homologs.

  1. Production and isolation of homologs of flerovium and element 115 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Despotopulos, John D.; Kmak, Kelly N.; Gharibyan, Narek; ...

    2015-10-01

    Here, new procedures have been developed to isolate no-carrier-added (NCA) radionuclides of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of flerovium (Hg, Sn) and element 115 (Sb), produced by 12–15 MeV proton irradiation of foil stacks with the tandem Van-de-Graaff accelerator at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) facility. The separation of 113Sn from natIn foil was performed with anion-exchange chromatography from hydrochloric and nitric acid matrices. A cation-exchange chromatography method based on hydrochloric and mixed hydrochloric/hydroiodic acids was used to separate 124Sb from natSn foil. A procedure using Eichrom TEVA resin was developed to separate 197Hg frommore » Au foil. These results demonstrate the suitability of using the CAMS facility to produce NCA radioisotopes for studies of transactinide homologs.« less

  2. The Center for the Holographic Arts Begins a New Artist Workshop and Residency Program in Conjunction with Ohio State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrongovius, Martina; Kagan, Harris; Moree, Sam

    2013-02-01

    This year the Center for the Holographic Arts (Holocenter) kicked off a new Artist Workshop and Residency Program in conjunction with Ohio State University. The newly renovated holography facility houses the Holocenter's pulse laser camera and two recording tables with continuous wave lasers. This facility is being utilized for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Art and Technology as well as the Artist Workshop and Residency Program.

  3. Clinical Usage and Economic Effectiveness of a Recently Developed Epidermal Autograft Harvesting System in 13 Chronic Wound Patients in a University-Based Wound Center

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, Angela; Linneman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem in the United States. Their costs approach 25 billion dollars in the United States. Current wound-care treatments of local wound care, moist dressings, and source control, while necessary for wound healing, are frequently not enough to ensure complete wound closure. The current surgical technique of split-thickness skin grafting is an operative procedure, painful, time-consuming, and leaves significant donor site wounds. A recently developed and marketed epidermal autograft harvester was tested at our university hospital wound center on 13 patients with wounds of various etiologies. Their clinical outcomes were evaluated, as were the costs associated with its usage compared with the potential costs of continued wound care without autograft placement. Methods: Thirteen patients whose wounds appeared to have "stalled" or reached a plateau in healing by measurement data and visual evidence were chosen to receive an epidermal autograft to accelerate wound closure. Wound-types included diabetic ulcers, venous or lymphedema-related ulcers, surgical site wounds, and traumatic wounds. Time-to-healing in days, when applicable, was captured. Wound center billing and charges were available and evaluated for nine of the 13 patients. Costs of standard care continuation compared with the cost of epidermal autograft technology usage were compared. Results: Healing rates were 62%; eight of the 13 patients had healed within four months, two were lost to follow-up, and three have wounds that remain open. Four of the patients healed in less than one month. The comparatively rapid closure of the open wound(s) post-epidermal autograft placement potentially reduced healthcare costs based on charges at an average of $1,153 per patient and yielded an average of $650 to the wound center, not applying the routine costs of dressings applied in the center.  Conclusion: The epidermal autograft harvester accelerated

  4. History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Chasis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as

  5. Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? A case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services.

  6. Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? a case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services. PMID:20098651

  7. Learning Centers: A Report of the 1977 NEH Institute at Ohio State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Edward D.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the twenty learning center units for advanced classes developed by the French and Spanish teacher-participants. Learning centers permit students to work independently at well-defined tasks. The units deal with housing, shopping, cooking, transportation, sports, fiestas, literature, history, architecture, painting, and music.…

  8. Evaluation and Research Center for Project Head Start, University of South Carolina. Interim Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Myles I.

    This document is an interim evaluation report of language development curriculums in full year Head Start programs operating in the five state area the Research and Evaluation Center serves. One experimental study in language development carried on in cooperation with the Texas and Tulane centers is reported in depth. The study was implemented in…

  9. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  10. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Yvernault, Benjamin C.; Boyd, Brian D.; Damon, Stephen M.; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N.; Phillips, Nicholas S.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and RedCAP to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. PMID:25988229

  11. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  12. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  13. Marquette University Department of Public Safety Implements New Command Information Center Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Marquette University, established in 1881, is a private Catholic, Jesuit institution located in the heart of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The university has a student population of more than 11,000 and more than 2,000 faculty and staff. In its effort to continually improve crime prevention and emergency preparedness Marquette's Department of Public…

  14. Design Choices: Universal Financing for Early Care and Education. Human Services Policy Center Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Richard N.; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Joesch, Jutta M.

    This policy brief describes the components of a computer model to compare different financing approaches for universal early care and education programs as developed by the Financing Universal Early Care and Education (ECE) for America's Children Project. The brief also discusses lessons learned from analyzing key features of existing…

  15. At University of Chicago, Dispute over Friedman Center Continues to Simmer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the dispute about the creation of an institute named for the late economist and free-market advocate Milton Friedman at the University of Chicago. Five months after the University of Chicago announced plans to invest $200-million in an economics institute named for the late Milton Friedman, the project is still generating…

  16. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided…

  17. Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

    2013-03-01

    The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials.

  18. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research - University of Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This center aims to understand why some children are more susceptible than others to the harmful effects of pesticides and are trying to identify how this susceptibility affects growth, development and learning.

  19. The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center at Atlanta's Emory University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Clyde

    1985-01-01

    The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center was designed to exude openness and space which would encourage participation while preserving existing playing fields and programs. Exterior and interior design of the facility are described. (DF)

  20. Radiation Doses in Consecutive CT Examinations from Five University of California Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Moghadassi, Michelle; Wilson, Nicole; Nelson, Thomas R.; Boone, John M.; Cagnon, Christopher H.; Gould, Robert; Hall, David J.; Krishnam, Mayil; Lamba, Ramit; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Seibert, Anthony; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To summarize data on computed tomographic (CT) radiation doses collected from consecutive CT examinations performed at 12 facilities that can contribute to the creation of reference levels. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review boards of the collaborating institutions and was compliant with HIPAA. Radiation dose metrics were prospectively and electronically collected from 199 656 consecutive CT examinations in 83 181 adults and 3871 consecutive CT examinations in 2609 children at the five University of California medical centers during 2013. The median volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose, along with the interquartile range (IQR), were calculated separately for adults and children and stratified according to anatomic region. Distributions for DLP and effective dose are reported for single-phase examinations, multiphase examinations, and all examinations. Results For adults, the median CTDIvol was 50 mGy (IQR, 37–62 mGy) for the head, 12 mGy (IQR, 7–17 mGy) for the chest, and 12 mGy (IQR, 8–17 mGy) for the abdomen. The median DLPs for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 640–1120 mGy · cm), 1550 mGy · cm (IQR, 1150–2130 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 690–1300 mGy · cm); chest, 420 mGy · cm (IQR, 260–610 mGy · cm), 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 570–1430 mGy · cm), and 550 mGy · cm (IQR 320–830 mGy · cm); and abdomen, 580 mGy · cm (IQR, 360–860 mGy · cm), 1220 mGy · cm (IQR, 850–1790 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 600–1460 mGy · cm). Median effective doses for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 2 mSv (IQR, 1–3 mSv), 4 mSv (IQR, 3–8 mSv), and 2 mSv (IQR, 2–3 mSv); chest, 9 mSv (IQR, 5–13 mSv), 18 mSv (IQR, 12–29 mSv), and 11 mSv (IQR, 6–18 mSv); and abdomen, 10 mSv (IQR, 6–16 mSv), 22 mSv (IQR, 15–32 mSv), and 17 m

  1. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  2. The way forward in capacity building in developing countries: space research center at Minoufiyia University, Egypt, as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosalam Shaltout, M. A.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Menoufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1. Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2. Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3. Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4. Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the world, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5. Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. 6. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  3. Constraints on cosmological models and reconstructing the acceleration history of the Universe with gamma-ray burst distance indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Nan; Wu Puxun; Zhang Shuangnan

    2010-04-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been regarded as standard candles at very high redshift for cosmology research. We have proposed a new method to calibrate GRB distance indicators with Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) data in a completely cosmology-independent way to avoid the circularity problem that had limited the direct use of GRBs to probe cosmology [N. Liang, W. K. Xiao, Y. Liu, and S. N. Zhang, Astrophys. J. 685, 354 (2008).]. In this paper, a simple method is provided to combine GRB data into the joint observational data analysis to constrain cosmological models; in this method those SNe Ia data points used for calibrating the GRB data are not used to avoid any correlation between them. We find that the {Lambda}CDM model is consistent with the joint data in the 1-{sigma} confidence region, using the GRB data at high redshift calibrated with the interpolating method, the Constitution set of SNe Ia, the cosmic microwave background radiation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five year observation, the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 galaxy sample, the x-ray baryon mass fraction in clusters of galaxies, and the observational Hubble parameter versus redshift data. Comparing to the joint constraints with GRBs and without GRBs, we find that the contribution of GRBs to the joint cosmological constraints is a slight shift in the confidence regions of cosmological parameters to better enclose the {Lambda}CDM model. Finally, we reconstruct the acceleration history of the Universe up to z>6 with the distance moduli of SNe Ia and GRBs and find some features that deviate from the {Lambda}CDM model and seem to favor oscillatory cosmology models; however, further investigations are needed to better understand the situation.

  4. 76 FR 37191 - Notice of Competition for University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration Notice of Competition for University Transportation... Transportation (U.S. DOT) is providing notice that it intends to conduct a competition for...

  5. Coilgun technology at the Center for Electromechanics, The University of Texas at Austin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresie, D. A.; Ingram, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    An account is presented of the engineering tradeoffs performed during the development of a collapsing-field accelerator 'coilgun' that can operate on the basis of existing power supplies. The tradeoffs encompassed structural stress, maximum temperature rise in conductors, efficiency, energy storage element time constants, and system weight. Attention is given to the operating principles of coilguns and the advantages of the present system's passive operation.

  6. Public Outreach at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory Cline Visitor Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Daniel B.; Hawkins, L.; Smith, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent completion of the Cline Visitor Center we have begun a program of public nights at our Dark Sky Observatory's 32-inch telescope. Events are ticketed online using an inexpensive commercial ticketing service and are limited to two groups of 60 visitors per night that arrive for 1.5-hour sessions. We are installing two large (70-inch) flat panel displays in the Center and planning additional exhibits to entertain visitors while they await their turn at the telescope's eyepiece. The facility is fully ADA compliant, with eyepiece access via a DFM Engineering Articulated Relay Eyepiece, and a wheelchair lift if needed. We present some of our experiences in this poster and encourage readers to offer suggestions. The Visitor Center was established with the support of Mr. J. Donald Cline, for which we are very grateful. The telescope was partially funded by the National Science Foundation.

  7. Remote connection to the Kyushu University Medical Center LAN using digital and analog telephone lines.

    PubMed

    Antoku, Y; Hanada, E; Akazawa, K; Kenjo, Y; Nose, Y

    1997-08-01

    SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) has recently become popular, as it makes working at home possible. Computers or Local Area Networks(LAN) connected to the office network from home are necessary for the implementation of this concept. Kyushu University has begun a service connecting home computers to the campus LAN for researchers, staff and students of the Faculty of Medicine. We have two different telephone connection methods. One connects the campus LAN and the home computer LAN using routers through the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). The other connects computers at home to the workstation in the university, using modems and the PPP (Point to Point Protocol) through a public telephone analog line. This paper outlines our university SOHO connection system and discusses the merits and demerits of using telephone line connections.

  8. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    PubMed

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  9. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce.

  10. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  11. Enjoying the Roller Coaster Ride: Directors' Perspectives on Fostering Staff Morale in University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eells, Gregory T.; Seals, Tom; Rockett, Jeri; Hayes, Denise

    2005-01-01

    The demand for mental health services in higher education settings continues to increase and places more pressure on staff, highlighting further the importance of good staff morale in these agencies. This task of bolstering staff morale is often placed primarily on the shoulders of counseling center directors. The present article outlines several…

  12. University of Kansas Medical center Cancer Research Equipment Award Type: Construction Grant

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Jamie

    2016-12-09

    A major mechanism to strengthen the overall cancer focus of KUCC and expand specific research programs is through targeted recruitment of additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research needs, and enable new collaborative projects. Over the last five years KUCC has demonstrated the ability to recruit nationally recognized basic, translational and clinical scientists to fill key leadership positions and strengthen our research programs. These researchers require new and renovated research facilities require state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. This includes standard equipment for the renovated laboratories and more specialized equipment as part of new investigator start-up packages. This funding is used to support recruitment, facilities, equipment, shared resources, administration, and patient care services. KUCC is committed to recruiting additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research positions and build the four cancer research programs. Each purposeful hire aims to further the scientific vision, mission, and goals of the Cancer Center research programs. The funds requested will be used to supplement the recruitment packages of future cancer center recruits primarily through purchase of key equipment items.

  13. University of Tennessee Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research had projects with space applications in six major areas: laser materials processing, artificial intelligence/expert systems, space transportation, computational methods, chemical propulsion, and electric propulsion. The closeout status of all these projects is addressed.

  14. Leaning toward the Centers: International Networking at China's Five C[subscript 9] League Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Rui; Xie, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Scholarly relations between developed and developing countries have long been characterized by imbalances and asymmetries. The "centers" in the North give direction, provide models, produce research and function as the pinnacles of the academic system while institutions in developing countries copy their development from the…

  15. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K.; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs…

  16. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment in US Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, Barr and Tagg ("Change Mag" 27(6):12-25, 1995) declared that a shift had occurred in higher education from an instruction paradigm to a learning paradigm. A central element in this new paradigm is learner-centered assessment. While a growing body of literature suggests that this approach to assessment is a best…

  17. Annual Progress Report, 1976. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Covering the 1976 activities of the Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC), this third annual report describes SRDC's: history; organization; regional workshops; functional networks; network bibliographies and other publications; Title V reports; grant received for training in rural development; orientation visits; consultants; information…

  18. The Pratt Center for Community Improvement: A University Urban Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, George M.; Shiffman, Ronald

    The Pratt Center for Community Improvement was founded in Brooklyn in 1963 by Pratt Institute. Its aim was to help equalize the knowledge level of city and community representatives concerning issues in urban renewal, and to gain the confidence of local residents and enhance their participation in decision making. Participant education and…

  19. Effects of Biofeedback on Distress in a University Counseling Center: Preliminary Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper-Smith, Adriana; Tift, Jay H.; Frye, Joan F.

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback (BF) and its mechanisms of change were examined alongside self-regulation and mind-body approaches in the context of counseling centers. The advance in psychopathology within this context and its intersections with neurophysiological, psychological, and social variables were highlighted. Although BF is commonly provided to students,…

  20. Annual Progress Report, 1978. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Summarizing Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC) activities during the October 1977-September 1978 fiscal year, this fifth annual report indicates that with Title V funding SRDC has continued its efforts to bring research and extension personnel together to work on problems in rural development. Support for programs and research at land grant…

  1. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Archaeology Center at the address below by October 29, 2012. ADDRESSES: Laura Jones, Director, Heritage... determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Stanford... tools. Based on the location of removal and in accordance with the information received in...

  2. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference.

  3. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  4. From Margin to Center: Participating in Village Pedagogy at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Otto D., III

    2012-01-01

    Are Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) necessary in the twenty-first century so-called "post-racial" US American context? This question is raised loudly and frequently given the contemporary social climate and economic considerations. In this article, the author offers a response to and critique of this question and surveys…

  5. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  6. Interpersonal Violence and Sexual Assault: Trauma-Informed Communication Approaches in University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Christina Granato; Campbell, Kimberly Brown

    2016-01-01

    A university in the United States Mountain West utilized grant resources to track counseling services for students who were currently experiencing or who had historically experienced relationship violence, sexual assault and/or stalking. This report reflects on the first 2 years of this program, including an overview of prevalence and reporting…

  7. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  8. Information Needs of Distance Learners: A Case of Winneba Study Center, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Agatha Gifty; Owusu-Acheaw, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The study focuses on the information needs of distance learners of the Winneba Study Centre of the University of Education, Winneba. The main objective was to investigate the information needs of this group of students who live far away from their host institution and have minimal interaction with their tutors. The study was a survey and made use…

  9. Library Resources in Gerontology: Periodicals, Indexes, and Abstracts. University Gerontology Center Information Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesaitis, Patricia; Hays, Judith A.

    Periodicals, indexes, and abstracts important to the interdisciplinary fields of gerontology and geriatrics which are currently available at the Wichita State University are discussed. The section on periodicals includes a discussion of why they are useful as an information source, along with a short description of the scope of 18 journals. The…

  10. University Health Center Providers' Beliefs about Discussing and Recommending Sexual Health Prevention to Women College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Geshnizjani, Alireza; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual health concerns such as sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy remain substantial health problems faced by young adults, especially college women. University healthcare providers may be instrumental in increasing female patients' involvement in preventative sexual health behaviors, however little research has examined this…

  11. The Social Welfare Practice and Research Center at the Chinese University of Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The organization and research programs of the Social Welfare Practice and Research Centre (SWPRC) at the Chinese University of Hong Kong are outlined. There are five regular research programs (Family and Group Practice Research Centre, Human Behavior and the Social Environment Research Program, Mutual Aid and Social Capital Research Program,…

  12. University Counseling Centers' Perceptions and Experiences Pertaining to Emotional Support Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Lori R.; Schaefer, Karen; Erdman, Phyllis; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students are requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of service animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities are faced with developing new policies and guidelines. A sample of 248…

  13. Implementing a Sustainable Program Evaluation Component at a Large University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    This action research dissertation study was undertaken to establish the foundation of a comprehensive evaluation component for the Turn-It-Around (TIA) workshop intervention program at Arizona State University (ASU), and was delivered in the form of a program development consultation. The study's intent was to enhance the ASU Counseling Service's…

  14. A Collaborative Effort at Marketing the University: Detailing a Student-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Judith H.; Petroshius, Susan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the use of an experiential team-based project in a capstone marketing management course. In the project, students worked with the university administration to develop a marketing plan for the Admissions Office's Tour Guide Program. The authors discuss why such marketing activities are important to colleges and…

  15. Transition from High School to University: A Person-Centered Approach to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Clercq, Mikaël; Galand, Benoît; Frenay, Mariane

    2017-01-01

    Although a vast body of studies regarding the variables related to students' achievement exists, only a handful has investigated how these variables combine and interact together. Such an investigation might make it possible to more accurately illustrate the heterogeneity of students enrolling in university and assess the impact of this diversity…

  16. The Role of Research Centers in Fulfilling the Community Engagement Mission of Public Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toof, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are seen by the public as having unique resources to identify and solve complex societal problems. Public universities, in particular, were originally established to be of service to communities and the nation to advance public good and solve problems. However, community engagement is not an easy task for…

  17. The Preparation of Master's Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    College and university counselors are tasked with performing a multitude of roles and meeting a variety of client needs unique from other counseling settings. It is important to examine the ability of counselors who work in these settings to determine if they have been adequately prepared. This study investigated the adequacy of preparation of…

  18. Melter performance during surrogate vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.C.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1995-10-05

    This report summarizes the results from seven melter campaigns performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. A brief description of the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stirred melter are included for reference. The report discusses each waste stream examined, glass formulations developed and utilized, specifics relating to melter operation, and a synopsis of the results from the campaigns. A `lessons learned` section is included for each melter to emphasize repeated processing problems and identify parameters which are considered extremely important to successful melter operation

  19. The InterCon network: a program for education partnerships at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center.

    PubMed

    Castro, G A; Bouldin, P A; Farver, D W; Maugans, L A; Sanders, L C; Booker, J

    1999-04-01

    The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center (UT-Houston) has created programs and activities to address the state's pressing needs in minority education. Through InterCon, a network of universities and K-12 schools, UT-Houston works with its partners to identify competitive candidates in the current pool of minority graduates with bachelor's degrees and to help them--along with their non-minority counterparts--progress in their education. Another objective is to expand the pool of minorities underrepresented in medicine who complete high school and go to college. In 1994 UT-Houston and Prairie View A&M University created a collaborative venture to provide new educational opportunities at UT-Houston for Prairie View's predominantly African American students. A three-track summer internship program--a result of that collaboration--has since been expanded to partnerships with other minority and majority universities throughout Texas. In 1998, for example, 108 undergraduate students from these universities (and 40 other universities nationwide) participated in research, professional, and administrative summer internships at UT-Houston. The InterCon network also has partnerships with K-12 schools. UT-Houston works with inner-city, suburban, and rural school districts to develop education models that can be transferred throughout the state. The partnerships deal with helping to teach basic academic skills and computer literacy, improve science-related instruction, meet demands for health promotion materials and information for school-initiated health and wellness programs, and develop distance-learning paradigms. UT-Houston views InterCon as a program helping Texas institutions to engage and adapt to the socioeconomic factors, demographic changes, and technology explosion that currently challenge public education.

  20. Twenty Years of Proton Radiation Therapy at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Jerry D.

    The proton treatment center at Loma Linda is the first hospital-based proton facility in the world. Dr. James M. Slater spearheaded its development in response to the need to reduce normal tissue injury and unacceptable side effects. Loma Linda physicians treat a wide range of cancers and other conditions with protons; studies are ongoing to expand applications and realize the still-evolving potential of the modality.

  1. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  2. A Center of Excellence in the Mathematical Sciences - at Cornell University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    A . CALVIN & RICHARD L. DYKSTRA 26 PAGES 76. LARGE ROTATING STATES OF A CONDUCTING ELASTIC WIRE 3 IN A MAGNETIC FIELD: SUBTLE...Cornell University Financial support from MSI of my project was for Richard Liu and a workshop. a Richard Liu has worked out many research papers. The...maximum utility consists almost surely of a U single point. Richard Davis and I completed a study of a subclass of the max-stable processes called

  3. Cardiovascular emergency preparedness in recreation facilities at major US universities: college fitness center emergency readiness.

    PubMed

    Herbert, William G; Herbert, David L; McInnis, Kyle J; Ribisl, Paul M; Franklin, Barry A; Callahan, Mandy; Hood, Aaron W

    2007-01-01

    Recent American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine (AHA/ACSM) guidelines advocate preparticipation screening, planning, and rehearsal for emergencies and automated external defibrillators in all health/fitness facilities. The authors evaluated adherence to these recommendations at 158 recreational service departments in major US universities (51% response rate for 313 institutions queried). Many made their facilities available to unaffiliated residents, with 39% offering programs for those with special medical conditions. Only 18% performed universal preparticipation screening. Twenty-seven percent reported having 1 or more exercise-related instances of cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death within the past 5 years. Seventy-three percent had an automated external defibrillator, but only 6% reported using it in an emergency. Almost all had written emergency plans, but only 50% posted their plans, and only 27% performed the recommended quarterly emergency drills. The authors' findings suggest low awareness of and adherence to the AHA/ACSM recommendations for identifying individuals at risk for exercise-related cardiovascular complications and for handling such emergencies in university-based fitness facilities. (

  4. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC): Development, Evolution, and Direction

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A historical summary is provided of the evolution of the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) since its origins in 1988. Begun as an NIH research center within a Department of Psychiatry and focused solely on alcohol and aging, early work emphasized treatment efficacy, differential outcome studies, and characterization of the neurophysiological and behavioral manifestations of chronic alcoholism. Over the last fifteen years, UMARC has extended its research focus along a number of dimensions: Its developmental reach has been extended etiologically by studies of risk early in the life span, and by way of work on earlier screening and the development of early, brief treatment interventions. The addiction focus has expanded to include other drugs of abuse. Levels of analysis have also broadened, with work on the molecular genetics and brain neurophysiology underlying addictive processes on the one hand, and examination of the role of the social environment in long term course of disorder on the other. Activities have been facilitated by several research training programs and by collaborative relationships with other universities around the United States and in Poland. Since 2002, a program for research infrastructure development and collaboration has been carried on, initially with Poland and more recently with Ukraine, Latvia, and Slovakia. A blueprint for the future includes expanded characterization of the neurobiology and genetics of addictive processes, the developmental environment, as well as programmatic work to address the public health implications of our ability to identify risk for disorder very early in life. PMID:20331547

  5. Impact of the Development of a Light Microscopy Shared Resource for the University of Rochester Medical Center: A Quantitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, M.; Jordan, P.; Kasischke, K.; Brown, E.; Reed, A.; Lentine, M.; Bushnell, T.; Puzas, E.; Callahan, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) determined the need for a shared Light Microscopy facility to support researchers requiring high-end light microscopy for their research programs. URMC Shared Resource Laboratories (SRLs) represent a strategic investment in technology, targeted expertise, and space administration to systematically support and advance the research mission of the institution. Recognizing the need for centralized light microscopy resources to support the University of Rochester Medical Center, a task force of senior researchers, investigators, and administration developed a plan to create a light microscopy resource. Through strategic investment for instrument upgrades and acquisition as well as hiring of additional staff, the LM resource has grown since its inception in 2008 with expanded capacity and capabilities to support the diverse needs and studies of the URMC researchers. The data presented here address the impact of the LM Shared Resource on the URMC research community in quantitative areas such as publications, new grant funding, and training as well as addressing qualitative measures of success including impact on graduate education and new research avenues.

  6. A retrospective study of 22 patients with necrotising fasciitis treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (2005-2010).

    PubMed

    Arifi, Hysni M; Duci, Shkelzen B; Zatriqi, Violeta K; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Ismajli, Vildane H; Gashi, Musli M; Zejnullahu, Ylber M; Mekaj, Agon Y

    2013-08-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a destructive invasive infection of skin, subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia. The aim of the study is to determine the causative agents of NF, its localisation, predisposing factors and comorbid conditions, duration of treatment and distribution of NF in different age groups and over the years. We conducted a retrospective study including 22 patients with NF from 2005 to 2010 in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The data were collected and analysed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The average age of patients was 56·9 years. In eight cases or 36·4% of total patients studied, NF was caused by monobacterial agents with a predominance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (five cases or 22·7% of total infections). Polybacterial agents were responsible for NF infection in other 14 cases (63·6%). Majority of the patients had other comorbidities like diabetes, trauma and prior history of surgical interventions. Diabetes was present in 17 patients or 77·3%. The remaining five patients (22·7%) had previous trauma and recent surgical intervention. Average length of treatment was 43 days. The hospital mortality rate in our case series was 22·6%. Early identification and diagnosis of NF significantly improves outcome and reduces mortality.

  7. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services. Eleventh Annual Report [of the] Oakland University Adult Career Counseling Center: September 1993-June 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splete, Howard

    This report profiles the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University, Michigan. Conceived in 1982, the Center provides services for adults seeking career guidance. The ACCC supplies career information, counseling, advice in preparation and interviewing skills, and referral information, all at no charge. The ACCC employed computers…

  8. The relationship between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--a profile in synergy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arthur S; Detre, Thomas P; McDonald, Margaret C; Roth, Loren H; Huber, George A; Brignano, Mary Germann; Danoff, Sandra N; Farner, David M; Masnick, Jeffrey L; Romoff, Jeffrey A

    2008-09-01

    In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research objectives of the SOM. UPMC's conceptual origin was fostered by its experience with Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in the 1970s. Over time, UPMC acquired other hospitals through merger and negotiation and, by 2008, had grown into a $7 billion global health enterprise. From the outset, the senior leaders of both UPMC and Pitt committed to collaborative decision making on all key issues. Under this coordinated decision-making model, UPMC oversees all clinical activity, including that from a consolidated physicians' practice plan. Pitt remains the guardian of all academic priorities, particularly faculty-based research. UPMC's steady financial success underpins the model. A series of interrelated agreements formally defines the relationship between Pitt and UPMC, including shared board seats and UPMC's committed ongoing financial support of the SOM. In addition, the two institutions have jointly made research growth a priority. The payoff from this dynamic has been a steadily growing Pitt research portfolio; enhanced growth, visibility, and stature for UPMC, the SOM, and Pitt as a whole; and the sustained success of UPMC's clinical enterprise, which now has an international scope. Given the current stagnation in the National Institutes of Health budget, the Pitt-UPMC experience may be instructive to other academic health centers.

  9. The Impact of Language Policy Issues on Program Development and Management at the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich Language Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the impact of language policy issues on program development and management at the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich Language Center. Based on the analysis of the language policy approach of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, the article reflects both current practices and policy elements with the help of the…

  10. Projektarbejde i fremmedsprogene: Rapport fra seminar pa Roskilde Universitetscenter (Project Work in Foreign Languages: Report from a Seminar at Roskilde University Center). ROLIG-papir 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsen, Karen Sonne, Ed.

    This report describes a seminar at Roskilde University Center (Denmark) on project work in foreign languages, which brought together language teachers and theorists from different schools, including universities, business schools, technical schools, merchants schools, and high schools, to discuss their experiences with project work in foreign…

  11. Fall Term 1999 Nova Southeastern University Students Respond to a Broad-Based Satisfaction Survey: Breakouts by Student Service Center Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    This study uses data originally gained by a fall 1999 survey process at Nova Southeastern University (NSU), Florida, to provide information about student satisfaction. In this report, survey results are broken out by the Florida geographic area at which the university offers instruction at Student Service Centers: Miami-Dade County, Palm Beach…

  12. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, July 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Oriani, R.A.

    1981-01-30

    At present, the research ranges from the quantum mechanics of the corrosion unit reactions, organic and inorganic coatings, surface reactions on polymers, metals and semiconductors to high-temperature chemistry of interest to solar-energy conversion. A second objective of the Center is to increase the utilization of corrosion data by the technical community through education and through the dissemination of appropriately formatted information. At present, two projects are in the planning stage for the near future. One is a pedagogical symposium on corrosion in microelectronic components and systems; the other is a series of lectures and videotapes, as well as a workshop on cathodic protection.

  13. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics, The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C. (Technical Monitor); Klein, Vladislav

    2005-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in GW at NASA Langley Research Center, which was originated March 20, 1975, and in the renewals of the research program from January 1, 2003 to September 30, 2005. The program in its present form includes three major topics: 1. the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for wind tunnel and flight data analysis, 2. the application of these methods to wind tunnel and flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes, 3. the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  14. Tissue procurement system in Japan: the role of a tissue bank in medical center for translational research, Osaka University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, H; Fukushima, N; Kitagawa, T; Ito, T; Masutani, Y; Sawa, Y

    2010-01-01

    Although organ procurement has been regulated by The Organ Transplantation Law (brain-dead donors since 1997, donors after cardiac death since 1979), there has been no law or governmental procurement network (except for cornea) in Japan. Since the late 1980s, some university hospitals have developed original banks. Finally, in 2001 guidelines for tissue procurement were established by The Japanese Society of Tissue Transplantation and Japan Tissue Transplant Network (JTTN) to coordinate tissue harvesting. Five tissue banks were joined to the tissue transplant network (skin in one, heart valves in two, and bone in two). As the number of tissue banks is small, each bank cooperates on procurement, but cannot cover the entire country. With regard to skin transplantation, only one skin bank-The Japan Skin Bank Network (JSBN), which is located in Tokyo-has organized skin procurement. Therefore, it has been difficult to procure skin in areas distant from Tokyo, especially around Osaka. In order to improve such a situation, a tissue bank collaborating with the JSBN was established at The Medical Center for Translational Research (MTR), Osaka University Hospital in April 2008. The bank has played a role in skin procurement center in western Japan and supported procurement and preservation at the time of the skin procurement. Between April 2008 and September 2009, the bank participated in eight tissue procurements in the western area. In the future, the bank is planning to procure and preserve pancreatic islets and bones. Moreover, there is a plan to set up an induced pluripotent stem cells center and stem cell bank in MTR. This tissue bank may play a role to increase tissue procurement in Japan, especially in the western area.

  15. Design of the main racetrack microtron accelerator end magnets of the Institute of Physics of University of São Paulo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, L. R.; Martins, M. N.; Takahashi, J.; Gouffon, P.

    1999-03-01

    This work deals with the design of the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP) main racetrack microtron accelerator end magnets. This is the last stage of acceleration, comprised of an accelerating section (1.04 m) and two end magnets (0.1585 T), in which a 5.10 MeV beam, produced by a racetrack microtron booster has its energy raised up to 31.15 MeV after 28 accelerations. Poisson code was used to give the final configuration that includes auxiliary pole pieces (clamps) and auxiliary homogenizing gaps. The clamps create a reverse fringe field region and avoid the vertical defocusing and the horizontal displacement of the beam produced by extended fringe fields; Ptrace code was used to perform the trajectory calculations in the fringe field region. The auxiliary homogenizing gaps improve the field uniformity as they create a ``magnetic shower'' that provides uniformity of +/-0.3%, before the introduction of the correcting coils that will be attached to the pole faces. This method of correction, used in the IFUSP racetrack microtron booster magnets, enabled uniformity of +/-0.001% in an average field of 0.1 T and will also be employed for these end magnets.

  16. Applications of the Strategic Defense Initiative's compact accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanarelli, Nick; Lynch, Ted

    1991-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative's (SDI) investment in particle accelerator technology for its directed energy weapons program has produced breakthroughs in the size and power of new accelerators. These accelerators, in turn, have produced spinoffs in several areas: the radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator (RFQ linac) was recently incorporated into the design of a cancer therapy unit at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, an SDI-sponsored compact induction linear accelerator may replace Cobalt-60 radiation and hazardous ethylene-oxide as a method for sterilizing medical products, and other SDIO-funded accelerators may be used to produce the radioactive isotopes oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET). Other applications of these accelerators include bomb detection, non-destructive inspection, decomposing toxic substances in contaminated ground water, and eliminating nuclear waste.

  17. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  18. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  19. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research.

  20. Educational and retraining programs in the International Laser Center of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. A.; Shlenov, S. A.

    2005-10-01

    We present educational programs on nonlinear optics and laser physics in the ILC MSU. These programs are aimed on both full-t ime students of physics faculty and students of retraining courses. As a part of life-l ong learning we offer different types of programs ranging from short courses to one-y ear long retraining programs. These programs include lecture courses, practical work in the training laboratories, and graduate research work in the scientific labs under a supervision of an expert. Special attention will be paid to new tendencies in the educational activities at the ILC MSU: developing and using multimedia courses, short-range practical courses in adjacent fields, constantly developing university teaching laboratory on laser physics and optics.