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Sample records for accelerator controls network

  1. Neural networks and orbit control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1994-07-01

    An overview of the architecture, workings and training of Neural Networks is given. We stress the aspects which are important for the use of Neural Networks for orbit control in accelerators and storage rings, especially its ability to cope with the nonlinear behavior of the orbit response to `kicks` and the slow drift in the orbit response during long-term operation. Results obtained for the two NSLS storage rings with several network architectures and various training methods for each architecture are given.

  2. Application of local area networks to accelerator control systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Linstadt, E.; Melen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The history and current status of SLAC's SDLC networks for distributed accelerator control systems are discussed. These local area networks have been used for instrumentation and control of the linear accelerator. Network topologies, protocols, physical links, and logical interconnections are discussed for specific applications in distributed data acquisition and control system, computer networks and accelerator operations.

  3. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  4. Real-time Optical Network for Accelerator Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Keun

    2012-06-27

    The timing requirements of a modern accelerator complex call for several features. The first is a system for high precision relative timing among accelerator components. Stabilized fiber links have already been demonstrated to achieve sub-10 femtoseconds relative timing precision. The second is a system for timing distribution of absolute time with sufficient precision to identify a specific RF bucket. The White Rabbit technology is a promising candidate to deliver the absolute time that is linked to the GPS clock. In this study we demonstrated that these two technologies can be combined in a way that the absolute time information can be delivered to the stabilized fiber link system. This was accomplished by researching the design of the stabilized fiber and White Rabbit systems and devising adaptation modules that facilitate co-existence of both systems in the same FPGA environment. We built a prototype system using off-the-shelf products and implemented a proof-of-concept version of the FPGA firmware. The test verified that the White Rabbit features operate correctly under the stabilized fiber system environment. This work demonstrates that turn-key femtosecond timing systems with absolute time information can be built cost effectively and deployed in various accelerator environments. This will lead to many new applications in chemistry, biology and surface dynamics, to name a few.

  5. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  6. Accelerating, hyperaccelerating, and decelerating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, M. J.; Mattick, J. S.

    2005-07-01

    Many growing networks possess accelerating statistics where the number of links added with each new node is an increasing function of network size so the total number of links increases faster than linearly with network size. In particular, biological networks can display a quadratic growth in regulator number with genome size even while remaining sparsely connected. These features are mutually incompatible in standard treatments of network theory which typically require that every new network node possesses at least one connection. To model sparsely connected networks, we generalize existing approaches and add each new node with a probabilistic number of links to generate either accelerating, hyperaccelerating, or even decelerating network statistics in different regimes. Under preferential attachment for example, slowly accelerating networks display stationary scale-free statistics relatively independent of network size while more rapidly accelerating networks display a transition from scale-free to exponential statistics with network growth. Such transitions explain, for instance, the evolutionary record of single-celled organisms which display strict size and complexity limits.

  7. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  8. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  9. Remote operations in a global accelerator network

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Steve; Satogata, Todd; Agarwal, Deborah; Rice, David

    2003-05-08

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  10. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA,T.; AGARWAL,D.; RICE,D.

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  11. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,TAGARWAL,DRICE,D

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  12. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  13. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  14. Ground test accelerator control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Burczyk, L.; Dalesio, R.; Dingler, R.; Hill, J.; Howell, J.A.; Kerstiens, D.; King, R.; Kozubal, A.; Little, C.; Martz, V.; Rothrock, R.; Sutton, J.

    1988-01-01

    The GTA control system provides an environment in which the automation of a state-of-the-art accelerator can be developed. It makes use of commercially available computers, workstations, computer networks, industrial I/O equipment, and software. This system has built-in supervisory control (like most accelerator control systems), tools to support continuous control (like the process control industry), and sequential control for automatic startup and fault recovery (like few other accelerator control systems). Several software tools support these levels of control: a real-time operating system (VxWorks) with a real-time kernel (VRTX), a configuration database, a sequencer, and a graphics editor. VxWorks supports multitasking, fast context-switching, and preemptive scheduling. VxWorks/VRTX is a network-based development environment specifically designed to work in partnership with the UNIX operating system. A database provides the interface to the accelerator components. It consists of a run time library and a database configuration and editing tool. A sequencer initiates and controls the operation of all sequence programs (expressed as state programs). A graphics editor gives the user the ability to create color graphic displays showing the state of the machine in either text or graphics form. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Robust control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.D. ); Abdallah, C.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The problem of controlling the variations in the rf power system can be effectively cast as an application of modern control theory. Two components of this theory are obtaining a model and a feedback structure. The model inaccuracies influence the choice of a particular controller structure. Because of the modeling uncertainty, one has to design either a variable, adaptive controller or a fixed, robust controller to achieve the desired objective. The adaptive control scheme usually results in very complex hardware; and, therefore, shall not be pursued in this research. In contrast, the robust control methods leads to simpler hardware. However, robust control requires a more accurate mathematical model of the physical process than is required by adaptive control. Our research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) has led to the development and implementation of a new robust rf power feedback system. In this paper, we report on our research progress. In section one, the robust control problem for the rf power system and the philosophy adopted for the beginning phase of our research is presented. In section two, the results of our proof-of-principle experiments are presented. In section three, we describe the actual controller configuration that is used in LANL FEL physics experiments. The novelty of our approach is that the control hardware is implemented directly in rf without demodulating, compensating, and then remodulating.

  16. Control of robot dynamics using acceleration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Prateru, S.; Li, W.; Hinman, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    Acceleration control of robotic devices can provide improvements to many space-based operations using flexible manipulators and to ground-based operations requiring better precision and efficiency than current industrial robots can provide. This paper reports on a preliminary study of acceleration measurement on robotic motion during parabolic flights on the NASA KC-135 and a parallel study of accelerations with and without gravity arising from computer simulated motions using TREETOPS software.

  17. Accelerating Learning By Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to learn faster by use of terminal teacher forcing. Method of supervised learning involves addition of teacher forcing functions to excitations fed as inputs to output neurons. Initially, teacher forcing functions are strong enough to force outputs to desired values; subsequently, these functions decay with time. When learning successfully completed, terminal teacher forcing vanishes, and dynamics or neural network become equivalent to those of conventional neural network. Simulated neural network with terminal teacher forcing learned to produce close approximation of circular trajectory in 400 iterations.

  18. A Portable Accelerator Control Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, W. A., III

    1997-05-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts between laboratories to share this effort and expense. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the cdev (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. With the advent of cdev, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on cdev now provide a large suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, on-line accelerator models, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (for example beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of cdev compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future enhancements.

  19. A portable accelerator control toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.A. III

    1997-06-01

    In recent years, the expense of creating good control software has led to a number of collaborative efforts among laboratories to share this cost. The EPICS collaboration is a particularly successful example of this trend. More recently another collaborative effort has addressed the need for sophisticated high level software, including model driven accelerator controls. This work builds upon the CDEV (Common DEVice) software framework, which provides a generic abstraction of a control system, and maps that abstraction onto a number of site-specific control systems including EPICS, the SLAC control system, CERN/PS and others. In principle, it is now possible to create portable accelerator control applications which have no knowledge of the underlying and site-specific control system. Applications based on CDEV now provide a growing suite of tools for accelerator operations, including general purpose displays, an on-line accelerator model, beamline steering, machine status displays incorporating both hardware and model information (such as beam positions overlaid with beta functions) and more. A survey of CDEV compatible portable applications will be presented, as well as plans for future development.

  20. Generic device controller for accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, R.; Buxton, W.; Frankel, R.; Hoff, L.

    1987-01-01

    A new distributed intelligence control system has become operational at the AGS for transport, injection, and acceleration of heavy ions. A brief description of the functionality of the physical devices making up the system is given. An attempt has been made to integrate the devices for accelerator specific interfacing into a standard microprocessor system, namely, the Universal Device Controller (UDC). The main goals for such a generic device controller are to provide: local computing power; flexibility to configure; and real time event handling. The UDC assemblies and software are described. (LEW)

  1. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  2. The APS control system network

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K.V.; McDowell, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    The APS accelerator control system is a distributed system consisting of operator interfaces, a network, and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. This implementation of a control system has come to be called the {open_quotes}Standard Model.{close_quotes} The operator interface is a UNDC-based workstation with an X-windows graphical user interface. The workstation may be located at any point on the facility network and maintain full functionality. The function of the network is to provide a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The crate or input/output controller (IOC) provides direct control and input/output interfaces for each accelerator subsystem. The network is an integral part of all modem control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper will describe the overall APS network and examine the APS control system network in detail. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  3. Accelerating commutation circuits in quantum computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Huang, Xu; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2012-12-01

    In a high speed and packet-switched quantum computer network, a packet routing delay often leads to traffic jams, becoming a severe bottleneck for speeding up the transmission rate. Based on the delayed commutation circuit proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110502 (2006), we present an improved scheme for accelerating network transmission. For two more realistic scenarios, we utilize the characteristic of a quantum state to simultaneously implement a data switch and transmission that makes it possible to reduce the packet delay and route a qubit packet even before its address is determined. This circuit is further extended to the quantum network for the transmission of the unknown quantum information. The analysis demonstrates that quantum communication technology can considerably reduce the processing delay time and build faster and more efficient packet-switched networks.

  4. Control of Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Dall’Asta, Luca; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-01-01

    The controllability of a network is a theoretical problem of relevance in a variety of contexts ranging from financial markets to the brain. Until now, network controllability has been characterized only on isolated networks, while the vast majority of complex systems are formed by multilayer networks. Here we build a theoretical framework for the linear controllability of multilayer networks by mapping the problem into a combinatorial matching problem. We found that correlating the external signals in the different layers can significantly reduce the multiplex network robustness to node removal, as it can be seen in conjunction with a hybrid phase transition occurring in interacting Poisson networks. Moreover we observe that multilayer networks can stabilize the fully controllable multiplex network configuration that can be stable also when the full controllability of the single network is not stable. PMID:26869210

  5. Tools for remote computing in accelerator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderssen, Pal S.; Frammery, Veronique; Wilcke, Rainer

    1990-08-01

    In modern accelerator control systems, the intelligence of the equipment is distributed in the geographical and the logical sense. Control processes for a large variety of tasks reside in both the equipment and the control computers. Hence successful operation hinges on the availability and reliability of the communication infrastructure. The computers are interconnected by a communication system and use remote procedure calls and message passing for information exchange. These communication mechanisms need a well-defined convention, i.e. a protocol. They also require flexibility in both the setup and changes to the protocol specification. The Network Compiler is a tool which provides the programmer with a means of establising such a protocol for his application. Input to the Network Compiler is a single Interface Description File provided by the programmer. This file is written according to a grammar, and completely specifies the interprocess communication interfaces. Passed through the Network Compiler, the Interface Description File automatically produces the additional source code needed for the protocol. Hence the programmer does not have to be concerned about the details of the communication calls. Any further additions and modifications are made easy, because all the information about the interface is kept in a single file.

  6. Numerical investigation of closed-loop control for Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Barral, S.; Miedzik, J.

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency discharge current oscillations in Hall accelerators are conventionally damped with external inductor-capacitor (LC) or resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) networks. The role of such network in the stabilization of the plasma discharge is investigated with a numerical model and the potential advantages of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) closed-loop control over RLC networks are subsequently assessed using either discharge voltage or magnetic field modulation. Simulations confirm the reduction of current oscillations in the presence of a RLC network, but suggest that PID control could ensure nearly oscillation-free operation with little sensitivity toward the PID settings.

  7. Controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-05-12

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. Although control theory offers mathematical tools for steering engineered and natural systems towards a desired state, a framework to control complex self-organized systems is lacking. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes with time-dependent control that can guide the system's entire dynamics. We apply these tools to several real networks, finding that the number of driver nodes is determined mainly by the network's degree distribution. We show that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control, but that dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled using a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the high-degree nodes.

  8. The Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Clare, Loren P.

    2008-01-01

    A document describes the Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator (IONAC) an electronic apparatus, now under development, for relaying data at high rates in spacecraft and interplanetary radio-communication systems utilizing a delay-tolerant networking protocol. The protocol includes provisions for transmission and reception of data in bundles (essentially, messages), transfer of custody of a bundle to a recipient relay station at each step of a relay, and return receipts. Because of limitations on energy resources available for such relays, data rates attainable in a conventional software implementation of the protocol are lower than those needed, at any given reasonable energy-consumption rate. Therefore, a main goal in developing the IONAC is to reduce the energy consumption by an order of magnitude and the data-throughput capability by two orders of magnitude. The IONAC prototype is a field-programmable gate array that serves as a reconfigurable hybrid (hardware/ firmware) system for implementation of the protocol. The prototype can decode 108,000 bundles per second and encode 100,000 bundles per second. It includes a bundle-cache static randomaccess memory that enables maintenance of a throughput of 2.7Gb/s, and an Ethernet convergence layer that supports a duplex throughput of 1Gb/s.

  9. Virtualized Network Control (VNC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, Thomas; Guok, Chin; Ghani, Nasir

    2013-01-31

    The focus of this project was on the development of a "Network Service Plane" as an abstraction model for the control and provisioning of multi-layer networks. The primary motivation for this work were the requirements of next generation networked applications which will need to access advanced networking as a first class resource at the same level as compute and storage resources. A new class of "Intelligent Network Services" were defined in order to facilitate the integration of advanced network services into application specific workflows. This new class of network services are intended to enable real-time interaction between the application co-scheduling algorithms and the network for the purposes of workflow planning, real-time resource availability identification, scheduling, and provisioning actions.

  10. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Dunxiong; Krafft, Geoffrey Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control.

  11. Application accelerator system having bunch control

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.; Krafft, G.A.

    1999-06-22

    An application accelerator system for monitoring the gain of a free electron laser is disclosed. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detection techniques are used with a bunch length monitor for ultra short, picosec to several tens of femtosec, electron bunches. The monitor employs an application accelerator, a coherent radiation production device, an optical or beam chopping device, an infrared radiation collection device, a narrow-banding filter, an infrared detection device, and a control. 1 fig.

  12. Control problems in very large accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley-Milling, M. C.

    1985-06-01

    There is no fundamental difference of kind in the control requirements between a small and a large accelerator since they are built of the same types of components, which individually have similar control inputs and outputs. The main difference is one of scale; the large machine has many more components of each type, and the distances involved are much greater. Both of these factors must be taken into account in determining the optimum way of carrying out the control functions. Small machines should use standard equipment and software for control as much as possible, as special developments for small quantities cannot normally be justified if all costs are taken into account. On the other hand, the very great number of devices needed for a large machine means that, if special developments can result in simplification, they may make possible an appreciable reduction in the control equipment costs. It is the purpose of this report to look at the special control problems of large accelerators, which the author shall arbitarily define as those with a length of circumference in excess of 10 km, and point out where special developments, or the adoption of developments from outside the accelerator control field, can be of assistance in minimizing the cost of the control system. Most of the first part of this report was presented as a paper to the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference. It has now been extended to include a discussion on the special case of the controls for the SSC.

  13. Implementation of the beamline controls at the Florence accelerator laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraresi, L.; Mirto, F. A.

    2008-05-01

    The new Tandetron accelerator in Florence, with many different beamlines, has required a new organization of all the control signals of the used equipment (slow control). We present our solution, which allows us the control of all the employed instruments simultaneously from a number of different workplaces. All of our equipment has been designed to be Ethernet based and this is the key to accomplish two very important requirements: simultaneous remote control from many computers and electrical isolation to achieve a lower noise level. The control of the instruments requires only one Ethernet network and no particular interfaces or drivers on the computers.

  14. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  15. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-03-15

    Matlab is a matrix manipulation language originally developed to be a convenient language for using the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. What makes Matlab so appealing for accelerator physics is the combination of a matrix oriented programming language, an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capability, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of software toolboxes for accelerators have been written in Matlab--the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for machine simulations, LOCO for accelerator calibration, Matlab Channel Access Toolbox (MCA) for EPICS connections, and the Middle Layer. This paper will describe the ''middle layer'' software toolbox that resides between the high-level control applications and the low-level accelerator control system. This software was a collaborative effort between ALS (LBNL) and SPEAR3 (SSRL) but easily ports to other machines. Five accelerators presently use this software. The high-level Middle Layer functionality includes energy ramp, configuration control (save/restore), global orbit correction, local photon beam steering, insertion device compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction, response matrix measurement, and script-based programs for machine physics studies.

  16. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  17. Automation of particle accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a 'mouseable' representation of a typical beamline. This responds actively to changes input from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beamline itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operator. We have incorporated the Fortran beam optics code TRANSPORT for simulation of the beam. The paper describes the experience gained in this process and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in real-time, on an operating beamline. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Olson, Gary; Olson, Judy

    2002-09-15

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  19. Knowledge engineering for PACES, the particle accelerator control expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, P. C.; Poehlman, W. F. S.; Stark, J. W.; Cousins, T.

    1992-04-01

    The KN-3000 used at Defense Research Establishment Ottawa is a Van de Graaff particle accelerator employed primarily to produce monoenergetic neutrons for calibrating radiation detectors. To provide training and assistance for new operators, it was decided to develop an expert system for accelerator operation. Knowledge engineering aspects of the expert system are reviewed. Two important issues are involved: the need to encapsulate expert knowledge into the system in a form that facilitates automatic accelerator operation and to partition the system so that time-consuming inferencing is minimized in favor of faster, more algorithmic control. It is seen that accelerator control will require fast, narrowminded decision making for rapid fine tuning, but slower and broader reasoning for machine startup, shutdown, fault diagnosis, and correction. It is also important to render the knowledge base in a form conducive to operator training. A promising form of the expert system involves a hybrid system in which high level reasoning is performed on the host machine that interacts with the user, while an embedded controller employs neural networks for fast but limited adjustment of accelerator performance. This partitioning of duty facilitates a hierarchical chain of command yielding an effective mixture of speed and reasoning ability.

  20. An Accelerator Control Middle Layer Using MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, Gregory J.; Corbett, Jeff; Terebilo, Andrei

    2005-05-15

    Matlab is an interpretive programming language originally developed for convenient use with the LINPACK and EISPACK libraries. Matlab is appealing for accelerator physics because it is matrix-oriented, provides an active workspace for system variables, powerful graphics capabilities, built-in math libraries, and platform independence. A number of accelerator software toolboxes have been written in Matlab -- the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) for model-based machine simulations, LOCO for on-line model calibration, and Matlab Channel Access (MCA) to connect with EPICS. The function of the MATLAB ''MiddleLayer'' is to provide a scripting language for machine simulations and on-line control, including non-EPICS based control systems. The MiddleLayer has simplified and streamlined development of high-level applications including configuration control, energy ramp, orbit correction, photon beam steering, ID compensation, beam-based alignment, tune correction and response matrix measurement. The database-driven Middle Layer software is largely machine-independent and easy to port. Six accelerators presently use the software package with more scheduled to come on line soon.

  1. Accelerated Biofluid Filling in Complex Microfluidic Networks by Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Cheung, Mei Ki; Liu, Shirley Xiaosu; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Rapid fluid transport and exchange are critical operations involved in many microfluidic applications. However, conventional mechanisms used for driving fluid transport in microfluidics, such as micropumping and high pressure, can be inaccurate and difficult for implementation for integrated microfluidics containing control components and closed compartments. Here, a technology has been developed termed Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM) capable of significantly enhancing biofluid transport in complex microfluidic environments containing dead-end channels and closed chambers. Operation of the V-PAM entails a pressurized fluid loading into microfluidic channels where gas confined inside can rapidly be dissipated through permeation through a thin, gas-permeable membrane sandwiched between microfluidic channels and a network of vacuum channels. Effects of different structural and operational parameters of the V-PAM for promoting fluid filling in microfluidic environments have been studied systematically. This work further demonstrates the applicability of V-PAM for rapid filling of temperature-sensitive hydrogels and unprocessed whole blood into complex irregular microfluidic networks such as microfluidic leaf venation patterns and blood circulatory systems. Together, the V-PAM technology provides a promising generic microfluidic tool for advanced fluid control and transport in integrated microfluidics for different microfluidic diagnosis, organs-on-chips, and biomimetic studies. PMID:27409528

  2. Neural networks for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Current research in Artificial Neural Networks indicates that networks offer some potential advantages in adaptation and fault tolerance. This research is directed at determining the possible applicability of neural networks to aircraft control. The first application will be to aircraft trim. Neural network node characteristics, network topology and operation, neural network learning and example histories using neighboring optimal control with a neural net are discussed.

  3. ACCELERATOR TARGET POSITIONER AND CONTROL CIRCUIT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Stone, K.F.; Force, R.J.; Olson, W.W.; Cagle, D.S.

    1959-12-15

    An apparatus is described for inserting and retracting a target material with respect to the internal beam of a charged particle accelerator and to circuitry for controlling the timing and motion of the target placement. Two drive coils are mounted on the shaft of a target holder arm and disposed within the accelerator magnetic field with one coil at right angles to the other. Control circuitry alternately connects each coil to a current source and to a varying shorting resistance whereby the coils interchangeably produce driving and braking forces which swing the target arm within a ninety degree arc. The target is thus moved into the beam and away from it at high speeds and is brought to rest after each movement without whiplash or vibration.

  4. Method Accelerates Training Of Some Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Three-layer networks trained faster provided two conditions are satisfied: numbers of neurons in layers are such that majority of work done in synaptic connections between input and hidden layers, and number of neurons in input layer at least as great as number of training pairs of input and output vectors. Based on modified version of back-propagation method.

  5. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination.

  6. Advanced concepts in accelerator timing control

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Salwen, C.

    1988-01-01

    The control system for the Booster accelerator presently under construction at BNL includes a timing section with serial high speed coded data distribution, computer based encoders for both real time and field driven clocks and a method of easily tracking the performance and reliability of these timing streams. We have developed a simple method for the generation of timing which operates to produce pulses which may be repeated as desired with minimal latency.

  7. Modeling of UH-60A Hub Accelerations with Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2002-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, flight test hub accelerations and the corresponding three N/rev pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) are studied. The present quantitative effort on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations considers the lateral and longitudinal vibrations. An earlier study had considered the vertical vibration. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database is used. A physics based "maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)", derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, is used. Fundamentally, the lateral vibration data show high vibration levels (up to 0.3 g's) at low airspeeds (for example, during landing flares) and at high airspeeds (for example, during turns). The results show that the advance ratio and the gross weight together can predict the vertical and the longitudinal vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together cannot predict the lateral vibration. The hub accelerations and the advance ratio can be used to satisfactorily predict the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal vibration. The present study shows that neural network based representations of all three UH-60A pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) can be obtained using the hub accelerations along with the gross weight and the advance ratio. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot vibration. The present conclusions potentially allow for the identification of neural network relationships between the experimental hub accelerations obtained from wind tunnel testing and the experimental pilot vibration data obtained from flight testing. A successful establishment of the above neural network based link between the wind tunnel hub accelerations and the flight test vibration data can increase the value of wind tunnel testing.

  8. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  9. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  11. Accelerated Training for Large Feedforward Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, Slawomir W.; Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new training algorithm, the scaled variable metric (SVM) method. Our approach attempts to increase the convergence rate of the modified variable metric method. It is also combined with the RBackprop algorithm, which computes the product of the matrix of second derivatives (Hessian) with an arbitrary vector. The RBackprop method allows us to avoid computationally expensive, direct line searches. In addition, it can be utilized in the new, 'predictive' updating technique of the inverse Hessian approximation. We have used directional slope testing to adjust the step size and found that this strategy works exceptionally well in conjunction with the Rbackprop algorithm. Some supplementary, but nevertheless important enhancements to the basic training scheme such as improved setting of a scaling factor for the variable metric update and computationally more efficient procedure for updating the inverse Hessian approximation are presented as well. We summarize by comparing the SVM method with four first- and second- order optimization algorithms including a very effective implementation of the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Our tests indicate promising computational speed gains of the new training technique, particularly for large feedforward networks, i.e., for problems where the training process may be the most laborious.

  12. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies thatmore » important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.« less

  13. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  14. Kinematics and Dynamics of Motion Control Based on Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Yuzuru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    The first IEEE International Workshop on Advanced Motion Control was held in 1990 pointed out the importance of physical interpretation of motion control. The software servoing technology is now common in machine tools, robotics, and mechatronics. It has been intensively developed for the numerical control (NC) machines. Recently, motion control in unknown environment will be more and more important. Conventional motion control is not always suitable due to the lack of adaptive capability to the environment. A more sophisticated ability in motion control is necessary for compliant contact with environment. Acceleration control is the key technology of motion control in unknown environment. The acceleration control can make a motion system to be a zero control stiffness system without losing the robustness. Furthermore, a realization of multi-degree-of-freedom motion is necessary for future human assistance. A human assistant motion will require various control stiffness corresponding to the task. The review paper focuses on the modal coordinate system to integrate the various control stiffness in the virtual axes. A bilateral teleoperation is a good candidate to consider the future human assistant motion and integration of decentralized systems. Thus the paper reviews and discusses the bilateral teleoperation from the control stiffness and the modal control design points of view.

  15. Control efficacy of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks.

  16. Control efficacy of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  17. Neural network technique for orbit correction in accelerators/storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors are exploring the use of Neural Networks, using the SNNS simulator, for orbit control in accelerators (primarily circular accelerators) and storage rings. The orbit of the beam in those machines are measured by orbit monitors (input nodes) and controlled by orbit corrector magnets (output nodes). The physical behavior of an accelerator is changing slowly in time. Thus, an adoptive algorithm is necessary. The goal is to have a trained net which will predict the exact corrector strengths which will minimize a measured orbit. The relationship between {open_quotes}kick{close_quotes} from the correctors and {open_quotes}response{close_quotes} from the monitors is in general non-linear and may slowly change during long-term operation of the machine. In the study, several network architectures are examined as well as various training methods for each architecture.

  18. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  19. Reliable timing systems for computer controlled accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Jürgen; Nettleton, Robert

    1986-06-01

    Over the past decade the use of computers has set new standards for control systems of accelerators with ever increasing complexity coupled with stringent reliability criteria. In fact, with very slow cycling machines or storage rings any erratic operation or timing pulse will cause the loss of precious particles and waste hours of time and effort of preparation. Thus, for the CERN linac and LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) timing system reliability becomes a crucial factor in the sense that all components must operate practically without fault for very long periods compared to the effective machine cycle. This has been achieved by careful selection of components and design well below thermal and electrical limits, using error detection and correction where possible, as well as developing "safe" decoding techniques for serial data trains. Further, consistent structuring had to be applied in order to obtain simple and flexible modular configurations with very few components on critical paths and to minimize the exchange of information to synchronize accelerators. In addition, this structuring allows the development of efficient strategies for on-line and off-line fault diagnostics. As a result, the timing system for Linac 2 has, so far, been operating without fault for three years, the one for LEAR more than one year since its final debugging.

  20. Controllability of structural brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function. PMID:26423222

  1. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinhua

    Satellite networks and transmissions find their application in fields of computer communications, telephone communications, television broadcasting, transportation, space situational awareness systems and so on. This thesis mainly focuses on two networking issues affecting satellite networking: network congestion control and network routing optimization. Congestion, which leads to long queueing delays, packet losses or both, is a networking problem that has drawn the attention of many researchers. The goal of congestion control mechanisms is to ensure high bandwidth utilization while avoiding network congestion by regulating the rate at which traffic sources inject packets into a network. In this thesis, we propose a stable congestion controller using data-driven, safe switching control theory to improve the dynamic performance of satellite Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management (TCP/AQM) networks. First, the stable region of the Proportional-Integral (PI) parameters for a nominal model is explored. Then, a PI controller, whose parameters are adaptively tuned by switching among members of a given candidate set, using observed plant data, is presented and compared with some classical AQM policy examples, such as Random Early Detection (RED) and fixed PI control. A new cost detectable switching law with an interval cost function switching algorithm, which improves the performance and also saves the computational cost, is developed and compared with a law commonly used in the switching control literature. Finite-gain stability of the system is proved. A fuzzy logic PI controller is incorporated as a special candidate to achieve good performance at all nominal points with the available set of candidate controllers. Simulations are presented to validate the theory. An effocient routing algorithm plays a key role in optimizing network resources. In this thesis, we briefly analyze Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks, review the Cross Entropy (CE

  2. Linear induction accelerator and pulse forming networks therefor

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, Malcolm T.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities.

  3. Attack Vulnerability of Network Controllability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Controllability of complex networks has attracted much attention, and understanding the robustness of network controllability against potential attacks and failures is of practical significance. In this paper, we systematically investigate the attack vulnerability of network controllability for the canonical model networks as well as the real-world networks subject to attacks on nodes and edges. The attack strategies are selected based on degree and betweenness centralities calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal, among which random failure is as a comparison. It is found that the node-based strategies are often more harmful to the network controllability than the edge-based ones, and so are the recalculated strategies than their counterparts. The Barabási-Albert scale-free model, which has a highly biased structure, proves to be the most vulnerable of the tested model networks. In contrast, the Erdős-Rényi random model, which lacks structural bias, exhibits much better robustness to both node-based and edge-based attacks. We also survey the control robustness of 25 real-world networks, and the numerical results show that most real networks are control robust to random node failures, which has not been observed in the model networks. And the recalculated betweenness-based strategy is the most efficient way to harm the controllability of real-world networks. Besides, we find that the edge degree is not a good quantity to measure the importance of an edge in terms of network controllability. PMID:27588941

  4. Attack Vulnerability of Network Controllability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe-Ming; Li, Xin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Controllability of complex networks has attracted much attention, and understanding the robustness of network controllability against potential attacks and failures is of practical significance. In this paper, we systematically investigate the attack vulnerability of network controllability for the canonical model networks as well as the real-world networks subject to attacks on nodes and edges. The attack strategies are selected based on degree and betweenness centralities calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal, among which random failure is as a comparison. It is found that the node-based strategies are often more harmful to the network controllability than the edge-based ones, and so are the recalculated strategies than their counterparts. The Barabási-Albert scale-free model, which has a highly biased structure, proves to be the most vulnerable of the tested model networks. In contrast, the Erdős-Rényi random model, which lacks structural bias, exhibits much better robustness to both node-based and edge-based attacks. We also survey the control robustness of 25 real-world networks, and the numerical results show that most real networks are control robust to random node failures, which has not been observed in the model networks. And the recalculated betweenness-based strategy is the most efficient way to harm the controllability of real-world networks. Besides, we find that the edge degree is not a good quantity to measure the importance of an edge in terms of network controllability. PMID:27588941

  5. A distributed control system status report of the munich accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, L.; Schnitter, H.

    1999-04-26

    A system of computers connected by a local area network (ARCNET) controls the Munich accelerator facility. This includes ion sources, the tandem accelerator, the beam transport system, the gas handling plant, parts of experimental setup and also an ion source test bench. ARCNET is a deterministic multi-master network with arbitrary topology, using coax cables and optical fibers. Crates with single board computers and I/O-boards (analog, parallel or serial digital), dependent on the devices being controlled, are distributed all over the building. Personal computers serve as user interfaces. The LAN communication protocol is a client/server protocol. Communication language and programming language for the single board computers is Forth. The user mode drivers in the personal computers are also written in Forth. The tools for the operators are MS-Windows applications, programmed in Forth, C++ or Visual Basic. Links to MS-Office applications are available, too.

  6. Accelerator diagnosis and control by Neural Nets

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neural Nets (NN) have been described as a solution looking for a problem. In the last conference, Artificial Intelligence (AI) was considered in the accelerator context. While good for local surveillance and control, its use for large complex systems (LCS) was much more restricted. By contrast, NN provide a good metaphor for LCS. It can be argued that they are logically equivalent to multi-loop feedback/forward control of faulty systems, and therefore provide an ideal adaptive control system. Thus, where AI may be good for maintaining a 'golden orbit,' NN should be good for obtaining it via a quantitative approach to 'look and adjust' methods like operator tweaking which use pattern recognition to deal with hardware and software limitations, inaccuracies or errors as well as imprecise knowledge or understanding of effects like annealing and hysteresis. Further, insights from NN allow one to define feasibility conditions for LCS in terms of design constraints and tolerances. Hardware and software implications are discussed and several LCS of current interest are compared and contrasted. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Applications toolkit for accelerator control and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1997-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has taken a unique approach to creating high-level software applications for accelerator operation and analysis. The approach is based on self-describing data, modular program toolkits, and scripts. Self-describing data provide a communication standard that aids the creation of modular program toolkits by allowing compliant programs to be used in essentially arbitrary combinations. These modular programs can be used as part of an arbitrary number of high-level applications. At APS, a group of about 70 data analysis, manipulation, and display tools is used in concert with about 20 control-system-specific tools to implement applications for commissioning and operations. High-level applications are created using scripts, which are relatively simple interpreted programs. The Tcl/Tk script language is used, allowing creating of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and a library of algorithms that are separate from the interface. This last factor allows greater automation of control by making it easy to take the human out of the loop. Applications of this methodology to operational tasks such as orbit correction, configuration management, and data review will be discussed.

  8. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  9. Status and Future Developments in Large Accelerator Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. White

    2006-10-31

    Over the years, accelerator control systems have evolved from small hardwired systems to complex computer controlled systems with many types of graphical user interfaces and electronic data processing. Today's control systems often include multiple software layers, hundreds of distributed processors, and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. While it is clear that the next generation of accelerators will require much bigger control systems, they will also need better systems. Advances in technology will be needed to ensure the network bandwidth and CPU power can provide reasonable update rates and support the requisite timing systems. Beyond the scaling problem, next generation systems face additional challenges due to growing cyber security threats and the likelihood that some degree of remote development and operation will be required. With a large number of components, the need for high reliability increases and commercial solutions can play a key role towards this goal. Future control systems will operate more complex machines and need to present a well integrated, interoperable set of tools with a high degree of automation. Consistency of data presentation and exception handling will contribute to efficient operations. From the development perspective, engineers will need to provide integrated data management in the beginning of the project and build adaptive software components around a central data repository. This will make the system maintainable and ensure consistency throughout the inevitable changes during the machine lifetime. Additionally, such a large project will require professional project management and disciplined use of well-defined engineering processes. Distributed project teams will make the use of standards, formal requirements and design and configuration control vital. Success in building the control system of the future may hinge on how well we integrate commercial components and learn from best practices used in other industries.

  10. A Microcomputer-Controlled Measurement of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, A. Jared; Stoner, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Describes apparatus and method used to allow rapid and repeated measurement of acceleration of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. Acceleration measurements can be performed in an hour with the apparatus interfaced to a Commodore PET microcomputer. A copy of the BASIC program is available from the authors. (Author/JN)

  11. An accelerated training method for back propagation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective is to provide a training procedure for a feed forward, back propagation neural network which greatly accelerates the training process. A set of orthogonal singular vectors are determined from the input matrix such that the standard deviations of the projections of the input vectors along these singular vectors, as a set, are substantially maximized, thus providing an optimal means of presenting the input data. Novelty exists in the method of extracting from the set of input data, a set of features which can serve to represent the input data in a simplified manner, thus greatly reducing the time/expense to training the system.

  12. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  13. Control of collective network chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Barreto, Ernest; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; So, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of "reduced" ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  14. Control of collective network chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemakers, Alexandre Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of “reduced” ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  15. Secure network for beamline control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, T.; Fukui, T.; Ishii, M.; Furukawa, Y.; Nakatani, T.; Matsushita, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, R.; Ishikawa, T.

    2001-07-01

    In SPring-8, beamline control system is constructed with a highly available distributed network system. The socket based communication protocol is used for the beamline control mainly. Beamline users can control the equipment by sending simple control commands to a server process, which is running on a beamline-managing computer (Ohata et al., SPring-8 beamline control system, ICALEPCS'99, Trieste, Italy, 1999). At the beginning the network was based on the shared topology at all beamlines. Consequently, it has a risk for misapplication of the user's program to access different machines on the network system cross over beamlines. It is serious problem for the SPring-8 beamline control system, because all beamlines controlled with unified software interfaces. We introduced the switching technology and the firewalls to support network access control. Also the virtual networking (VLAN: IEEE 802.1Q) and the gigabit Ethernet technology (IEEE 802.3ab) are introduced. Thus the network security and the reliability are guaranteed at the higher level in SPring-8 beamline.

  16. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  17. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  18. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  19. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  20. Network-Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Hak-Wai; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    1989-01-01

    Algorithm developed for optimal routing of packets of data along links of multilink, multinode digital communication network. Algorithm iterative and converges to cost-optimal assignment independent of initial assignment. Each node connected to other nodes through links, each containing number of two-way channels. Algorithm assigns channels according to message traffic leaving and arriving at each node. Modified to take account of different priorities among packets belonging to different users by using different delay constraints or imposing additional penalties via cost function.

  1. A new LabVIEW-based control system for the Naval Research Laboratory Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J. Jr.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knoll, C.; Kennedy, C. A.; Hubler, G. K.

    1999-06-10

    A new LabVIEW-based control system for the existing tandem accelerator and new AMS components has been implemented at the Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Through the use of Device Interfaces (DIs) distributed along a fiber optic network, virtually every component of the accelerator system can be controlled from any networked computer terminal as well as remotely via modem or the internet. This paper discusses the LabVIEW-based control software, including remote operation, automatic calculation of ion optical component parameters, beam optimization, and data logging and retrieval.

  2. Nonlinear control with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Research results are presented to show the successful industrial application of neural networks in closed loop. Two distillation columns are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of nonlinear controllers. The two columns chosen for this purpose are very dissimilar in operating characteristics, and dynamic behavior. One of the columns is a crude column, and the second, a depropaniser, is a smaller column in a vapor recovery unit. In earlier work, neural networks had been presented as general function estimators, for prediction of stream compositions and the suitability of the various network architectures for this task had been investigated. This report reviews the successful application of neural networks, as feedback controllers, to large industrial distillation columns. 21 refs.

  3. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  4. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics.

  5. NODAL — The second life of the accelerator control language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, G.; Perriollat, F.; Ribeiro, P.; Kagarmanov, A.; Kovaltsov, V.

    1994-12-01

    NODAL has been a popular interpreter language for accelerator controls since the beginning of the 1970s. NODAL has been rewritten in the C language to be easily portable to the different computer platforms which are in use in accelerator controls. The paper describes the major features of this new version of NODAL, the major software packages which are available through this implementation, the platforms on which it is currently running, and some relevant performances. The experience gained during the rejuvenation project of the CERN accelerator control systems is presented. The benefit of this is discussed, in particular in a view of the prevailing strong constraints in personnel and money resources.

  6. Laser-ion acceleration through controlled surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Nees, John A.; He Zhaohan; Easter, James H.; Thomas, Alexander G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl M.; Petrov, George; Davis, Jack

    2011-04-15

    In laser-plasma ion accelerators, control of target contamination layers can lead to selection of accelerated ion species and enhancement of acceleration. To demonstrate this, deuterons up to 75 keV are accelerated from an intense laser interaction with a glass target simply by placing 1 ml of heavy water inside the experimental chamber prior to pumping to generate a deuterated contamination layer on the target. Using the same technique with a deuterated-polystyrene-coated target also enhances deuteron yield by a factor of 3 to 5, while increasing the maximum energy of the generated deuterons to 140 keV.

  7. Accelerating Very Deep Convolutional Networks for Classification and Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Zou, Jianhua; He, Kaiming; Sun, Jian

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to accelerate the test-time computation of convolutional neural networks (CNNs), especially very deep CNNs [1] that have substantially impacted the computer vision community. Unlike previous methods that are designed for approximating linear filters or linear responses, our method takes the nonlinear units into account. We develop an effective solution to the resulting nonlinear optimization problem without the need of stochastic gradient descent (SGD). More importantly, while previous methods mainly focus on optimizing one or two layers, our nonlinear method enables an asymmetric reconstruction that reduces the rapidly accumulated error when multiple (e.g., ≥ 10) layers are approximated. For the widely used very deep VGG-16 model [1] , our method achieves a whole-model speedup of 4 × with merely a 0.3 percent increase of top-5 error in ImageNet classification. Our 4 × accelerated VGG-16 model also shows a graceful accuracy degradation for object detection when plugged into the Fast R-CNN detector [2] . PMID:26599615

  8. Accelerator control system at KEKB and the linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kurashina, Miho; Mikawa, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Satoh, Masanori; Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    KEKB has completed all of the technical milestones and has offered important insights into the flavor structure of elementary particles, especially CP violation. The accelerator control system at KEKB and the injector linac was initiated by a combination of scripting languages at the operation layer and EPICS (experimental physics and industrial control system) at the equipment layer. During the project, many features were implemented to achieve extreme performance from the machine. In particular, the online linkage to the accelerator simulation played an essential role. In order to further improve the reliability and flexibility, two major concepts were additionally introduced later in the project, namely, channel access everywhere and dual-tier controls. Based on the improved control system, a virtual accelerator concept was realized, allowing the single injector linac to serve as three separate injectors to KEKB's high-energy ring, low-energy ring, and Photon Factory, respectively. These control technologies are indispensable for future particle accelerators.

  9. A control network of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Rogers, Patricia G.; Colvin, Tim R.

    1991-01-01

    A control network for Triton has been computed using a bundle-type analytical triangulation program. The network contains 105 points that were measured on 57 Voyager-2 pictures. The adjustment contained 1010 observation equations and 382 normal equations and resulted in a standard measurement error of 13.36 microns. The coordinates of the control points, the camera orientation angles at the times when the pictures were taken, and Triton's mean radius were determined. A separate statistical analysis confirmed Triton's radius to be 1352.6 + or - 2.4 km. Attempts to tie the control network around the satellite were unsuccessful because discontinuities exist in high-resolution coverage between 66 deg and 289 deg longitude, north of 38 deg latitude, and south of 78 deg latitude.

  10. Neural Networks for Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Neural networks are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to permit real-time adaptive control of time varying nonlinear systems, enhance the fault-tolerance of mission hardware, and permit online system reconfiguration. In general, the problem of controlling time varying nonlinear systems with unknown structures has not been solved. Adaptive neural control techniques show considerable promise and are being applied to technical challenges including automated docking of spacecraft, dynamic balancing of the space station centrifuge, online reconfiguration of damaged aircraft, and reducing cost of new air and spacecraft designs. Our experiences have shown that neural network algorithms solved certain problems that conventional control methods have been unable to effectively address. These include damage mitigation in nonlinear reconfiguration flight control, early performance estimation of new aircraft designs, compensation for damaged planetary mission hardware by using redundant manipulator capability, and space sensor platform stabilization. This presentation explored these developments in the context of neural network control theory. The discussion began with an overview of why neural control has proven attractive for NASA application domains. The more important issues in control system development were then discussed with references to significant technical advances in the literature. Examples of how these methods have been applied were given, followed by projections of emerging application needs and directions.

  11. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  12. APPARATUS FOR CONTROL OF HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS

    DOEpatents

    Heard, H.G.

    1961-10-24

    A particle beam positioning control for a synchrotron or the like is described. The control includes means for selectively impressing a sinusoidal perturbation upon the rising voltage utilized to sweep the frequency of the f-m oscillator which is conventionally coupled to the accelerating electrode of a synchrotron. The perturbation produces a variation in the normal rate of change of frequency of the accelerating voltage applied to the accelerating electrode, resulting in an expansion or contraction of the particle beam orbit diameter during the perturbation. The beam may thus be controlled such that a portion strikes a target positioned close to the expanded or contracted orbit diameter and returns to the original orbit for further acceleration to the final energy. (AEC)

  13. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  14. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  15. IPNS Chopper Control and Accelerator Interface Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, G.E.; Donley, L.I.; Rauchas, A.V.; Volk, G.J.; Jung, E.A.; Haumann, J.R.; Pelizzari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Several of the instruments at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne use rotating Fermi choppers. The techniques used to control the speed and phase of these rotating devices are discussed.

  16. The AMSC network control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, William B.

    1990-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) is going to construct, launch, and operate a satellite system in order to provide mobile satellite services to the United States. AMSC is going to build, own, and operate a Network Control System (NCS) for managing the communications usage of the satellites, and to control circuit switched access between mobile earth terminals and feeder-link earth stations. An overview of the major NCS functional and performance requirements, the control system physical architecture, and the logical architecture is provided.

  17. The AMSC network control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, William B.

    The American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) is going to construct, launch, and operate a satellite system in order to provide mobile satellite services to the United States. AMSC is going to build, own, and operate a Network Control System (NCS) for managing the communications usage of the satellites, and to control circuit switched access between mobile earth terminals and feeder-link earth stations. An overview of the major NCS functional and performance requirements, the control system physical architecture, and the logical architecture is provided.

  18. Controllability of the better chosen partial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2016-08-01

    How to control large complex networks is a great challenge. Recent studies have proved that the whole network can be sufficiently steered by injecting control signals into a minimum set of driver nodes, and the minimum numbers of driver nodes for many real networks are high, indicating that it is difficult to control them. For some large natural and technological networks, it is impossible and not feasible to control the full network. For example, in biological networks like large-scale gene regulatory networks it is impossible to control all the genes. This prompts us to explore the question how to choose partial networks that are easy for controlling and important in networked systems. In this work, we propose a method to achieve this goal. By computing the minimum driver nodes densities of the partial networks of Erdös-Rényi (ER) networks, scale-free (SF) networks and 23 real networks, we find that our method performs better than random method that chooses nodes randomly. Moreover, we find that the nodes chosen by our method tend to be the essential elements of the whole systems, via studying the nodes chosen by our method of a real human signaling network and a human protein interaction network and discovering that the chosen nodes from these networks tend to be cancer-associated genes. The implementation of our method shows some interesting connections between the structure and the controllability of networks, improving our understanding of the control principles of complex systems.

  19. Development of a fast voltage control method for electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.; Linardakis, Peter; Tsifakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The concept of a novel fast voltage control loop for tandem electrostatic accelerators is described. This control loop utilises high-frequency components of the ion beam current intercepted by the image slits to generate a correction voltage that is applied to the first few gaps of the low- and high-energy acceleration tubes adjoining the high voltage terminal. New techniques for the direct measurement of the transfer function of an ultra-high impedance structure, such as an electrostatic accelerator, have been developed. For the first time, the transfer function for the fast feedback loop has been measured directly. Slow voltage variations are stabilised with common corona control loop and the relationship between transfer functions for the slow and new fast control loops required for optimum operation is discussed. The main source of terminal voltage instabilities, which are due to variation of the charging current caused by mechanical oscillations of charging chains, has been analysed.

  20. Projection learning algorithm for threshold - controlled neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    The projection learning algorithm proposed in [1, 2] and further developed in [3] substantially improves the efficiency of memorizing information and accelerates the learning process in neural networks. This algorithm is compatible with the completely connected neural network architecture (the Hopfield network [4]), but its application to other networks involves a number of difficulties. The main difficulties include constraints on interconnection structure and the need to eliminate the state uncertainty of latent neurons if such are present in the network. Despite the encouraging preliminary results of [3], further extension of the applications of the projection algorithm therefore remains problematic. In this paper, which is a continuation of the work begun in [3], we consider threshold-controlled neural networks. Networks of this type are quite common. They represent the receptor neuron layers in some neurocomputer designs. A similar structure is observed in the lower divisions of biological sensory systems [5]. In multilayer projection neural networks with lateral interconnections, the neuron layers or parts of these layers may also have the structure of a threshold-controlled completely connected network. Here the thresholds are the potentials delivered through the projection connections from other parts of the network. The extension of the projection algorithm to the class of threshold-controlled networks may accordingly prove to be useful both for extending its technical applications and for better understanding of the operation of the nervous system in living organisms.

  1. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  2. Opinion control in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    In many political elections, the electorate appears to be a composite of partisan and independent voters. Given that partisans are not likely to convert to a different party, an important goal for a political party could be to mobilize independent voters toward the party with the help of strong leadership, mass media, partisans, and the effects of peer-to-peer influence. Based on the exact solution of classical voter model dynamics in the presence of perfectly partisan voters (i.e., zealots), we propose a computational method that uses pinning control strategy to maximize the share of a party in a social network of independent voters. The party, corresponding to the controller or zealots, optimizes the nodes to be controlled given the information about the connectivity of independent voters and the set of nodes that the opposing party controls. We show that controlling hubs is generally a good strategy, but the optimized strategy is even better. The superiority of the optimized strategy is particularly eminent when the independent voters are connected as directed (rather than undirected) networks.

  3. Weight-Control Information Network (WIN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Reducing Childhood Obesity The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of ... here are tips from the Weight-control Information Network (WIN), an information service of the National Institute ...

  4. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-01

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  5. Acceleration and torque feedback for robotic control - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclnroy, John E.; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    Gross motion control of robotic manipulators typically requires significant on-line computations to compensate for nonlinear dynamics due to gravity, Coriolis, centripetal, and friction nonlinearities. One controller proposed by Luo and Saridis avoids these computations by feeding back joint acceleration and torque. This study implements the controller on a Puma 600 robotic manipulator. Joint acceleration measurement is obtained by measuring linear accelerations of each joint, and deriving a computationally efficient transformation from the linear measurements to the angular accelerations. Torque feedback is obtained by using the previous torque sent to the joints. The implementation has stability problems on the Puma 600 due to the extremely high gains inherent in the feedback structure. Since these high gains excite frequency modes in the Puma 600, the algorithm is modified to decrease the gain inherent in the feedback structure. The resulting compensator is stable and insensitive to high frequency unmodeled dynamics. Moreover, a second compensator is proposed which uses acceleration and torque feedback, but still allows nonlinear terms to be fed forward. Thus, by feeding the increment in the easily calculated gravity terms forward, improved responses are obtained. Both proposed compensators are implemented, and the real time results are compared to those obtained with the computed torque algorithm.

  6. Closed-loop control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Barral, S.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Kurzyna, J.; Dudeck, M.

    2011-08-15

    Feedback control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated with a proportional-integral-derivative controller acting on the discharge voltage. The stability of the current is found to systematically improve with proportional control, whereas integral and derivative control have in most cases a detrimental or insignificant impact. At low discharge voltages, proportional control eliminates at the same time ionization breathing oscillations as well as a coexisting low frequency mode. A progressive deterioration of the stability is observed at higher voltage, presumably attributable to the limited output voltage range of the controller. The time-averaged characteristics of the discharge such as average current, thrust and efficiency, remain unchanged within measurement uncertainties.

  7. Neural Network Controlled Visual Saccades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey D.; Grogan, Timothy A.

    1989-03-01

    The paper to be presented will discuss research on a computer vision system controlled by a neural network capable of learning through classical (Pavlovian) conditioning. Through the use of unconditional stimuli (reward and punishment) the system will develop scan patterns of eye saccades necessary to differentiate and recognize members of an input set. By foveating only those portions of the input image that the system has found to be necessary for recognition the drawback of computational explosion as the size of the input image grows is avoided. The model incorporates many features found in animal vision systems, and is governed by understandable and modifiable behavior patterns similar to those reported by Pavlov in his classic study. These behavioral patterns are a result of a neuronal model, used in the network, explicitly designed to reproduce this behavior.

  8. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  9. Topological constraints on network control profiles

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Colin; Ruths, Justin; Ruths, Derek; Shea, Katriona; Albert, Réka

    2015-01-01

    Network models are designed to capture properties of empirical networks and thereby provide insight into the processes that underlie the formation of complex systems. As new information concerning network structure becomes available, it becomes possible to design models that more fully capture the properties of empirical networks. A recent advance in our understanding of network structure is the control profile, which summarizes the structural controllability of a network in terms of source nodes, external dilations, and internal dilations. Here, we consider the topological properties–and their formation mechanisms—that constrain the control profile. We consider five representative empirical categories of internal-dilation dominated networks, and show that the number of source and sink nodes, the form of the in- and out-degree distributions, and local complexity (e.g., cycles) shape the control profile. We evaluate network models that are sufficient to produce realistic control profiles, and conclude that holistic network models should similarly consider these properties. PMID:26691951

  10. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  11. Network Adaptive Deadband: NCS Data Flow Control for Shared Networks

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Cacho, Miguel; Delgado, Emma; Prieto, José A. G.; López, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new middleware solution called Network Adaptive Deadband (NAD) for long time operation of Networked Control Systems (NCS) through the Internet or any shared network based on IP technology. The proposed middleware takes into account the network status and the NCS status, to improve the global system performance and to share more effectively the network by several NCS and sensor/actuator data flows. Relationship between network status and NCS status is solved with a TCP-friendly transport flow control protocol and the deadband concept, relating deadband value and transmission throughput. This creates a deadband-based flow control solution. Simulation and experiments in shared networks show that the implemented network adaptive deadband has better performance than an optimal constant deadband solution in the same circumstances. PMID:23208556

  12. Network Access Control List Situation Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifers, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Network security is a large and complex problem being addressed by multiple communities. Nevertheless, current theories in networking security appear to overestimate network administrators' ability to understand network access control lists (NACLs), providing few context specific user analyses. Consequently, the current research generally seems to…

  13. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  14. Towards MRI-guided linear accelerator control: gating on an MRI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Crijns, S P M; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2011-08-01

    To boost the possibilities of image guidance in radiotherapy by providing images with superior soft-tissue contrast during treatment, we pursue diagnostic quality MRI functionality integrated with a linear accelerator. Large respiration-induced semi-periodic target excursions hamper treatment of cancer of the abdominal organs. Methods to compensate in real time for such motion are gating and tracking. These strategies are most effective in cases where anatomic motion can be visualized directly, which supports the use of an integrated MRI accelerator. We establish here an infrastructure needed to realize gated radiation delivery based on MR feedback and demonstrate its potential as a first step towards more advanced image guidance techniques. The position of a phantom subjected to one-dimensional periodic translation is tracked with the MR scanner. Real-time communication with the MR scanner and control of the radiation beam are established. Based on the time-resolved position of the phantom, gated radiation delivery to the phantom is realized. Dose distributions for dynamic delivery conditions with varying gating windows are recorded on gafchromic film. The similarity between dynamically and statically obtained dose profiles gradually increases as the gating window is decreased. With gating windows of 5 mm, we obtain sharp dose profiles. We validate our gating implementation by comparing measured dose profiles to theoretical profiles calculated using the knowledge of the imposed motion pattern. Excellent correspondence is observed. At the same time, we show that real-time on-line reconstruction of the accumulated dose can be performed using time-resolved target position information. This facilitates plan adaptation not only on a fraction-to-fraction scale but also during one fraction, which is especially valuable in highly accelerated treatment strategies. With the currently established framework and upcoming improvements to our prototype-integrated MRI accelerator

  15. PHOBOS and Deimos control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Callahan, J. D.

    1989-02-01

    Viking Orbiter images of Phobos and Deimos have been measured to establish global control networks for 98 surface features of the former and 53 of the latter; photogrammetric triangulation has yielded body-fixed coordinates of these control-points, as well as mean triaxial radii of 13.3 x 11.1 x 9.3 km for Phobos and 7.5 x 6.2 x 5.4 for Deimos. Expressions are also obtained for the inertial orientations of these bodies' spin axes and prime meridians. While these expressions should be accurate to a few tenths of a deg for the 1971-1980 period, their accuracy will degrade with time as the orbit accuracy degrades.

  16. Phobos and Deimos control networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, Thomas C.; Callahan, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images of Phobos and Deimos have been measured to establish global control networks for 98 surface features of the former and 53 of the latter; photogrammetric triangulation has yielded body-fixed coordinates of these control-points, as well as mean triaxial radii of 13.3 x 11.1 x 9.3 km for Phobos and 7.5 x 6.2 x 5.4 for Deimos. Expressions are also obtained for the inertial orientations of these bodies' spin axes and prime meridians. While these expressions should be accurate to a few tenths of a deg for the 1971-1980 period, their accuracy will degrade with time as the orbit accuracy degrades.

  17. The control network of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1984-08-01

    A control network of the Saturnian satellite Iapetus has been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft. Coordinates of 62 control points have been computed and listed; pixel measurements of these points were made on 14 Voyager 1 and 66 Voyager 2 pictures. Some of these points are identified on the preliminary U.S. Geological Survey map of Iapetus and many are identified by name. The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 pictures covered limited regions of the satellite's surface and contained no overlapping areas. The longitude system on Iapetus is defined by the crater Almeric; the 276 deg meridian passes through the center of this crater. The obliquity of Iapetus has been measured as 0.4 deg + or - 1.6 deg. The mean radius of Iapetus has been determined at 718 + or - 8 km.

  18. The control network of Iapetus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A control network of the Saturnian satellite Iapetus has been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft. Coordinates of 62 control points have been computed and listed; pixel measurements of these points were made on 14 Voyager 1 and 66 Voyager 2 pictures. Some of these points are identified on the preliminary U.S. Geological Survey map of Iapetus and many are identified by name. The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 pictures covered limited regions of the satellite's surface and contained no overlapping areas. The longitude system on Iapetus is defined by the crater Almeric; the 276 deg meridian passes through the center of this crater. The obliquity of Iapetus has been measured as 0.4 deg + or - 1.6 deg. The mean radius of Iapetus has been determined at 718 + or - 8 km.

  19. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  20. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  1. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J.

    1996-04-01

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  2. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  3. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  4. Neuro-fuzzy control of structures using acceleration feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurter, Kyle C.; Roschke, Paul N.

    2001-08-01

    This paper described a new approach for the reduction of environmentally induced vibration in constructed facilities by way of a neuro-fuzzy technique. The new control technique is presented and tested in a numerical study that involves two types of building models. The energy of each building is dissipated through magnetorheological (MR) dampers whose damping properties are continuously updated by a fuzzy controller. This semi-active control scheme relies on the development of a correlation between the accelerations of the building (controller input) and the voltage applied to the MR damper (controller output). This correlation forms the basis for the development of an intelligent neuro-fuzzy control strategy. To establish a context for assessing the effectiveness of the semi-active control scheme, responses to earthquake excitation are compared with passive strategies that have similar authority for control. According to numerical simulation, MR dampers are less effective control mechanisms than passive dampers with respect to a single degree of freedom (DOF) building model. On the other hand, MR dampers are predicted to be superior when used with multiple DOF structures for reduction of lateral acceleration.

  5. An adaptive cryptographic accelerator for network storage security on dynamically reconfigurable platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li; Liu, Jing-Ning; Feng, Dan; Tong, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Existing security solutions in network storage environment perform poorly because cryptographic operations (encryption and decryption) implemented in software can dramatically reduce system performance. In this paper we propose a cryptographic hardware accelerator on dynamically reconfigurable platform for the security of high performance network storage system. We employ a dynamic reconfigurable platform based on a FPGA to implement a PowerPCbased embedded system, which executes cryptographic algorithms. To reduce the reconfiguration latency, we apply prefetch scheduling. Moreover, the processing elements could be dynamically configured to support different cryptographic algorithms according to the request received by the accelerator. In the experiment, we have implemented AES (Rijndael) and 3DES cryptographic algorithms in the reconfigurable accelerator. Our proposed reconfigurable cryptographic accelerator could dramatically increase the performance comparing with the traditional software-based network storage systems.

  6. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  7. Network Monitor and Control of Disruption-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, J. Leigh

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade, NASA and many researchers in the international community have been developing Internet-like protocols that allow for automated network operations in networks where the individual links between nodes are only sporadically connected. A family of Disruption-Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocols has been developed, and many are reaching CCSDS Blue Book status. A NASA version of DTN known as the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) has been flight-tested on the EPOXI spacecraft and ION is currently being tested on the International Space Station. Experience has shown that in order for a DTN service-provider to set up a large scale multi-node network, a number of network monitor and control technologies need to be fielded as well as the basic DTN protocols. The NASA DTN program is developing a standardized means of querying a DTN node to ascertain its operational status, known as the DTN Management Protocol (DTNMP), and the program has developed some prototypes of DTNMP software. While DTNMP is a necessary component, it is not sufficient to accomplish Network Monitor and Control of a DTN network. JPL is developing a suite of tools that provide for network visualization, performance monitoring and ION node control software. This suite of network monitor and control tools complements the GSFC and APL-developed DTN MP software, and the combined package can form the basis for flight operations using DTN.

  8. Neural Network Based Representation of UH-60A Pilot and Hub Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2000-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, experimental hub accelerations and the corresponding pilot floor vertical vibration are studied. The present physics-based, quantitative effort represents an initial systematic study on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database was used. A 'maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)', derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, was used. Three neural network based representation-cases were considered. The pilot floor vertical vibration was considered in the first case and the hub accelerations were separately considered in the second case. The third case considered both the hub accelerations and the pilot floor vertical vibration. Neither the advance ratio nor the gross weight alone could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration over the entire flight envelope. The hub accelerations data were modeled and found to be of very acceptable quality. The hub accelerations alone could not be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. Thus, the hub accelerations alone do not drive the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the hub accelerations, along with either the advance ratio or the gross weight or both, could be used to satisfactorily predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot floor vertical vibration.

  9. G-NetMon: a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. In this work, we explore new opportunities in network traffic monitoring and analysis with GPUs. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  10. Minimum-cost control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Deng, Lei; Tang, Pei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Finding the solution for driving a complex network at the minimum energy cost with a given number of controllers, known as the minimum-cost control problem, is critically important but remains largely open. We propose a projected gradient method to tackle this problem, which works efficiently in both synthetic and real-life networks. The study is then extended to the case where each controller can only be connected to a single network node to have the lowest connection complexity. We obtain the interesting insight that such connections basically avoid high-degree nodes of the network, which is in resonance with recent observations on controllability of complex networks. Our results provide the first technical path to enabling minimum-cost control of complex networks, and contribute new insights to locating the key nodes from a minimum-cost control perspective.

  11. Control of Large-Scale Boolean Networks via Network Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Cheng, Daizhan

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge to solve problems in control of Boolean networks is that the computational cost increases exponentially when the number of nodes in the network increases. We consider the problem of controllability and stabilizability of Boolean control networks, address the increasing cost problem by partitioning the network graph into several subnetworks, and analyze the subnetworks separately. Easily verifiable necessary conditions for controllability and stabilizability are proposed for a general aggregation structure. For acyclic aggregation, we develop a sufficient condition for stabilizability. It dramatically reduces the computational complexity if the number of nodes in each block of the acyclic aggregation is small enough compared with the number of nodes in the entire Boolean network.

  12. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  13. Microprocessor control and data acquisition at the LLNL 100-MeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, M.L.

    1981-05-26

    A distributed microprocessor control and data acquisition network has been designed for implementation on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 100 MeV electron/positron accelerator (LINAC). The system has been designed to be as transparent to the user as possible by stressing responsiveness, reliability, and relevance of data presented to the user. Implementation of the network will take place in modular fashion in three stages, so as to minimize disruption of normal operations. The first elements to be installed will be the beam transport system controls, beam set-up time. Beam diagnostic equipment is now being position monitors, and accelerator operating status monitors. These units will reduce beam set-up time. Beam diagnostic equipment is now being designed that will be used in a second stage implementation. This stage will concentrate on determining beam parameters and allowing the user to optimize the beam for a given parameter. The final stage will be to install experimenter data acquisition equipment. The equipment will augment the presently existing data acquisition system. The completed network will allow a more efficient operation of the LINAC, resulting in reduced experiment costs, and more controllable beam parameters, both of which are major concerns of experimenters.

  14. An Integrated Enterprise Accelerator Database for the SLC Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, Terri E

    2002-08-07

    Since its inception in the early 1980's, the SLC Control System has been driven by a highly structured memory-resident real-time database. While efficient, its rigid structure and file-based sources makes it difficult to maintain and extract relevant information. The goal of transforming the sources for this database into a relational form is to enable it to be part of a Control System Enterprise Database that is an integrated central repository for SLC accelerator device and Control System data with links to other associated databases. We have taken the concepts developed for the NLC Enterprise Database and used them to create and load a relational model of the online SLC Control System database. This database contains data and structure to allow querying and reporting on beamline devices, their associations and parameters. In the future this will be extended to allow generation of EPICS and SLC database files, setup of applications and links to other databases such as accelerator maintenance, archive data, financial and personnel records, cabling information, documentation etc. The database is implemented using Oracle 8i. In the short term it will be updated daily in batch from the online SLC database. In the longer term, it will serve as the primary source for Control System static data, an R&D platform for the NLC, and contribute to SLC Control System operations.

  15. Device Configuration Handler for Accelerator Control Applications at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Bickley; P. Chevtsov; T. Larrieu

    2003-10-01

    The accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab uses hundreds of physical devices with such popular instrument bus interfaces as Industry Pack (IPAC), GPIB, RS-232, etc. To properly handle all these components, control computers (IOCs) must be provided with the correct information about the unique memory addresses of the used interface cards, interrupt numbers (if any), data communication channels and protocols. In these conditions, the registration of a new control device in the control system is not an easy task for software developers. Because the device configuration is distributed, it requires the detailed knowledge about not only the new device but also the configuration of all other devices on the existing system. A configuration handler implemented at Jefferson Lab centralizes the information about all control devices making their registration user-friendly and very easy to use. It consists of a device driver framework and the device registration software developed on the basis of ORACLE database and freely available scripting tools (perl, php).

  16. Ghrelin accelerates synapse formation and activity development in cultured cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While ghrelin was initially related to appetite stimulation and growth hormone secretion, it also has a neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases and regulates cognitive function. The cellular basis of those processes is related to synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin not only stimulates synapse formation in cultured cortical neurons and hippocampal slices, but also alters some of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the hypothalamus, amygdala and other subcortical areas. However, direct evidence for ghrelin’s ability to modulate the activity in cortical neurons is not available yet. In this study, we investigated the effect of acylated ghrelin on the development of the activity level and activity patterns in cortical neurons, in relation to its effect on synaptogenesis. Additionally, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of the receptor for acylated ghrelin – growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a) during development. Results We performed electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry on dissociated cortical cultures from neonates, treated chronically with acylated ghrelin. On average 76 ± 4.6% of the cortical neurons expressed GHSR-1a. Synapse density was found to be much higher in ghrelin treated cultures than in controls across all age groups (1, 2 or 3 weeks). In all cultures (control and ghrelin treated), network activity gradually increased until it reached a maximum after approximately 3 weeks, followed by a slight decrease towards a plateau. During early developmental stages (1–2 weeks), the activity was much higher in ghrelin treated cultures and consequently, they reached the plateau value almost a week earlier than controls. Conclusions Acylated ghrelin leads to earlier network formation and activation in cultured cortical neuronal networks, the latter being a possibly consequence of accelerated synaptogenesis. PMID:24742241

  17. Controllably accelerating and decelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fu; Yu, Weihao; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-11-01

    By solving the (3  +  1)D free-space Schrödinger equation in polar coordinates analytically, we have investigated the propagation of 3D controllably accelerating and decelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian (CAiBG) wave packets, even CAiBG wave packets, odd CAiBG wave packets and the superposition of several CAiBG wave packets in free space. The CAiBG wave packets are constructed with the Airy pulses with initial velocity in temporal domain and the Bessel–Gaussian beams in space domain. Due to the initial velocity on Airy pulses, we can obtain decelerating and accelerating Airy–Bessel–Gaussian wave packets by selecting different initial velocities. Moreover, by superposing several CAiBG wave packets, we can obtain the rotating wave packets.

  18. Congestion control and avoidance for ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Ming

    1997-10-01

    The flow of papers proposing new schemes to cope with congestion in networks continues unabated. In particular as the deployment of ATM networks advances effective congestion control is required to ensure that these networks can effectively provide the wide range of services that they promise. This paper attempts to evaluate whether recently proposed algorithms are likely to be useful in practice using performance simulation and modeling methods. However the performance is very sensitive to the flow control parameters and identifying an appropriate set of parameters is difficult since it depends heavily on the traffic conditions. The aim of this paper described is to broaden the context within which ATM performance is considered, and outline ongoing work in performance evaluation of ATM networks. This paper presents the complete picture for evaluating the properties of congestion control mechanisms including fairness, overhead, data loss and network utilization are described. It is particularly aimed at estimating the effects of recent congestion control schemes for ATM networks.

  19. Centralized surveillance and control of satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzewnicki, S. E.; McBeath, J. W.; Brostrup-Jensen, P.

    Satellite based services and networks are increasing in number. This paper describes how such networks can be operated efficiently using software based systems to do satellite transmission surveillance and remote earth station status, alarm and control monitoring at a centralized operations control center. Arrangements are available to accomplish real time, customer controlled configuration of space segments and earth station equipment. Application of the system elements satellite transmission surveillance, alarm and control central, earth station remote, and customer control terminals - to a number of typical networks is described.

  20. Attitude control of spacecraft using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Krishnan, S.; Singh, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of radial basis function neural networks for adaptive attitude control and momentum management of spacecraft. In the first part of the paper, neural networks are trained to learn from a family of open-loop optimal controls parameterized by the initial states and times-to-go. The trained is then used for closed-loop control. In the second part of the paper, neural networks are used for direct adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled effects and parameter uncertainty. The control and learning laws are derived using the method of Lyapunov.

  1. Interdependent networks: the fragility of control

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Richard G.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in the area of interdependent networks has focused on interactions between two systems of the same type. However, an important and ubiquitous class of systems are those involving monitoring and control, an example of interdependence between processes that are very different. In this Article, we introduce a framework for modelling ‘distributed supervisory control' in the guise of an electrical network supervised by a distributed system of control devices. The system is characterised by degrees of freedom salient to real-world systems— namely, the number of control devices, their inherent reliability, and the topology of the control network. Surprisingly, the behavior of the system depends crucially on the reliability of control devices. When devices are completely reliable, cascade sizes are percolation controlled; the number of devices being the relevant parameter. For unreliable devices, the topology of the control network is important and can dramatically reduce the resilience of the system. PMID:24067404

  2. Introducing a new paradigm for accelerators and large experimental apparatus control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Zani, F.; Bisegni, C.; Di Pirro, G.; Foggetta, L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Stecchi, A.

    2012-11-01

    The integration of web technologies and web services has been, in the recent years, one of the major trends in upgrading and developing distributed control systems for accelerators and large experimental apparatuses. Usually, web technologies have been introduced to complement the control systems with smart add-ons and user friendly services or, for instance, to safely allow access to the control system to users from remote sites. Despite this still narrow spectrum of employment, some software technologies developed for high-performance web services, although originally intended and optimized for these particular applications, deserve some features suggesting a deeper integration in a control system and, eventually, their use to develop some of the control system’s core components. In this paper, we present the conceptual design of a new control system for a particle accelerator and associated machine data acquisition system, based on a synergic combination of a nonrelational key/value database and network distributed object caching. The use of these technologies, to implement respectively continuous data archiving and data distribution between components, brought about the definition of a new control system concept offering a number of interesting features such as a high level of abstraction of services and components and their integration in a framework that can be seen as a comprehensive service provider that both graphical user interface applications and front-end controllers join for accessing and, to some extent, expanding its functionalities.

  3. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  4. Controlled Electron Acceleration in a Plane Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataronis, J. A.; Petržílka, V.; Krlín, L.

    2002-11-01

    Through numerical modeling of the relativistic test particle motion of an ensemble of electrons in a plane laser beam, we show in the present contribution that a significant electron acceleration arises if an additional perpendicularly propagagating transverse laser beam with a randomized phase is present. We also demonstrate that the acceleration rate can be controlled by the power flux intensity of the additional laser beam. The power flux intensity of the additional beam can be typically much lower than the power flux intensity of the main laser beam. In the main laser beam, the electrons perform also a forward oscillating motion because of the effects of the magnetic field intensity of the beam. The acceleration results from the accumulation of the forward electron motion due to phase changes provided by the additional laser beam. For parameters of the PALS^1 device (Prague Asterix Laser System), the attainable electron energy is about 40 MeV in 10^4 wave periods. [2pt] Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by Czech grant GACR 202/00/1217 and USDOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER54398. [2pt] ^1K.Jungwirth et al., Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2495.

  5. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  6. Distributed intelligent control and status networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, Andre; Patel, Manoj

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Network Control Systems Branch (Code 532) has been investigating control and status networking technologies. These emerging technologies use distributed processing over a network to accomplish a particular custom task. These networks consist of small intelligent 'nodes' that perform simple tasks. Containing simple, inexpensive hardware and software, these nodes can be easily developed and maintained. Once networked, the nodes can perform a complex operation without a central host. This type of system provides an alternative to more complex control and status systems which require a central computer. This paper will provide some background and discuss some applications of this technology. It will also demonstrate the suitability of one particular technology for the Space Network (SN) and discuss the prototyping activities of Code 532 utilizing this technology.

  7. Controlling statistical moments of stochastic dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielievtsov, Dmytro; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We consider a general class of stochastic networks and ask which network nodes need to be controlled, and how, to stabilize and switch between desired metastable (target) states in terms of the first and second statistical moments of the system. We first show that it is sufficient to directly interfere with a subset of nodes which can be identified using information about the graph of the network only. Then we develop a suitable method for feedback control which acts on that subset of nodes and preserves the covariance structure of the desired target state. Finally, we demonstrate our theoretical results using a stochastic Hopfield network and a global brain model. Our results are applicable to a variety of (model) networks and further our understanding of the relationship between network structure and collective dynamics for the benefit of effective control.

  8. Controlling statistical moments of stochastic dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Bielievtsov, Dmytro; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We consider a general class of stochastic networks and ask which network nodes need to be controlled, and how, to stabilize and switch between desired metastable (target) states in terms of the first and second statistical moments of the system. We first show that it is sufficient to directly interfere with a subset of nodes which can be identified using information about the graph of the network only. Then we develop a suitable method for feedback control which acts on that subset of nodes and preserves the covariance structure of the desired target state. Finally, we demonstrate our theoretical results using a stochastic Hopfield network and a global brain model. Our results are applicable to a variety of (model) networks and further our understanding of the relationship between network structure and collective dynamics for the benefit of effective control. PMID:27575147

  9. The DARHTAcquisition, Archival, Analysis, And Instrument Control System (DAAAC), And Network Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Rita Denise; Sanchez, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is the world's most advanced weapons test facility. DARHT contains two linear accelerators for producing flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. High-speed electronics and optical instrumentation are used for triggering the accelerators and collecting accelerator data. Efficient and effective diagnostics provide basic information needed to routinely tune the accelerators for peak radiographic performance, and to successfully monitor the accelerators performance. DARHT's server and network infrastructure is a key element in providing shot related data storage and retrieval for successfully executing radiographic experiments. This paper will outline the elaborate Data Acquisition, Archival, Analysis, and Instrument Control System (DAAAC), as well as the server and network infrastructure for both accelerators.

  10. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  11. Distribution of computer functionality for accelerator control at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A set of physical and functional system components and their interconnection protocols have been established for all controls work at the AGS. Portions of these designs were tested as part of enhanced operation of the AGS as a source of polarized protons and additional segments will be implemented during the continuing construction efforts which are adding heavy ion capability to our facility. Included in our efforts are the following computer and control system elements: a broad band local area network, which embodies MODEMS; transmission systems and branch interface units; a hierarchical layer, which performs certain data base and watchdog/alarm functions; a group of work station processors (Apollo's) which perform the function of traditional minicomputer host(s) and a layer, which provides both real time control and standardization functions for accelerator devices and instrumentation. Data base and other accelerator functionality is assigned to the most correct level within our network for both real time performance, long-term utility, and orderly growth.

  12. An artificial intelligence approach to accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Hurd, J.W.; Brown, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment was recently started at LAMPF to evaluate the power and limitations of using artificial intelligence techniques to solve problems in accelerator control and operation. A knowledge base was developed to describe the characteristics and the relationships of the first 30 devices in the LAMPF H+ beam line. Each device was categorized and pertinent attributes for each category defined. Specific values were assigned in the knowledge base to represent each actual device. Relationships between devices are modeled using the artificial intelligence techniques of rules, active values, and object-oriented methods. This symbolic model, built using the Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEE) system, provides a framework for analyzing faults, tutoring trainee operators, and offering suggestions to assist in beam tuning. Based on information provided by the domain expert responsible for tuning this portion of the beam line, additional rules were written to describe how he tunes, how he analyzes what is actually happening, and how he deals with failures. Initial results have shown that artificial intelligence techniques can be a useful adjunct to traditional methods of numerical simulation. Successful and efficient operation of future accelerators may depend on the proper merging of symbolic reasoning and conventional numerical control algorithms.

  13. Controllability of Microbial Contamination in Hydrologic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasi, M. S.; Yeghiazarian, L.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial contamination in surface water networks is highly dynamic and stochastic, and is characterized by high level of spatial and temporal variability. Controlling water contamination is therefore challenging.Ideally, to control contamination in a flow network, one needs to design a management approach whereby the level of contamination can be controlled everywhere at all times, by controlling it at certain locations in the network. This can be viewed as a control problem in which we aim to efficiently drive the system to a desired state by manipulating few input variables. Such problems reduce to i) finding the best control locations in the network that would impact the whole system; and ii) choosing the time-variant inputs at the control locations to achieve the desired state of the system. In this study, we aim to answer questions like "How controllable is microbial contamination in a watershed flow network?" and "Given the network topology, geometry and environmental drivers, what are the best control locations?".

  14. Robust Multiobjective Controllability of Complex Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Gao, Huijun; Du, Wei; Lu, Jianquan; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Kurths, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses robust multiobjective identification of driver nodes in the neuronal network of a cat's brain, in which uncertainties in determination of driver nodes and control gains are considered. A framework for robust multiobjective controllability is proposed by introducing interval uncertainties and optimization algorithms. By appropriate definitions of robust multiobjective controllability, a robust nondominated sorting adaptive differential evolution (NSJaDE) is presented by means of the nondominated sorting mechanism and the adaptive differential evolution (JaDE). The simulation experimental results illustrate the satisfactory performance of NSJaDE for robust multiobjective controllability, in comparison with six statistical methods and two multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs): nondominated sorting genetic algorithms II (NSGA-II) and nondominated sorting composite differential evolution. It is revealed that the existence of uncertainties in choosing driver nodes and designing control gains heavily affects the controllability of neuronal networks. We also unveil that driver nodes play a more drastic role than control gains in robust controllability. The developed NSJaDE and obtained results will shed light on the understanding of robustness in controlling realistic complex networks such as transportation networks, power grid networks, biological networks, etc.

  15. Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  16. Computer control of large accelerators design concepts and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.; Gormley, M.

    1984-05-01

    Unlike most of the specialities treated in this volume, control system design is still an art, not a science. These lectures are an attempt to produce a primer for prospective practitioners of this art. A large modern accelerator requires a comprehensive control system for commissioning, machine studies and day-to-day operation. Faced with the requirement to design a control system for such a machine, the control system architect has a bewildering array of technical devices and techniques at his disposal, and it is our aim in the following chapters to lead him through the characteristics of the problems he will have to face and the practical alternatives available for solving them. We emphasize good system architecture using commercially available hardware and software components, but in addition we discuss the actual control strategies which are to be implemented since it is at the point of deciding what facilities shall be available that the complexity of the control system and its cost are implicitly decided. 19 references.

  17. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  18. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  19. Effect of the accelerating growth of communications networks on their structure.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Mendes, J F

    2001-02-01

    Motivated by data on the evolution of the Internet and World Wide Web we consider scenarios of self-organization of nonlinearly growing networks into free-scale structures. We find that the accelerating growth of networks establishes their structure. For growing networks with preferential linking and increasing density of links, two scenarios are possible. In one of them, the value of the exponent gamma of the distribution of the number of incoming links is between 3/2 and 2. In the other scenario, gamma>2 and the distribution is necessarily nonstationary.

  20. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

  1. Self-Control in Sparsely Coded Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, D. R. C.; Bollé, D.

    1998-03-01

    A complete self-control mechanism is proposed in the dynamics of neural networks through the introduction of a time-dependent threshold, determined in function of both the noise and the pattern activity in the network. Especially for sparsely coded models this mechanism is shown to considerably improve the storage capacity, the basins of attraction, and the mutual information content.

  2. The DPC-2000 advanced control system for the Dynamitron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestler, Bernard A.; Lisanti, Thomas F.

    1993-07-01

    The DPC-2000 is an advanced control system utilizing the latest technology in computer control circuitry and components. Its overall design is modular and technologically advanced to keep up with customer and engineering demands. The full control system is presented as four units. They are the Remote I/O (Input / Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The central processing unit, the heart of the system, executes a high level language program that communicates to the different sub-assemblies through advanced serial and parallel communication lines. All operational parameters of the accelerator are monitored, controlled and corrected at close to 20 times per second. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not have to communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the machine. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. This allows the operator to set up the process parameters by selecting the product identification code from a menu presented on the display screen. All process parameters are printed to report at regular intervals during a process run for later analysis and record keeping.

  3. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  4. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  5. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  6. Tailorable software architectures in the accelerator control system environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejuev, Igor; Kumagai, Akira; Kadokura, Eiichi

    2001-08-01

    Tailoring is further evolution of an application after deployment in order to adapt it to requirements that were not accounted for in the original design. End-user tailorability has been extensively researched in applied computer science from HCl and software engineering perspectives. Tailorability allows coping with flexibility requirements, decreasing maintenance and development costs of software products. In general, dynamic or diverse software requirements constitute the need for implementing end-user tailorability in computer systems. In accelerator physics research the factor of dynamic requirements is especially important, due to frequent software and hardware modifications resulting in correspondingly high upgrade and maintenance costs. In this work we introduce the results of feasibility study on implementing end-user tailorability in the software for accelerator control system, considering the design and implementation of distributed monitoring application for 12 GeV KEK Proton Synchrotron as an example. The software prototypes used in this work are based on a generic tailoring platform (VEDICI), which allows decoupling of tailoring interfaces and runtime components. While representing a reusable application-independent framework, VEDICI can be potentially applied for tailoring of arbitrary compositional Web-based applications.

  7. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Feddema, John T.; Byrne, Raymond H.; Bryan, Jon R.; Harrington, John J.; Gladwell, T. Scott

    2002-01-01

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  8. Fast predictive control of networked energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Frank Fu-Han

    In this thesis we study the optimal control of networked energy systems. Networked energy systems consist of a collection of energy storage nodes and a network of links and inputs which allow energy to be exchanged, injected, or removed from the nodes. The nodes may exchange energy between each other autonomously or via controlled flows between the nodes. Examples of networked systems include building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and networked battery systems. In the building system example, the nodes of the system are rooms which store thermal energy in the air and other elements which have thermal capacity. The rooms transfer energy autonomously through thermal conduction, convection, and radiation. Thermal energy can be injected into or removed from the rooms via conditioned air or slabs. In the case of a networked battery system, the batteries store electrical energy in their chemical cells. The batteries may be electrically linked so that a controller can move electrical charge from one battery to another. Networked energy systems are typically large-scale (contain many states and inputs), affected by uncertain forecasts and disturbances, and require fast computation on cheap embedded platforms. In this thesis, the optimal control technique we study is model predictive control for networked energy systems. Model predictive or receding horizon control is a time-domain optimization-based control technique which uses predictive models of a system to forecast its behavior and minimize a performance cost subject to system constraints. In this thesis we address two primary issues concerning model predictive control for networked energy systems: robustness to uncertainty in forecasts and reducing the complexity of the large-scale optimization problem for use in embedded platforms. The first half of the thesis deals primarily with the efficient computation of robust controllers for dealing with random and adversarial uncertainties in the

  9. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  10. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  11. Structural controllability and controlling centrality of temporal networks.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yujian; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Temporal networks are such networks where nodes and interactions may appear and disappear at various time scales. With the evidence of ubiquity of temporal networks in our economy, nature and society, it's urgent and significant to focus on its structural controllability as well as the corresponding characteristics, which nowadays is still an untouched topic. We develop graphic tools to study the structural controllability as well as its characteristics, identifying the intrinsic mechanism of the ability of individuals in controlling a dynamic and large-scale temporal network. Classifying temporal trees of a temporal network into different types, we give (both upper and lower) analytical bounds of the controlling centrality, which are verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and empirical temporal networks. We find that the positive relationship between aggregated degree and controlling centrality as well as the scale-free distribution of node's controlling centrality are virtually independent of the time scale and types of datasets, meaning the inherent robustness and heterogeneity of the controlling centrality of nodes within temporal networks. PMID:24747676

  12. The control networks of Mimas and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-02-01

    A bundle-type analytical triangulation program is employed to compute control networks for Mimas, whose network encircles the satellite with 110 points measured on 32 Voyager 1 pictures, and Enceladus, whose network does not completely encircle the satellite and contains 71 points measured on 22 Voyager 2 pictures. Many of the control points are identified on illustrations and by name, and their coordinates are presented in tabular form. The analytical triangulation program was used to solve for the mean radii and three principal axes of best-fit ellipsoids. The mean radius of Mimas is 197 + or - 3 km, while that of Enceladus is 251 + or - 5 km.

  13. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network ``mobile'' can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

  14. The control networks of Mimas and Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A bundle-type analytical triangulation program is employed to compute control networks for Mimas, whose network encircles the satellite with 110 points measured on 32 Voyager 1 pictures, and Enceladus, whose network does not completely encircle the satellite and contains 71 points measured on 22 Voyager 2 pictures. Many of the control points are identified on illustrations and by name, and their coordinates are presented in tabular form. The analytical triangulation program was used to solve for the mean radii and three principal axes of best-fit ellipsoids. The mean radius of Mimas is 197 + or - 3 km, while that of Enceladus is 251 + or - 5 km.

  15. The network of global corporate control.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers.

  16. Inferring Network Connectivity by Delayed Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongchuan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a control based approach to topology estimation of networks with elements. This method first drives the network to steady states by a delayed feedback control; then performs structural perturbations for shifting the steady states times; and finally infers the connection topology from the steady states' shifts by matrix inverse algorithm () or -norm convex optimization strategy applicable to estimate the topology of sparse networks from perturbations. We discuss as well some aspects important for applications, such as the topology reconstruction quality and error sources, advantages and disadvantages of the suggested method, and the influence of (control) perturbations, inhomegenity, sparsity, coupling functions, and measurement noise. Some examples of networks with Chua's oscillators are presented to illustrate the reliability of the suggested technique. PMID:21969856

  17. Controlling neural network responsiveness: tradeoffs and constraints.

    PubMed

    Keren, Hanna; Marom, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    In recent years much effort is invested in means to control neural population responses at the whole brain level, within the context of developing advanced medical applications. The tradeoffs and constraints involved, however, remain elusive due to obvious complications entailed by studying whole brain dynamics. Here, we present effective control of response features (probability and latency) of cortical networks in vitro over many hours, and offer this approach as an experimental toy for studying controllability of neural networks in the wider context. Exercising this approach we show that enforcement of stable high activity rates by means of closed loop control may enhance alteration of underlying global input-output relations and activity dependent dispersion of neuronal pair-wise correlations across the network. PMID:24808860

  18. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  19. Epidemic Extinction and Control in Heterogeneous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider epidemic extinction in finite networks with a broad variation in local connectivity. Generalizing the theory of large fluctuations to random networks with a given degree distribution, we are able to predict the most probable, or optimal, paths to extinction in various configurations, including truncated power laws. We find that paths for heterogeneous networks follow a limiting form in which infection first decreases in low-degree nodes, which triggers a rapid extinction in high-degree nodes, and finishes with a residual low-degree extinction. The usefulness of our approach is further demonstrated through optimal control strategies that leverage the dependence of finite-size fluctuations on network topology. Interestingly, we find that the optimal control is a mix of treating both high- and low-degree nodes based on theoretical predictions, in contrast to methods that ignore dynamical fluctuations.

  20. Network control processor for a TDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryadevara, Omkarmurthy; Debettencourt, Thomas J.; Shulman, R. B.

    Two unique aspects of designing a network control processor (NCP) to monitor and control a demand-assigned, time-division multiple-access (TDMA) network are described. The first involves the implementation of redundancy by synchronizing the databases of two geographically remote NCPs. The two sets of databases are kept in synchronization by collecting data on both systems, transferring databases, sending incremental updates, and the parallel updating of databases. A periodic audit compares the checksums of the databases to ensure synchronization. The second aspect involves the use of a tracking algorithm to dynamically reallocate TDMA frame space. This algorithm detects and tracks current and long-term load changes in the network. When some portions of the network are overloaded while others have excess capacity, the algorithm automatically calculates and implements a new burst time plan.

  1. Epidemic Extinction and Control in Heterogeneous Networks.

    PubMed

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira B

    2016-07-01

    We consider epidemic extinction in finite networks with a broad variation in local connectivity. Generalizing the theory of large fluctuations to random networks with a given degree distribution, we are able to predict the most probable, or optimal, paths to extinction in various configurations, including truncated power laws. We find that paths for heterogeneous networks follow a limiting form in which infection first decreases in low-degree nodes, which triggers a rapid extinction in high-degree nodes, and finishes with a residual low-degree extinction. The usefulness of our approach is further demonstrated through optimal control strategies that leverage the dependence of finite-size fluctuations on network topology. Interestingly, we find that the optimal control is a mix of treating both high- and low-degree nodes based on theoretical predictions, in contrast to methods that ignore dynamical fluctuations. PMID:27447531

  2. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  3. Color control of printers by neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji

    1998-07-01

    A method is proposed for solving the mapping problem from the 3D color space to the 4D CMYK space of printer ink signals by means of a neural network. The CIE-L*a*b* color system is used as the device-independent color space. The color reproduction problem is considered as the problem of controlling an unknown static system with four inputs and three outputs. A controller determines the CMYK signals necessary to produce the desired L*a*b* values with a given printer. Our solution method for this control problem is based on a two-phase procedure which eliminates the need for UCR and GCR. The first phase determines a neural network as a model of the given printer, and the second phase determines the combined neural network system by combining the printer model and the controller in such a way that it represents an identity mapping in the L*a*b* color space. Then the network of the controller part realizes the mapping from the L*a*b* space to the CMYK space. Practical algorithms are presented in the form of multilayer feedforward networks. The feasibility of the proposed method is shown in experiments using a dye sublimation printer and an ink jet printer.

  4. The Unified Lunar Control Network 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archinal, Brent A.; Rosiek, Mark R.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Redding, Bonnie L.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents a new general unified lunar control network and lunar topographic model based on a combination of Clementine images and a previous network derived from Earth-based & Apollo photographs, and Mariner 10, & Galileo images. This photogrammetric network solution is the largest planetary control network ever completed. It includes the determination of the 3-D positions of 272,931 points on the lunar surface and the correction of the camera angles for 43,866 Clementine images, using 546,126 tie point measurements. The solution RMS is 20 ?m (= 0.9 pixels) in the image plane, with the largest residual of 6.4 pixels. The explanation given here, along with the accompanying files, comprises the release of the network information and of global lunar digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from the network. A paper that will describe the solution and network in further detail will be submitted to a refereed journal, and will include additional background information, solution details, discussion of accuracy and precision, and explanatory figures.

  5. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean; Kath, William; Motter, Adilson

    2012-02-01

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of critical importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, power system design, and cell reprogramming. These systems have the property that localized perturbations can propagate through the network, causing the system as a whole to change behavior and possibly collapse. We will show how this same mechanism can actually be exploited to prevent such failures and, more generally, control a network's behavior. This strategy is based on counteracting a deleterious perturbation through the judicious application of additional, compensatory perturbations---a prospect recently demonstrated heuristically in metabolic and food-web networks. Here, we introduce a method to identify such compensatory perturbations in general complex networks, under arbitrary constraints that restrict the interventions one can actually implement in real systems. Our method accounts for the full nonlinear time evolution of real complex networks, and in fact capitalizes on this behavior to bring the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Altogether, these results provide a new framework for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of complex networks in various domains.

  6. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  7. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  8. The APS control system network upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K. v.; Leibfritz, D.; McDowell, W. P.

    1999-10-22

    When it was installed,the Advanced Photon Source (APS) control system network was at the state-of-the-art. Different aspects of the system have been reported at previous meetings [1,2]. As loads on the controls network have increased due to newer and faster workstations and front-end computers, we have found performance of the system declining and have implemented an upgraded network. There have been dramatic advances in networking hardware in the last several years. The upgraded APS controls network replaces the original FDDI backbone and shared Ethernet hubs with redundant gigabit uplinks and fully switched 10/100 Ethernet switches with backplane fabrics in excess of 20 Gbits/s (Gbps). The central collapsed backbone FDDI concentrator has been replaced with a Gigabit Ethernet switch with greater than 30 Gbps backplane fabric. Full redundancy of the system has been maintained. This paper will discuss this upgrade and include performance data and performance comparisons with the original network.

  9. Toward controlling perturbations in robotic sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ashis G.; Majumder, Saikat R.

    2014-06-01

    Robotic sensor networks (RSNs), which consist of networks of sensors placed on mobile robots, are being increasingly used for environment monitoring applications. In particular, a lot of work has been done on simultaneous localization and mapping of the robots, and optimal sensor placement for environment state estimation1. The deployment of RSNs, however, remains challenging in harsh environments where the RSNs have to deal with significant perturbations in the forms of wind gusts, turbulent water flows, sand storms, or blizzards that disrupt inter-robot communication and individual robot stability. Hence, there is a need to be able to control such perturbations and bring the networks to desirable states with stable nodes (robots) and minimal operational performance (environment sensing). Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of controlling the non-linear dynamics in other communication networks like emergency management systems and power grids by introducing compensatory perturbations to restore network stability and operation2. In this paper, we develop a computational framework to investigate the usefulness of this approach for RSNs in marine environments. Preliminary analysis shows promising performance and identifies bounds on the original perturbations within which it is possible to control the networks.

  10. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Black, Sherilynn J.; Hultman, Rainbo; Szabo, Steven T.; DeMaio, Kristine D.; Du, Jeanette; Katz, Brittany M.; Feng, Guoping; Covington, Herbert E.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic effect of these approaches. Here we show that direct optogenetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) descending projection neurons in mice engineered to express Chr2 in layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1–Chr2 mice) models an antidepressant-like effect in mice subjected to a forced-swim test. Furthermore, we show that this PFC stimulation induces a long-lasting suppression of anxiety-like behavior (but not conditioned social avoidance) in socially stressed Thy1–Chr2 mice: an effect that is observed >10 d after the last stimulation. Finally, we use optogenetic stimulation and multicircuit recording techniques concurrently in Thy1–Chr2 mice to demonstrate that activation of cortical projection neurons entrains neural oscillatory activity and drives synchrony across limbic brain areas that regulate affect. Importantly, these neural oscillatory changes directly correlate with the temporally precise activation and suppression of limbic unit activity. Together, our findings show that the direct activation of cortical projection systems is sufficient to modulate activity across networks underlying affective regulation. They also suggest that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projection systems may serve as a viable therapeutic strategy for treating affective disorders. PMID:23325249

  11. High-performance control system for a heavy-ion medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, H.D.; Magyary, S.B.; Sah, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    A high performance control system is being designed as part of a heavy ion medical accelerator. The accelerator will be a synchrotron dedicated to clinical and other biomedical uses of heavy ions, and it will deliver fully stripped ions at energies up to 800 MeV/nucleon. A key element in the design of an accelerator which will operate in a hospital environment is to provide a high performance control system. This control system will provide accelerator modeling to facilitate changes in operating mode, provide automatic beam tuning to simplify accelerator operations, and provide diagnostics to enhance reliability. The control system being designed utilizes many microcomputers operating in parallel to collect and transmit data; complex numerical computations are performed by a powerful minicomputer. In order to provide the maximum operational flexibility, the Medical Accelerator control system will be capable of dealing with pulse-to-pulse changes in beam energy and ion species.

  12. [The network of official medicines control laboratories].

    PubMed

    Buchheit, K-H; Wanko, R

    2014-10-01

    Licensing, control and surveillance by competent authorities is the basis for ensuring efficacy, safety and quality of medicines in Europe. The control of the quality of medicines by national control laboratories, known as Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) is an essential step in this process; it encompasses controls before and after granting a marketing authorisation. For certain groups of biomedical medicines (vaccines for human and veterinary use, medicines derived from human plasma) even each batch is controlled before it can be placed on the market. As single OMCLs would not be able to cope with their task, given the large number and diversity of medicines, in 1994 the OMCL network was founded upon initiative of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare, in close collaboration with the Commission of the European Union. Currently 68 OMCLs from 39 countries are part of the network. Prerequisite for the smooth operation of the OMCL network is the harmonisation of the quality management system of the individual OMCLs, based on the ISO 17025 standard, internal guidelines and the European Pharmacopoeia. Compliance with these standards is checked through regular audits, thus creating the basis for mutual recognition of test results. The collaboration in the OMCL network for the surveillance of the medicines market, the official control authority batch release and the fight against counterfeiting and illegal medicines enables OMCLs to keep pace with the developments in the field of medicines and to control the broad spectrum of medicines. In the 20 years since its start, the OMCL network has become a European success story. PMID:25192832

  13. Feedback Controller Design for the Synchronization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan; Liang, Jinling

    2016-09-01

    This brief investigates the partial and complete synchronization of two Boolean control networks (BCNs). Necessary and sufficient conditions for partial and complete synchronization are established by the algebraic representations of logical dynamics. An algorithm is obtained to construct the feedback controller that guarantees the synchronization of master and slave BCNs. Two biological examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  14. Genetic networks controlling retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Chona, Felix R.; Khan, Amna N.; Chan, Chun K.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Hernandez, M. Rosario; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J.; Manly, Kenneth F.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The present study defines genomic loci underlying coordinate changes in gene expression following retinal injury. Methods A group of acute phase genes expressed in diverse nervous system tissues was defined by combining microarray results from injury studies from rat retina, brain, and spinal cord. Genomic loci regulating the brain expression of acute phase genes were identified using a panel of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains. Candidate upstream regulators within a locus were defined using single nucleotide polymorphism databases and promoter motif databases. Results The acute phase response of rat retina, brain, and spinal cord was dominated by transcription factors. Three genomic loci control transcript expression of acute phase genes in brains of BXD RI mouse strains. One locus was identified on chromosome 12 and was highly correlated with the expression of classic acute phase genes. Within the locus we identified the inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2) as a candidate upstream regulator. Id2 was upregulated as an acute phase transcript in injury models of rat retina, brain, and spinal cord. Conclusions We defined a group of transcriptional changes associated with the retinal acute injury response. Using genetic linkage analysis of natural transcript variation, we identified regulatory loci and candidate regulators that control transcript levels of acute phase genes. PMID:16288200

  15. Identification of Interventions to Control Network Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Sahasrabudhe, Sagar; Motter, Adilson

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale crises in financial, social, infrastructure, genetic and ecological networks often result from the spread of disturbances that in isolation would only cause limited damage. Here we present a method to identify and schedule interventions that can mitigate cascading failures in general complex networks. When applied to competition networks, our method shows that the system can often be rescued from global failures through actions that satisfy restrictive constraints typical of real-world conditions. However, under such constraints, interventions that can rescue the system from a propagating cascade exist over specific periods of time that do not always include the early postperturbation period, suggesting that scheduling is critical in the control of network cascades.

  16. Controlling extreme events on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network "mobile" can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  17. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  18. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II accelerator shots

    SciTech Connect

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes.

  19. The Network of Global Corporate Control

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B.; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic “super-entity” that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers. PMID:22046252

  20. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-12

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  1. REAL TIME CONTROL OF URBAN DRAINAGE NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time control (RTC) is a custom-designed, computer-assisted management technology for a specific sewerage network to meet the operational objectives of its collection/conveyance system. RTC can operate in several modes, including a mode that is activated during a wet weather ...

  2. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  3. Distributed control network for optogenetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, G.; Juszczyk, B.; Mankiewicz, L.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays optogenetic experiments are constructed to examine social behavioural relations in groups of animals. A novel concept of implantable device with distributed control network and advanced positioning capabilities is proposed. It is based on wireless energy transfer technology, micro-power radio interface and advanced signal processing.

  4. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  5. Inner structure of capital control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    We study the topological structure of the network of shareholding relationships in the Italian stock market (MIB) and in two US stock markets (NYSE and NASDAQ). The portfolio diversification and the wealth invested on the market by economical agents have been shown in our previous work to have all a power law behavior. However, a further investigation shows that the inner structure of the capital control network are not at all the same across markets. The shareholding network is a weighted graph, therefore we introduce two quantities analogous to in-degree and out-degree for weighted graphs which measure, respectively: the number of effective shareholders of a stock and the number of companies effectively controlled by a single holder. Combining the information carried by the distributions of these two quantities we are able to extract the backbone of each market and we find that while the MIB splits into several separated groups of interest, the US markets is characterized by very large holders sharing control on overlapping subsets of stocks. This method seems promising for the analysis of the topology of capital control networks in general and not only in the stock market.

  6. Advantages and safety features using foundation fieldbus-H1 based instrumentation & control for cryo system in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S.; Haneef, K. K. M.; Jayaram, M. N.; Lalsare, D. K.

    2008-05-01

    Large accelerator programme instrumentation and control for monitoring of large no. of parameters for cryogenic/cooling system. The parameters are Cryo Temperature, Vacuum, He Level and He flow etc. The circumference of the accelerator may vary up to several kilometers. Large size accelerators require huge cabling and hardware. The use of foundation fieldbus based Transmitters for measurement and Control valves field positioners for cryo system shall reduce the cabling, hardware, maintenance and enhance data processing and interoperability. Safety is an important requirement for efficient, trouble free and safe operation of any process industry such as cryo used in accelerators. Instrumentation and Control systems can be developed using Foundation Field Bus. The safety features in foundation field bus system can be achieved by use of intrinsic safe devices, fail safe configuration, minimize the hazard by distribution of control function blocks, short circuit preventers. Apart from above features, the significant cable reduction in the fieldbus system reduces the hazard due to electrical cable fire, which is considered one of the major risk in industry. Further the reliability in fieldbus can be improved by hot stand-by redundant power supply, hot stand-by redundant CPU, hot stand-by redundant network capability and use of link active scheduler.

  7. Controlled drug release from hydrogel nanoparticle networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Gao, Jun; Hu, Zhibing; St John, John V; Ponder, Bill C; Moro, Dan

    2004-02-10

    Monodisperse nanoparticles of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-allylamine (PNIPAM-co-allylamine) and PNIPAM-co-acrylic acid (PNIPAM-co-AA) were synthesized. The close-packed PNIPAM-co-allylamine and PNIPAM-co-AA nanoparticles were converted to three-dimensional gel networks by covalently crosslinking neighboring particles at room temperature and neutral pH using glutaric dialdehyde and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. Controlled release studies were conducted using dextran markers of various molecular weights as model macromolecular drugs. Release was quantified under various physical conditions, including a range of temperatures and dextran molecular weights. Dextran, entrapped in cavities in the nanoparticle network, was released with a rate regulated by their molecular weights and cavity size. No release from a conventional bulk PNIPAM gel, with high crosslinking density, was observed. The rate of release from the PNIPAM-co-allylamine network was temperature-dependent, being much faster at room temperature than that at human body temperature. In contrast, release of low molecular weight dextrans from the PNIPAM-co-AA network showed a temperature-independent release profile. These nanoparticle networks have several advantages over conventional bulk gels for controlling the release of high molecular weight biomolecules. PMID:14744482

  8. 49 CFR 571.124 - Standard No. 124; Accelerator control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the driver removes the actuating force from the accelerator control, or in the event of a severance or... and injuries resulting from engine overspeed caused by malfunctions in the accelerator control system. S3. Application. This standard applies to passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles,...

  9. Measurement of performance using acceleration control and pulse control in simulated spacecraft docking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Nine commercial airline pilots served as test subjects in a study to compare acceleration control with pulse control in simulated spacecraft maneuvers. Simulated remote dockings of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station were initiated from 50, 100, and 150 meters along the station's -V-bar (minus velocity vector). All unsuccessful missions were reflown. Five way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) with one between factor, first mode, and four within factors (mode, bloch, range, and trial) were performed on the data. Recorded performance measures included mission duration and fuel consumption along each of the three coordinate axes. Mission duration was lower with pulse mode, while delta V (fuel consumption) was lower with acceleration mode. Subjects used more fuel to travel faster with pulse mode than with acceleration mode. Mission duration, delta V, X delta V, Y delta V., and Z delta V all increased with range. Subjects commanded the OMV to 'fly' at faster rates from further distances. These higher average velocities were paid for with increased fuel consumption. Asymmetrical transfer was found in that the mode transitions could not be predicted solely from the mission duration main effect. More testing is advised to understand the manual control aspects of spaceflight maneuvers better.

  10. Flexible body control using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported on the control of Control Structures Interaction suitcase demonstrator (a flexible structure) using neural networks and fuzzy logic. It is concluded that while control by neural nets alone (i.e., allowing the net to design a controller with no human intervention) has yielded less than optimal results, the neural net trained to emulate the existing fuzzy logic controller does produce acceptible system responses for the initial conditions examined. Also, a neural net was found to be very successful in performing the emulation step necessary for the anticipatory fuzzy controller for the CSI suitcase demonstrator. The fuzzy neural hybrid, which exhibits good robustness and noise rejection properties, shows promise as a controller for practical flexible systems, and should be further evaluated.

  11. Network control architecture for solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, Alfred D.; Morgan, Fritz

    2001-12-01

    At the current time most of the attention in the solid-state lighting field has been placed on the blue and white light emitting diodes (LEDs). It has and will continue to be extremely important to concentrate on increasing the efficiencies of these devices. However, one of the most overlooked benefits of LEDs is that they are intrinsically simple to control. In this paper, the authors will discuss a technology that is currently being developed to enable fixtures incorporating LED light engines to be connected to a digital lighting network. A description of such a network enabling device and the results from a technology demonstration of a prototype system are provided.

  12. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  13. Estimation of Respiration Rate from Three-Dimensional Acceleration Data Based on Body Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guan-Zheng; Guo, Yan-Wei; Zhu, Qing-Song; Huang, Bang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory monitoring is widely used in clinical and healthcare practice to detect abnormal cardiopulmonary function during ordinary and routine activities. There are several approaches to estimate respiratory rate, including accelerometer(s) worn on the torso that are capable of sensing the inclination changes due to breathing. In this article, we present an adaptive band-pass filtering method combined with principal component analysis to derive the respiratory rate from three-dimensional acceleration data, using a body sensor network platform previously developed by us. In situ experiments with 12 subjects indicated that our method was capable of offering dynamic respiration rate estimation during various body activities such as sitting, walking, running, and sleeping. The experimental studies also suggested that our frequency spectrum-based method was more robust, resilient to motion artifact, and therefore outperformed those algorithms primarily based on spatial acceleration information. PMID:22035321

  14. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  15. Feasibility of Using Neural Network Models to Accelerate the Testing of Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Verification testing is an important aspect of the design process for mechanical mechanisms, and full-scale, full-length life testing is typically used to qualify any new component for use in space. However, as the required life specification is increased, full-length life tests become more costly and lengthen the development time. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, we theorized that neural network systems may be able to model the operation of a mechanical device. If so, the resulting neural network models could simulate long-term mechanical testing with data from a short-term test. This combination of computer modeling and short-term mechanical testing could then be used to verify the reliability of mechanical systems, thereby eliminating the costs associated with long-term testing. Neural network models could also enable designers to predict the performance of mechanisms at the conceptual design stage by entering the critical parameters as input and running the model to predict performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using neural networks to predict the performance and life of mechanical systems. To do this, we generated a neural network system to model wear obtained from three accelerated testing devices: 1) A pin-on-disk tribometer; 2) A line-contact rub-shoe tribometer; 3) A four-ball tribometer.

  16. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  17. Evolution of Controllability in Interbank Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpini, Danilo; Battiston, Stefano; Riccaboni, Massimo; Gabbi, Giampaolo; Pammolli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2013-04-01

    The Statistical Physics of Complex Networks has recently provided new theoretical tools for policy makers. Here we extend the notion of network controllability to detect the financial institutions, i.e. the drivers, that are most crucial to the functioning of an interbank market. The system we investigate is a paradigmatic case study for complex networks since it undergoes dramatic structural changes over time and links among nodes can be observed at several time scales. We find a scale-free decay of the fraction of drivers with increasing time resolution, implying that policies have to be adjusted to the time scales in order to be effective. Moreover, drivers are often not the most highly connected ``hub'' institutions, nor the largest lenders, contrary to the results of other studies. Our findings contribute quantitative indicators which can support regulators in developing more effective supervision and intervention policies.

  18. Evolution of Controllability in Interbank Networks

    PubMed Central

    Delpini, Danilo; Battiston, Stefano; Riccaboni, Massimo; Gabbi, Giampaolo; Pammolli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The Statistical Physics of Complex Networks has recently provided new theoretical tools for policy makers. Here we extend the notion of network controllability to detect the financial institutions, i.e. the drivers, that are most crucial to the functioning of an interbank market. The system we investigate is a paradigmatic case study for complex networks since it undergoes dramatic structural changes over time and links among nodes can be observed at several time scales. We find a scale-free decay of the fraction of drivers with increasing time resolution, implying that policies have to be adjusted to the time scales in order to be effective. Moreover, drivers are often not the most highly connected “hub” institutions, nor the largest lenders, contrary to the results of other studies. Our findings contribute quantitative indicators which can support regulators in developing more effective supervision and intervention policies. PMID:23568033

  19. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  20. Neural Networks for Signal Processing and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselroth, Ted Daniel

    Neural networks are developed for controlling a robot-arm and camera system and for processing images. The networks are based upon computational schemes that may be found in the brain. In the first network, a neural map algorithm is employed to control a five-joint pneumatic robot arm and gripper through feedback from two video cameras. The pneumatically driven robot arm employed shares essential mechanical characteristics with skeletal muscle systems. To control the position of the arm, 200 neurons formed a network representing the three-dimensional workspace embedded in a four-dimensional system of coordinates from the two cameras, and learned a set of pressures corresponding to the end effector positions, as well as a set of Jacobian matrices for interpolating between these positions. Because of the properties of the rubber-tube actuators of the arm, the position as a function of supplied pressure is nonlinear, nonseparable, and exhibits hysteresis. Nevertheless, through the neural network learning algorithm the position could be controlled to an accuracy of about one pixel (~3 mm) after two hundred learning steps. Applications of repeated corrections in each step via the Jacobian matrices leads to a very robust control algorithm since the Jacobians learned by the network have to satisfy the weak requirement that they yield a reduction of the distance between gripper and target. The second network is proposed as a model for the mammalian vision system in which backward connections from the primary visual cortex (V1) to the lateral geniculate nucleus play a key role. The application of hebbian learning to the forward and backward connections causes the formation of receptive fields which are sensitive to edges, bars, and spatial frequencies of preferred orientations. The receptive fields are learned in such a way as to maximize the rate of transfer of information from the LGN to V1. Orientational preferences are organized into a feature map in the primary visual

  1. Optimizing the controllability of arbitrary networks with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to optimize networks' controllability has become a common and urgent problem. In this paper, we develop an efficient genetic algorithm oriented optimization tool to optimize the controllability of arbitrary networks consisting of both state nodes and control nodes under Popov-Belevitch-Hautus rank condition. The experimental results on a number of benchmark networks show the effectiveness of this method and the evolution of network topology is captured. Furthermore, we explore how network structure affects its controllability and find that the sparser a network is, the more control nodes are needed to control it and the larger the differences between node degrees, the more control nodes are needed to achieve the full control. Our framework provides an alternative to controllability optimization and can be applied to arbitrary networks without any limitations.

  2. Parallel processing data network of master and slave transputers controlled by a serial control network

    DOEpatents

    Crosetto, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    The present device provides for a dynamically configurable communication network having a multi-processor parallel processing system having a serial communication network and a high speed parallel communication network. The serial communication network is used to disseminate commands from a master processor to a plurality of slave processors to effect communication protocol, to control transmission of high density data among nodes and to monitor each slave processor`s status. The high speed parallel processing network is used to effect the transmission of high density data among nodes in the parallel processing system. Each node comprises a transputer, a digital signal processor, a parallel transfer controller, and two three-port memory devices. A communication switch within each node connects it to a fast parallel hardware channel through which all high density data arrives or leaves the node. 6 figs.

  3. Parallel processing data network of master and slave transputers controlled by a serial control network

    DOEpatents

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1996-01-01

    The present device provides for a dynamically configurable communication network having a multi-processor parallel processing system having a serial communication network and a high speed parallel communication network. The serial communication network is used to disseminate commands from a master processor (100) to a plurality of slave processors (200) to effect communication protocol, to control transmission of high density data among nodes and to monitor each slave processor's status. The high speed parallel processing network is used to effect the transmission of high density data among nodes in the parallel processing system. Each node comprises a transputer (104), a digital signal processor (114), a parallel transfer controller (106), and two three-port memory devices. A communication switch (108) within each node (100) connects it to a fast parallel hardware channel (70) through which all high density data arrives or leaves the node.

  4. Accelerated aging of extruded dielectric power cables. Part 1; Control and monitoring methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.S.; Smith, J.T. III ); Thue, W.A. )

    1992-04-01

    In accelerated cable life testing of power cables, cable samples are usually subjected to elevated voltages and temperatures in the presence of water in order to promote aging of the insulation and premature failures through the treeing mechanism. Failure to accurately control and monitor these accelerating facts can have adverse effects on test results and can lead to erroneous conclusions. In this paper, a new and improved accelerated cable life test is described. Through the use of programmable logic controllers (PLCs), very precise and consistent control of the accelerated aging process has been achieved. A computer has been utilized to make continuous real-time data acquisition and storage to key operating parameters possible. This precise control of monitoring methodology has permitted the study of the synergistic effects of voltage and temperature on the accelerated aging of full-sized cables in the laboratory.

  5. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  6. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  7. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors.

  8. Dynamic congestion control mechanisms for MPLS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, Felicia; Phillips, Chris I.

    2001-02-01

    Considerable interest has arisen in congestion control through traffic engineering from the knowledge that although sensible provisioning of the network infrastructure is needed, together with sufficient underlying capacity, these are not sufficient to deliver the Quality of Service required for new applications. This is due to dynamic variations in load. In operational Internet Protocol (IP) networks, it has been difficult to incorporate effective traffic engineering due to the limited capabilities of the IP technology. In principle, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), which is a connection-oriented label swapping technology, offers new possibilities in addressing the limitations by allowing the operator to use sophisticated traffic control mechanisms. This paper presents a novel scheme to dynamically manage traffic flows through the network by re-balancing streams during periods of congestion. It proposes management-based algorithms that will allow label switched routers within the network to utilize mechanisms within MPLS to indicate when flows are starting to experience frame/packet loss and then to react accordingly. Based upon knowledge of the customer's Service Level Agreement, together with instantaneous flow information, the label edge routers can then instigate changes to the LSP route and circumvent congestion that would hitherto violate the customer contacts.

  9. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating physiological systems modeling based on Laguerre-Volterra networks.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kostoglou, Kyriaki; Mitsis, Georgios D; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    The use of a GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in biomedical engineering and biology-related applications have shown promising results. GPU acceleration can be used to speedup computation-intensive models, such as the mathematical modeling of biological systems, which often requires the use of nonlinear modeling approaches with a large number of free parameters. In this context, we developed a CUDA-enabled version of a model which implements a nonlinear identification approach that combines basis expansions and polynomial-type networks, termed Laguerre-Volterra networks and can be used in diverse biological applications. The proposed software implementation uses the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the aforementioned modeling approach to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The initial results of the GPU-based model presented in this work, show performance improvements over the original MATLAB model. PMID:26736993

  10. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    PubMed Central

    Beske, Phillip H.; Scheeler, Stephen M.; Adler, Michael; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well-understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ pre-synaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT. PMID:25954159

  11. Parietal network underlying movement control: disturbances during subcortical electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Almairac, Fabien; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of brain movement control has changed over the last two decades. Recent findings in the monkey and in humans have led to a parallel and interconnected network. Nevertheless, little is known about these networks. Here, we present two cases of patients with a parietal low-grade glioma. They underwent surgery under local anesthesia with cortical and subcortical mapping. For patient 1, subcortical electrostimulation immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced movement disorders, with an inhibition of leg and arm movements medially and, more laterally, an acceleration of arm movement. For patient 2, electrostimulation of white matter immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced an inhibition of both arm movement. It means that the detected fibers in the parietal lobe may be involved in the motor control modulation. They are distributed veil-like immediately posterior to thalamocortical pathways and could correspond to a fronto-parietal movement control subnetwork. These two cases highlight the major role of the subcortical connectivity in movement regulation, involving parietal lobe, thus the necessity to be identified and preserved during brain surgery.

  12. Energy shaping non-linear acceleration control for a pendulum-type mobility and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kazuto; Takahashi, Masaki

    2015-02-01

    A dynamics-based non-linear controller with energy shaping to accelerate a pendulum-type mobility is proposed. The concept of this study is to control translational acceleration of the vehicle in a dynamically reasonable manner. The body angle is controlled to maintain a reference state where the vehicle is statically unstable but dynamically stable, which leads to a constant translational acceleration due to instability of the system. The accelerating motion is like a sprinter moving from crouch start and it fully exploits dynamics of the vehicle. To achieve it, the total energy of the system is shaped to have the minimum at a given reference state and the system is controlled to converge to it. The controller can achieve various properties through the energy shaping procedure. Especially, an energy function that will lead to safe operation of the vehicle is proposed. The effectiveness of the controller is verified in simulations and experiments.

  13. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication. PMID:27562484

  14. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  15. Evolution on neutral networks accelerates the ticking rate of the molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Manrubia, Susanna; Cuesta, José A

    2015-01-01

    Large sets of genotypes give rise to the same phenotype, because phenotypic expression is highly redundant. Accordingly, a population can accept mutations without altering its phenotype, as long as the genotype mutates into another one on the same set. By linking every pair of genotypes that are mutually accessible through mutation, genotypes organize themselves into neutral networks (NNs). These networks are known to be heterogeneous and assortative, and these properties affect the evolutionary dynamics of the population. By studying the dynamics of populations on NNs with arbitrary topology, we analyse the effect of assortativity, of NN (phenotype) fitness and of network size. We find that the probability that the population leaves the network is smaller the longer the time spent on it. This progressive 'phenotypic entrapment' entails a systematic increase in the overdispersion of the process with time and an acceleration in the fixation rate of neutral mutations. We also quantify the variation of these effects with the size of the phenotype and with its fitness relative to that of neighbouring alternatives.

  16. Microturbine control based on fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shijie; Bian, Chunyuan; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2006-11-01

    As microturbine generator (MTG) is a clean, efficient, low cost and reliable energy supply system. From outside characteristics of MTG, it is multi-variable, time-varying and coupling system, so it is difficult to be identified on-line and conventional control law adopted before cannot achieve desirable result. A novel fuzzy-neural networks (FNN) control algorithm was proposed in combining with the conventional PID control. In the paper, IF-THEN rules for tuning were applied by a first-order Sugeno fuzzy model with seven fuzzy rules and the membership function was given as the continuous GAUSSIAN function. Some sample data were utilized to train FNN. Through adjusting shape of membership function and weight continually, objective of auto-tuning fuzzy-rules can be achieved. The FNN algorithm had been applied to "100kW Microturbine control and power converter system". The results of simulation and experiment are shown that the algorithm can work very well.

  17. Neural networks as a control methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    While conventional computers must be programmed in a logical fashion by a person who thoroughly understands the task to be performed, the motivation behind neural networks is to develop machines which can train themselves to perform tasks, using available information about desired system behavior and learning from experience. There are three goals of this fellowship program: (1) to evaluate various neural net methods and generate computer software to implement those deemed most promising on a personal computer equipped with Matlab; (2) to evaluate methods currently in the professional literature for system control using neural nets to choose those most applicable to control of flexible structures; and (3) to apply the control strategies chosen in (2) to a computer simulation of a test article, the Control Structures Interaction Suitcase Demonstrator, which is a portable system consisting of a small flexible beam driven by a torque motor and mounted on springs tuned to the first flexible mode of the beam. Results of each are discussed.

  18. Neural networks for LED color control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashdown, Ian E.

    2004-01-01

    The design and implementation of an architectural dimming control for multicolor LED-based lighting fixtures is complicated by the need to maintain a consistent color balance under a wide variety of operating conditions. Factors to consider include nonlinear relationships between luminous flux intensity and drive current, junction temperature dependencies, LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters, device aging characteristics, variations in color sensor spectral responsitivities, and the approximations introduced by linear color space models. In this paper we formulate this problem as a nonlinear multidimensional function, where maintaining a consistent color balance is equivalent to determining the hyperplane representing constant chromaticity. To be useful for an architectural dimming control design, this determination must be made in real time as the lighting fixture intensity is adjusted. Further, the LED drive current must be continuously adjusted in response to color sensor inputs to maintain constant chromaticity for a given intensity setting. Neural networks are known to be universal approximators capable of representing any continuously differentiable bounded function. We therefore use a radial basis function neural network to represent the multidimensional function and provide the feedback signals needed to maintain constant chromaticity. The network can be trained on the factory floor using individual device measurements such as spectral radiant intensity and color sensor characteristics. This provides a flexible solution that is mostly independent of LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters.

  19. The 1982 control network of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to a planet-wide control network of Mars that was computed in September 1982 using a large single-block analytical triangulation with 47,524 measurements of 6853 control points on 1054 Mariner 9 and 757 Viking pictures. In all, 19,139 normal equations were solved, with a resulting standard error of measurement of 18.06 microns. The control points identified by name and letter designation are given, as are the aerographic coordinates of the control points. In addition, the coordinates of the Viking I lander site are given: latitude, 22.480 deg; longitude, 47.962 deg (radius, 3389.32 km). This study expands and updates the previously published network (1978). It is noted that the computation differs in many respects from standard aerial mapping photogrammetric practice. In comparison with aerial mapping photography, the television formats are small and the focal lengths are long; stereo coverage is rare, the scale of the pictures varies greatly, and the residual camera distortions are large.

  20. Optimising Control of Disease Spread on Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, B.; Kleczkowski, A.; Gilligan, C. A.

    2005-05-01

    We consider models for control of epidemics on local, global, small-world and scale-free networks, with only partial information accessible about the status of individuals and their connections. The effectiveness of local (e.g. ring vaccination or culling) versus global (e.g. random vaccination) control measures is evaluated, with the aim of minimising the total cost of an epidemic. The costs include direct costs of treating infected individuals as well as costs of treatment. We first consider a random (global) vaccination strategy designed to stop any potential outbreak. We show that if the costs of the preventive vaccination are ignored, the optimal strategy is to vaccinate the whole population, although most of the resources are wasted on preventing a small number of cases. If the vaccination costs are included, or if a local strategy (within a certain neighbourhood of a symptomatic individual) is chosen, there is an optimum number of treated individuals. Inclusion of non-local contacts (``small-worlds'' or scale-free networks) increases the levels of preventive (random) vaccination and radius of local treatment necessary for stopping the outbreak at a minimal cost. The number of initial foci also influences our choice of optimal strategy. The size of epidemics and the number of treated individuals increase for outbreaks that are initiated from a larger number of initial foci, but the optimal radius of local control actually decreases. The results are important for designing control strategies based on cost effectiveness.

  1. End-to-End Flow Control Using PI Controller for Servo Control over Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Daisuke; Kubo, Ryogo; Yakoh, Takahiro; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This paper presents a novel flow control method using a PI controller for servo control over networks. The UDP is known to be effective for motion control systems over networks such as bilateral teleoperation. However, UDP does not have a mechanism for congestion avoidance. The congestion, which causes large communication delay, jitter, and packet loss, deteriorates the performance and stability of control systems over networks. To avoid this congestion, a novel flow control method, which adjusts a packet-sending period in real time, is proposed. The validity of the proposed method is shown by simulation and experimental results.

  2. A comprehensive Network Security Risk Model for process control networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew H; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2009-02-01

    The risk of cyber attacks on process control networks (PCN) is receiving significant attention due to the potentially catastrophic extent to which PCN failures can damage the infrastructures and commodity flows that they support. Risk management addresses the coupled problems of (1) reducing the likelihood that cyber attacks would succeed in disrupting PCN operation and (2) reducing the severity of consequences in the event of PCN failure or manipulation. The Network Security Risk Model (NSRM) developed in this article provides a means of evaluating the efficacy of candidate risk management policies by modeling the baseline risk and assessing expectations of risk after the implementation of candidate measures. Where existing risk models fall short of providing adequate insight into the efficacy of candidate risk management policies due to shortcomings in their structure or formulation, the NSRM provides model structure and an associated modeling methodology that captures the relevant dynamics of cyber attacks on PCN for risk analysis. This article develops the NSRM in detail in the context of an illustrative example.

  3. A comprehensive Network Security Risk Model for process control networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew H; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2009-02-01

    The risk of cyber attacks on process control networks (PCN) is receiving significant attention due to the potentially catastrophic extent to which PCN failures can damage the infrastructures and commodity flows that they support. Risk management addresses the coupled problems of (1) reducing the likelihood that cyber attacks would succeed in disrupting PCN operation and (2) reducing the severity of consequences in the event of PCN failure or manipulation. The Network Security Risk Model (NSRM) developed in this article provides a means of evaluating the efficacy of candidate risk management policies by modeling the baseline risk and assessing expectations of risk after the implementation of candidate measures. Where existing risk models fall short of providing adequate insight into the efficacy of candidate risk management policies due to shortcomings in their structure or formulation, the NSRM provides model structure and an associated modeling methodology that captures the relevant dynamics of cyber attacks on PCN for risk analysis. This article develops the NSRM in detail in the context of an illustrative example. PMID:19000078

  4. The control network of Mars: April 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Rogers, Patricia G.

    1991-01-01

    The modern geodetic control network of Mars was first established based on Mariner 9 images with 1-2 km/pixel resolutions and covered almost the entire Martian surface. The introduction of higher resolution (10-200 meter/pixel) Viking Orbiter images greatly improved the accuracy and density of points in the control network. Analysis of the Viking Lander radio tracking data led to more accurate measurements of Mars' rotation period, spin axis direction, and the lander coordinates relative to the inertial reference frame. The prime meridian on Mars was defined by the Geodesy/Cartography Group of the Mariner 9 Television Team as the crater Airy-0, located about 5 degrees south of the equator. The Viking 1 Lander site was identified on a high resolution Viking frame. The control point measurements form the basis of a least squares solution determined by analytical triangulation after the pixel measurements are corrected for geometric distortions and converted to millimeter coordinates in the camera focal plane. Photogrammetric strips encircling Mars at the equator and at 60 degree north south were used to strengthen the overall net and improve the accuracy of the coordinates of points. In addition, photogrammetric strips along 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees longitude to the Viking 1 Lander site have all significantly strengthened the control network. Most recently, photogrammetric strips were added to the net along 30 degrees north latitude between 0 and 180 degrees, and along 30 degrees between 180 and 360 degrees. The Viking 1 Lander site and Airy-0 are linked through photogrammetric strips occurring along the 0 degree meridian from Airy-0 to 65 degrees north, from that point through the Viking 1 Lander site to the equator, and along the equator to 180 degrees longitude. The Viking 1 lander site is thus a well calibrated area with coordinates of points accurate to approximately 200 meters relative to the J2000 inertial coordinate system. This will be a useful

  5. UGV: security analysis of subsystem control network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott-McCune, Sam; Kobezak, Philip; Tront, Joseph; Marchany, Randy; Wicks, Al

    2013-05-01

    Unmanned Ground vehicles (UGVs) are becoming prolific in the heterogeneous superset of robotic platforms. The sensors which provide odometry, localization, perception, and vehicle diagnostics are fused to give the robotic platform a sense of the environment it is traversing. The automotive industry CAN bus has dominated the industry due to the fault tolerance and the message structure allowing high priority messages to reach the desired node in a real time environment. UGVs are being researched and produced at an accelerated rate to preform arduous, repetitive, and dangerous missions that are associated with a military action in a protracted conflict. The technology and applications of the research will inevitably be turned into dual-use platforms to aid civil agencies in the performance of their various operations. Our motivation is security of the holistic system; however as subsystems are outsourced in the design, the overall security of the system may be diminished. We will focus on the CAN bus topology and the vulnerabilities introduced in UGVs and recognizable security vulnerabilities that are inherent in the communications architecture. We will show how data can be extracted from an add-on CAN bus that can be customized to monitor subsystems. The information can be altered or spoofed to force the vehicle to exhibit unwanted actions or render the UGV unusable for the designed mission. The military relies heavily on technology to maintain information dominance, and the security of the information introduced onto the network by UGVs must be safeguarded from vulnerabilities that can be exploited.

  6. Neural network-based finite horizon stochastic optimal control design for nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    The stochastic optimal control of nonlinear networked control systems (NNCSs) using neuro-dynamic programming (NDP) over a finite time horizon is a challenging problem due to terminal constraints, system uncertainties, and unknown network imperfections, such as network-induced delays and packet losses. Since the traditional iteration or time-based infinite horizon NDP schemes are unsuitable for NNCS with terminal constraints, a novel time-based NDP scheme is developed to solve finite horizon optimal control of NNCS by mitigating the above-mentioned challenges. First, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to approximate the control coefficient matrix that is subsequently utilized in conjunction with the critic and actor NNs to determine a time-based stochastic optimal control input over finite horizon in a forward-in-time and online manner. Eventually, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded with ultimate bounds being a function of initial conditions and final time. Moreover, the approximated control input converges close to optimal value within finite time. The simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:25720004

  7. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications. PMID:26274112

  8. Analog compound orthogonal neural network control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ye

    2005-12-01

    An analog compound orthogonal neural network is presented which is based on digital compound orthogonal neural networks. The compound neural network's control performance was investigated as applied to a robot control problem. The analog neural network is a Chebyshev neural network with a high speed-learning rate in an on-line manner. Its control algorithm does not relate to controlled plant models. The analog neural network is used as the feedforward controller, and PD is used as the feedback controller in the control system of robots. The excellent performance in system response, tracking accuracy, and robustness was verified through a simulation experiment applied to a robotic manipulator with friction and nonlinear disturbances. The trajectory tracking control showed results in satisfactory effectiveness. This analog neural controller provides a novel approach for the control of uncertain or unknown systems.

  9. Deep Space Network Antenna Logic Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow; Morgan, Scott; Hames, Peter; Strain, Martha; Owen, Christopher; Shimizu, Kenneth; Wilson, Karen; Shaller, David; Doktomomtaz, Said; Leung, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The Antenna Logic Controller (ALC) software controls and monitors the motion control equipment of the 4,000-metric-ton structure of the Deep Space Network 70-meter antenna. This program coordinates the control of 42 hydraulic pumps, while monitoring several interlocks for personnel and equipment safety. Remote operation of the ALC runs via the Antenna Monitor & Control (AMC) computer, which orchestrates the tracking functions of the entire antenna. This software provides a graphical user interface for local control, monitoring, and identification of faults as well as, at a high level, providing for the digital control of the axis brakes so that the servo of the AMC may control the motion of the antenna. Specific functions of the ALC also include routines for startup in cold weather, controlled shutdown for both normal and fault situations, and pump switching on failure. The increased monitoring, the ability to trend key performance characteristics, the improved fault detection and recovery, the centralization of all control at a single panel, and the simplification of the user interface have all reduced the required workforce to run 70-meter antennas. The ALC also increases the antenna availability by reducing the time required to start up the antenna, to diagnose faults, and by providing additional insight into the performance of key parameters that aid in preventive maintenance to avoid key element failure. The ALC User Display (AUD) is a graphical user interface with hierarchical display structure, which provides high-level status information to the operation of the ALC, as well as detailed information for virtually all aspects of the ALC via drill-down displays. The operational status of an item, be it a function or assembly, is shown in the higher-level display. By pressing the item on the display screen, a new screen opens to show more detail of the function/assembly. Navigation tools and the map button allow immediate access to all screens.

  10. Intensity control in experimental rooms of the GANIL accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, C.; Jamet, C.; Le Coz, W.; Ledu, G.

    2014-12-01

    The safety re-examination of existing GANIL (the French national heavy-ion accelerator facility) installations requires the implementation of a safety system which makes possible the monitoring of beam intensities sent in the experimental rooms. The aim is to demonstrate that beam intensities stay below the authorized limits. The required characteristics should enable the measurement, by a non-interceptive method, of beam intensities from 5 nA to 5 μA with a maximum uncertainty of ±5%, independently of the frequency and the beam energy. After a comparative study, two high frequency diagnostics were selected: the capacitive Pick-Up (PU) and the Fast Current Transformer (FCT). Based on results of simulation, laboratory tests and machine studies, this paper discusses all the considerations required to deliver accurate results from PU and FCT measurement of ion beams.

  11. Magnetically Controlled Optical Plasma Waveguide for Electron Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B. B.; Davis, P.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Palastro, J. P.; Price, D.; Froula, D. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2009-01-22

    In order to produce multi-Gev electrons from Laser Wakefield Accelerators, we present a technique to guide high power laser beams through underdense plasma. Experimental results from the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that show density channels with minimum plasma densities below 5x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} are presented. These results are obtained using an external magnetic field (<5 T) to limit the radial heat flux from a pre-forming laser beam. The resulting increased plasma pressure gradient produces a parabolic density gradient which is tunable by changing the external magnetic field strength. These results are compared with 1-D hydrodynamic simulations, while quasi-static kinetic simulations show that for these channel conditions 90% of the energy in a 150 TW short pulse beam is guided over 5 cm and predict electron energy gains of 3 GeV.

  12. Magnetically Controlled Optical Plasma Waveguide for Electron Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J P; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-08-28

    In order to produce multi-Gev electrons from Laser Wakefield Accelerators, we present a technique to guide high power laser beams through underdense plasma. Experimental results from the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that show density channels with minimum plasma densities below 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} are presented. These results are obtained using an external magnetic field (<5 T) to limit the radial heat flux from a pre-forming laser beam. The resulting increased plasma pressure gradient produces a parabolic density gradient which is tunable by changing the external magnetic field strength. These results are compared with 1-D hydrodynamic simulations, while quasi-static kinetic simulations show that for these channel conditions 90% of the energy in a 150 TW short pulse beam is guided over 5 cm and predict electron energy gains of 3 GeV.

  13. Photodetector performance enhancement using an electron accelerator controlled by light.

    PubMed

    Srithanachai, Itsara; Dilla Zainol, Farrah; Ueamanapong, Surada; Niemcharoen, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-07-20

    A new method of photodetector performance enhancement using an embedded optical accelerator circuit within the photodetector is proposed. The principle of optical tweezer generation using a light pulse within a PANDA ring is also reviewed. By using a modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA microring resonator, which is embedded within the photodetector circuit, the device performance can be improved by using an electron injection technique, in which electrons can be trapped by optical tweezers generated by a PANDA ring resonator. Finally, electrons can move faster within the device via the optical waveguide without trapping center in the silicon bulk to the contact, in which the increase in photodetector current is seen. Simulation results obtained have shown that the device's light currents are increased by the order of four, and the switching time is increased by the order of five. This technique can be used for better photodetector performance and other semiconductor applications in the future.

  14. Criteria for stochastic pinning control of networks of chaotic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio; DeLellis, Pietro

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the controllability of discrete-time networks of coupled chaotic maps through stochastic pinning. In this control scheme, the network dynamics are steered towards a desired trajectory through a feedback control input that is applied stochastically to the network nodes. The network controllability is studied by analyzing the local mean square stability of the error dynamics with respect to the desired trajectory. Through the analysis of the spectral properties of salient matrices, a toolbox of conditions for controllability are obtained, in terms of the dynamics of the individual maps, algebraic properties of the network, and the probability distribution of the pinning control. We demonstrate the use of these conditions in the design of a stochastic pinning control strategy for networks of Chirikov standard maps. To elucidate the applicability of the approach, we consider different network topologies and compare five different stochastic pinning strategies through extensive numerical simulations.

  15. Optimization of Aero Engine Acceleration Control in Combat State Based on Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fan, Ding; Sreeram, Victor

    2012-03-01

    In order to drastically exploit the potential of the aero engine and improve acceleration performance in the combat state, an on-line optimized controller based on genetic algorithms is designed for an aero engine. For testing the validity of the presented control method, detailed joint simulation tests of the designed controller and the aero engine model are performed in the whole flight envelope. Simulation test results show that the presented control algorithm has characteristics of rapid convergence speed, high efficiency and can fully exploit the acceleration performance potential of the aero engine. Compared with the former controller, the designed on-line optimized controller (DOOC) can improve the security of the acceleration process and greatly enhance the aero engine thrust in the whole range of the flight envelope, the thrust increases an average of 8.1% in the randomly selected working states. The plane which adopts DOOC can acquire better fighting advantage in the combat state.

  16. On designing a control system for a new generation of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schaller, S.C.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A well-conceived plan of attack is essential to the task of designing a control system for a large accelerator. Several aspects of such a plan have been investigated during recent work at LAMPF on design strategies for an Advanced Hadron Facility control system. Aspects discussed in this paper include: identification of requirements, creation and enforcement of standards, interaction with users, consideration of commercial controls products, integration with existing control systems, planning for continual change, and establishment of design reviews. We emphasize the need for the controls group to acquire and integrate accelerator design information from the start of the design process. We suggest that a controls design for a new generation of accelerators be done with a new generation of software tools. 12 refs.

  17. Phase control of the microwave radiation in free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    A phase control system for the FEL portion of Two-Beam Accelerator is proposed. The control keeps the phase error within acceptable bounds. The control mechanism is analyzed, both analytically in a ''resonant particle'' approximation and numerically in a multi-particle simulation code. Sensitivity of phase errors to the FEL parameters has been noticed.

  18. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli. PMID:11854503

  19. Network-based production quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yongjin; Tseng, Bill; Chiou, Richard

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of remote quality control using a host of advanced automation equipment with Internet accessibility. Recent emphasis on product quality and reduction of waste stems from the dynamic, globalized and customer-driven market, which brings opportunities and threats to companies, depending on the response speed and production strategies. The current trends in industry also include a wide spread of distributed manufacturing systems, where design, production, and management facilities are geographically dispersed. This situation mandates not only the accessibility to remotely located production equipment for monitoring and control, but efficient means of responding to changing environment to counter process variations and diverse customer demands. To compete under such an environment, companies are striving to achieve 100%, sensor-based, automated inspection for zero-defect manufacturing. In this study, the Internet-based quality control scheme is referred to as "E-Quality for Manufacturing" or "EQM" for short. By its definition, EQM refers to a holistic approach to design and to embed efficient quality control functions in the context of network integrated manufacturing systems. Such system let designers located far away from the production facility to monitor, control and adjust the quality inspection processes as production design evolves.

  20. Congestion Control in TCP/AQM Networks Using a Disturbance Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Ryogo; Kani, Junichi; Fujimoto, Yukihiro

    This paper presents a novel congestion controller for transmission control protocol/active queue management (TCP/AQM) networks. In order to maintain the queue length to a value less than the buffer size at the aggregation nodes, the queue management mechanism drops some packets depending on the probability calculated by a congestion controller. However, conventional controllers such as random early detection (RED) algorithms and proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based controllers are not compatible with parameter variation in TCP/AQM networks. Parameter variation in TCP/AQM networks includes the change of the number of TCP connections, the inflow of user datagram protocol (UDP) flows and so on. In the proposed method, the effect of parameter variation is estimated as drop probability disturbance by using a disturbance observer (DOB). By using the DOB, disturbance suppression characteristics of the controlled system can be drastically improved. In addition, the TCP/AQM network system is analyzed on the basis of an acceleration control scheme. The proposed method is validated by simulation studies performed using a nonlinear model of a TCP/AQM network and verifications made using the network simulator ns-2.

  1. System modeling for the longitudinal beam dynamics control problem in heavy ion induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.N.

    1993-05-17

    We address the problem of developing system models that are suitable for studying the control of the longitudinal beam dynamics in induction accelerators for heavy ions. In particular, we present the preliminary results of our efforts to devise a general framework for building detailed, integrated models of accelerator systems consisting of pulsed power modular circuits, induction cells, beam dynamics, and control system elements. Such a framework will permit us to analyze and design the pulsed power modulators and the control systems required to effect precise control over the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  2. G-NetMon: A GPU-accelerated Network Performance Monitoring System for Large Scale Scientific Collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  3. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations.

  4. GENERATION AND CONTROL OF HIGH PRECISION BEAMS AT LEPTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Chiu Chao

    2007-06-25

    Parity violation experiments require precision manipulation of helicity-correlated beam coordinates on target at the nm/nrad-level. Achieving this unprecedented level of control requires a detailed understanding of the particle optics and careful tuning of the beam transport to keep anomalies from compromising the design adiabatic damping. Such efforts are often hindered by machine configuration and instrumentation limitations at the low energy end. A technique has been developed at CEBAF including high precision measurements, Mathematica-based analysis for obtaining corrective solutions, and control hardware/software developments for realizing such level of control at energies up to 5 GeV.

  5. Tangential acceleration feedback control of friction induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jyayasi; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    Tangential control action is studied on a phenomenological mass-on-belt model exhibiting friction-induced self-excited vibration attributed to the low-velocity drooping characteristics of friction which is also known as Stribeck effect. The friction phenomenon is modelled by the exponential model. Linear stability analysis is carried out near the equilibrium point and local stability boundary is delineated in the plane of control parameters. The system is observed to undergo a Hopf bifurcation as the eigenvalues determined from the linear stability analysis are found to cross the imaginary axis transversally from RHS s-plane to LHS s-plane or vice-versa as one varies the control parameters, namely non-dimensional belt velocity and the control gain. A nonlinear stability analysis by the method of Averaging reveals the subcritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation. Thus, a global stability boundary is constructed so that any choice of control parameters from the globally stable region leads to a stable equilibrium. Numerical simulations in a MATLAB SIMULINK model and bifurcation diagrams obtained in AUTO validate these analytically obtained results. Pole crossover design is implemented to optimize the filter parameters with an independent choice of belt velocity and control gain. The efficacy of this optimization (based on numerical results) in the delicate low velocity region is also enclosed.

  6. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P R; Borghesi, M; Brenner, C; Carroll, D C; De Martinis, C; Fiorini, Francesca; Flacco, A; Floquet, V; Fuchs, J; Gallegos, P; Giove, D; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B; Kirby, D; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Nuesslin, F; Prasad, R; Reinhardt, S; Roth, M; Schramm, U; Scott, G G; Ter-Avetisyan, S; Tolley, M; Turchetti, G; Wilkens, J J

    2014-05-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented at the first workshop on 'Instrumentation for Diagnostics and Control of Laser-accelerated Proton (Ion) Beams' in Abingdon, UK. It includes radiochromic film (RCF), image plates (IP), micro-channel plates (MCP), Thomson spectrometers, prompt inline scintillators, time and space-resolved interferometry (TASRI) and nuclear activation schemes. Repetition-rated instrumentation requirements for target metrology are also addressed.

  7. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met.

  8. Control of tree water networks: A geometric programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela Perelman, L.; Amin, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a modeling and operation approach for tree water supply systems. The network control problem is approximated as a geometric programming (GP) problem. The original nonlinear nonconvex network control problem is transformed into a convex optimization problem. The optimization model can be efficiently solved to optimality using state-of-the-art solvers. Two control schemes are presented: (1) operation of network actuators (pumps and valves) and (2) controlled demand shedding allocation between network consumers with limited resources. The dual of the network control problem is formulated and is used to perform sensitivity analysis with respect to hydraulic constraints. The approach is demonstrated on a small branched-topology network and later extended to a medium-size irrigation network. The results demonstrate an intrinsic trade-off between energy costs and demand shedding policy, providing an efficient decision support tool for active management of water systems.

  9. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  10. Stabilization of an axially moving accelerated/decelerated system via an adaptive boundary control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Zhijia; He, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an adaptive boundary control is developed for vibration suppression of an axially moving accelerated/decelerated belt system. The dynamic model of the belt system is represented by partial-ordinary differential equations with consideration of the high acceleration/deceleration and unknown distributed disturbance. By utilizing adaptive technique and Lyapunov-based back stepping method, an adaptive boundary control is proposed for vibration suppression of the belt system, a disturbance observer is introduced to attenuate the effects of unknown boundary disturbance, the adaptive law is developed to handle parametric uncertainties and the S-curve acceleration/deceleration method is adopted to plan the belt׳s speed. With the proposed control scheme, the well-posedness and stability of the closed-loop system are mathematically demonstrated. Simulations are displayed to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control. PMID:27269191

  11. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  12. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  13. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven; Whalen, Andrew; Brennan, Sean; Sauer, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems may have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces are difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since most of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. We find that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks. National Academies - Keck Futures Initiative, NSF grant DMS 1216568, and Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience NIH Grant 1R01EB014641.

  14. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Andrew J.; Brennan, Sean N.; Sauer, Timothy D.; Schiff, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces can be difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since almost all of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and nonlinear measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. Our analysis shows that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks.

  15. Optimizing a mobile robot control system using GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Nat; McGuinness, Michael; Martin, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our attempt to optimize a robot control program for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) by running computationally intensive portions of the system on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). The IGVC Autonomous Challenge requires a control program that performs a number of different computationally intensive tasks ranging from computer vision to path planning. For the 2011 competition our Robot Operating System (ROS) based control system would not run comfortably on the multicore CPU on our custom robot platform. The process of profiling the ROS control program and selecting appropriate modules for porting to run on a GPU is described. A GPU-targeting compiler, Bacon, is used to speed up development and help optimize the ported modules. The impact of the ported modules on overall performance is discussed. We conclude that GPU optimization can free a significant amount of CPU resources with minimal effort for expensive user-written code, but that replacing heavily-optimized library functions is more difficult, and a much less efficient use of time.

  16. The control networks of Tethys and Dione

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Control networks of the Saturnian satellites Tethys and Dione have been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft during their flybys. Coordinates of 110 points on Tethys and 126 points on Dione are listed; selected points are identified on U.S. Geological Survey maps of the satellites, and many are identified by name. Measurements of these points were made on six pictures from Voyager 1 and 21 from Voyager 2 for Tethys, and on 27 pictures from Voyager 1 and one from Voyager 2 for Dione. The longitude systems on the satellites have been defined by craters on their surfaces. The mean radii have been determined as 524 + or - 5 km for Tethys and 559 + or - 5 km for Dione.

  17. Non-linear stochastic optimal control of acceleration parametrically excited systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Jin, Xiaoling; Huang, Zhilong

    2016-02-01

    Acceleration parametrical excitations have not been taken into account due to the lack of physical significance in macroscopic structures. The explosive development of microtechnology and nanotechnology, however, motivates the investigation of the acceleration parametrically excited systems. The adsorption and desorption effects dramatically change the mass of nano-sized structures, which significantly reduces the precision of nanoscale sensors or can be reasonably utilised to detect molecular mass. This manuscript proposes a non-linear stochastic optimal control strategy for stochastic systems with acceleration parametric excitation based on stochastic averaging of energy envelope and stochastic dynamic programming principle. System acceleration is approximately expressed as a function of system displacement in a short time range under the conditions of light damping and weak excitations, and the acceleration parametrically excited system is shown to be equivalent to a constructed system with an additional displacement parametric excitation term. Then, the controlled system is converted into a partially averaged Itô equation with respect to the total system energy through stochastic averaging of energy envelope, and the optimal control strategy for the averaged system is derived from solving the associated dynamic programming equation. Numerical results for a controlled Duffing oscillator indicate the efficacy of the proposed control strategy.

  18. Accelerate OPC convergence with new iteration control methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Heng; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo

    2008-10-01

    A dilemmatic trade-off that all OPC engineers are facing everyday is the convergence of the OPC result and the control of the OPC iteration times. Theoretically, infinite times of OPC iterations are needed to achieve a convergent and stable correction result. But actually there should always be a cut-off for the iteration time, for turnaround- time is always an important criteria for IC fabs. But considering the design layout becomes more complicated and pattern density becomes higher with the shrinkage of the critical dimension, fragmentation control during the OPC procedure is also becoming more and more sophisticated. Thus, to achieve a convergent correction result for all OPC fragments within limited correction iteration times now becomes a big challenge to OPC engineers. This work presents our study in a new OPC iteration control methodology. It can help to find an algorithm that always converges, and reduce the excessive use of parameter setting, commands and other involvement by the user. With this, we can reduce the run time required to obtain a convergent OPC solution.

  19. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Vylet, Vashek; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a reference.

  20. Self-teaching neural network learns difficult reactor control problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jouse, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    A self-teaching neural network used as an adaptive controller quickly learns to control an unstable reactor configuration. The network models the behavior of a human operator. It is trained by allowing it to operate the reactivity control impulsively. It is punished whenever either the power or fuel temperature stray outside technical limits. Using a simple paradigm, the network constructs an internal representation of the punishment and of the reactor system. The reactor is constrained to small power orbits.

  1. Modern approaches to accelerator simulation and on-line control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Clearwater, S.; Theil, E.; Paxson, V.

    1987-02-01

    COMFORT-PLUS consists of three parts: (1) COMFORT (Control Of Machine Function, ORbits, and Trajectories), which computes the machine lattice functions and transport matrices along a beamline; (2) PLUS (Prediction from Lattice Using Simulation) which finds or compensates for errors in the beam parameters or machine elements; and (3) a highly graphical interface to PLUS. The COMFORT-PLUS package has been developed on a SUN-3 workstation. The structure and use of COMFORT-PLUS are described, and an example of the use of the package is presented. (LEW)

  2. [Accelerated rubella control and the prevention of congenital rubella syndrome].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Solórzano, Carlos; de Quadros, Ciro A

    2002-04-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and with high costs. Today, as a result of improved vaccination and epidemiological surveillance efforts directed at eradicating measles from the Western Hemisphere, there has been a notable increase in the ability to detect, prevent, and control rubella and CRS. The importance of these measures is undeniable, and this piece examines the components that are essential in moving ahead to reduce these major public health problems in Latin America and the Caribbean. One step in that direction would be to integrate the surveillance of measles with that of rubella and CRS.

  3. A geometrical approach to control and controllability of nonlinear dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Zhi; Su, Ri-Qi; Huang, Zi-Gang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wen-Xu; Grebogi, Celso; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the recent interest and advances in linear controllability of complex networks, controlling nonlinear network dynamics remains an outstanding problem. Here we develop an experimentally feasible control framework for nonlinear dynamical networks that exhibit multistability. The control objective is to apply parameter perturbation to drive the system from one attractor to another, assuming that the former is undesired and the latter is desired. To make our framework practically meaningful, we consider restricted parameter perturbation by imposing two constraints: it must be experimentally realizable and applied only temporarily. We introduce the concept of attractor network, which allows us to formulate a quantifiable controllability framework for nonlinear dynamical networks: a network is more controllable if the attractor network is more strongly connected. We test our control framework using examples from various models of experimental gene regulatory networks and demonstrate the beneficial role of noise in facilitating control. PMID:27076273

  4. An extended signal control strategy for urban network traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Tian, Fuli; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-03-01

    Traffic flow patterns are in general repeated on a daily or weekly basis. To improve the traffic conditions by using the inherent repeatability of traffic flow, a novel signal control strategy for urban networks was developed via iterative learning control (ILC) approach. Rigorous analysis shows that the proposed learning control method can guarantee the asymptotic convergence. The impacts of the ILC-based signal control strategy on the macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) were analyzed by simulations on a test road network. The results show that the proposed ILC strategy can evenly distribute the accumulation in the network and improve the network mobility.

  5. Artificial intelligence research in particle accelerator control systems for beam line tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pieck, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Tuning particle accelerators is time consuming and expensive, with a number of inherently non-linear interactions between system components. Conventional control methods have not been successful in this domain and the result is constant and expensive monitoring of the systems by human operators. This is particularly true for the start-up and conditioning phase after a maintenance period or an unexpected fault. In turn, this often requires a step-by-step restart of the accelerator. Surprisingly few attempts have been made to apply intelligent accelerator control techniques to help with beam tuning, fault detection, and fault recovery problems. The reason for that might be that accelerator facilities are rare and difficult to understand systems that require detailed expert knowledge about the underlying physics as well as months if not years of experience to understand the relationship between individual components, particularly if they are geographically disjoint. This paper will give an overview about the research effort in the accelerator community that has been dedicated to the use of artificial intelligence methods for accelerator beam line tuning.

  6. SU-E-T-52: Beam Data Comparison for 20 Linear Accelerators in One Network

    SciTech Connect

    LoSasso, T; Lim, S; Tang, G; Chan, M; Li, J; Obcemea, C; Song, Y; Ma, R; Yang, G; Xiong, W; Huang, D; Burman, C; Mechalakos, J; Hunt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare photon beam data for the 20 Varian linear accelerators (TrueBeam, iX, and EX models) in use at five centers in the same network with the intent to model with one set of beam data in Eclipsec. Methods: Varian linear accelerators, TrueBeam (3), 21 EX, iX, and Trilogy (14), and 6 EX (3), installed between 1999 and 2014 have their 6 MV and 15 MV x-ray beams reevaluated. Full commissioning, including output factors (St), percent depth doses (PDD), and off-axis profiles, was recently performed for a TrueBeam with a cc04 ion chamber in an IBA Blue phantom. Similarly, a subset of beam data for each of the other accelerators was measured recently as follows: for 3×3, 10×10, and 30×30 cm{sup 2} field sizes, flatness and penumbra (80–20%) were measured at dmax and 10 cm depths, PDD were measured at 10 and 20 cm depths, and St were measured at 5 cm depth. Measurement results for all machines were compared. Results: For 15 high-energy (6 and 15 MV) and 3 low-energy machines (6MV only): 1) PDD agreed within 1.4% at 10 and 20 cm depths; 2) penumbra agreed within 1.0 mm at dmax and 10 cm depths; 3) flatness was within 1.3% at dmax and 10 cm depths; and 4) with exception of the three low energy machines, output factors were within 1.1% and 0.5% for 3×3 and 30×30 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Measurement uncertainty, not quantified here, accounts for some of these differences. Conclusion: Measured beam data from 15 high-energy Varian linacs are consistent enough that they can be classified using one beam data set in Eclipse. Two additional high-energy machines are removed from this group until their data are further confirmed. Three low-energy machines will be in a separate class based upon differences in output factors (St)

  7. Unified Lunar Control Network 2005 and Topographic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archinal, B. A.; Rosiek, M. R.; Redding, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    There are currently two generally accepted lunar control networks. These are the Unified Lunar Control Network (ULCN) and the Clementine Lunar Control Network (CLCN), both derived by M. Davies and T. Colvin at RAND. We address here our efforts to merge and improve these networks into a new ULCN. The ULCN was described in the last major publication about a lunar control network. The statistics on this and the other networks discussed here. Images for this network are from the Apollo, Mariner 10, and Galileo missions, and Earth-based photographs. The importance of this network is that its accuracy is relatively well quantified and published information on the network is available. The CLCN includes measurements on 43,871 Clementine 750-nm images - the largest planetary control network ever computed. This purpose of this network was to determine the geometry for the Clementine Basemap Mosiac (CBM). The geometry of that mosaic was used to produce the Clementine UVVIS digital image model and the Near-Infrared Global Multispectral Map of the Moon from Clementine. Through the extensive use of these products, they and the underlying CLCN in effect define the generally accepted current coordinate system for reporting and describing the location of lunar coordinates. However, no publication describes the CLCN itself.

  8. Implementing controlled-unitary operations over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a multiparty quantum computation task over a network in a situation where the capacities of both the quantum and classical communication channels of the network are limited and a bottleneck occurs. Using a resource setting introduced by Hayashi [1], we present an efficient protocol for performing controlled-unitary operations between two input nodes and two output nodes over the butterfly network, one of the most fundamental networks exhibiting the bottleneck problem. This result opens the possibility of developing a theory of quantum network coding for multiparty quantum computation, whereas the conventional network coding only treats multiparty quantum communication.

  9. Active Control of Automotive Intake Noise under Rapid Acceleration using the Co-FXLMS Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Jin; Lee, Gyeong-Tae; Oh, Jae-Eung

    The method of reducing automotive intake noise can be classified by passive and active control techniques. However, passive control has a limited effect of noise reduction at low frequency range (below 500 Hz) and is limited by the space of the engine room. However, active control can overcome these passive control limitations. The active control technique mostly uses the Least-Mean-Square (LMS) algorithm, because the LMS algorithm can easily obtain the complex transfer function in real-time, particularly when the Filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is applied to an active noise control (ANC) system. However, the convergence performance of the LMS algorithm decreases significantly when the FXLMS algorithm is applied to the active control of intake noise under rapidly accelerating driving conditions. Therefore, in this study, the Co-FXLMS algorithm was proposed to improve the control performance of the FXLMS algorithm during rapid acceleration. The Co-FXLMS algorithm is realized by using an estimate of the cross correlation between the adaptation error and the filtered input signal to control the step size. The performance of the Co-FXLMS algorithm is presented in comparison with that of the FXLMS algorithm. Experimental results show that active noise control using Co-FXLMS is effective in reducing automotive intake noise during rapid acceleration.

  10. Tunable monoenergetic electron beams from independently controllable laser-wakefield acceleration and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Banerjee, S.; Zhang, J.; Zeng, M.; Sheng, Z.; Umstadter, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on laser-wakefield acceleration in a novel two-stage gas target with independently adjustable density and atomic-composition profiles. We were able to tailor these profiles in a way that led to the separation of the processes of electron injection and acceleration and permitted independent control of both. This resulted in the generation of stable, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with central energy tunable in 50-300 MeV range. For the first time, we are able to independently control the beam charge and energy spread over the entire tunability range.

  11. Minimizing communication cost among distributed controllers in software defined networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlimatti, Shivaleela; Elbreiki, Walid; Hassan, Suhaidi; Habbal, Adib; Elshaikh, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a new paradigm to increase the flexibility of today's network by promising for a programmable network. The fundamental idea behind this new architecture is to simplify network complexity by decoupling control plane and data plane of the network devices, and by making the control plane centralized. Recently controllers have distributed to solve the problem of single point of failure, and to increase scalability and flexibility during workload distribution. Even though, controllers are flexible and scalable to accommodate more number of network switches, yet the problem of intercommunication cost between distributed controllers is still challenging issue in the Software Defined Network environment. This paper, aims to fill the gap by proposing a new mechanism, which minimizes intercommunication cost with graph partitioning algorithm, an NP hard problem. The methodology proposed in this paper is, swapping of network elements between controller domains to minimize communication cost by calculating communication gain. The swapping of elements minimizes inter and intra communication cost among network domains. We validate our work with the OMNeT++ simulation environment tool. Simulation results show that the proposed mechanism minimizes the inter domain communication cost among controllers compared to traditional distributed controllers.

  12. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  13. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  14. Neural networks for self-learning control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Derrick H.; Widrow, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how a neural network can learn of its own accord to control a nonlinear dynamic system. An emulator, a multilayered neural network, learns to identify the system's dynamic characteristics. The controller, another multilayered neural network, next learns to control the emulator. The self-trained controller is then used to control the actual dynamic system. The learning process continues as the emulator and controller improve and track the physical process. An example is given to illustrate these ideas. The 'truck backer-upper,' a neural network controller that steers a trailer truck while the truck is backing up to a loading dock, is demonstrated. The controller is able to guide the truck to the dock from almost any initial position. The technique explored should be applicable to a wide variety of nonlinear control problems.

  15. Accelerating the development of an AIDS vaccine: the AIDS vaccine for Asia Network (Avan).

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Chiu, Joseph; Kim, Jerome; Benenson, Michael; Kent, Stephen J; Tamashiro, Hiko; Manrique, Amapola; Bernstein, Alan; Goyal, Rajat; Ditangco, Rossana A; Cooper, David A; Osmanov, Saladin; Mathieson, Bonnie; Sandstrom, Eric; Esparza, Jose; Hoff, Rodney; Shao, Yiming

    2011-09-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. The development of a safe and effective HIV vaccine is central to stopping the epidemic and would be a great public health tool. The AIDS Vaccine for Asia Network (AVAN) is a group of concerned investigators committed to assisting regional and global HIV vaccine efforts. AVAN's focus on improving the coordination and harmonization of research, ethical reviews, clinical trial capacity, regulatory frameworks, vaccine manufacturing, community participation, and government advocacy could help accelerate HIV vaccine efforts in the region. At a meeting in November 2010, researchers from various countries in Asia presented their progress in HIV vaccine research and development. Six working groups discussed the current status, gaps and methods to strengthen capacity and infrastructure in various areas related to AIDS vaccine research and development. These discussions led to the development of prioritized action plans for the next 5 years. This report describes the gaps and challenges HIV vaccine research faces in the region and recommends improvement and standardization of facilities, and coordination and harmonization of all activities related to AIDS vaccine research and development, including possible technology transfer when a vaccine becomes available.

  16. Scalable Approaches to Control Network Dynamics: Prospects for City Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2014-07-01

    A city is a complex, emergent system and as such can be conveniently represented as a network of interacting components. A fundamental aspect of networks is that the systemic properties can depend as much on the interactions as they depend on the properties of the individual components themselves. Another fundamental aspect is that changes to one component can affect other components, in a process that may cause the entire or a substantial part of the system to change behavior. Over the past 2 decades, much research has been done on the modeling of large and complex networks involved in communication and transportation, disease propagation, and supply chains, as well as emergent phenomena, robustness and optimization in such systems...

  17. Default network activity, coupled with the frontoparietal control network, supports goal-directed cognition.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Stevens, W Dale; Chamberlain, Jon P; Gilmore, Adrian W; Schacter, Daniel L

    2010-10-15

    Tasks that demand externalized attention reliably suppress default network activity while activating the dorsal attention network. These networks have an intrinsic competitive relationship; activation of one suppresses activity of the other. Consequently, many assume that default network activity is suppressed during goal-directed cognition. We challenge this assumption in an fMRI study of planning. Recent studies link default network activity with internally focused cognition, such as imagining personal future events, suggesting a role in autobiographical planning. However, it is unclear how goal-directed cognition with an internal focus is mediated by these opposing networks. A third anatomically interposed 'frontoparietal control network' might mediate planning across domains, flexibly coupling with either the default or dorsal attention network in support of internally versus externally focused goal-directed cognition, respectively. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing brain activity during autobiographical versus visuospatial planning. Autobiographical planning engaged the default network, whereas visuospatial planning engaged the dorsal attention network, consistent with the anti-correlated domains of internalized and externalized cognition. Critically, both planning tasks engaged the frontoparietal control network. Task-related activation of these three networks was anatomically consistent with independently defined resting-state functional connectivity MRI maps. Task-related functional connectivity analyses demonstrate that the default network can be involved in goal-directed cognition when its activity is coupled with the frontoparietal control network. Additionally, the frontoparietal control network may flexibly couple with the default and dorsal attention networks according to task domain, serving as a cortical mediator linking the two networks in support of goal-directed cognitive processes.

  18. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading.

    PubMed

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks-with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size-is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics. PMID:27627315

  19. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading.

    PubMed

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks-with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size-is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  20. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller a via network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. In one embodiment, the bus controller transmits messages to the network device interface containing a plurality of bits having a value defined by a transition between first and second states in the bits. The network device interface determines timing of the data sequence of the message and uses the determined timing to communicate with the bus controller.

  1. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface is a state machine, such as an ASIC, that operates independent of a processor in communicating with the bus controller and data channels.

  2. Connected Dominating Set Based Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are now widely used for monitoring and controlling of systems where human intervention is not desirable or possible. Connected Dominating Sets (CDSs) based topology control in WSNs is one kind of hierarchical method to ensure sufficient coverage while reducing redundant connections in a relatively crowded network.…

  3. Controlled Ion Acceleration in Two Crossed Laser Beams Propagating in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataronis, J. A.; Petržílka, V.; Krlín, L.

    2003-10-01

    Electron acceleration occurs in a single plane laser beam that is in the presence of a secondary perpendicularly propagating plane laser beam with a randomized phase. As the accelerated electrons are pushed away, they leave the heavier ions behind, producing thereby a charge separation electrostatic field and consequent ion flows. The power flux carried by the accelerated ions can be controlled by varying the intensity of the secondary beam. Results of a numerical study of this control process are presented here. The laser beam parameters chosen for the computations of the primary electron acceleration match the parameters available at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)^1. For the modeling, we use an advanced version of our 3-d two-fluid numerical code^2, originally developed for the analysis of fast electron generation and subsequent ion acceleration in front of lower hybrid wave launchers in large tokamaks. [2pt] ^1K. Jungwirth et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2495 (2001). [2pt] ^2V. Petržílka et al., Proc. 29th EPS Conference, Montreux, June 2002, paper 2.105.

  4. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks—with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size—is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  5. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one embodiment, the bus controller sends commands and data a defined bit rate, and the network device interface senses this bit rate and sends data back to the bus controller using the defined bit rate.

  6. Control chart pattern recognition using a back propagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerre, Julie K.; Perry, Marcus B.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, control chart pattern recognition using artificial neural networks is presented. An important motivation of this research is the growing interest in intelligent manufacturing systems, specifically in the area of Statistical Process Control (SPC). On-line automated process analysis is an important area of research since it allows the interfacing of process control with Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) techniques. A back propagation artificial neural network is used to model X-bar quality control charts and identify process instability situations as specified by the Western Electric Statistical Quality Control handbook. Results indicate that the performance of the back propagation neural network is very accurate in identifying these control chart patterns. This work is significant in that the neural network output can serve as a link to process parameters in a closed-loop control system. In this way, adjustments to the process can be made on-line and quality problems averted.

  7. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  8. Epigenetics and Why Biological Networks are More Controllable than Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. In this talk, I will show that it is possible to exploit this same principle to control network behavior. This approach takes advantage of the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real networks, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible or the linear counterpart is not controllable. Applications show that this framework permits both reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure, which I will illustrate through various biological problems. I will also briefly review the progress our group has made over the past 5 years on related control of complex networks in non-biological domains.

  9. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ova, Maria

    2009-09-09

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  10. A neural-network approach to robotic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. P. W.; Deleuterio, G. M. T.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial neural-network paradigm for the control of robotic systems is presented. The approach is based on the Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller created by James Albus and incorporates several extensions. First, recognizing the essential structure of multibody equations of motion, two parallel modules are used that directly reflect the dynamical characteristics of multibody systems. Second, the architecture of the proposed network is imbued with a self-organizational capability which improves efficiency and accuracy. Also, the networks can be arranged in hierarchical fashion with each subsequent network providing finer and finer resolution.

  11. Prototype of network distributed control system for MLF/J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Takeshi; Nakajima, Kenji; Torii, Shuki; Bharoto; Higemoto, Wataru; Sato, Setsuo; Otomo, Toshiya; Arai, Masatoshi

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a prototype data acquisition and device control system for experiment instruments at the Material and Life science Facility (MLF)/Japan-Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The system employs distributed computing via Ethernet, client/server architecture, modular structure and a state machine. Communication between client and server software utilizes socket protocols over TCP/IP. We have deployed this prototype software in the network distributed control system by improving the data acquisition software used at KENS, introducing the system for the SWAN at KENS/KEK. It was kept in working order throughout 2 weeks of machine operation.

  12. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions-a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself.

  13. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions-a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  14. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions—a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  15. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott; Jennings, Esther; Schoolcraft, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Congestion control is an important feature that directly affects network performance. Network congestion may cause loss of data or long delays. Although this problem has been studied extensively in the Internet, the solutions for Internet congestion control do not apply readily to challenged network environments such as Delay Tolerant Networks (DTN) where end-to-end connectivity may not exist continuously and latency can be high. In DTN, end-to-end rate control is not feasible. This calls for congestion control mechanisms where the decisions can be made autonomously with local information only. We use an economic pricing model and propose a rule-based congestion control mechanism where each router can autonomously decide on whether to accept a bundle (data) based on local information such as available storage and the value and risk of accepting the bundle (derived from historical statistics). Preliminary experimental results show that this congestion control mechanism can protect routers from resource depletion without loss of data.

  16. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. In some embodiments, network device interfaces associated with different data channels coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  17. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  18. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks.

  19. Dynamics and control of diseases in networks with community structure.

    PubMed

    Salathé, Marcel; Jones, James H

    2010-04-08

    The dynamics of infectious diseases spread via direct person-to-person transmission (such as influenza, smallpox, HIV/AIDS, etc.) depends on the underlying host contact network. Human contact networks exhibit strong community structure. Understanding how such community structure affects epidemics may provide insights for preventing the spread of disease between communities by changing the structure of the contact network through pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions. We use empirical and simulated networks to investigate the spread of disease in networks with community structure. We find that community structure has a major impact on disease dynamics, and we show that in networks with strong community structure, immunization interventions targeted at individuals bridging communities are more effective than those simply targeting highly connected individuals. Because the structure of relevant contact networks is generally not known, and vaccine supply is often limited, there is great need for efficient vaccination algorithms that do not require full knowledge of the network. We developed an algorithm that acts only on locally available network information and is able to quickly identify targets for successful immunization intervention. The algorithm generally outperforms existing algorithms when vaccine supply is limited, particularly in networks with strong community structure. Understanding the spread of infectious diseases and designing optimal control strategies is a major goal of public health. Social networks show marked patterns of community structure, and our results, based on empirical and simulated data, demonstrate that community structure strongly affects disease dynamics. These results have implications for the design of control strategies.

  20. Flux Control in Networks of Diffusion Paths

    SciTech Connect

    A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-08

    A class of optimization problems in networks of intersecting diffusion domains of a special form of thin paths has been considered. The system of equations describing stationary solutions is equivalent to an electrical circuit built of intersecting conductors. The solution of an optimization problem has been obtained and extended to the analogous electrical circuit. The interest in this network arises from, among other applications, an application to wave-particle diffusion through resonant interactions in plasma.

  1. The Datacon Master -- Renovation of a Datacon field bus communications system for accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Datacon system is a serial coaxial transformer isolated communication field bus system used to control and monitor accelerator remote devices. The Datacon field bus has been a BNL accelerator standard since its initial use in 1965. A single Datacon field bus supports up to 256 devices on a multidrop RG62A/U coaxial cable with up to 33 devices or 2,000 feet between repeaters or buffered branches. The forcing factor to renovate was the inability to repair the aging PDP-8E and PDP10 computers. The maintenance on this aging system was costly and the large number of accelerator devices dependent on the Datacon system could not be converted in a reasonable period of time to a new modern field bus. A commercial VMEbus host CPU mated with a custom designed VMEbus SBC event driven serial communications engine featuring a superscaler RISC 32-bit Intel i960 CPU met the design challenge. The commercial VMEbus host runs the VxWorks real-time operating system and connects to UNIX workstations over a Ethernet LAN. The V110 Datacon Master is the custom designed front end computer that integrates an accelerator event time line system with accelerator devices for up to 8 ppm users adding new capabilities.

  2. NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

  3. A high-performance network for a distributed-control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuttone, G.; Aghion, F.; Giove, D.

    1989-04-01

    Local area networks play a central rule in modern distributed-control systems for accelerators. For a superconducting cyclotron under construction at the University of Milan, an optical Ethernet network has been implemented for the interconnection of multicomputer-based stations. Controller boards, with VLSI protocol chips, have been used. The higher levels of the ISO OSI model have been implemented to suit real-time control requirements. The experimental setup for measuring the data throughput between stations will be described. The effect of memory-to-memory data transfer with respect to the packet size has been studied for packets ranging from 200 bytes to 10 Kbytes. Results, showing the data throughput to range from 0.2 to 1.1 Mbit/s, will be discussed.

  4. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  5. Economical launching and accelerating control strategy for a single-shaft parallel hybrid electric bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Song, Jian; Li, Liang; Li, Shengbo; Cao, Dongpu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an economical launching and accelerating mode, including four ordered phases: pure electrical driving, clutch engagement and engine start-up, engine active charging, and engine driving, which can be fit for the alternating conditions and improve the fuel economy of hybrid electric bus (HEB) during typical city-bus driving scenarios. By utilizing the fast response feature of electric motor (EM), an adaptive controller for EM is designed to realize the power demand during the pure electrical driving mode, the engine starting mode and the engine active charging mode. Concurrently, the smoothness issue induced by the sequential mode transitions is solved with a coordinated control logic for engine, EM and clutch. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed launching and accelerating mode and its control methods are effective in improving the fuel economy and ensure the drivability during the fast transition between the operation modes of HEB.

  6. Control and scheduling codesign based on EDF-IAE in networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shen; Bing, Guo

    2005-12-01

    Networked control systems are one type of distributed real-time control systems where sensors, actuator and controllers are interconnected by communication networks. In networked control systems, the insertion of the communication network makes the analysis and design of a networked control system more complex. In the past, control system design and CPU scheduling or network scheduling design have normally been separated. But from the point of both the communication protocols and the interacting controlled system, they should not be treated as separate. Thus, a co-design approach is proposed. Firstly, transmission model for the networked control systems is defined when a set of networked control systems is connected to the network, the Rate Monotonic (RM) scheduling algorithm and the Earliest Deadline First (EDF) scheduling algorithm are introduced. Then, applying EDF scheduling algorithm with the Integral of the Absolute Error (IAE) to schedule a set of real-time networked control systems. Finally, a simulation example is given to implement EDF-IAE performance protocol. The simulation results show that EDF-IAE performance protocol is feasible.

  7. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  8. Backstepping Control Augmented by Neural Networks For Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkheiri, Mohammed; Boudjema, Farès

    2008-06-01

    A new control approach is proposed to address the tracking problem of robot manipulators. In this approach, one relies first on a partially known model to the system to be controlled using a backstepping control strategy. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modeling errors. The proposed approach is systematic, and exploits the known nonlinear dynamics to derive the stepwise virtual stabilizing control laws. At the final step, an augmented Lyapunov function is introduced to derive the adaptation laws of the network weights. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is demonstrated through computer simulation on PUMA 560 robot.

  9. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures.

  10. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  11. Adaptive neural network motion control of manipulators with experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Puga-Guzmán, S; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Santibáñez, V

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller. PMID:24574910

  12. Adaptive Neural Network Motion Control of Manipulators with Experimental Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Puga-Guzmán, S.; Moreno-Valenzuela, J.; Santibáñez, V.

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller. PMID:24574910

  13. Adaptive neural network motion control of manipulators with experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Puga-Guzmán, S; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Santibáñez, V

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller.

  14. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Brain Network Connectivity Maintains Cognition across the Lifespan Despite Accelerated Decay of Regional Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N.A.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Razi, Adeel; Geerligs, Linda; Ham, Timothy E.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of wellbeing across the lifespan depends on the preservation of cognitive function. We propose that successful cognitive aging is determined by interactions both within and between large-scale functional brain networks. Such connectivity can be estimated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), also known as resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). However, common correlational methods are confounded by age-related changes in the neurovascular signaling. To estimate network interactions at the neuronal rather than vascular level, we used generative models that specified both the neural interactions and a flexible neurovascular forward model. The networks' parameters were optimized to explain the spectral dynamics of rs-fMRI data in 602 healthy human adults from population-based cohorts who were approximately uniformly distributed between 18 and 88 years (www.cam-can.com). We assessed directed connectivity within and between three key large-scale networks: the salience network, dorsal attention network, and default mode network. We found that age influences connectivity both within and between these networks, over and above the effects on neurovascular coupling. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that the relationship between network connectivity and cognitive function was age-dependent: cognitive performance relied on neural dynamics more strongly in older adults. These effects were driven partly by reduced stability of neural activity within all networks, as expressed by an accelerated decay of neural information. Our findings suggest that the balance of excitatory connectivity between networks, and the stability of intrinsic neural representations within networks, changes with age. The cognitive function of older adults becomes increasingly dependent on these factors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintaining cognitive function is critical to successful aging. To study the neural basis of cognitive function across the lifespan, we studied a

  15. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  16. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Jennings, Esther H.

    2005-01-01

    Congestion control is an important feature that directly affects network performance. Network congestion may cause loss of data or long delays. Although this problem has been studied extensively in the Internet, the solutions for Internet congestion control do not apply readily to challenged network environments such as Delay Tolerant Networks (DTN) where end-to-end connectivity may not exist continuously and latency can be high. In DTN, end-to-end rate control is not feasible. This calls for congestion control mechanisms where the decisions can be made autonomously with local information only. We use an economic pricing model and propose a rule-based congestion control mechanism where each router can autonomously decide on whether to accept a bundle (data) based on local information such as available storage and the value and risk of accepting the bundle (derived from historical statistics).

  17. Evolving artificial neural networks to control chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Burgess, John M.

    1997-08-01

    We develop a genetic algorithm that produces neural network feedback controllers for chaotic systems. The algorithm was tested on the logistic and Hénon maps, for which it stabilizes an unstable fixed point using small perturbations, even in the presence of significant noise. The network training method [D. E. Moriarty and R. Miikkulainen, Mach. Learn. 22, 11 (1996)] requires no previous knowledge about the system to be controlled, including the dimensionality of the system and the location of unstable fixed points. This is the first dimension-independent algorithm that produces neural network controllers using time-series data. A software implementation of this algorithm is available via the World Wide Web.

  18. A GPU-accelerated cortical neural network model for visually guided robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Oros, Nicolas; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Humans and other terrestrial animals use vision to traverse novel cluttered environments with apparent ease. On one hand, although much is known about the behavioral dynamics of steering in humans, it remains unclear how relevant perceptual variables might be represented in the brain. On the other hand, although a wealth of data exists about the neural circuitry that is concerned with the perception of self-motion variables such as the current direction of travel, little research has been devoted to investigating how this neural circuitry may relate to active steering control. Here we present a cortical neural network model for visually guided navigation that has been embodied on a physical robot exploring a real-world environment. The model includes a rate based motion energy model for area V1, and a spiking neural network model for cortical area MT. The model generates a cortical representation of optic flow, determines the position of objects based on motion discontinuities, and combines these signals with the representation of a goal location to produce motor commands that successfully steer the robot around obstacles toward the goal. The model produces robot trajectories that closely match human behavioral data. This study demonstrates how neural signals in a model of cortical area MT might provide sufficient motion information to steer a physical robot on human-like paths around obstacles in a real-world environment, and exemplifies the importance of embodiment, as behavior is deeply coupled not only with the underlying model of brain function, but also with the anatomical constraints of the physical body it controls. PMID:26494281

  19. A GPU-accelerated cortical neural network model for visually guided robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Oros, Nicolas; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Humans and other terrestrial animals use vision to traverse novel cluttered environments with apparent ease. On one hand, although much is known about the behavioral dynamics of steering in humans, it remains unclear how relevant perceptual variables might be represented in the brain. On the other hand, although a wealth of data exists about the neural circuitry that is concerned with the perception of self-motion variables such as the current direction of travel, little research has been devoted to investigating how this neural circuitry may relate to active steering control. Here we present a cortical neural network model for visually guided navigation that has been embodied on a physical robot exploring a real-world environment. The model includes a rate based motion energy model for area V1, and a spiking neural network model for cortical area MT. The model generates a cortical representation of optic flow, determines the position of objects based on motion discontinuities, and combines these signals with the representation of a goal location to produce motor commands that successfully steer the robot around obstacles toward the goal. The model produces robot trajectories that closely match human behavioral data. This study demonstrates how neural signals in a model of cortical area MT might provide sufficient motion information to steer a physical robot on human-like paths around obstacles in a real-world environment, and exemplifies the importance of embodiment, as behavior is deeply coupled not only with the underlying model of brain function, but also with the anatomical constraints of the physical body it controls.

  20. Thermoelastic steam turbine rotor control based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzadkowski, Romuald; Dominiczak, Krzysztof; Radulski, Wojciech; Szczepanik, R.

    2015-12-01

    Considered here are Nonlinear Auto-Regressive neural networks with eXogenous inputs (NARX) as a mathematical model of a steam turbine rotor for controlling steam turbine stress on-line. In order to obtain neural networks that locate critical stress and temperature points in the steam turbine during transient states, an FE rotor model was built. This model was used to train the neural networks on the basis of steam turbine transient operating data. The training included nonlinearity related to steam turbine expansion, heat exchange and rotor material properties during transients. Simultaneous neural networks are algorithms which can be implemented on PLC controllers. This allows for the application neural networks to control steam turbine stress in industrial power plants.

  1. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems.

  2. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems.

  3. The deep space network, volume 18. [Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Ground Communication Facility, and Network Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  4. Asynchronous data change notification between database server and accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2011-10-10

    Database data change notification (DCN) is a commonly used feature. Not all database management systems (DBMS) provide an explicit DCN mechanism. Even for those DBMS's which support DCN (such as Oracle and MS SQL server), some server side and/or client side programming may be required to make the DCN system work. This makes the setup of DCN between database server and interested clients tedious and time consuming. In accelerator control systems, there are many well established software client/server architectures (such as CDEV, EPICS, and ADO) that can be used to implement data reflection servers that transfer data asynchronously to any client using the standard SET/GET API. This paper describes a method for using such a data reflection server to set up asynchronous DCN (ADCN) between a DBMS and clients. This method works well for all DBMS systems which provide database trigger functionality. Asynchronous data change notification (ADCN) between database server and clients can be realized by combining the use of a database trigger mechanism, which is supported by major DBMS systems, with server processes that use client/server software architectures that are familiar in the accelerator controls community (such as EPICS, CDEV or ADO). This approach makes the ADCN system easy to set up and integrate into an accelerator controls system. Several ADCN systems have been set up and used in the RHIC-AGS controls system.

  5. Basis function repetitive and feedback control with application to a particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akogyeram, Raphael Akuete

    2002-09-01

    The thesis addresses three problem areas within repetitive control. Firstly, it addresses issues concerning the ability of repetitive control and feedback control systems to eliminate periodic disturbances occurring above the Nyquist frequency of the hardware. Methods are developed for decomposing and unfolding notch filter or comb filter feedback control so that disturbances above Nyquist frequency can be canceled. Phenomena affecting final error levels are discussed, including error in unfolding, coarseness of zero-order hold cancellation, and waterbed effects in the feedback control system frequency response for different sample rates. Secondly, matched basis function repetitive control laws are developed for batch mode and real time implementation to converge to zero tracking error in the presence of periodic disturbances. For both control methods, conditions are given that guarantee asymptotic and monotonic convergence. Stability tests are formulated to examine stability when the period of a disturbance is not an integer number of sample times, and when there are multiple unrelated periods whose common period is too long to use. Thirdly, an understanding is developed of the optimum division of labor between the objectives accomplished by feedback and the objectives accomplished by repetitive control action. Some experimental results of the particle accelerator testbed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, are reported.

  6. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks. PMID:27152220

  7. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks.

  8. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals.

  9. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals. PMID:27586601

  10. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals.

  11. The Life-Changing Magic of Nonlinearity in Network Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean

    The proper functioning and reliability of many man-made and natural systems is fundamentally tied to our ability to control them. Indeed, applications as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response and cell reprogramming all, at their heart, require us to drive a system to--or keep it in--a desired state. This process is complicated by the nonlinear dynamics inherent to most real systems, which has traditionally been viewed as the principle obstacle to their control. In this talk, I will discuss two ways in which nonlinearity turns this view on its head, in fact representing an asset to the control of complex systems. First, I will show how nonlinearity in the form of multistability allows one to systematically design control interventions that can deliberately induce ``reverse cascading failures'', in which a network spontaneously evolves to a desirable (rather than a failed) state. Second, I will show that nonlinearity in the form of time-varying dynamics unexpectedly makes temporal networks easier to control than their static counterparts, with the former enjoying dramatic and simultaneous reductions in all costs of control. This is true despite the fact that temporality tends to fragment a network's structure, disrupting the paths that allow the directly-controlled or ``driver'' nodes to communicate with the rest of the network. Taken together, these studies shed new light on the crucial role of nonlinearity in network control, and provide support to the idea we can control nonlinearity, rather than letting nonlinearity control us.

  12. Transmission of Real World Force Sensation by Micro/Macro Bilateral Control Based on Acceleration Control with Standardization Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Tomoyuki; Katsura, Seiichiro; Susa, Shigeru; Takei, Takayoshi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This paper proposes novel micro/macro bilateral control based on acceleration control with standardization matrix. In bilateral control, force control and position control should be realized simultaneously. However, they are not able to be realized in one real axis at the same time. Thus, force control and position control are realized in virtual mode space in this paper. Then, the proposed standardization matrix is able to harmonize the standard of macro master system with the standard of micro slave system in the virtual mode space. With the proposed method, the transmission of force sensation from the real micro environment is realized. The experimental results are shown to verify the viability of the proposed method.

  13. Morphology of fluvial networks on Titan: Evidence for structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Devon M.; Drummond, Sarah A.; Cartwright, Richard; Black, Benjamin A.; Perron, J. Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Although Titan’s surface shows clear evidence of erosional modification, such as fluvial incision, evidence for tectonism has been less apparent. On Earth, fluvial networks with strongly preferred orientations are often associated with structural features, such as faults or joints, that influence flow or erodibility. We delineated and classified the morphologies of fluvial drainages on Titan and discovered evidence of structural control. Fluvial networks were delineated both on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images covering ∼40% of Titan from the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper up through T71 and on visible light images of the Huygens landing site collected by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR). The delineated networks were assigned to one of three morphologic classes-dendritic, parallel or rectangular-using a quantitative terrestrial drainage pattern classification algorithm modified for use with Titan data. We validated our modified algorithm by applying it to synthetic fluvial networks produced by a landscape evolution model with no structural control of drainage orientations, and confirmed that only a small fraction of the networks are falsely identified as structurally controlled. As a second validation, we confirmed that our modified algorithm correctly classifies terrestrial networks that are classified in multiple previous works as rectangular. Application of this modified algorithm to our Titan networks results in a classification of rectangular for one-half of the SAR and DISR networks. A review of the geological context of the four terrestrial rectangular networks indicates that tensional stresses formed the structures controlling those terrestrial drainages. Based on the similar brittle response of rock and cryogenic ice to stress, we infer that structures formed under tension are the most likely cause of the rectangular Titan networks delineated here. The distribution of these rectangular networks suggests that tensional stresses on Titan may

  14. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method.

  15. High Availability On-line Relational Databases for Accelerator Control and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dohan,D.; Dalesio, L.; Carcassi, G.

    2009-05-04

    The role that relational database (RDB) technology plays in accelerator control and operation continues to grow in such areas as electronic logbooks, machine parameter definitions, and facility infrastructure management. RDBs are increasingly relied upon to provide the official 'master' copy of these data. Whereas the services provided by the RDB have traditionally not been 'mission critical', the availability of modern RDB management systems is now equivalent to that of standard computer file-systems. RDBs can be relied on to supply pseudo real-time response to operator and machine physicist requests. This paper describes recent developments in the IRMIS RDB project. Generic lattice support has been added, serving as the driver for model-based machine control. Abstract physics name service and process variable introspection has been added. Specific emphasis has been placed both on providing fast response time to accelerator operators and modeling code requests, as well as high (24/7) availability of the RDB service.

  16. Host-based data acquisition system to control pulsed facilities of the accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamriy, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    The report discusses development of the host-based system to carry out timed measurements and data acquisition for the control of pulsed facilities of the accelerator. We consider modes of timing and allocation of operations of channels and the system node. The time of any working cycle of the pulsed facilities, rate of a data flow and an amount of serviced channels are coordinated with operation characteristics of the system node. Estimations of the readout rate of the data and the waiting time demonstrate the system efficiency. The technique has been developed to provide checking of groups of pulse parameters and control the facilities of the linear accelerator of electrons LUE-200 of the neutron source IREN.

  17. On neural networks in identification and control of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the applicability of neural networks in the identification and control of dynamic systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how the neural networks handle linear systems and how the new approach is related to conventional system identification and control methods. Extensions of the approach to nonlinear systems are then made. The paper explains the fundamental concepts of neural networks in their simplest terms. Among the topics discussed are feed forward and recurrent networks in relation to the standard state-space and observer models, linear and nonlinear auto-regressive models, linear, predictors, one-step ahead control, and model reference adaptive control for linear and nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of these important concepts.

  18. Autonomous Congestion Control in Delay-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott; Jennings, Esther; Schoolcraft, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    This presentation highlights communication congestion control in delay-tolerant networks (DTNs). Large-scale future space exploration will offer complex communication challenges that may be best addressed by establishing a network infrastructure. However, current internet techniques for congestion control are not well suited for operation of a network over interplanetary distances. An alternative, delay-tolerant technique for congestion control in a delay-tolerant network is presented. A simple DTN was constructed and an experimental congestion control mechanism was applied. The mechanism appeared to be effective and each router was able to make its bundle acceptance decisions autonomously. Future research will examine more complex topologies and alternative bundle acceptance rules that might enhance performance.

  19. Enhancing complex network controllability by minimum link direction reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lvlin; Lao, Songyang; Small, Michael; Xiao, Yandong

    2015-07-01

    Controllability of complex networks has recently become one of the most popular research fields, but the importance of link direction for controllability has not been systematically considered. We propose a method to enhance controllability of a directed network by changing the direction of a small fraction of links while keeping the total number of links unchanged. The main idea of the method is to find candidate links based on the matching path. Extensive numerical simulation on many modeled networks demonstrates that this method is effective. Furthermore, we find that the nodes linked to candidate links have a distinct character, which provide us with a strategy to improve the controllability based on the local structure. Since the whole topology of many real networks is not visible and we only get some local structure information, this strategy is potentially more practical compared to those that demand complete topology information.

  20. Controlling natural convection in a closed thermosyphon using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, L.; Fichera, A.; Pagano, A.

    . The aim of this paper is to present a neural network-based approach to identification and control of a rectangular natural circulation loop. The first part of the paper defines a NARMAX model for the prediction of the experimental oscillating behavior characterizing the fluid temperature. The model has been generalized and implemented by means of a Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network that has been trained to simulate the system experimental dynamics. In the second part of the paper, the NARMAX model has been used to simulate the plant during the training of another neural network aiming to suppress the undesired oscillating behavior of the system. In order to define the neural controller, a cascade of several couples of neural networks representing both the system and the controller has been used, the number of couples coinciding with the number of steps in which the control action is exerted.

  1. Adaptive artificial neural network for autonomous robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: neural network controller for robot arm positioning with visual feedback; initial training of the arm; automatic recovery from cumulative fault scenarios; and error reduction by iterative fine movements.

  2. Recognition with self-control in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Nowak, Andrzej

    1989-10-01

    We present a theory of fully connected neural networks that incorporates mechanisms of dynamical self-control of recognition process. Using a functional integral technique, we formulate mean-field dynamics for such systems.

  3. Multi-loop networked process control: a synchronized approach.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Ghosh, R; Goswami, B; Chandra, A K; Balasubramanian, R; Luksch, P; Gupta, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern day process control uses digital controllers which are based on the principle of distributed rather than centralized control. Distributing controllers, sensors and actuators across a plant entails considerable wiring which can be reduced substantially by integrating the components of a control loop over a network. The other advantages include greater flexibility and higher reliability with lower hardware redundancy. The controllers and sensors are on a network and can take over the function of a failed component automatically, without the need of manual reconfiguration, thus eliminating the need of having a redundant component for each and every component. Though elaborate techniques have been developed for Single Input Single Output (SISO) systems, the major challenge lies in extending these ideas to control a practical process plant where de-centralized control is actually achieved through control of individual SISO control loops derived through de-coupling of the original system. Multiple loops increase network load and hence the sampling times associated with the control loops and makes synchronization difficult. This paper presents a methodology by which network based process control can be applied to practical process plants, with a simple direct synchronization mechanism. PMID:19028386

  4. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A communications system and method are provided for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. Network device interfaces associated with different data channels can coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  5. Active control of an innovative seat suspension system with acceleration measurement based friction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Donghong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Hongyi; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an innovative active seat suspension system for vehicles is presented. This seat suspension prototype is built with two low cost actuators each of which has one rotary motor and one gear reducer. A H∞ controller with friction compensation is designed for the seat suspension control system where the friction is estimated and compensated based on the measurement of seat acceleration. This principal aim of this research was to control the low frequency vibration transferred or amplified by the vehicle (chassis) suspension, and to maintain the passivity of the seat suspension at high frequency (isolation vibration) while taking into consideration the trade-off between the active seat suspension cost and its high frequency performance. Sinusoidal excitations of 1-4.5 Hz were applied to test the active seat suspension both when controlled and when uncontrolled and this is compared with a well-tuned passive heavy duty vehicle seat suspension. The results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm within the tested frequencies. Further tests were conducted using the excitations generated from a quarter-car model under bump and random road profiles. The bump road tests indicate the controlled active seat suspension has good transient response performance. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) method and ISO 2631-1 standards were applied to analyse the seat suspension's acceleration under random road conditions. Although some low magnitude and high frequency noise will inevitably be introduced by the active system, the weighted-frequency Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration shows that this may not have a large effect on ride comfort. In fact, the ride comfort is improved from being an 'a little uncomfortable' to a 'not uncomfortable' level when compared with the well-tuned passive seat suspension. This low cost active seat suspension design and the proposed controller with the easily measured feedback signals are very practical for real

  6. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  7. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  8. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; MacLellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources.

  9. Hybrid modeling and receding horizon control of sewer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph-Duran, Bernat; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Cembrano, Gabriela

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a control-oriented sewer network model is presented based on a hybrid linear modeling framework. The model equations are described independently for each network element, thus allowing the model to be applied to a broad class of networks. A parameter calibration procedure using data obtained from simulation software that solves the physically based model equations is described and validation results are given for a case study. Using the control model equations, an optimal control problem to minimize flooding and pollution is formulated to be solved by means of mixed-integer linear or quadratic programming. A receding horizon control strategy based on this optimal control problem is applied to the case study using the simulation software as a virtual reality. Results of this closed-loop simulation tests show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in fulfilling the control objectives while complying with physical and operational constraints.

  10. Adaptive Quality of Transmission Control in Elastic Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xinran

    Optical fiber communication is becoming increasingly important due to the burgeoning demand in the internet capacity. However, traditional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique fails to address such demand because of its inefficient spectral utilization. As a result, elastic optical networking (EON) has been under extensive investigation recently. Such network allows sub-wavelength and super-wavelength channel accommodation, and mitigates the stranded bandwidth problem in the WDM network. In addition, elastic optical network is also able to dynamically allocate the spectral resources of the network based on channel conditions and impairments, and adaptively control the quality of transmission of a channel. This application requires two aspects to be investigated: an efficient optical performance monitoring scheme and networking control and management algorithms to reconfigure the network in a dynamic fashion. This thesis focuses on the two aspects discussed above about adaptive QoT control. We demonstrated a supervisory channel method for optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring. In addition, our proof-of-principle testbed experiments show successful impairment aware reconfiguration of the network with modulation format switching (MFS) only and MFS combined with lightpath rerouting (LR) for hundred-GHz QPSK superchannels undergoing time-varying OSNR impairment.

  11. Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Johnstone

    2004-08-23

    Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  12. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and SpaceCharge Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, Gwenael G.J.

    2005-09-01

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 μm, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread.

  13. Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccine Schedule among Drug Users – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Lu-Yu; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Tran, Thanh Quoc; Clark, April; Xia, Rui; Lai, Dejian; Troisi, Catherine; Williams, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B vaccine provides a model for improving uptake and completion of multi-dose vaccinations in the drug-using community. Methods DASH project conducted randomized controlled trial among not-in-treatment current drug users in two urban neighborhoods. Neighborhoods were cluster-randomized to receive a standard (HIV information) or enhanced (HBV vaccine acceptance/adherence) behavioral intervention; participants within clusters were randomized to a standard (0, 1, 6 mo) or accelerated (0, 1, 2 mo) vaccination schedule. Outcomes were completion of three-dose vaccine and HBV seroprotection. Results Of those screening negative for HIV/HBV, 77% accepted HB vaccination and 75% of those received all 3 doses. Injecting drug users (IDUs) on the accelerated schedule were significantly more likely to receive 3 doses (76%) than those on the standard schedule (66%, p=.04), although for drug users as a whole the adherence was 77% and 73%. No difference in adherence was observed between behavioral intervention groups. Predictors of adherence were older age, African American race, stable housing, and alcohol use. Cumulative HBV seroprotection (≥10 mIU/mL) was gained by 12 months by 65% of those completing. Seroprotection at 6 months was greater for the accelerated schedule group. Conclusions The accelerated vaccine schedule improves hepatitis B vaccination adherence among IDU. PMID:20936979

  14. Ideomotor feedback control in a recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Mathieu

    2015-06-01

    The architecture of a neural network controlling an unknown environment is presented. It is based on a randomly connected recurrent neural network from which both perception and action are simultaneously read and fed back. There are two concurrent learning rules implementing a sort of ideomotor control: (i) perception is learned along the principle that the network should predict reliably its incoming stimuli; (ii) action is learned along the principle that the prediction of the network should match a target time series. The coherent behavior of the neural network in its environment is a consequence of the interaction between the two principles. Numerical simulations show a promising performance of the approach, which can be turned into a local and better "biologically plausible" algorithm.

  15. Quality of service policy control in virtual private networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiqing; Wang, Hongbin; Zhou, Zhi; Zhou, Dongru

    2004-04-01

    This paper studies the QoS of VPN in an environment where the public network prices connection-oriented services based on source, destination and grade of service, and advertises these prices to its VPN customers (users). As different QoS technologies can produce different QoS, there are according different traffic classification rules and priority rules. The internet service provider (ISP) may need to build complex mechanisms separately for each node. In order to reduce the burden of network configuration, we need to design policy control technologies. We considers mainly directory server, policy server, policy manager and policy enforcers. Policy decision point (PDP) decide its control according to policy rules. In network, policy enforce point (PEP) decide its network controlled unit. For InterServ and DiffServ, we will adopt different policy control methods as following: (1) In InterServ, traffic uses resource reservation protocol (RSVP) to guarantee the network resource. (2) In DiffServ, policy server controls the DiffServ code points and per hop behavior (PHB), its PDP distributes information to each network node. Policy server will function as following: information searching; decision mechanism; decision delivering; auto-configuration. In order to prove the effectiveness of QoS policy control, we make the corrective simulation.

  16. Adaptive mechanism-based congestion control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2013-03-01

    In order to assure the communication quality in network systems with heavy traffic and limited bandwidth, a new ATRED (adaptive thresholds random early detection) congestion control algorithm is proposed for the congestion avoidance and resource management of network systems. Different to the traditional AQM (active queue management) algorithms, the control parameters of ATRED are not configured statically, but dynamically adjusted by the adaptive mechanism. By integrating with the adaptive strategy, ATRED alleviates the tuning difficulty of RED (random early detection) and shows a better control on the queue management, and achieve a more robust performance than RED under varying network conditions. Furthermore, a dynamic transmission control protocol-AQM control system using ATRED controller is introduced for the systematic analysis. It is proved that the stability of the network system can be guaranteed when the adaptive mechanism is finely designed. Simulation studies show the proposed ATRED algorithm achieves a good performance in varying network environments, which is superior to the RED and Gentle-RED algorithm, and providing more reliable service under varying network conditions.

  17. Using EDF-IAE to integrate scheduling and control for networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Guo, Bing; Li, Xunbo

    2007-12-01

    Networked control systems are one type of distributed real-time control systems where sensors, actuator and controllers are interconnected by communication networks. The insertion of the communication network makes the analysis and design of a networked control system complex. So the performance of the control loops not only depends on the design of the control algorithms, but also on the scheduling of the shared network resource. A co-design method based on the integrated Earliest Deadline First (EDF) scheduling algorithm and the Integral of the Absolute Error (IAE) is proposed in order that the communication medium is more efficiently used and control performance is improved. The presented method can adjust the sampling period, handle three types of message and guarantees real-time transmission of periodic and aperiodic message, and non-real time message. The simulation results show that the proposed co-design method is available and improve the system resources efficiency.

  18. Prediction and control of chaotic processes using nonlinear adaptive networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Flake, G.W.; Lee, K.; Lewis, P.S.; O'Rouke, M.K.; Qian, S.

    1990-01-01

    We present the theory of nonlinear adaptive networks and discuss a few applications. In particular, we review the theory of feedforward backpropagation networks. We then present the theory of the Connectionist Normalized Linear Spline network in both its feedforward and iterated modes. Also, we briefly discuss the theory of stochastic cellular automata. We then discuss applications to chaotic time series, tidal prediction in Venice lagoon, finite differencing, sonar transient detection, control of nonlinear processes, control of a negative ion source, balancing a double inverted pendulum and design advice for free electron lasers and laser fusion targets.

  19. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman

    2014-09-12

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  20. Validation of a new control system for Elekta accelerators facilitating continuously variable dose rate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelsen, Anders; Lorenzen, Ebbe L.; Brink, Carsten

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Elekta accelerators controlled by the current clinically used accelerator control system, Desktop 7.01 (D7), uses binned variable dose rate (BVDR) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The next version of the treatment control system (Integrity) supports continuously variable dose rate (CVDR) as well as BVDR. Using CVDR opposed to BVDR for VMAT has the potential of reducing the treatment time but may lead to lower dosimetric accuracy due to faster moving accelerator parts. Using D7 and a test version of Integrity, differences in ability to control the accelerator, treatment efficiency, and dosimetric accuracy between the two systems were investigated. Methods: Single parameter tests were designed to expose differences in the way the two systems control the movements of the accelerator. In these tests, either the jaws, multi leaf collimators (MLCs), or gantry moved at constant speed while the dose rate was changed in discrete steps. The positional errors of the moving component and dose rate were recorded using the control systems with a sampling frequency of 4 Hz. The clinical applicability of Integrity was tested using 15 clinically used VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5 H and N, and 5 lung) generated by the SmartArc algorithm in PINNACLE. The treatment time was measured from beam-on to beam-off and the accuracy of the dose delivery was assessed by comparing DELTA4 measurements and PINNACLE calculated doses using gamma evaluation. Results: The single parameter tests showed that Integrity had an improved feedback between gantry motion and dose rate at the slight expense of MLC control compared to D7. The single parameter test did not reveal any significant differences in the control of either jaws or backup jaws between the two systems. These differences in gantry and MLC control together with the use of CVDR gives a smoother Integrity VMAT delivery compared to D7 with less abrupt changes in accelerator motion. Gamma evaluation (2% of 2 Gy and 2 mm) of the

  1. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  2. Neural network based dynamic controllers for industrial robots.

    PubMed

    Oh, S Y; Shin, W C; Kim, H G

    1995-09-01

    The industrial robot's dynamic performance is frequently measured by positioning accuracy at high speeds and a good dynamic controller is essential that can accurately compute robot dynamics at a servo rate high enough to ensure system stability. A real-time dynamic controller for an industrial robot is developed here using neural networks. First, an efficient time-selectable hidden layer architecture has been developed based on system dynamics localized in time, which lends itself to real-time learning and control along with enhanced mapping accuracy. Second, the neural network architecture has also been specially tuned to accommodate servo dynamics. This not only facilitates the system design through reduced sensing requirements for the controller but also enhances the control performance over the control architecture neglecting servo dynamics. Experimental results demonstrate the controller's excellent learning and control performances compared with a conventional controller and thus has good potential for practical use in industrial robots.

  3. Gene networks controlling early cerebral cortex arealization.

    PubMed

    Mallamaci, Antonello; Stoykova, Anastassia

    2006-02-01

    Early thalamus-independent steps in the process of cortical arealization take place on the basis of information intrinsic to the cortical primordium, as proposed by Rakic in his classical protomap hypothesis [Rakic, P. (1988)Science, 241, 170-176]. These steps depend on a dense network of molecular interactions, involving genes encoding for diffusible ligands which are released around the borders of the cortical field, and transcription factor genes which are expressed in graded ways throughout this field. In recent years, several labs worldwide have put considerable effort into identifying members of this network and disentangling its topology. In this respect, a considerable amount of knowledge has accumulated and a first, provisional description of the network can be delineated. The aim of this review is to provide an organic synthesis of our current knowledge of molecular genetics of early cortical arealization, i.e. to summarise the mechanisms by which secreted ligands and graded transcription factor genes elaborate positional information and trigger the activation of distinctive area-specific morphogenetic programs.

  4. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pareja, S.; Vilches, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    The ant colony method is used to control the application of variance reduction techniques to the simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy. In particular, splitting and Russian roulette, two standard variance reduction methods, are considered. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits, in addition, to investigate the "hot" regions of the accelerator, an information which is basic to develop a source model for this therapy tool.

  5. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  6. Network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  7. Applying Trusted Network Technology To Process Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhravi, Hamed; Nicol, David

    Interconnections between process control networks and enterprise networks expose instrumentation and control systems and the critical infrastructure components they operate to a variety of cyber attacks. Several architectural standards and security best practices have been proposed for industrial control systems. However, they are based on older architectures and do not leverage the latest hardware and software technologies. This paper describes new technologies that can be applied to the design of next generation security architectures for industrial control systems. The technologies are discussed along with their security benefits and design trade-offs.

  8. Controllability of Boolean networks via input controls under Harvey's update scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Shao, Rui; Zheng, YuanJie

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the controllability of Boolean networks via input controls under Harvey's update scheme is investigated. First, the model of Boolean control networks under Harvey's stochastic update is proposed, by means of semi-tensor product approach, which is converted into discrete-time linear representation. And, a general formula of control-depending network transition matrix is provided. Second, based on discrete-time dynamics, controllability of the proposed model is analytically discussed by revealing the necessary and sufficient conditions of the reachable sets, respectively, for three kinds of controls, i.e., free Boolean control sequence, input control networks, and close-loop control. Examples are showed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  9. Controllability of Boolean networks via input controls under Harvey's update scheme.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Shao, Rui; Zheng, YuanJie

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the controllability of Boolean networks via input controls under Harvey's update scheme is investigated. First, the model of Boolean control networks under Harvey's stochastic update is proposed, by means of semi-tensor product approach, which is converted into discrete-time linear representation. And, a general formula of control-depending network transition matrix is provided. Second, based on discrete-time dynamics, controllability of the proposed model is analytically discussed by revealing the necessary and sufficient conditions of the reachable sets, respectively, for three kinds of controls, i.e., free Boolean control sequence, input control networks, and close-loop control. Examples are showed to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  10. A Method of Social Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing Acceleration for e-Learning System: The Distance Learning Network Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różewski, Przemysław

    Nowadays, e-learning systems take the form of the Distance Learning Network (DLN) due to widespread use and accessibility of the Internet and networked e-learning services. The focal point of the DLN performance is efficiency of knowledge processing in asynchronous learning mode and facilitating cooperation between students. In addition, the DLN articulates attention to social aspects of the learning process as well. In this paper, a method for the DLN development is proposed. The main research objectives for the proposed method are the processes of acceleration of social collaboration and knowledge sharing in the DLN. The method introduces knowledge-disposed agents (who represent students in educational scenarios) that form a network of individuals aimed to increase their competence. For every agent the competence expansion process is formulated. Based on that outcome the process of dynamic network formation performed on the social and knowledge levels. The method utilizes formal apparatuses of competence set and network game theories combined with an agent system-based approach.

  11. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  12. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2014-01-15

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup −7} rad /√( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  13. Cavity control system advanced modeling and simulations for TESLA linear accelerator and free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The cavity control system for the TESLA -- TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project is initially introduced. The elementary analysis of the cavity resonator on RF (radio frequency) level and low level frequency with signal and power considerations is presented. For the field vector detection the digital signal processing is proposed. The electromechanical model concerning Lorentz force detuning is applied for analyzing the basic features of the system performance. For multiple cavities driven by one klystron the field vector sum control is considered. Simulink model implementation is developed to explore the feedback and feed-forward system operation and some experimental results for signals and power considerations are presented.

  14. A unified lunar control network - The near side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Merton E.; Colvin, Tim R.; Meyer, Donald L.

    1987-12-01

    A unified lunar control network for the moon's near side, which combines all the data collected by the Lunokhod 2 and Apollo 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions, is presented. Transformations involving translation, rotation, and scale were determined that adjusted the coordinates of the points of three Apollo control networks, computed previously, to the center of mass origin and the mean earth/polar axis coordinate system defined by the lunar ranging retroreflector experiment. The transformed control network computed by the Defense Mapping Agency Aerospace Center was found to be the best fit to the Apollo ALSEP antenna coordinates and was selected as a base to transform all points in Meyer's (1979) telescopic network to the new origin and coordinate system. New coordinates of 1156 of these points are given as are 10 points from a Mariner 10 solution in the north polar region.

  15. Space Network Control Conference on Resource Allocation Concepts and Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Karen L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Space Network Control (SNC) Conference. In the late 1990s, when the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System is operational, Space Network communication services will be supported and controlled by the SNC. The goals of the conference were to survey existing resource allocation concepts and approaches, to identify solutions applicable to the Space Network, and to identify avenues of study in support of the SNC development. The conference was divided into three sessions: (1) Concepts for Space Network Allocation; (2) SNC and User Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Human-Computer Interface Concepts; and (3) Resource Allocation Tools, Technology, and Algorithms. Key recommendations addressed approaches to achieving higher levels of automation in the scheduling process.

  16. A global spacecraft control network for spacecraft autonomy research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitts, Christopher A.

    1996-01-01

    The development and implementation of the Automated Space System Experimental Testbed (ASSET) space operations and control network, is reported on. This network will serve as a command and control architecture for spacecraft operations and will offer a real testbed for the application and validation of advanced autonomous spacecraft operations strategies. The proposed network will initially consist of globally distributed amateur radio ground stations at locations throughout North America and Europe. These stations will be linked via Internet to various control centers. The Stanford (CA) control center will be capable of human and computer based decision making for the coordination of user experiments, resource scheduling and fault management. The project's system architecture is described together with its proposed use as a command and control system, its value as a testbed for spacecraft autonomy research, and its current implementation.

  17. On controlling networks of limit-cycle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2016-09-01

    The control of network-coupled nonlinear dynamical systems is an active area of research in the nonlinear science community. Coupled oscillator networks represent a particularly important family of nonlinear systems, with applications ranging from the power grid to cardiac excitation. Here, we study the control of network-coupled limit cycle oscillators, extending the previous work that focused on phase oscillators. Based on stabilizing a target fixed point, our method aims to attain complete frequency synchronization, i.e., consensus, by applying control to as few oscillators as possible. We develop two types of controls. The first type directs oscillators towards larger amplitudes, while the second does not. We present numerical examples of both control types and comment on the potential failures of the method.

  18. A Hybrid Authentication and Authorization Process for Control System Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, David O.; Edgar, Thomas W.; Fink, Glenn A.

    2010-08-25

    Convergence of control system and IT networks require that security, privacy, and trust be addressed. Trust management continues to plague traditional IT managers and is even more complex when extended into control system networks, with potentially millions of entities, a mission that requires 100% availability. Yet these very networks necessitate a trusted secure environment where controllers and managers can be assured that the systems are secure and functioning properly. We propose a hybrid authentication management protocol that addresses the unique issues inherent within control system networks, while leveraging the considerable research and momentum in existing IT authentication schemes. Our hybrid authentication protocol for control systems provides end device to end device authentication within a remote station and between remote stations and control centers. Additionally, the hybrid protocol is failsafe and will not interrupt communication or control of vital systems in a network partition or device failure. Finally, the hybrid protocol is resilient to transitory link loss and can operate in an island mode until connectivity is reestablished.

  19. Identifying controlling nodes in neuronal networks in different scales.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Gao, Huijun; Zou, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have detected hubs in neuronal networks using degree, betweenness centrality, motif and synchronization and revealed the importance of hubs in their structural and functional roles. In addition, the analysis of complex networks in different scales are widely used in physics community. This can provide detailed insights into the intrinsic properties of networks. In this study, we focus on the identification of controlling regions in cortical networks of cats' brain in microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic scales, based on single-objective evolutionary computation methods. The problem is investigated by considering two measures of controllability separately. The impact of the number of driver nodes on controllability is revealed and the properties of controlling nodes are shown in a statistical way. Our results show that the statistical properties of the controlling nodes display a concave or convex shape with an increase of the allowed number of controlling nodes, revealing a transition in choosing driver nodes from the areas with a large degree to the areas with a low degree. Interestingly, the community Auditory in cats' brain, which has sparse connections with other communities, plays an important role in controlling the neuronal networks.

  20. Constrained off-line synthesis approach of model predictive control for networked control systems with network-induced delays.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoming; Qu, Hongchun; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Meng

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates the off-line synthesis approach of model predictive control (MPC) for a class of networked control systems (NCSs) with network-induced delays. A new augmented model which can be readily applied to time-varying control law, is proposed to describe the NCS where bounded deterministic network-induced delays may occur in both sensor to controller (S-A) and controller to actuator (C-A) links. Based on this augmented model, a sufficient condition of the closed-loop stability is derived by applying the Lyapunov method. The off-line synthesis approach of model predictive control is addressed using the stability results of the system, which explicitly considers the satisfaction of input and state constraints. Numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Temporal modulation of collective cell behavior controls vascular network topology

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Esther; Kim, Jiha; Tata, Aleksandra; Comin, Cesar H; Harrington, Kyle I; Costa, Luciano da F; Bentley, Katie; Gu, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular network density determines the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to host tissues, but how the vast diversity of densities is generated is unknown. Reiterations of endothelial-tip-cell selection, sprout extension and anastomosis are the basis for vascular network generation, a process governed by the VEGF/Notch feedback loop. Here, we find that temporal regulation of this feedback loop, a previously unexplored dimension, is the key mechanism to determine vascular density. Iterating between computational modeling and in vivo live imaging, we demonstrate that the rate of tip-cell selection determines the length of linear sprout extension at the expense of branching, dictating network density. We provide the first example of a host tissue-derived signal (Semaphorin3E-Plexin-D1) that accelerates tip cell selection rate, yielding a dense network. We propose that temporal regulation of this critical, iterative aspect of network formation could be a general mechanism, and additional temporal regulators may exist to sculpt vascular topology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13212.001 PMID:26910011

  2. Temporal modulation of collective cell behavior controls vascular network topology.

    PubMed

    Kur, Esther; Kim, Jiha; Tata, Aleksandra; Comin, Cesar H; Harrington, Kyle I; Costa, Luciano da F; Bentley, Katie; Gu, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular network density determines the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to host tissues, but how the vast diversity of densities is generated is unknown. Reiterations of endothelial-tip-cell selection, sprout extension and anastomosis are the basis for vascular network generation, a process governed by the VEGF/Notch feedback loop. Here, we find that temporal regulation of this feedback loop, a previously unexplored dimension, is the key mechanism to determine vascular density. Iterating between computational modeling and in vivo live imaging, we demonstrate that the rate of tip-cell selection determines the length of linear sprout extension at the expense of branching, dictating network density. We provide the first example of a host tissue-derived signal (Semaphorin3E-Plexin-D1) that accelerates tip cell selection rate, yielding a dense network. We propose that temporal regulation of this critical, iterative aspect of network formation could be a general mechanism, and additional temporal regulators may exist to sculpt vascular topology.

  3. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron–betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators. PMID:24026068

  4. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron-betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators.

  5. FIPA agent based network distributed control system

    SciTech Connect

    D. Abbott; V. Gyurjyan; G. Heyes; E. Jastrzembski; C. Timmer; E. Wolin

    2003-03-01

    A control system with the capabilities to combine heterogeneous control systems or processes into a uniform homogeneous environment is discussed. This dynamically extensible system is an example of the software system at the agent level of abstraction. This level of abstraction considers agents as atomic entities that communicate to implement the functionality of the control system. Agents' engineering aspects are addressed by adopting the domain independent software standard, formulated by FIPA. Jade core Java classes are used as a FIPA specification implementation. A special, lightweight, XML RDFS based, control oriented, ontology markup language is developed to standardize the description of the arbitrary control system data processor. Control processes, described in this language, are integrated into the global system at runtime, without actual programming. Fault tolerance and recovery issues are also addressed.

  6. Noise Control for a Moving Evaluation Point Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Toshiki; Shiraishi, Toshihiko

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the noise control for a moving evaluation point using neural networks by making the best use of its learning ability. Noise control is a technology which is effective on low-frequency noise. Based on the principle of superposition, a primary sound wave can be cancelled at an evaluation point by emitting a secondary opposite sound wave. To obtain good control performance, it is important to precisely identify the characteristics of all the sound paths. One of the most popular algorithms of noise control is filtered-x LMS algorithm. This algorithm can deliver a good result while all the sound paths do not change. However, the control system becomes uncontrollable while the evaluation point is moving. To solve the problem, the characteristics of all the paths are must be identified at all time. In this paper, we applied neural networks with the learning ability to the noise control system to follow the time-varying paths and verified its control performance by numerical simulations. Then, dropout technique for the networks is also applied. Dropout is a technique that prevent the network from overfitting and enables better control performance. By applying dropout for noise control, it prevents the system from diverging.

  7. Genes and experience shape brain networks of conscious control.

    PubMed

    Posner, Michael I

    2005-01-01

    One aspect of consciousness involves voluntary control over thoughts and feelings, often called will. Progress in neuroimaging and in sequencing the human genome makes it possible to think about voluntary control in terms of a specific neural network that includes midline and lateral frontal areas. A number of cognitive tasks involving conflict as well as the control of emotions have been shown to activate these brain areas. Studies have traced the development of this network in the ability to regulate cognition and emotion from about 2.5 to 7 years of age. Individual differences in this network have been related to parental reports of the ability of children to regulate their behavior, to delay reward and to develop a conscience. In adolescents these individual differences predict the propensity for antisocial behavior. Differences in specific genes are related to individual efficiency in performance of the network, and by neuroimaging, to the strength of its activation of this network. Future animal studies may make it possible to learn in detail how genes influence the common pattern of development of self-regulation made possible by this network. Moreover, a number of neurological and psychiatric pathologies involving difficulties in awareness and volition show deficits in parts of this network. We are now studying whether specific training experiences can influence the development of this network in 4-year-old children and if so, for whom it is most effective. Voluntary control is also important for the regulation of conscious input from the sensory environment. It seems likely that the same network involved in self-regulation is also crucial for focal attention to the sensory world.

  8. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network.

  9. Information spread in networks: Games, optimal control, and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafer, Ali

    This thesis focuses on designing efficient mechanisms for controlling information spread in networks. We consider two models for information spread. The first one is the well-known distributed averaging dynamics. The second model is a nonlinear one that describes virus spread in computer and biological networks. We seek to design optimal, robust, and stabilizing controllers under practical constraints. For distributed averaging networks, we study the interaction between a network designer and an adversary. We consider two types of attacks on the network. In Attack-I, the adversary strategically disconnects a set of links to prevent the nodes from reaching consensus. Meanwhile, the network designer assists the nodes in reaching consensus by changing the weights of a limited number of links in the network. We formulate two problems to describe this competition where the order in which the players act is reversed in the two problems. Although the canonical equations provided by the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (MP) seem to be intractable, we provide an alternative characterization for the optimal strategies that makes connection to potential theory. Further, we provide a sufficient condition for the existence of a saddle-point equilibrium (SPE) for the underlying zero-sum game. In Attack-II, the designer and the adversary are both capable of altering the measurements of all nodes in the network by injecting global signals. We impose two constraints on both players: a power constraint and an energy constraint. We assume that the available energy to each player is not sufficient to operate at maximum power throughout the horizon of the game. We show the existence of an SPE and derive the optimal strategies in closed form for this attack scenario. As an alternative to the "network designer vs. adversary" framework, we investigate the possibility of stabilizing unknown network diffusion processes using a distributed mechanism, where the uncertainty is due to an attack

  10. Role extraction in complex networks and its application in control of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mingyang; He, Xingsheng; Fu, Zhongqian; Zhuo, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Given a large network, dynamics of the network are determined by both nodes' features and network connections. Some features could be extracted from node labels and other kinds of priori knowledge. But how to perform the feature classification without priori knowledge is a challenge. This paper addresses the key problem: how do we conduct role extraction in networks with only edge connections known? On the basis of behavior differences in dynamics, nodes are classified into three role groups: Leaders(L), Communicators(C) and Members(M). Unlike traditional community detections, we detect overlapping communities by link clustering first and then classify nodes according to the community entropy, which describes the disorder of how many different communities a node connects to. We propose a time saving and unsupervised learning approach for automatically discovering nodes' roles based solely on network topology. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated on six real-world networks through pinning control. By controlling communicator nodes, the controllability is enhanced and the cost for control is reduced obviously in networks with strong community structure.

  11. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  12. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-08-15

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high-energy physics applications.

  13. Performance analysis of reactive congestion control for ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Kenji; Oie, Yuji; Murata, Masayuki; Miyahara, Hideo

    1995-05-01

    In ATM networks, preventive congestion control is widely recognized for efficiently avoiding congestion, and it is implemented by a conjunction of connection admission control and usage parameter control. However, congestion may still occur because of unpredictable statistical fluctuation of traffic sources even when preventive control is performed in the network. In this paper, we study another kind of congestion control, i.e., reactive congestion control, in which each source changes its cell emitting rate adaptively to the traffic load at the switching node (or at the multiplexer). Our intention is that, by incorporating such a congestion control method in ATM networks, more efficient congestion control is established. We develop an analytical model, and carry out an approximate analysis of reactive congestion control algorithm. Numerical results show that the reactive congestion control algorithms are very effective in avoiding congestion and in achieving the statistical gain. Furthermore, the binary congestion control algorithm with pushout mechanism is shown to provide the best performance among the reactive congestion control algorithms treated here.

  14. Autonomous control of production networks using a pheromone approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, D.; de Beer, C.; Freitag, M.; Jagalski, T.; Ringhofer, C.

    2006-04-01

    The flow of parts through a production network is usually pre-planned by a central control system. Such central control fails in presence of highly fluctuating demand and/or unforeseen disturbances. To manage such dynamic networks according to low work-in-progress and short throughput times, an autonomous control approach is proposed. Autonomous control means a decentralized routing of the autonomous parts themselves. The parts’ decisions base on backward propagated information about the throughput times of finished parts for different routes. So, routes with shorter throughput times attract parts to use this route again. This process can be compared to ants leaving pheromones on their way to communicate with following ants. The paper focuses on a mathematical description of such autonomously controlled production networks. A fluid model with limited service rates in a general network topology is derived and compared to a discrete-event simulation model. Whereas the discrete-event simulation of production networks is straightforward, the formulation of the addressed scenario in terms of a fluid model is challenging. Here it is shown, how several problems in a fluid model formulation (e.g. discontinuities) can be handled mathematically. Finally, some simulation results for the pheromone-based control with both the discrete-event simulation model and the fluid model are presented for a time-dependent influx.

  15. Missile Guidance Law Based on Robust Model Predictive Control Using Neural-Network Optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Xia, Yuanqing; Su, Chun-Yi; Deng, Jun; Fu, Jun; He, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In this brief, the utilization of robust model-based predictive control is investigated for the problem of missile interception. Treating the target acceleration as a bounded disturbance, novel guidance law using model predictive control is developed by incorporating missile inside constraints. The combined model predictive approach could be transformed as a constrained quadratic programming (QP) problem, which may be solved using a linear variational inequality-based primal-dual neural network over a finite receding horizon. Online solutions to multiple parametric QP problems are used so that constrained optimal control decisions can be made in real time. Simulation studies are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the proposed guidance control law for missile interception.

  16. Acceleration feedback of a current-following synchronized control algorithm for telescope elevation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Du, Jun-Feng; Ren, Ge; Tian, Jing

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a dual-motor configuration to enhance closed-loop performance of a telescope control system. Two identical motors are mounted on each side of a U-type frame to drive the telescope elevation axis instead of a single motor drive, which is usually used in a classical design. This new configuration and mechanism can reduce the motor to half the size used in the former design, and it also provides some other advantages. A master-slave current control mode is employed to synchronize the two motors. Acceleration feedback control is utilized to further enhance the servo performance. Extensive experiments are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm in synchronization, disturbance attenuation and low-velocity tracking.

  17. National Ignition Facility (NIF) Control Network Design and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Claybourn, R V; Pavel, G; Schaefer, W J

    2001-10-19

    The control network for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to meet the needs for common object request broker architecture (CORBA) inter-process communication, multicast video transport, device triggering, and general TCP/IP communication within the NIF facility. The network will interconnect approximately 650 systems, including the embedded controllers, front-end processors (FEPs), supervisory systems, and centralized servers involved in operation of the NIF. All systems are networked with Ethernet to serve the majority of communication needs, and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) is used to transport multicast video and synchronization triggers. CORBA software infra-structure provides location-independent communication services over TCP/IP between the application processes in the 15 supervisory and 300 FEP systems. Video images sampled from 500 video cameras at a 10-Hz frame rate will be multicast using direct ATM Application Programming Interface (API) communication from video FEPs to any selected operator console. The Ethernet and ATM control networks are used to broadcast two types of device triggers for last-second functions in a large number of FEPs, thus eliminating the need for a separate infrastructure for these functions. Analysis, design, modeling, and testing of the NIF network has been performed to provide confidence that the network design will meet NIF control requirements.

  18. Control analysis for autonomously oscillating biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Reijenga, Karin A; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kholodenko, Boris N; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-01-01

    It has hitherto not been possible to analyze the control of oscillatory dynamic cellular processes in other than qualitative ways. The control coefficients, used in metabolic control analyses of steady states, cannot be applied directly to dynamic systems. We here illustrate a way out of this limitation that uses Fourier transforms to convert the time domain into the stationary frequency domain, and then analyses the control of limit cycle oscillations. In addition to the already known summation theorems for frequency and amplitude, we reveal summation theorems that apply to the control of average value, waveform, and phase differences of the oscillations. The approach is made fully operational in an analysis of yeast glycolytic oscillations. It follows an experimental approach, sampling from the model output and using discrete Fourier transforms of this data set. It quantifies the control of various aspects of the oscillations by the external glucose concentration and by various internal molecular processes. We show that the control of various oscillatory properties is distributed over the system enzymes in ways that differ among those properties. The models that are described in this paper can be accessed on http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za.

  19. Output feedback sliding mode control under networked environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Lam, James; Xia, Yuanqing

    2013-04-01

    This article considers the problem of sliding mode output feedback control for networked control systems (NCSs). The key idea is to make use of not only the current and previous measurements, but also previous inputs for the reconstruction of the state variables. Using this idea, sliding mode controllers are designed for systems with constant or time-varying network delay. The approach is not only more practical but also easy to implement. To illustrate this, the design technique is applied to an inverted pendulum system.

  20. Control of communication networks: welfare maximization and multipath transfers.

    PubMed

    Key, Peter B; Massoulié, Laurent

    2008-06-13

    We discuss control strategies for communication networks such as the Internet. We advocate the goal of welfare maximization as a paradigm for network resource allocation. We explore the application of this paradigm to the case of parallel network paths. We show that welfare maximization requires active balancing across paths by data sources, and potentially requires implementation of novel transport protocols. However, the only requirement from the underlying 'network layer' is to expose the marginal congestion cost of network paths to the 'transport layer'. We further illustrate the versatility of the corresponding layered architecture by describing transport protocols with the following properties: they welfare maximization, each communication may use an arbitrary collection of paths, where paths may be from an overlay, and paths may be combined in series and parallel. We conclude by commenting on incentives, pricing and open problems. PMID:18325871

  1. Control of State Transitions in Complex and Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson; Wells, Daniel; Kath, William

    Noise is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here I will present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. I will discuss applications of this methodology to predict control interventions that can induce lineage changes and to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating network dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of complex networks exhibiting multi-stability. Reference: D. K. Wells, W. L. Kath, and A. E. Motter, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031036 (2015). Work funded by CBC, NCI, NIGMS, and NSF.

  2. Distributed Coordinated Control of Large-Scale Nonlinear Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Soumya; Anghel, Marian

    2015-11-08

    We provide a distributed coordinated approach to the stability analysis and control design of largescale nonlinear dynamical systems by using a vector Lyapunov functions approach. In this formulation the large-scale system is decomposed into a network of interacting subsystems and the stability of the system is analyzed through a comparison system. However finding such comparison system is not trivial. In this work, we propose a sum-of-squares based completely decentralized approach for computing the comparison systems for networks of nonlinear systems. Moreover, based on the comparison systems, we introduce a distributed optimal control strategy in which the individual subsystems (agents) coordinate with their immediate neighbors to design local control policies that can exponentially stabilize the full system under initial disturbances.We illustrate the control algorithm on a network of interacting Van der Pol systems.

  3. Distributed Coordinated Control of Large-Scale Nonlinear Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Kundu, Soumya; Anghel, Marian

    2015-11-08

    We provide a distributed coordinated approach to the stability analysis and control design of largescale nonlinear dynamical systems by using a vector Lyapunov functions approach. In this formulation the large-scale system is decomposed into a network of interacting subsystems and the stability of the system is analyzed through a comparison system. However finding such comparison system is not trivial. In this work, we propose a sum-of-squares based completely decentralized approach for computing the comparison systems for networks of nonlinear systems. Moreover, based on the comparison systems, we introduce a distributed optimal control strategy in which the individual subsystems (agents) coordinatemore » with their immediate neighbors to design local control policies that can exponentially stabilize the full system under initial disturbances.We illustrate the control algorithm on a network of interacting Van der Pol systems.« less

  4. Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

  5. Neural network guided search control in partial order planning

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.

    1996-12-31

    The development of efficient search control methods is an active research topic in the field of planning. Investigation of a planning program integrated with a neural network (NN) that assists in search control is underway, and has produced promising preliminary results.

  6. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural networks as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research are identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  7. A Network Access Control Framework for 6LoWPAN Networks

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luís M. L.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; de Sousa, Amaro F.; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Low power over wireless personal area networks (LoWPAN), in particular wireless sensor networks, represent an emerging technology with high potential to be employed in critical situations like security surveillance, battlefields, smart-grids, and in e-health applications. The support of security services in LoWPAN is considered a challenge. First, this type of networks is usually deployed in unattended environments, making them vulnerable to security attacks. Second, the constraints inherent to LoWPAN, such as scarce resources and limited battery capacity, impose a careful planning on how and where the security services should be deployed. Besides protecting the network from some well-known threats, it is important that security mechanisms be able to withstand attacks that have not been identified before. One way of reaching this goal is to control, at the network access level, which nodes can be attached to the network and to enforce their security compliance. This paper presents a network access security framework that can be used to control the nodes that have access to the network, based on administrative approval, and to enforce security compliance to the authorized nodes. PMID:23334610

  8. Energy management and multi-layer control of networked microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Ramon

    Networked microgrids is a group of neighboring microgrids that has ability to interchange power when required in order to increase reliability and resiliency. Networked microgrid can operate in different possible configurations including: islanded microgrid, a grid-connected microgrid without a tie-line converter, a grid-connected microgrid with a tie-line converter, and networked microgrids. These possible configurations and specific characteristics of renewable energy offer challenges in designing control and management algorithms for voltage, frequency and power in all possible operating scenarios. In this work, control algorithm is designed based on large-signal model that enables microgrid to operate in wide range of operating points. A combination between PI controller and feed-forward measured system responses will compensate for the changes in operating points. The control architecture developed in this work has multi-layers and the outer layer is slower than the inner layer in time response. The main responsibility of the designed controls are to regulate voltage magnitude and frequency, as well as output power of the DG(s). These local controls also integrate with a microgrid level energy management system or microgrid central controller (MGCC) for power and energy balance for. the entire microgrid in islanded, grid-connected, or networked microgid mode. The MGCC is responsible to coordinate the lower level controls to have reliable and resilient operation. In case of communication network failure, the decentralized energy management will operate locally and will activate droop control. Simulation results indicate the superiority of designed control algorithms compared to existing ones.

  9. Controllability of multiplex, multi-time-scale networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Márton; Gao, Jianxi; Cornelius, Sean P.; Barabási, Albert-László; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2016-09-01

    The paradigm of layered networks is used to describe many real-world systems, from biological networks to social organizations and transportation systems. While recently there has been much progress in understanding the general properties of multilayer networks, our understanding of how to control such systems remains limited. One fundamental aspect that makes this endeavor challenging is that each layer can operate at a different time scale; thus, we cannot directly apply standard ideas from structural control theory of individual networks. Here we address the problem of controlling multilayer and multi-time-scale networks focusing on two-layer multiplex networks with one-to-one interlayer coupling. We investigate the practically relevant case when the control signal is applied to the nodes of one layer. We develop a theory based on disjoint path covers to determine the minimum number of inputs (Ni) necessary for full control. We show that if both layers operate on the same time scale, then the network structure of both layers equally affect controllability. In the presence of time-scale separation, controllability is enhanced if the controller interacts with the faster layer: Ni decreases as the time-scale difference increases up to a critical time-scale difference, above which Ni remains constant and is completely determined by the faster layer. We show that the critical time-scale difference is large if layer I is easy and layer II is hard to control in isolation. In contrast, control becomes increasingly difficult if the controller interacts with the layer operating on the slower time scale and increasing time-scale separation leads to increased Ni, again up to a critical value, above which Ni still depends on the structure of both layers. This critical value is largely determined by the longest path in the faster layer that does not involve cycles. By identifying the underlying mechanisms that connect time-scale difference and controllability for a simplified

  10. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, Kevin L.; Baum, Christopher C.; Jones, Roger D.

    1997-01-01

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data.

  11. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  12. Robust nonlinear variable selective control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Behrooz

    2016-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the networked control of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. In this way, Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy modelling is used to extend the previously proposed variable selective control (VSC) methodology to nonlinear systems. This extension is based upon the decomposition of the nonlinear system to a set of fuzzy-blended locally linearised subsystems and further application of the VSC methodology to each subsystem. To increase the applicability of the T-S approach for uncertain nonlinear networked control systems, this study considers the asynchronous premise variables in the plant and the controller, and then introduces a robust stability analysis and control synthesis. The resulting optimal switching-fuzzy controller provides a minimum guaranteed cost on an H2 performance index. Simulation studies on three nonlinear benchmark problems demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Wireless Sensor/Actuator Network Design for Mobile Control Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Tian, Yu-Chu; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Youxian

    2007-01-01

    Wireless sensor/actuator networks (WSANs) are emerging as a new generation of sensor networks. Serving as the backbone of control applications, WSANs will enable an unprecedented degree of distributed and mobile control. However, the unreliability of wireless communications and the real-time requirements of control applications raise great challenges for WSAN design. With emphasis on the reliability issue, this paper presents an application-level design methodology for WSANs in mobile control applications. The solution is generic in that it is independent of the underlying platforms, environment, control system models, and controller design. To capture the link quality characteristics in terms of packet loss rate, experiments are conducted on a real WSAN system. From the experimental observations, a simple yet efficient method is proposed to deal with unpredictable packet loss on actuator nodes. Trace-based simulations give promising results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Mitigation of ground motion effects in linear accelerators via feed-forward control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfingstner, J.; Artoos, K.; Charrondiere, C.; Janssens, St.; Patecki, M.; Renier, Y.; Schulte, D.; Tomás, R.; Jeremie, A.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.

    2014-12-01

    Ground motion is a severe problem for many particle accelerators, since it excites beam oscillations, which decrease the beam quality and create beam-beam offset (at colliders). Orbit feedback systems can only compensate ground motion effects at frequencies significantly smaller than the beam repetition rate. In linear colliders, where the repetition rate is low, additional counter measures have to be put in place. For this reason, a ground motion mitigation method based on feed-forward control is presented in this paper. It has several advantages compared to other techniques (stabilization systems and intratrain feedback systems) such as cost reduction and potential performance improvement. An analytical model is presented that allows the derivation of hardware specification and performance estimates for a specific accelerator and ground motion model. At the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2), ground motion sensors have been installed to verify the feasibility of important parts of the mitigation strategy. In experimental studies, it has been shown that beam excitations due to ground motion can be predicted from ground motion measurements on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Correlations of up to 80% between the estimated and measured orbit jitter have been observed. Additionally, an orbit jitter source was identified and has been removed, which halved the orbit jitter power at ATF2 and shows that the feed-forward scheme is also very useful for the detection of installation issues. We believe that the presented mitigation method has the potential to reduce costs and improve the performance of linear colliders and potentially other linear accelerators.

  15. Dissipative rendering and neural network control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    1995-01-01

    Model-based control system designs are limited by the accuracy of the models of the plant, plant uncertainty, and exogenous signals. Although better models can be obtained with system identification, the models and control designs still have limitations. One approach to reduce the dependency on particular models is to design a set of compensators that will guarantee robust stability to a set of plants. Optimization over the compensator parameters can then be used to get the desired performance. Conservativeness of this approach can be reduced by integrating fundamental properties of the plant models. This is the approach of dissipative control design. Dissipative control designs are based on several variations of the Passivity Theorem, which have been proven for nonlinear/linear and continuous-time/discrete-time systems. These theorems depend not on a specific model of a plant, but on its general dissipative properties. Dissipative control design has found wide applicability in flexible space structures and robotic systems that can be configured to be dissipative. Currently, there is ongoing research to improve the performance of dissipative control designs. For aircraft systems that are not dissipative active control may be used to make them dissipative and then a dissipative control design technique can be used. It is also possible that rendering a system dissipative and dissipative control design may be combined into one step. Furthermore, the transformation of a non-dissipative system to dissipative can be done robustly. One sequential design procedure for finite dimensional linear time-invariant systems has been developed. For nonlinear plants that cannot be controlled adequately with a single linear controller, model-based techniques have additional problems. Nonlinear system identification is still a research topic. Lacking analytical models for model-based design, artificial neural network algorithms have recently received considerable attention. Using

  16. Control, timing, and data acquisition for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Ho, C.; Power, J.; Chojnacki, E.

    1993-08-01

    The AWA is a new facility primarily designed for wakefield acceleration experiments at the 100 MV/m scale, which incorporates a high current linac and rf photocathode electron source, a low emittance rf electron gun for witness beam generation, and associated beamlines and diagnostics. The control system is based on VME and CA-MAC electronics interfaced to a high performance work-station and provides some distributed processing capability. In addition to the control of linac rf, laser optics, and beamlines, the system is also used for acquisition of video data both from luminescent beam position monitors and from streak camera pulse length diagnostics. Online image feature extraction will permit wakefields to be computed during the course of data taking. The linac timing electronics and its interface to the control system is described.

  17. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  18. Data acquisition, storage and control architecture for the SuperNova Acceleration Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Alan; Cardoso, Guilherme; Chramowicz, John; Marriner, John; Rivera, Ryan; Turqueti, Marcos; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) instrument is being designed to collect image and spectroscopic data for the study of dark energy in the universe. In this paper, we describe a distributed architecture for the data acquisition system which interfaces to visible light and infrared imaging detectors. The architecture includes the use of NAND flash memory for the storage of exposures in a file system. Also described is an FPGA-based lossless data compression algorithm with a configurable pre-scaler based on a novel square root data compression method to improve compression performance. The required interactions of the distributed elements with an instrument control unit will be described as well.

  19. Optimization and control of two-component radially self-accelerating beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-11-23

    We report on the properties of radially self-accelerating intensity distributions consisting of two components in the angular frequency domain. We show how this subset of solutions, in literature also known as helicon beams, possesses peculiar characteristics that enable a better control over its properties. In this work, we present a step-by-step optimization procedure to achieve the best possible intensity contrast, a distinct rotation rate and long propagation lengths. All points are discussed on a theoretical basis and are experimentally verified.

  20. Reengineering for optimized control of DC networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintea, Adela; Schiopu, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The management of the Independent Power Grids is the global body/structure with flexible technological support for Command-Control-Communications and Informatized Management having the responsibility for providing the conditions and information (the informational flux of decision) for the decision-maker aiming at predictable and harmonic administration of the situations (crises) and for generating the harmonic situations (results).

  1. Performance limitations for networked control systems with plant uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Ming; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Cheng, Xin-Ming; Yuan, Fu-Shun

    2016-04-01

    There has recently been significant interest in performance study for networked control systems with communication constraints. But the existing work mainly assumes that the plant has an exact model. The goal of this paper is to investigate the optimal tracking performance for networked control system in the presence of plant uncertainty. The plant under consideration is assumed to be non-minimum phase and unstable, while the two-parameter controller is employed and the integral square criterion is adopted to measure the tracking error. And we formulate the uncertainty by utilising stochastic embedding. The explicit expression of the tracking performance has been obtained. The results show that the network communication noise and the model uncertainty, as well as the unstable poles and non-minimum phase zeros, can worsen the tracking performance.

  2. Adaptive neural-network-based control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Kyle; Dagli, Cihan H.

    2001-03-01

    Robotic manipulators are beginning to be seen doing more tasks in our environment. Classical controls engineers have long known how to control these automated hands. They have failed to address the continued control of these devices after parts of the control infrastructure have failed. A failed motor or actuator in a manipulator decreases its range of motion and changes its control structure. Most failures however do not render the manipulator useless. This paper will discuss the use of a neural network to actively update the controller design as portions of a manipulator fail. Actuators can become stuck and later free themselves. Motors can lose range of motion or stop completely. Connecting arms can become bent or entangled. Results will be presented on the ability to maintain functionality through a variety of failure modes. The neural network is constructed and tested in a Matlab environment. This allows testing of several neural network techniques such as back propagation and temporal processing without the need to continually reconfigure target hardware. In this paper we will demonstrate that a modified ensemble of back propagation experts can be trained to control a robotic manipulator without the need to calculate the inverse kinematics equations. Further individual experts can be retrained online to allow for adaptive control through changing dynamics. This allows for manipulators to remain in service through failures in the manipulator infrastructure without the need for human intervention into control equations.

  3. Control of complex networks requires both structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Alexander J.; Rocha, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of network structure has uncovered signatures of the organization of complex systems. However, there is also a need to understand how to control them; for example, identifying strategies to revert a diseased cell to a healthy state, or a mature cell to a pluripotent state. Two recent methodologies suggest that the controllability of complex systems can be predicted solely from the graph of interactions between variables, without considering their dynamics: structural controllability and minimum dominating sets. We demonstrate that such structure-only methods fail to characterize controllability when dynamics are introduced. We study Boolean network ensembles of network motifs as well as three models of biochemical regulation: the segment polarity network in Drosophila melanogaster, the cell cycle of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the floral organ arrangement in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that structure-only methods both undershoot and overshoot the number and which sets of critical variables best control the dynamics of these models, highlighting the importance of the actual system dynamics in determining control. Our analysis further shows that the logic of automata transition functions, namely how canalizing they are, plays an important role in the extent to which structure predicts dynamics. PMID:27087469

  4. Application of network control systems for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eager, Robert J.

    2008-04-01

    The communication architecture for most pointing, tracking, and high order adaptive optics control systems has been based on a centralized point-to-point and bus based approach. With the increased use of larger arrays and multiple sensors, actuators and processing nodes, these evolving systems require decentralized control, modularity, flexibility redundancy, integrated diagnostics, dynamic resource allocation, and ease of maintenance to support a wide range of experiments. Network control systems provide all of these critical functionalities. This paper begins with a quick overview of adaptive optics as a control system and communication architecture. It then provides an introduction to network control systems, identifying the key design areas that impact system performance. The paper then discusses the performance test results of a fielded network control system used to implement an adaptive optics system comprised of: a 10KHz, 32x32 spatial selfreferencing interferometer wave front sensor, a 705 channel "Tweeter" deformable mirror, a 177 channel "Woofer" deformable mirror, ten processing nodes, and six data acquisition nodes. The reconstructor algorithm utilized a modulo-2pi wave front phase measurement and a least-squares phase un-wrapper with branch point correction. The servo control algorithm is a hybrid of exponential and infinite impulse response controllers, with tweeter-to-woofer saturation offloading. This system achieved a first-pixel-out to last-mirror-voltage latency of 86 microseconds, with the network accounting for 4 microseconds of the measured latency. Finally, the extensibility of this architecture will be illustrated, by detailing the integration of a tracking sub-system into the existing network.

  5. The control networks of the satellites of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, M. E.; Colvin, T. R.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1987-07-01

    Control networks of the five large satellites of Uranus have been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The control networks cover the illuminated southern hemisphere of each satellite. Coordinates are listed for 103 points on Miranda, 52 points on Ariel, 43 points on Umbriel, 46 points on Titania, and 34 points on Oberon; some points are identified on the U.S. Geological Survey maps of these satellites. Miranda is ellipsoidal in shape with radii of 241, 235, and 232 km. Mean radii are 579 km for Ariel, 586 km for Umbriel, 790 km for Titania, and 762 km for Oberon.

  6. Adaptive nonlinear control of missiles using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Michael Bryan

    Research has shown that neural networks can be used to improve upon approximate dynamic inversion for control of uncertain nonlinear systems. In one architecture, the neural network adaptively cancels inversion errors through on-line learning. Such learning is accomplished by a simple weight update rule derived from Lyapunov theory, thus assuring stability of the closed-loop system. In this research, previous results using linear-in-parameters neural networks were reformulated in the context of a more general class of composite nonlinear systems, and the control scheme was shown to possess important similarities and major differences with established methods of adaptive control. The neural-adaptive nonlinear control methodology in question has been used to design an autopilot for an anti-air missile with enhanced agile maneuvering capability, and simulation results indicate that this approach is a feasible one. There are, however, certain difficulties associated with choosing the proper network architecture which make it difficult to achieve the rapid learning required in this application. Accordingly, this technique has been further extended to incorporate the important class of feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer. These neural networks feature well-known approximation capabilities and provide an effective, although nonlinear, parameterization of the adaptive control problem. Numerical results from a six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear agile anti-air missile simulation demonstrate the effectiveness of the autopilot design based on multilayer networks. Previous work in this area has implicitly assumed precise knowledge of the plant order, and made no allowances for unmodeled dynamics. This thesis describes an approach to the problem of controlling a class of nonlinear systems in the face of both unknown nonlinearities and unmodeled dynamics. The proposed methodology is similar to robust adaptive control techniques derived for control of linear

  7. Applications of neural networks to process control and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Brown, S.K.; Flake, G.W.; Jones, R.D.; O'Rourke, M.K.; Lee, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    Modeling and control of physical processes are universal parts of modern life, from control of chemical plants to riding a bicycle. Often, an effective model of the process is not known so that traditional control theory is of little use. If a process can be represented by a set of a data which captures it behavior over a range of parameter settings, a neural net can inductively model the process and form the basis of an optimization procedure. We present a neural network architecture which is particularly effective in process modeling and control. We discuss its effectiveness in several application areas as well as some of the non-ideal characteristics present in real control problems which effect the form and style of the network architecture and learning algorithm. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  8. An architecture for designing fuzzy logic controllers using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1991-01-01

    Described here is an architecture for designing fuzzy controllers through a hierarchical process of control rule acquisition and by using special classes of neural network learning techniques. A new method for learning to refine a fuzzy logic controller is introduced. A reinforcement learning technique is used in conjunction with a multi-layer neural network model of a fuzzy controller. The model learns by updating its prediction of the plant's behavior and is related to the Sutton's Temporal Difference (TD) method. The method proposed here has the advantage of using the control knowledge of an experienced operator and fine-tuning it through the process of learning. The approach is applied to a cart-pole balancing system.

  9. Temporal dynamics of a homeostatic pathway controlling neural network activity

    PubMed Central

    Bateup, Helen S.; Denefrio, Cassandra L.; Johnson, Caroline A.; Saulnier, Jessica L.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons use a variety of mechanisms to homeostatically regulate neural network activity in order to maintain firing in a bounded range. One such process involves the bi-directional modulation of excitatory synaptic drive in response to chronic changes in network activity. Down-scaling of excitatory synapses in response to high activity requires Arc-dependent endocytosis of glutamate receptors. However, the temporal dynamics and signaling pathways regulating Arc during homeostatic plasticity are not well understood. Here we determine the relative contribution of transcriptional and translational control in the regulation of Arc, the signaling pathways responsible for the activity-dependent production of Arc, and the time course of these signaling events as they relate to the homeostatic adjustment of network activity in hippocampal neurons. We find that an ERK1/2-dependent transcriptional pathway active within 1–2 h of up-regulated network activity induces Arc leading to a restoration of network spiking rates within 12 h. Under basal and low activity conditions, specialized mechanisms are in place to rapidly degrade Arc mRNA and protein such that they have half-lives of less than 1 h. In addition, we find that while mTOR signaling is regulated by network activity on a similar time scale, mTOR-dependent translational control is not a major regulator of Arc production or degradation suggesting that the signaling pathways underlying homeostatic plasticity are distinct from those mediating synapse-specific forms of synaptic depression. PMID:24065881

  10. Unknown input observer design and analysis for networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Ahmad F.; Elmahdi, Ahmed; Panchal, Jitesh H.; Sun, Dengfeng

    2015-05-01

    The insertion of communication networks in the feedback loops of control systems is a defining feature of modern control systems. These systems are often subject to unknown inputs in a form of disturbances, perturbations, or attacks. The objective of this paper is to design and analyse an observer for networked dynamical systems with unknown inputs. The network effect can be viewed as either a perturbation or time-delay to the exchanged signals. In this paper, we (1) review an unknown input observer (UIO) design for a non-networked system, (2) derive the networked unknown input observer (NetUIO) dynamics, (3) design a NetUIO such that the effect of higher delay order terms are nullified and (4) establish stability-guaranteeing bounds on the networked-induced time-delay and perturbation. The formulation and results derived in this paper can be generalised to scenarios and applications where the signals are perturbed due to a different source of perturbation or delay.

  11. Enhanced Communication Network Solution for Positive Train Control Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatehi, M. T.; Simon, J.; Chang, W.; Chow, E. T.; Burleigh, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The commuter and freight railroad industry is required to implement Positive Train Control (PTC) by 2015 (2012 for Metrolink), a challenging network communications problem. This paper will discuss present technologies developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to overcome comparable communication challenges encountered in deep space mission operations. PTC will be based on a new cellular wireless packet Internet Protocol (IP) network. However, ensuring reliability in such a network is difficult due to the "dead zones" and transient disruptions we commonly experience when we lose calls in commercial cellular networks. These disruptions make it difficult to meet PTC s stringent reliability (99.999%) and safety requirements, deployment deadlines, and budget. This paper proposes innovative solutions based on space-proven technologies that would help meet these challenges: (1) Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) technology, designed for use in resource-constrained, embedded systems and currently in use on the International Space Station, enables reliable communication over networks in which timely data acknowledgments might not be possible due to transient link outages. (2) Policy-Based Management (PBM) provides dynamic management capabilities, allowing vital data to be exchanged selectively (with priority) by utilizing alternative communication resources. The resulting network may help railroads implement PTC faster, cheaper, and more reliably.

  12. Development of Velocity Guidance Assistance System by Haptic Accelerator Pedal Reaction Force Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feilong; Hayashi, Ryuzo; Raksincharoensak, Pongsathorn; Nagai, Masao

    This research proposes a haptic velocity guidance assistance system for realizing eco-driving as well as enhancing traffic capacity by cooperating with ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems). The proposed guidance system generates the desired accelerator pedal (abbreviated as pedal) stroke with respect to the desired velocity obtained from ITS considering vehicle dynamics, and provides the desired pedal stroke to the driver via a haptic pedal whose reaction force is controllable and guides the driver in order to trace the desired velocity in real time. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of the haptic velocity guidance. A haptic velocity guidance system for research is developed on the Driving Simulator of TUAT (DS), by attaching a low-inertia, low-friction motor to the pedal, which does not change the original characteristics of the original pedal when it is not operated, implementing an algorithm regarding the desired pedal stroke calculation and the reaction force controller. The haptic guidance maneuver is designed based on human pedal stepping experiments. A simple velocity profile with acceleration, deceleration and cruising is synthesized according to naturalistic driving for testing the proposed system. The experiment result of 9 drivers shows that the haptic guidance provides high accuracy and quick response in velocity tracking. These results prove that the haptic guidance is a promising velocity guidance method from the viewpoint of HMI (Human Machine Interface).

  13. Spin Models for Packet Routing Control in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, T.

    We investigate packet flow in computer networks within the framework of statistical physics by using numerical simulations. As mathematical models for packet routing, we present a spin model with lattice gas spins and the one with Ising spins. Then we propose dynamic programming for optimal routing control of packet flow by using the two spin models. This is a kind of goal-directed learning for taking into account of time-dependent environment for the packets. Next we investigate a congestion problem by using the model with lattice gas spins when the packets are not sent to nodes at which their buffers are already full up with packets. Since we have found serious congestion in the packet flow, we then propose reinforcement learning for avoiding the congestion and have performed simulations on several networks including small world networks, scale free networks and so on.

  14. A Rate Feedback Predictive Control Scheme Based on Neural Network and Control Theory for Autonomic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Naixue; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.; Yang, Laurence T.; Long, Fei; Shu, Lei; Li, Yingshu

    The main difficulty arising in designing an efficient congestion control scheme lies in the large propagation delay in data transfer which usually leads to a mismatch between the network resources and the amount of admitted traffic. To attack this problem, this chapter describes a novel congestion control scheme that is based on a Back Propagation (BP) neural network technique.We consider a general computer communication model with multiple sources and one destination node. The dynamic buffer occupancy of the bottleneck node is predicted and controlled by using a BP neural network. The controlled best-effort traffic of the sources uses the bandwidth, which is left over by the guaranteed traffic. This control mechanism is shown to be able to avoid network congestion efficiently and to optimize the transfer performance both by the theoretic analyzing procedures and by the simulation studies.

  15. Steam turbine stress control using NARX neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiczak, Krzysztof; Rzadkowski, Romuald; Radulski, Wojciech

    2015-11-01

    Considered here is concept of steam turbine stress control, which is based on Nonlinear AutoRegressive neural networks with eXogenous inputs. Using NARX neural networks,whichwere trained based on experimentally validated FE model allows to control stresses in protected thickwalled steam turbine element with FE model quality. Additionally NARX neural network, which were trained base on FE model, includes: nonlinearity of steam expansion in turbine steam path during transients, nonlinearity of heat exchange inside the turbine during transients and nonlinearity of material properties during transients. In this article NARX neural networks stress controls is shown as an example of HP rotor of 18K390 turbine. HP part thermodynamic model as well as heat exchange model in vicinity of HP rotor,whichwere used in FE model of the HP rotor and the HP rotor FE model itself were validated based on experimental data for real turbine transient events. In such a way it is ensured that NARX neural network behave as real HP rotor during steam turbine transient events.

  16. Control over stress accelerates extinction of drug seeking via prefrontal cortical activation

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Michael V.; Pomrenze, Matthew B.; Nakamura, Shinya; Dolzani, Samuel D.; Cooper, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction is a form of inhibitory learning viewed as an essential process in suppressing conditioned responses to drug cues, yet there is little information concerning experiential variables that modulate its formation. Coping factors play an instrumental role in determining how adverse life events impact the transition from casual drug use to addiction. Here we provide evidence in rat that prior exposure to controllable stress accelerates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior relative to uncontrollable or no stress exposure. Subsequent experimentation using high-speed optogenetic tools determined if the infralimbic region (IL) of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex mediates the impact of controllable stress on cocaine-seeking behavior. Photoinhibition of pyramidal neurons in the IL during coping behavior did not interfere with subject's ability to control the stressor, but prevented the later control-induced facilitation of extinction. These results provide strong evidence that the degree of behavioral control over adverse events, rather than adverse events per se, potently modulates the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior, and that controllable stress engages prefrontal circuitry that primes future extinction learning. PMID:25954765

  17. Epidemic Control in a Hierarchical Social Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Andrzej; Kosiński, Robert A.

    The phenomenon of epidemic spreading in a population with a hierarchical structure of interpersonal interactions is described and investigated numerically. The SIR model with incubation time is used. In our model the localization of individuals in different social groups, the effectiveness of different interpersonal interactions and the mobility of a contemporary community are taken into account. The influence of different control methods on the spreading process is investigated as a function of different initial conditions. The cost-effectiveness of mass preventive random vaccinations, target vaccinations and sick leaves are compared. A critical range of vaccinations, sufficient for suppressing of an epidemic is calculated. The results of numerical calculations are similar to the solutions of the master equation for the spreading process.

  18. Information spread in networks: Games, optimal control, and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafer, Ali

    This thesis focuses on designing efficient mechanisms for controlling information spread in networks. We consider two models for information spread. The first one is the well-known distributed averaging dynamics. The second model is a nonlinear one that describes virus spread in computer and biological networks. We seek to design optimal, robust, and stabilizing controllers under practical constraints. For distributed averaging networks, we study the interaction between a network designer and an adversary. We consider two types of attacks on the network. In Attack-I, the adversary strategically disconnects a set of links to prevent the nodes from reaching consensus. Meanwhile, the network designer assists the nodes in reaching consensus by changing the weights of a limited number of links in the network. We formulate two problems to describe this competition where the order in which the players act is reversed in the two problems. Although the canonical equations provided by the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (MP) seem to be intractable, we provide an alternative characterization for the optimal strategies that makes connection to potential theory. Further, we provide a sufficient condition for the existence of a saddle-point equilibrium (SPE) for the underlying zero-sum game. In Attack-II, the designer and the adversary are both capable of altering the measurements of all nodes in the network by injecting global signals. We impose two constraints on both players: a power constraint and an energy constraint. We assume that the available energy to each player is not sufficient to operate at maximum power throughout the horizon of the game. We show the existence of an SPE and derive the optimal strategies in closed form for this attack scenario. As an alternative to the "network designer vs. adversary" framework, we investigate the possibility of stabilizing unknown network diffusion processes using a distributed mechanism, where the uncertainty is due to an attack

  19. Schizophrenia and the brain's control network: aberrant within- and between-network connectivity of the frontoparietal network in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tu, Pei-Chi; Lee, Ying-Chiao; Chen, Ying-Shiue; Li, Cheng-Ta; Su, Tung-Ping

    2013-07-01

    The deficit of executive control is a core feature of schizophrenia, and as such, it provides hints for the neural signature of this devastating mental illness. The frontoparietal network (FPN) is a newly defined network important for various tasks requiring executive control. This study aims to investigate both the within- and between-network connectivity of the FPN in schizophrenia using functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI). Thirty-six subjects with schizophrenia and thirty-six healthy controls were enrolled. Each subject received resting fMRI scanning, clinical evaluations and cognitive examinations. Twenty-two regions of interest (ROIs) in the key hubs of the FPN were defined according to the functional connectivity map of the left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and included the bilateral frontal pole, inferior parietal lobe (IPL), insula, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), middle cingulate cortex (mCC), precuneus, caudate, thalamus and cerebellum. Between-group comparisons were conducted using both multiple ROI-based and brain-wise analyses. The ROI-based analysis revealed that the schizophrenic participants were associated with a prominent cortico-subcortical disconnection within the FPN. Further brain-wise analyses demonstrated that the schizophrenia patients showed increased functional connectivity between several ROIs in the FPN and regions belonging to the primary sensory processing or default mode networks. These results indicated that schizophrenia is associated with both within- and between-network dysconnectivity of the FPN. Together with our previous findings of the cortico-striatal disconnection of the cingulo-opercular network, we suggest that the brain's control networks may play an important role in the neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  20. Formation control for a network of small-scale robots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonsoo

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a network of small-scale robots (typically centimeter-scale robots) equipped with artificial actuators such as electric motors is considered. The purpose of this network is to have the robots keep a certain formation shape (or change to another formation shape) during maneuvers. The network has a fixed communication topology in the sense that robots have a fixed group of neighbors to communicate during maneuvers. Assuming that each robot and its actuator can be modeled as a linear system, a decentralized control law (such that each robot activates its actuator based on the information from its neighbors only) is introduced to achieve the purpose of formation keeping or change. A linear matrix inequality (LMI) for deriving the upper bound on the actuator's time constant is also presented. Simulation results are shown to demonstrate the merit of the introduced control law.

  1. Remote control of ATLAS-MPX Network and Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turecek, D.; Holy, T.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-05-01

    The ATLAS-MPX Network is a network of 15 Medipix2-based detector devices, installed in various positions in the ATLAS detector at CERN, Geneva. The aim of the network is to perform a real-time measurement of the spectral characteristics and the composition of radiation inside the ATLAS detector during its operation. The remote control system of ATLAS-MPX controls and configures all the devices from one place, via a web interface, accessible from different operating systems. The Data Visualization application, also with a web interface, has been developed in order to present measured data to the scientific community. It allows to browse through recorded frames from all devices and to search for specific frames by date and time. Charts containing the number of different types of tracks in each frame as a function of time may be rendered from the database.

  2. Optimal control of coupled PDE networks with automated code generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a framework for the optimal control of coupled PDE networks. A coupled PDE network is a system of partial differential equations coupled together. Such systems can be represented as a directed graph. A domain specific language (DSL)—an extension of the DOT language—is used for the description of such a coupled PDE network. The adjoint equations and the gradient, required for its optimal control, are computed with the help of a computer algebra system (CAS). Automated code generation techniques have been used for the generation of the PDE systems of both the direct and the adjoint equations. Both the direct and adjoint equations are solved with the standard finite element method. Finally, for the numerical optimization of the system standard optimization techniques are used such as BFGS and Newton conjugate gradient.

  3. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases.

  4. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases. PMID:26382469

  5. Stimulation-Based Control of Dynamic Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott T; Vettel, Jean M; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    The ability to modulate brain states using targeted stimulation is increasingly being employed to treat neurological disorders and to enhance human performance. Despite the growing interest in brain stimulation as a form of neuromodulation, much remains unknown about the network-level impact of these focal perturbations. To study the system wide impact of regional stimulation, we employ a data-driven computational model of nonlinear brain dynamics to systematically explore the effects of targeted stimulation. Validating predictions from network control theory, we uncover the relationship between regional controllability and the focal versus global impact of stimulation, and we relate these findings to differences in the underlying network architecture. Finally, by mapping brain regions to cognitive systems, we observe that the default mode system imparts large global change despite being highly constrained by structural connectivity. This work forms an important step towards the development of personalized stimulation protocols for medical treatment or performance enhancement.

  6. Stimulation-Based Control of Dynamic Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualetti, Fabio; Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate brain states using targeted stimulation is increasingly being employed to treat neurological disorders and to enhance human performance. Despite the growing interest in brain stimulation as a form of neuromodulation, much remains unknown about the network-level impact of these focal perturbations. To study the system wide impact of regional stimulation, we employ a data-driven computational model of nonlinear brain dynamics to systematically explore the effects of targeted stimulation. Validating predictions from network control theory, we uncover the relationship between regional controllability and the focal versus global impact of stimulation, and we relate these findings to differences in the underlying network architecture. Finally, by mapping brain regions to cognitive systems, we observe that the default mode system imparts large global change despite being highly constrained by structural connectivity. This work forms an important step towards the development of personalized stimulation protocols for medical treatment or performance enhancement. PMID:27611328

  7. Stimulation-Based Control of Dynamic Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Gu, Shi; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott T; Vettel, Jean M; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    The ability to modulate brain states using targeted stimulation is increasingly being employed to treat neurological disorders and to enhance human performance. Despite the growing interest in brain stimulation as a form of neuromodulation, much remains unknown about the network-level impact of these focal perturbations. To study the system wide impact of regional stimulation, we employ a data-driven computational model of nonlinear brain dynamics to systematically explore the effects of targeted stimulation. Validating predictions from network control theory, we uncover the relationship between regional controllability and the focal versus global impact of stimulation, and we relate these findings to differences in the underlying network architecture. Finally, by mapping brain regions to cognitive systems, we observe that the default mode system imparts large global change despite being highly constrained by structural connectivity. This work forms an important step towards the development of personalized stimulation protocols for medical treatment or performance enhancement. PMID:27611328

  8. Gain Control Network Conditions in Early Sensory Coding

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Eduardo; Nowotny, Thomas; Levi, Rafael; Smith, Brian H.; Huerta, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Gain control is essential for the proper function of any sensory system. However, the precise mechanisms for achieving effective gain control in the brain are unknown. Based on our understanding of the existence and strength of connections in the insect olfactory system, we analyze the conditions that lead to controlled gain in a randomly connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We consider two scenarios for the variation of input into the system. In the first case, the intensity of the sensory input controls the input currents to a fixed proportion of neurons of the excitatory and inhibitory populations. In the second case, increasing intensity of the sensory stimulus will both, recruit an increasing number of neurons that receive input and change the input current that they receive. Using a mean field approximation for the network activity we derive relationships between the parameters of the network that ensure that the overall level of activity of the excitatory population remains unchanged for increasing intensity of the external stimulation. We find that, first, the main parameters that regulate network gain are the probabilities of connections from the inhibitory population to the excitatory population and of the connections within the inhibitory population. Second, we show that strict gain control is not achievable in a random network in the second case, when the input recruits an increasing number of neurons. Finally, we confirm that the gain control conditions derived from the mean field approximation are valid in simulations of firing rate models and Hodgkin-Huxley conductance based models. PMID:23874176

  9. Sinusoidal modulation control method in a chaotic neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qihanyue; Xie, Xiaoping; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Hongping; He, Guoguang

    2014-08-01

    Chaotic neural networks (CNNs) have chaotic dynamic associative memory properties: The memory states appear non-periodically, and cannot be converged to a stored pattern. Thus, it is necessary to control chaos in a CNN in order to recognize associative memory. In this paper, a novel control method, the sinusoidal modulation control method, has been proposed to control chaos in a CNN. In this method, a sinusoidal wave simplified from brain waves is used as a control signal to modulate a parameter of the CNN. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of this control method. The controlled CNN can be applied to information processing. Moreover, the method provides a way to associate brain waves by controlling CNNs.

  10. The structure of network control system for LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ling-Zhe; Xu, Xin-Qi

    2006-09-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a large scientific and engineering project in China. It will become by its completion an astronomical survey telescope with largest field of view and most efficient observation in 4-m aperture or above telescopes in the world. The telescope will be able to acquire spectra from 4000 stars simultaneously. All these prformance features have brought about a tremendous challenge for the control system design. This paper presents the network structure for the control system with mass data and multitask circumstances, focusing on the strategy how to conduct subsystem control, environmental monitoring, time service and wireless remote monitoring & controlling, etc. A number of IT technologies have been utilized in the network system, such as real time database, GPS time ticking and GSM communication.

  11. On-board congestion control for satellite packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.

    1991-01-01

    It is desirable to incorporate packet switching capability on-board for future communication satellites. Because of the statistical nature of packet communication, incoming traffic fluctuates and may cause congestion. Thus, it is necessary to incorporate a congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing to smooth and regulate the bursty traffic. Although there are extensive studies on congestion control for both baseband and broadband terrestrial networks, these schemes are not feasible for space based switching networks because of the unique characteristics of satellite link. Here, we propose a new congestion control method for on-board satellite packet switching. This scheme takes into consideration the long propagation delay in satellite link and takes advantage of the the satellite's broadcasting capability. It divides the control between the ground terminals and satellite, but distributes the primary responsibility to ground terminals and only requires minimal hardware resource on-board satellite.

  12. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  13. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  14. Defining a neural network controller structure for a rubbertuator robot.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, M; Inoue, K; Negishi, K; Yamanaka, T

    2000-01-01

    Rubbertuator (Rubber-Actuator) robot arm is a pneumatic robot, unique with its lightweight, high power, compliant and spark free nature. Compressibility of air in the actuator tubes and the elastic nature of the rubber, however, are the two major sources of increased non-linearity and complexity in motion control. Soft computing, exploiting the tolerance of uncertainty and vagueness in cognitive reasoning has been offering easy to handle, robust, and low-priced solutions to several non-linear industrial applications. Nonetheless, the black-box approach in these systems results in application specific architectures with some important design parameters left for fine tuning (i.e. number of nodes in a neural network). In this study we propose a more systematic method in defining the structure of a soft computing technique, namely the backpropagation neural network, when used as a controller for rubbertuator robot systems. The structure of the neural network is based on the physical model of the robot, while the neural network itself is trained to learn the trajectory independent parameters of the model that are essential for defining the robot dynamics. The proposed system performance was compared with a well-tuned PID controller and shown to be more accurate in trajectory control for rubbertuator robots.

  15. Statistical porcess control in Deep Space Network operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodder, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes how the Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) Operations Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (EL) uses Statistical Process Control (SPC) to monitor performance and evaluate initiatives for improving processes on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Deep Space Network (DSN).

  16. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  17. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    PubMed

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  18. Accelerated growth in outgoing links in evolving networks: deterministic versus stochastic picture.

    PubMed

    Sen, Parongama

    2004-04-01

    In several real-world networks such as the Internet, World Wide Web, etc., the number of links grow in time in a nonlinear fashion. We consider growing networks in which the number of outgoing links is a nonlinear function of time but new links between older nodes are forbidden. The attachments are made using a preferential attachment scheme. In the deterministic picture, the number of outgoing links m (t) at any time t is taken as N (t)(theta) where N (t) is the number of nodes present at that time. The continuum theory predicts a power-law decay of the degree distribution: P (k) proportional to k-(1-2/ (1-theta ) ), while the degree of the node introduced at time t(i) is given by k(t(i),t)=t(theta)(i) [t/t(i) ]((1+theta)/2) when the network is evolved till time t. Numerical results show a growth in the degree distribution for small k values at any nonzero theta. In the stochastic picture, m (t) is a random variable. As long as is independent of time, the network shows a behavior similar to the Barabási-Albert (BA) model. Different results are obtained when is time dependent, e.g., when m (t) follows a distribution P (m) proportional to m(-lambda). The behavior of P (k) changes significantly as lambda is varied: for lambda>3, the network has a scale-free distribution belonging to the BA class as predicted by the mean field theory; for smaller values of lambda it shows different behavior. Characteristic features of the clustering coefficients in both models have also been discussed.

  19. Accelerated growth in outgoing links in evolving networks:Deterministic versus stochastic picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Parongama

    2004-04-01

    In several real-world networks such as the Internet, World Wide Web, etc., the number of links grow in time in a nonlinear fashion. We consider growing networks in which the number of outgoing links is a nonlinear function of time but new links between older nodes are forbidden. The attachments are made using a preferential attachment scheme. In the deterministic picture, the number of outgoing links m (t) at any time t is taken as N (t)θ where N (t) is the number of nodes present at that time. The continuum theory predicts a power-law decay of the degree distribution: P (k) ∝ k-1-2/ ( 1-θ ) , while the degree of the node introduced at time ti is given by k(ti,t)=tθi [t/ ti ](1+θ)/2 when the network is evolved till time t . Numerical results show a growth in the degree distribution for small k values at any nonzero θ . In the stochastic picture, m (t) is a random variable. As long as < m (t) > is independent of time, the network shows a behavior similar to the Barabási-Albert (BA) model. Different results are obtained when < m (t) > is time dependent, e.g., when m (t) follows a distribution P (m) ∝ m-λ . The behavior of P (k) changes significantly as λ is varied: for λ>3 , the network has a scale-free distribution belonging to the BA class as predicted by the mean field theory; for smaller values of λ it shows different behavior. Characteristic features of the clustering coefficients in both models have also been discussed.

  20. Performance analysis of Integrated Communication and Control System networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halevi, Y.; Ray, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents statistical analysis of delays in Integrated Communication and Control System (ICCS) networks that are based on asynchronous time-division multiplexing. The models are obtained in closed form for analyzing control systems with randomly varying delays. The results of this research are applicable to ICCS design for complex dynamical processes like advanced aircraft and spacecraft, autonomous manufacturing plants, and chemical and processing plants.

  1. Tibialis anterior muscle fatigue leads to changes in tibial axial acceleration after impact when ankle dorsiflexion angles are visually controlled.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Adriana M; Andrews, David M

    2010-08-01

    Heel impact forces may lead to injury as they travel through the human musculoskeletal system. Previous work on the effect that localized muscle fatigue has on the tibial response (shank axial acceleration) to impact was limited because ankle angle was not controlled. The purpose of this study was to compare the tibial response when the tibialis anterior was fatigued and when not fatigued, while participants controlled dorsiflexion angles at impact using visual feedback. Twenty participants (10 male, 10 female; M+/-SD=21.8+/-2.9 years) were strapped supine to a human pendulum apparatus, and instrumented with a low mass accelerometer (affixed medial to the tibial tuberosity). Participant dorsiflexion angle range was recorded by an electro-goniometer, and divided into four angle ranges so tibial response variables (peak tibial acceleration, time to peak acceleration, acceleration slope) could be compared when fatigued and not fatigued. Peak tibial acceleration and acceleration slopes decreased, and time to peak acceleration increased following fatigue, when comparing values across the same dorsiflexion ranges. Dorsiflexion angle alone did not account for differences in tibial response during localized leg muscle fatigue; supporting prior work and suggesting that the muscle and ankle joint become less stiff when fatigued, thereby increasing the lower extremity attenuation capability to heel impacts.

  2. Distributed communications and control network for robotic mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffbauer, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The application of robotics to coal mining machines is one approach pursued to increase productivity while providing enhanced safety for the coal miner. Toward that end, a network composed of microcontrollers, computers, expert systems, real time operating systems, and a variety of program languages are being integrated that will act as the backbone for intelligent machine operation. Actual mining machines, including a few customized ones, have been given telerobotic semiautonomous capabilities by applying the described network. Control devices, intelligent sensors and computers onboard these machines are showing promise of achieving improved mining productivity and safety benefits. Current research using these machines involves navigation, multiple machine interaction, machine diagnostics, mineral detection, and graphical machine representation. Guidance sensors and systems employed include: sonar, laser rangers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, clinometers, and accelerometers. Information on the network of hardware/software and its implementation on mining machines are presented. Anticipated coal production operations using the network are discussed. A parallelism is also drawn between the direction of present day underground coal mining research to how the lunar soil (regolith) may be mined. A conceptual lunar mining operation that employs a distributed communication and control network is detailed.

  3. DCS-Neural-Network Program for Aircraft Control and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program implements a dynamic-cell-structure (DCS) artificial neural network that can perform such tasks as learning selected aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane from wind-tunnel test data and computing real-time stability and control derivatives of the airplane for use in feedback linearized control. A DCS neural network is one of several types of neural networks that can incorporate additional nodes in order to rapidly learn increasingly complex relationships between inputs and outputs. In the DCS neural network implemented by the present program, the insertion of nodes is based on accumulated error. A competitive Hebbian learning rule (a supervised-learning rule in which connection weights are adjusted to minimize differences between actual and desired outputs for training examples) is used. A Kohonen-style learning rule (derived from a relatively simple training algorithm, implements a Delaunay triangulation layout of neurons) is used to adjust node positions during training. Neighborhood topology determines which nodes are used to estimate new values. The network learns, starting with two nodes, and adds new nodes sequentially in locations chosen to maximize reductions in global error. At any given time during learning, the error becomes homogeneously distributed over all nodes.

  4. Control of laser-accelerated ions: Recent advances and preliminary results from the new Trident 250-TW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Albright, Brian J.; Yin, Lin; Flippo, Kirk A.; Cort Gautier, D.; Letzring, Samuel; Schulze, Roland; Schmitt, Mark; Fernandez, Juan C.

    2007-11-01

    Advanced target design, treatment and characterization enable progress in laser-driven ion acceleration. We demonstrate spectral shaping and mono-energetic features from in-situ formed source layers on different substrate materials. Advanced targets and experimental techniques allow control of the properties of laser accelerated ion beams, which is of importance to future applications like Ion Fast Ignition (IFI), WDM research and others. We will also present preliminary results from the new 250-TW Trident laser system that will allow the extrapolation of scaling laws similar to those derived for proton acceleration.

  5. ISABELLE control system

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J W; Frankel, R S; Niederer, J A

    1980-01-01

    Design principles for the Brookhaven ISABELLE control intersecting storage ring accelerator are described. Principal features include a locally networked console and control computer complex, a system wide process data highway, and intelligent local device controllers. Progress to date is summarized.

  6. Retrospective analysis of linear accelerator output constancy checks using process control techniques.

    PubMed

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Shewhart control charts have previously been suggested as a process control tool for use in routine linear accelerator (linac) output verifications. However, a comprehensive approach to process control has not been investigated for linac output verifications. The purpose of this work is to investigate a comprehensive process control approach to linac output constancy quality assurance (QA). The RBA-3 dose constancy check was used to verify outputs of photon beams and electron beams delivered by a Varian Clinac 21EX linac. The data were collected during 2009 to 2010. Shewhart-type control charts, exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) charts, and capability indices were applied to these processes. The Shewhart-type individuals chart (X-chart) was used and the number of data points used to calculate the control limits was varied. The parameters tested for the EWMA charts (smoothing parameter (λ) and the control limit width (L)) were λ = 0.05, L = 2.492; λ = 0.10, L = 2.703; and λ = 0.20, L = 2.860, as well as the number of points used to estimate the initial process mean and variation. Lastly, the number of in-control data points used to determine process capability (C(p)) and acceptability (C(pk)) were investigated, comparing the first in-control run to the longest in-control run of the process data. C(p) and C(pk) values greater than 1.0 were considered acceptable. The 95% confidence intervals were reported. The X-charts detected systematic errors (e.g., device setup errors). In-control run lengths on the X-charts varied from 5 to 30 output measurements (about one to seven months). EWMA charts showed in-control runs ranging from 9 to 33 output measurements (about two to eight months). The C(p) and C(pk) ratios are higher than 1.0 for all energies, except 12 and 20 MeV. However, 10 MV and 6, 9, and 16 MeV were in question when considering the 95% confidence limits. The X-chart should be calculated using 8-12 data points. For EWMA chart, using 4 data points

  7. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small

  8. Network-based H∞ synchronization control of time-delay neural networks with communication constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Ling, Rongyao; Zhang, Dan

    2016-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the network-based H∞ synchronization control for a class of discrete time-delay neural networks, and attention is focused on how to reduce the communication rate since the communication resource is limited. Techniques such as the measurement size reduction, signal quantization and stochastic signal transmission are introduced to achieve the above goal. An uncertain switched system model is first proposed to capture the above-networked uncertainties. Based on the switched system theory and Lyapunov stability approach, a sufficient condition is obtained such that the closed-loop synchronization system is exponentially stable in the mean-square sense with a prescribed H∞ performance level. The controller gains are determined by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is finally presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  9. Observer-based tracking controller design for networked predictive control systems with uncertain Markov delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Shi, Yang; Wang, Junmin

    2013-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a tracking controller design problem for discrete-time networked predictive control systems. The control law used here is a combined state-feedback control and integral control. Since not all the states are available in practice, a local Luenberger observer is utilised to estimate the state vector. The measured output and estimated state vector are packed together and transmitted to the tracking controller via a communication channel with a limited capacity. Meanwhile, the control signal is also transmitted through a communication network.Network-induced delays on both links are considered for the signal transmission and modelled by Markov chains. Moreover, it is assumed that the elements in Markov transition matrices are subject to uncertainties. In order to fully compensate for network-induced delays, the controller generates a sequence of control signals which are dependent on each possible delay in the feedforward channel. By taking the augmentation twice, we obtain delay-free stochastic closed-loop systems and the controlled output is chosen as the tracking error. Sufficient conditions are provided for the energy-to-peak performance of the closed-loop systems. The feedback gains of the controller can be derived by solving a minimisation problem. Two examples are illustrated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  10. Efficient evaluation of wireless real-time control networks.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Peter; Yampolskiy, Mark; Koutsoukos, Xenofon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system simulation framework for the design and performance evaluation of complex wireless cyber-physical systems. We describe the simulator architecture and the specific developments that are required to simulate cyber-physical systems relying on multi-channel, multihop mesh networks. We introduce realistic and efficient physical layer models and a system simulation methodology, which provides statistically significant performance evaluation results with low computational complexity. The capabilities of the proposed framework are illustrated in the example of WirelessHART, a centralized, real-time, multi-hop mesh network designed for industrial control and monitor applications. PMID:25679314

  11. Efficient Evaluation of Wireless Real-Time Control Networks

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Peter; Yampolskiy, Mark; Koutsoukos, Xenofon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system simulation framework for the design and performance evaluation of complex wireless cyber-physical systems. We describe the simulator architecture and the specific developments that are required to simulate cyber-physical systems relying on multi-channel, multihop mesh networks. We introduce realistic and efficient physical layer models and a system simulation methodology, which provides statistically significant performance evaluation results with low computational complexity. The capabilities of the proposed framework are illustrated in the example of WirelessHART, a centralized, real-time, multi-hop mesh network designed for industrial control and monitor applications. PMID:25679314

  12. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K.; Mitchell, Grant W.; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A.; Croglio, Michael P.; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y.; Razzo, Beatrice M.; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R.; Fajgenbaum, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in “omics” technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN’s collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care. PMID:26604862

  13. Network Efficient Power Control for Wireless Communication Systems

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Luna-Rivera, Jose Martin; Martinez-Sánchez, C. J.; Gutierrez, Carlos A.; Tecpanecatl-Xihuitl, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a two-loop power control that allows an efficient use of the overall power resources for commercial wireless networks based on cross-layer optimization. This approach maximizes the network's utility in the outer-loop as a function of the averaged signal to interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) by considering adaptively the changes in the network characteristics. For this purpose, the concavity property of the utility function was verified with respect to the SINR, and an iterative search was proposed with guaranteed convergence. In addition, the outer-loop is in charge of selecting the detector that minimizes the overall power consumption (transmission and detection). Next the inner-loop implements a feedback power control in order to achieve the optimal SINR in the transmissions despite channel variations and roundtrip delays. In our proposal, the utility maximization process and detector selection and feedback power control are decoupled problems, and as a result, these strategies are implemented at two different time scales in the two-loop framework. Simulation results show that substantial utility gains may be achieved by improving the power management in the wireless network. PMID:24683350

  14. Analog neural network control method proposed for use in a backup satellite control mode

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors propose to use an analog neural network controller implemented in hardware, independent of the active control system, for use in a satellite backup control mode. The controller uses coarse sun sensor inputs. The field of view of the sensors activate the neural controller, creating an analog dead band with respect to the direction of the sun on each axis. This network controls the orientation of the vehicle toward the sunlight to ensure adequate power for the system. The attitude of the spacecraft is stabilized with respect to the ambient magnetic field on orbit. This paper develops a model of the controller using real-time coarse sun sensor data and a dynamic model of a prototype system based on a satellite system. The simulation results and the feasibility of this control method for use in a satellite backup control mode are discussed.

  15. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-07-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.

  16. Spontaneous Centralization of Control in a Network of Company Ownerships

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Sebastian M.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a model for the adaptive evolution of a network of company ownerships. In a recent work it has been shown that the empirical global network of corporate control is marked by a central, tightly connected “core” made of a small number of large companies which control a significant part of the global economy. Here we show how a simple, adaptive “rich get richer” dynamics can account for this characteristic, which incorporates the increased buying power of more influential companies, and in turn results in even higher control. We conclude that this kind of centralized structure can emerge without it being an explicit goal of these companies, or as a result of a well-organized strategy. PMID:24324594

  17. An optimal control approach to probabilistic Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2012-12-01

    External control of some genes in a genetic regulatory network is useful for avoiding undesirable states associated with some diseases. For this purpose, a number of stochastic optimal control approaches have been proposed. Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) as powerful tools for modeling gene regulatory systems have attracted considerable attention in systems biology. In this paper, we deal with a problem of optimal intervention in a PBN with the help of the theory of discrete time Markov decision process. Specifically, we first formulate a control model for a PBN as a first passage model for discrete time Markov decision processes and then find, using a value iteration algorithm, optimal effective treatments with the minimal expected first passage time over the space of all possible treatments. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, an example is also displayed.

  18. Spontaneous centralization of control in a network of company ownerships.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sebastian M; Peixoto, Tiago P; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a model for the adaptive evolution of a network of company ownerships. In a recent work it has been shown that the empirical global network of corporate control is marked by a central, tightly connected "core" made of a small number of large companies which control a significant part of the global economy. Here we show how a simple, adaptive "rich get richer" dynamics can account for this characteristic, which incorporates the increased buying power of more influential companies, and in turn results in even higher control. We conclude that this kind of centralized structure can emerge without it being an explicit goal of these companies, or as a result of a well-organized strategy.

  19. Quality of local control for simple sewer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolechkina, Alla; van Nooijen, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Combined sewer networks, where both foul water and storm water are transported through the same system, tend to develop into complex networks due to expansion of towns and villages. The transport capacity of these systems is always limited, so occasional controlled spills into surface water, combined sewer overflows (CSO), are part of the normal operating procedure. Occasionally the ideas and rules present in the original design are not respected when the system is extended to cover a larger area. One way to deal with this problem is to implement central control. Another is to add pipes and hardware to bring the extended system into line with the original rules and ideas. We show that for a design rule often followed in the Netherlands, local control does quite well as long as the rule is respected and there are no large variations in precipitation intensity over the area covered by the system.

  20. Spontaneous centralization of control in a network of company ownerships.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sebastian M; Peixoto, Tiago P; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a model for the adaptive evolution of a network of company ownerships. In a recent work it has been shown that the empirical global network of corporate control is marked by a central, tightly connected "core" made of a small number of large companies which control a significant part of the global economy. Here we show how a simple, adaptive "rich get richer" dynamics can account for this characteristic, which incorporates the increased buying power of more influential companies, and in turn results in even higher control. We conclude that this kind of centralized structure can emerge without it being an explicit goal of these companies, or as a result of a well-organized strategy. PMID:24324594